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Black Wisdom - beBee

Black Wisdom

~ 100 buzzes
Black Wisdom represents the parts of life as they are and not how we would like them to be. It is the intelligence we often put to the side because it is uncomfortable or we view it as a taboo, even though it is the expression of real people saying real things. This is not simply a trip into the dark side, it is the essence of our emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is the essence of human reality, for washing our insides out with political correctness is not emotional intelligence. I want to be aware of uncomfortable conversations as much as I want to see a better world. It covers the world of hard truths but also that which is truly touches me as emotionally intelligent.
Buzzes
  1. Chas Wyatt

    Chas Wyatt

    03/12/2016
    The 99% Reality, (a must read)~
    http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2012/02/mac-mcclelland-free-online-shipping-warehouses-labor
    Chas Wyatt
    Relevant
  2. Chas Wyatt

    Chas Wyatt

    26/11/2016
    http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/86908454/cuban-television-reports-that-fidel-castro-has-died-aged-90 Chas Wyatt
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    Comments

    CityVP Manjit
    26/11/2016 #2 CityVP Manjit
    I like the New York Times wording "the man who bedeviled 11 American Presidents" http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/26/world/americas/fidel-castro-dies.html?_r=0
    CityVP Manjit
    26/11/2016 #1 CityVP Manjit
    The man who survived so many US Presidents who wanted to shun him and a few who actually wanted to assassinate him will now have the opportunity to invite the only US president in recent times has recognized post-Castro Cuba. In the window between Trump and Bush, his passing is ironic in its timing. Where as Che Guevara became a symbolic martyr, how Fidel Castro survived the pressure the United States exerted on his regime is quite a story in itself. Love him or hate him, the guy was huge on the geopolitical stage.
  3. ProducerGerald Hecht

    Gerald Hecht

    01/11/2016
    On Conformity
    On Conformity“More hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion.” - C.F. SnowIt really is one of the greatest practical (pragmatic) jokes in all of Psychology; indeed it was inspired by the...
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    Comments

    Gerald Hecht
    20/11/2016 #58 Gerald Hecht
    #56 @Jim Murray It should also be noted that in the last week alone; the exponential increase in the number of nations rapidly moving toward isolationist, nationalistic/protectionist positions with a simultaneous increase in the influence of extreme right wing/neofascist political parties is something that hasn't been seen in a long time...indeed, your very own recent post (Attn: Canadians...popular vote going to Hillary...We of course are above that sort of thing...) --humorous/tounge-in-cheek; yes ...underlying nationalist passive-aggressive expression of Canadian moral superiority --also yes. I remember a while ago --at the very beginning of the Trump Campaign; (when nobody was taking it seriously at all)...saying: "It's all very funny/entertaining...right up until the second that it isn't..."
    Gerald Hecht
    20/11/2016 #57 Gerald Hecht
    #56 @Jim Murray Yes the original Milgram studies were designed as a sort of "post-mortem" of the Nuremberg courts...to resolve a nasty debate among academics as to whether the "only following orders thing " was an anomaly (a predisposition of "Germanic Culture") or whether the indoctrination to obey authority figures (parents, teachers, law enforcement officials, etc.) was pretty much universal in Western Cultures --built in to the "Romantic-Classical Dualism" in all societies built up from "Aristotelean Reason"...i.e., The USA, Canada, etc...Milgram demonstrated that horrific events requiring "Nuremberg type" war tribunal remediation were were just as likely to be required in Washington D.C. , Toronto, London, Paris, etc...at anytime --as a function of a sweeping reversal of economic fortune in nations; creating a zeitgeist in which (potentially "crazy") populist leaders appeared on the scene --with a message that resonated strongly enough...
    Jim Murray
    19/11/2016 #56 Jim Murray
    I seem to recall that the Nuremburg courts found that blind obedience to authority was no excuse. I kind of read between the lines here and have to tell you that I believe, In America, as of January whatever, civil disobedience will climb to astronomical levels. Mainly because the authority figures are not going to be respected. Some will blindly obey and those are the ones you want to steer clear of. You say you want a revolution...right after Christmas.
    Gerald Hecht
    14/11/2016 #55 Gerald Hecht
    #52 @Peter van Doorn ...sounds like my late dad; he taught me things that are called "behaving decently"in the real world of interacting with people in the physical world...but are barely perceptible in the virtual world...and even more worrisome --the dynamics of the virtual world seem to be transforming the dynamics of the physical world more so than...what should be happening...the exact opposite
    Gerald Hecht
    14/11/2016 #54 Gerald Hecht
    #49 @CityVP Manjit "personal compass" --almost makes failure to express non-dangerous moral protest as a "man made measurement instrument" limitation ...on the other hand you use the word "check"...implying that perhaps it is in need of recalibration; a recalibration that is in fact possible...that is what I like to think.
    Gerald Hecht
    14/11/2016 #53 Gerald Hecht
    #46 @Peter van Doorn Yeah...I am experiencing a similar disconnect between "life as one sees it" ...and the baffling alternative dimension of social media; so much distortion, amplification variability...complete lack of engagement for tactile, olfactory, gustatory, nocioceptive...any interoceptive feedback "thingies"...it's impossible to be sure of what "identities" are really up to...my latest longform post (a test of some ideas pertaining to this) is behaving as expected...people are viewing it and then "slinking away" like they've been "bad dogs" or something...why? Because I used words almost guaranteed to keep folks from deploying "Phaedrus's analytic knife"...to even bother separating "what a thing is" versus "what a thing means"...it's all gone to far; IMO
    Milos Djukic
    07/11/2016 #50 Anonymous
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKb9XQ39-zc
    CityVP Manjit
    06/11/2016 #49 CityVP Manjit
    #48 not free but awareness of what freedom is, whether that is the Prisoner TV series from the 60's, George Orwell writing 1984 or the first Matrix movie - all of which knock on our life door and reminds us to check our own personal compass called freedom.
    Gerald Hecht
    06/11/2016 #48 Gerald Hecht
    #45 thank you for sharing your conviction that you are not a number; but rather: You are free
    Gerald Hecht
    06/11/2016 #47 Gerald Hecht
    #46 @Peter van Doorn Thank you for sharing your point of view on this
    CityVP Manjit
    05/11/2016 #45 CityVP Manjit
    All I have got to say here is "I am not a number, I am a free man"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFs1RgmqLBo
    Gerald Hecht
    05/11/2016 #44 Gerald Hecht
    Peter Gabriel's ...https://www.youtube.com/shared?ci=4xIePn4Uvdo
    Gerald Hecht
    05/11/2016 #43 Gerald Hecht
    #42 @Peter van Doorn Well, in Milgram's original study; NOT EVERYONE (although most) followed orders all the way to the horrific conclusion --Peter Gabriel wrote a song about those who rebelled against killing someone because a guy dressed in authority clothes told them to. To Gabriel, they represented the last hope for humanity https://www.youtube.com/shared?ci=amscaLF0xho
    Gerald Hecht
    05/11/2016 #41 Gerald Hecht
    #40 @Phil Friedman As I am sure you know --in the famous Milgram Studies, 85% of ordinary citizens of New Haven Connecticut (in the early 1960's --volunteering to participate in a "Learning Experiment" for which they were paid $4.50)...were willing to electrocute a stranger (for incorrectly memorizing a list of words) because a guy in a white lab coat with a clipboard said: "administer the next shock and continue the experiment"...the "path lighting" on the route to hell probably flickers due to massive voltage fluctuations
    Phil Friedman
    03/11/2016 #40 Phil Friedman
    So, Gerald, no matter what a man does, "...If he does so with a pure thought, happiness follows him like a shadow that never leaves him...."? That would seem to suggest that acts of murder, even genocide are okay, provided one does them for the "right" reason(s). However, the Second Scroll of The Wisdom of Chung King (circa 650 AD) says, "Beware of he who performs dastardly acts without conscious malice, because a pure heart is always accompanied by an empty mind." Eichmann showed us that evil can truly be banal, but none the less evil. And The road to hell is often lit with "pure" intentions.
    Gerald Hecht
    03/11/2016 #39 Gerald Hecht
    We see two different expressions; one by @Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes and another by @jesse kaellis we ponder these with great care...
    jesse kaellis
    03/11/2016 #38 jesse kaellis
    #31
    I think about the sixties a very selfish and self-absorbed decade that ran over into the seventies. I think about the places I lived with the sexual predators and rampant promiscuity. I think about that and I think about "It was just the times we were living through," but there are always "times" and it took half of my lifetime to find my own values.
    Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes
    03/11/2016 #37 Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes
    "All we are is the result of what we have thought. If a man speaks or acts with cunning, followed by the pain. If he does so with a pure thought, happiness follows him like a shadow that never leaves him.
    Gerald Hecht
    03/11/2016 #36 Gerald Hecht
    #34 @Phil Friedman "blast your logic" -Dr. Leonard McCoy, Chief Medical Officer, USS Enterprise. "No...Bones --I think that @Phil Friedman raises a valid point" - James Tiberius Kirk, Captain, USS Enterprise.
    Gerald Hecht
    03/11/2016 #35 Gerald Hecht
    #26 @John Vaughan or maybe... "No reason to get excited," the thief he kindly spoke, "There are many here among us who feel that life is but a joke. But you and I, we've been through that, and this is not our fate, So let us not talk falsely now, the hour is getting late."...Outside in the distance a wildcat did growl, Two riders were approaching, the wind began to howl. -Bob Dylan
  4. Allen Merck

    Allen Merck

    01/11/2016
    Please check out my blog First Generation Father.
    Allen Merck
    First Generation Father
    www.firstgenfather.com Parenting from a male...
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  5. ProducerAurorasa Sima

    Aurorasa Sima

    14/10/2016
    Toxic and destructive people and why I am "missing"
    Toxic and destructive people and why I am "missing"The last and next few days are so busy that I cannot spend as much time as I would love to and honor your valuable and often thought-provoking honey. I am doing my best. The last days, I also felt a bit sad and troubled. It happens to the most...
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    Comments

    Deb Helfrich
    16/10/2016 #60 Deb Helfrich
    #58 Belongs in the Comment Hall of Fame, @CityVP Manjit.

    "Life is a felt experience."
    CityVP Manjit
    16/10/2016 #58 CityVP Manjit
    When I look at cults I often see the empath attracted by the narcissist because the narcissist has learned to use emotional intelligence findings about human beings as a manipulation of highly empathetic human beings. Later in such groupings where sexual abuse is discovered within the group, a state of denial may exist except in those empaths whose eyes have been opened by pain - that who they trusted and placed their face in was an incarnate of evil, a monster of a human being.

    This is where "real life" is about awakening to truths, while facing those truths must not make us lose faith in the idea of humanity. The cold blooded human being will treat emotion as a manipulation rather than a divine gift and those that are most human have emotional energy flowing in abundance - and when that energy is betrayed, when it has been debased and corrupted, they suffer a further emotional wounding - a wounding of trust and faith in people that was most natural to them.

    For those who advocate simply forgiveness for emotional scars that will never heal, they are advocates who do not possess high emotional resonance and sensitivity to life that is a felt experience and more importantly they have not experienced even a fraction of 1% of the pain felt by those whose emotions are remain human skin rather than a suit of armor.

    This narcissism is just one example of the toxic. David Foster Wallace faced a cynical and self-interest filled world that he never came to terms with, http://pangeaprogress.blogspot.ca/2015/10/david-foster-wallace-on-toxic.html In facing the real, our memories repeat many times, while the offender only needed to cut us once and often not even realize the wound so inflicted.
    James O'Connell
    16/10/2016 #57 James O'Connell
    #56 I hear you, you're quite right (' ' ,)
    Aurorasa Sima
    16/10/2016 #56 Aurorasa Sima
    #53 Maybe even less, I think. They have a powerful impact on our lives and we´ll forget 100 positive people before we forget one toxic one.
    Aurorasa Sima
    16/10/2016 #55 Aurorasa Sima
    #52 I would consider this a great honor, dear @Dean Owen. Thank you.
    Aurorasa Sima
    16/10/2016 #54 Aurorasa Sima
    #51 Oh, you have children? You said it: Those of us who have a higher goal are blessed. I am certainly witness to the positivity you spread and I am always very happy to read your comments and posts. Luckily, you kindly translate many into English.
    James O'Connell
    16/10/2016 #53 James O'Connell
    Nice one @Aurorasa Sima. Are they really as few as 1% though?! (' ' .)
    Dean Owen
    16/10/2016 #52 Dean Owen
    Knocked this one for six @Aurorasa. I might well copy and paste your email for future use!
    Mamen Delgado
    15/10/2016 #51 Mamen Delgado
    #50 Yes Aurorasa, to admit our potential to grow and the willing to change is the first and essential step to a new life. I have travelled that road, I'm not the one I used to be, so I do know that change is possible as you say at the beginning of your email. It's a bit easier if we find a reason, a powerful reason, to go through that journey.
    I found that reason in my oldest daughter. Powerful enough to swim down to darkness and deal with my inner little girl.
    I was lucky, still I am, because Life gave that beautiful opportunity to live another life in this one. But not everybody has the chance, or finds his/her POWERFUL reason. And no one can do it for them.
    Aurorasa Sima
    15/10/2016 #50 Aurorasa Sima
    #49 I bet you´d be a great coach with your love for people and live. That was not a coaching client, he offered to do some other work for me. You´re right once more: the people who would need you most will not come.

    It´s positive people that admit their potential to grow and are willing to change.
    Mamen Delgado
    15/10/2016 #49 Mamen Delgado
    I really admire your job @Aurorasa Sima, some friends tell me I should have studied Coaching or something related to Emotional Therapy but I always think I couldn't deal with negativity and with people I see clearly they don't want to change, it's easier for them to keep in the dark side or in the "poor of me" way of being.
    By the way... The best cheese for pizza is clearly grana padano!!! LOL!! 😂
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    15/10/2016 #48 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #46 Well said, Robert Cormack.
    Aurorasa Sima
    15/10/2016 #47 Aurorasa Sima
    #46 Yes, there is. I told a negative person, respectful and polite, that I do not want to work with them. They then flipped out and started actions that come close to criminal offenses. You´d pity them if they were not targeting you.

    It´s just not nice to see crazy up-close or to be forced to deal with negativity. These people are obviously not well. But they overstrain my patience when it comes to my willingness to help.
    Robert Cormack
    15/10/2016 #46 Robert Cormack
    We all deal with destructive people, Aurorasa, even when we think we've made "friends." A few years back, I took a serious look at my friendships over the last 40 years. Some have remained around that long. What surprised me was how many had taken our relationship for granted all that time. So I took a lesson from someone who said, "Sometimes even the best of friendships need to be laid to rest." The ones I decided to "lay to rest" probably don't even know. If you don't call them, nothing happens. But I also discovered I don't miss them. I made room for other people, some good, some bad. I've actually made some friendships that are far more rewarding. My novel would never have gotten done without the help of what I'll call "new friends." They've shown themselves to be smart, loyal and incredibly insightful. There's always hope, in other words.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    15/10/2016 #45 Mohammed A. Jawad
    When you find toxic people around you, all you need is balancing patience that makes an exposure with bokd, wise counsel. On the contrary, silent suffering is sheer timidity.
    Irene Hackett
    15/10/2016 #44 Anonymous
    #40 Always the perfect gentleman my dear brother @Ali Anani - even in the midst of our late night 'sillies' 😄
    Aurorasa Sima
    15/10/2016 #43 Aurorasa Sima
    #41 Thank you, what a luxurious treatment of us bees. So fast!!!!
    Federico Álvarez San Martín
    15/10/2016 #42 Federico Álvarez San Martín
    #25 ✌🏻️
    Federico Álvarez San Martín
    15/10/2016 #41 Federico Álvarez San Martín
    #26 It's ok. It was a timely bug. I have made a buzz in CC for you access the link. In a while I delete the buzz. CC @Aurorasa Sima
    Ali Anani
    15/10/2016 #40 Ali Anani
    #35 @Aurorasa Sima and @Irene Hackett= the metaphors from kitchens in general are a huge source of creative inspiration. Soon will talk about
  6. Pascal Derrien 🐝
    Have been re-reading that one, brutally honest from @John White, MBA

    Not sure what would I do what would you do?
    Pascal Derrien 🐝
    Daddy, Did You Get Fired From Your Job?
    www.inc.com It's in moments like these that we get the gut checks we need to be able to solve our greatest challenges in...
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    Comments

    Lisa Gallagher
    24/09/2016 #9 Lisa Gallagher
    In case you missed this by @John White, MBA. Wonderful read!
    Irene Hackett
    24/09/2016 #8 Anonymous
    @John White, MBA - Such great sharing - thanks for showing us how to rise above the experience of being 'let go'.
    CityVP Manjit
    24/09/2016 #7 CityVP Manjit
    Experiencing job loss does not end or begin with a termination, the fear of job loss is a pervasive one that manifests itself in all organizations. This article is an important contribution in a much wider cameo that covers before, during and after. All of this can be debilitating, thankfully human beings are natural storytellers - this faculty of our psychology is what enlightens us. John White does also happen to be a very good storyteller and thus there is much to identify in this particular story, as a part of an even bigger picture that now we can all intelligently share, even without John's well crafted skills as a writer.
    David B. Grinberg
    24/09/2016 #6 David B. Grinberg
    Thank you, again, @John White, MBA for sharing your incredibly inspirational story. I think you nailed it with this line: "With hard work and perseverance truly anything is possible." I would add "faith" into the mix, but perhaps that's just a given. Your story reminds me of that saying: When one door closes, a new door opens." You deserve many accolades, John, for walking through those new doors and truly triumphing in the wake of uncertainty. You are a role model and inspiration for us all, sir!
    John White, MBA
    24/09/2016 #5 John White, MBA
    Ah shucks, thanks so much everybody! It's cliche to even say, "things happen for a reason." However, they are words that I live by.
    Gert Scholtz 🐝
    23/09/2016 #4 Gert Scholtz 🐝
    Do read this! An honest and inspirational telling of what to do when you hear: "John, we're going to have to let you go."
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    23/09/2016 #1 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    This is a must read!
  7. CityVP Manjit

    CityVP Manjit

    11/09/2016
    On September 11th, my business partner was already on the way to Vancouver for a trip in Seattle, while I was awoken after a late night at 10am with my family saying that I have to come down and watch what was happening in New York. It was a very surreal day, with no one knowing for sure what was happening or why it was happening, but my first instinct was to go to my Fast Company discussion board and simply do what I always do, which is write out my thoughts, and this is the buzz I share, those words as I watched the horror begin to unfold on television and the only thing I near for sure that was a day of terrible infamy. I named the post "Terrorism's Worst Hour". CityVP Manjit
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  8. ProducerLeckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    04/09/2016
    Distraction isn't curiosity
    Distraction isn't curiosity"Squirrel" Many of us are familiar and have quoted this line from the movie Up, which Dug was predisposed to say. We call it distraction. Is it really dissociation?Let me share a story with you. A few years ago when I was still a carpenter, we had a...
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    05/09/2016 #6 Leckey Harrison
    #5 You're welcome!
    CityVP Manjit
    05/09/2016 #5 CityVP Manjit
    #4 Excellent. Reading this buzz has given me a greater appreciation for "little T Trauma's", as you say we remember the big trauma's but I have become mindful here of all the small moments that our body registers but which we think we have moved on from - and as you say unless the body releases it, it accumulates - and that accumulation is what struck me most as insightful. Thank you.
    Leckey Harrison
    05/09/2016 #4 Leckey Harrison
    #2 Any time you have questions, since trauma healing is my field, I'm happy to answer. There are Big "T" traumas: everyone remembers where they were on 9/11. Being mugged. Car accidents. Deaths. Then there are little "t" traumas. The stuff of life like being fired, having to move, and so on. I look at the middle two letters of PTSD equally as meaning "traumatizing chronic stress" as well as Big "T" traumatic stress. Yes, unless the body releases it (which is what I tech people how to do) it accumulates. It creates illness and disease, and, trauma does not get better with time. Hope that helps!
    Leckey Harrison
    05/09/2016 #3 Leckey Harrison
    #1 You're welcome!
    CityVP Manjit
    05/09/2016 #2 CityVP Manjit
    I have been wondering about this meme of the "Squirrel" that I have seen over the last few weeks at beBee and this is the first time I found that it is from the movie UP. First thing is I will need to watch that movie, but more importantly this buzz was very insightful, especially the line

    QUOTE: ["Instead he got distracted by his own emotional state and a need to gain approval, and dug his hole even deeper.]END QUOTE

    What was particularly insightful about this is it help me re-evaluate what trauma is, that in addition to the deep trauma, there must subtle trauma's that accumulate into getting distracted by one's emotional state. By subtle trauma I am wondering whether a bunch of tiny effects can accumulate over many years leaving us that much insecure about life and leading to a need to gain approval?
  9. ProducerPamela L. Williams
    STEVEN WAS IN MY REAL WORLD
    STEVEN WAS IN MY REAL WORLDMy brother Steven sadly passed away on the 12th of August. In my last two blog posts I opened my heart to you as a community, relating to the sad news I received about my brother being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. The past month hands down has...
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    Comments

    Ali Anani
    31/08/2016 #7 Ali Anani
    I know exactly how you feel dear @CityVP Manjit because I suffered from the loss of a young brother. In these difficult times we need to swallow bitterness and I am sure you have so many great memories that shall keep your brother vivid in your memory. I share your difficult times and i hope our sympathy with you will help you to endure these difficult times.
    David B. Grinberg
    31/08/2016 #6 David B. Grinberg
    @Nicholas Fester - please accept the heartfelt sympathy and condolences from the beBee community. You and your family are in our thoughts and prayers during this difficult time, Nick.
    Andrew Porter
    24/08/2016 #4 Andrew Porter
    @Nicholas Fester my sincerest condolences to you and your family, and I reiterate what Pamela says this is one heck of a tribute to a loved one, this bought back memories of When My Dad was diagnosed with cancer less than a month later he had passed away, the road of life has some very cruel twists and turns along the way, but we grow from our inner strength and endevour to forge forward, but never a day goes by When we do not remember our loved ones and all the good we times had with Them, take heart That you are not alone in your time of grief.
    CityVP Manjit
    24/08/2016 #3 CityVP Manjit
    You follow a life approach that I have great affinity with, to me work and the external things of life are secondary to family and the bonds of home. I look at the photo of your brother and see kindness and great humanity writ large into his eyes and his face.

    In reading your words and I see that you were there for him and in an equally solemn way I see the grace that is etched all over Steven's picture. I am humbled to read this account because as you said your brothers heart remained pure and this account is also pure, for that alone shows me great brotherly love.

    Your work may involve being a pastor, but this time is yours to be Nicholas, and so my condolences to your family and to you Nicholas for also being a truly great brother to Steve.
    Pamela L. Williams
    24/08/2016 #2 Pamela L. Williams
    I'm sharing this because the Bees support and encourage each other!
    Pamela L. Williams
    24/08/2016 #1 Pamela L. Williams
    @Nicholas Fester this has to be one of the best tributes to a lost loved one that I have ever read. I could feel the love you had for your brother and the sadness. It just not enough to say; I'm sorry for your loss. 1996 was the year I lost my only 'big' brother (I have 2 younger) but there's something about a big brother. Just know that we the Bees are here for you whenever you want to be on social media. Sometimes you can share here what you can't to those around you. We're here! My deepest heartfelt condolences to you and your family.
  10. Alvaro INFANTE SANCHEZ
    Do you want to know how to play guitar ? Just see this
    Jimi Hendrix Experience - Purple Haze Live (1967)
    Jimi Hendrix Experience - Purple Haze Live (1967) Purple...
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    Comments

    CityVP Manjit
    14/08/2016 #6 CityVP Manjit
    Brilliance is encountering the timeless and I never get tired of Purple Haze or Along the Watchtower - Hendrix did reach into depths that we would not dare go but his stage performances emit the extraordinary and it is this extraordinary that becomes timeless.
    Antonio L Rodríguez del Pozo
    14/08/2016 #5 Antonio L Rodríguez del Pozo
    There is no doubt this Jimi was one of the inspiration sources for the missing Mr. Purple, let's hope we do not have to wait too long for another maestro taking the baton.
    Tony Brandstetter
    10/08/2016 #4 Tony Brandstetter
    In 1968 I was 8 years old, one day we went to visit my cousin who played in a band. As we got out of the car I heard this music coming from the house, it was loud, very loud. We discovered Danny was playing Fire by Jimi, my first taste of rock and roll and I have never looked back. Move over Rover and let Jimi take over....
    Lisa Gallagher
    10/08/2016 #3 Lisa Gallagher
    As mentioned, video's are acceptable in this hive. I love stories and music. I love humor. That's why the hive is so diverse! "Stories in English"
    Lisa Gallagher
    10/08/2016 #2 Lisa Gallagher
    Hendrix experience, love it!
    Javier beBee
    09/08/2016 #1 Javier beBee
    Amazing. I love it. Thanks for sharing
  11. ProducerPaul Rosenberg

    Paul Rosenberg

    13/08/2016
    Beautiful
    BeautifulThe plan was to shame her, to destroy her life, to create disgust and fear, and spend her life as an outcast.  The acid on her face would consume her, as the rage consumed her attacker. When we made a decision spend some time with acid burn victims,...
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    Comments

    Paul Rosenberg
    14/09/2016 #20 Paul Rosenberg
    @Joanna Hofman..thank you so much for your warm words and taking the time to read these amazing women's story.
    Joanna Hofman
    14/09/2016 #19 Joanna Hofman
    What an amazing story. Thank you, Paul !
    Joanna Hofman
    14/09/2016 #18 Joanna Hofman
    What an inspiring, full of emphaty story, dear Paul Rosenberg. I am grateful to read it. Thank you.
    Paul Rosenberg
    14/08/2016 #17 Paul Rosenberg
    #10 @CityVP Manjit...thank you so much. You are right. Its a movement for change.
    Paul Rosenberg
    14/08/2016 #16 Paul Rosenberg
    #9 @Julie Hickman.....beautiful truth.
    Paul Rosenberg
    14/08/2016 #15 Paul Rosenberg
    #8 @Savvy Raj...thank you for sharing their story, and for your words that resonate with heart.
    Paul Rosenberg
    14/08/2016 #14 Paul Rosenberg
    #6 @Graham Edwards 🐝 Your comments are most appreciated. We are all humbled by their courage and their inspiration.
    Paul Rosenberg
    14/08/2016 #13 Paul Rosenberg
    @Andrew Books...thank you for your warm words and keeping these women's inspirational story visible.
    Paul Rosenberg
    14/08/2016 #12 Paul Rosenberg
    @Dean Owen Thank you for your kind words and for getting their story told.
    Paul Rosenberg
    14/08/2016 #11 Paul Rosenberg
    #1 @Aurorasa Sima.....thank you for sharing their courageous story. We all must speak up.
    CityVP Manjit
    13/08/2016 #10 CityVP Manjit
    The key paragraph for me was

    "They are heroes because they have refused to be silent. Through right action they have made it difficult for acid to be sold on the streets, they have successfully lobbied for tougher laws, and got laws enacted where none existed. They have put their attackers behind bars"

    Like Rosenberg I see a hero here who refuses to be a victim and is getting laws changed, and is making sure that people who do this are duly held to account and the guilty sent to jail. The WSJ report details a news story about SIngapore and here the focus is psychological violence http://blogs.wsj.com/indonesiarealtime/2013/05/28/study-most-singaporeans-wouldnt-help-domestic-violence-victims/ - this story has the same foundation - a photo with victim crossed out and and replaced by victor. We do not need to live heroic lives, the heroes who become victors are heroes because this involves change that is both compassionate but also courageous.

    All of that shows me that this is not just a shelter for victims, this is a movement towards change.
    Julie Hickman
    13/08/2016 #9 Julie Hickman
    These barbaric acts are inconceivable and indefensible. You highlight the true beauty and strength of heart these women possess and it is stunning.
    Savvy Raj
    13/08/2016 #8 Savvy Raj
    Thank you for sharing this Paul Rosenberg My deepest respects for these brave hearts. Have reshared this post on Life and Living as I think it truly projects their inner strength in living life in this now, braving and rising beyond these unexpected circumstances and not just existing.
    Aurorasa Sima
    13/08/2016 #7 Aurorasa Sima
    #4 I had to leave my home country after 8 years of violence and abuse by a sick "man". My biggest struggle was not spoiling my soul by wishing it dead. There were times I woke up with the thought it should die, I thought it throughout the day and it was my last thought before I went to sleep. Even as a victim I would never condone death penalties. I´d put them all away, far away from society, where they cannot harm anyone. The real problem is the society, though. It´s like killing the flies swarming a rotten apple without removing the apple.
    Graham Edwards 🐝
    13/08/2016 #6 Graham Edwards 🐝
    I am horrified that this happens, and humbled by the strength, beauty and inspiration. Thank you for sharing this @Paul Rosenberg
    Andrew Books
    13/08/2016 #5 Andrew Books
    Makes you realize your struggles are pretty small by comparison. Beautiful indeed, Paul.
    Dean Owen
    13/08/2016 #4 Dean Owen
    #3 It's the deterrent that works. Singapore has the death penalty for drug traffickers but they very very rarely need to use it and it keeps the country's streets free of drugs.
    Aurorasa Sima
    13/08/2016 #3 Aurorasa Sima
    #2 Honour killings, genital mutilation, and, and, and .... Killing monsters might be tempting but becoming a monster yourself is not a solution.
    Dean Owen
    13/08/2016 #2 Dean Owen
    Absolutely horrific. I'd heard there were a few cafes and even a hair salon that only employed acid burn victims. Something needs to be done asap. I would condone the death penalty for this despicably evil act. Thanks for sharing this superb buzz. You are clearly someone we need to follow (and I don't mean just on beBee!).
    Aurorasa Sima
    13/08/2016 #1 Aurorasa Sima
    For some of things that men do I am missing words. Good that there are others like yourself too. Important post.
  12. ProducerGerald Hecht

    Gerald Hecht

    13/08/2016
    ON TODAY'S BATON ROUGE WEATHER
    ON TODAY'S BATON ROUGE WEATHERHurricane Gustav "The barrier islands of Louisiana are eroding at an extreme rate. In places up to 100 feet of shoreline are disappearing every year. Though it has long been assumed that this erosion was due to the area's rapid rate of relative sea...
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    Comments

    jesse kaellis
    17/10/2016 #53 jesse kaellis
    That is very well written, Gerald. We have experienced weather dislocation (storms) over the past three days here. Here in the Pacific Northwest and the West Coast of Canada. Also Vancouver Island. Gale force winds and 75,000 people without power. I lost power for three hours yesterday evening/night. Of course, this is nothing compared to what you experienced. It does seem as though there is severe weather dislocations worldwide.
    Gerald Hecht
    25/08/2016 #52 Gerald Hecht
    #50 @Mamen Delgado I couldn't have either, if I hadn't had two previous "practice runs"...
    Gerald Hecht
    25/08/2016 #51 Gerald Hecht
    #48 @Lisa Gallagher The first time I experienced those conditions (after Hurricane Katrina), it was pretty much a state of panic. The second time (after Hurricane Gustav), our house literally blew apart; that was a pretty much a state of numb shock, followed fairly quickly by getting down to the necessary logistics, lots of learning, and a subsequent marital thingie. This time --its personal; this was not a natural disaster. This was an unnatural disaster, and not one that happened "somewhere else", where depending upon the media outlet providing the information, it's fairly easy to stick with the "spin" which best fits one's political, environmental, and philosophical perspective. This time I could see how the delta plain was turned into Swiss cheese, or put through a paper shredder; the bizarre, erratic, and extreme magnitude of "backwater flooding" laid the truth bare; the damage to the wetlands, the overkill (in the number of man made canals) for shipping purposes by known industrial interests no longer lives in the realm of political debate, or debating the merits of generating revenue versus concern for the environment; all of that is transformed by a mystical alchemy when you are swimming in it, and seeing water rising up through the holes in the Swiss cheese.
    Mamen Delgado
    24/08/2016 #50 Mamen Delgado
    #46 I can not even imagine it Gerry...
    Lisa Gallagher
    24/08/2016 #49 Lisa Gallagher
    #47 Thanks @Gerald Hecht
    Lisa Gallagher
    24/08/2016 #48 Lisa Gallagher
    #45 It still had to be hard to be trapped inside without food or electricity but I hear and understand what you are saying. It makes me very sad.
    Gerald Hecht
    24/08/2016 #47 Gerald Hecht
    #43 @Lisa Gallagher if anyone wants the latest updates, here is our local "paper" http://www.theadvocate.com/louisiana_flood_2016/article_b6aae68c-6952-11e6-9dd9-dfb229b90b79.html?sr_source=lift_amplify I gotta do "cleanup stuff", it's supposed to rain again
    Gerald Hecht
    24/08/2016 #46 Gerald Hecht
    #44 @Mamen Delgado at least I got that piece posted about what the backwater flooding was going to do (because of how much of the delta has disintegrated) two days before it actually happened. That's the best I could do;the flood had already "happened", but I knew what was coming in a few days because of the "Louisiana Boot"; and then it came
    Gerald Hecht
    24/08/2016 #45 Gerald Hecht
    #43 @Lisa Gallagher it's so frustrating because despite all of the myriad ways of communicating we have at our disposal; I was trapped inside without power or food for a couple of days which makes me so fortunate, like a 1%er compared to so many thousands around here and it feels like "the world still isn't fully aware of what is going on
    Mamen Delgado
    24/08/2016 #44 Mamen Delgado
    Such a pity Gerry...
    Lisa Gallagher
    24/08/2016 #43 Lisa Gallagher
    @Gerald Hecht, this is very disturbing to read about. I wish the media would focus more on disasters like this (even if it's not coined one) because it's much more relevant than who's running for Prez and their ratings. We are talking about many humans living in conditions that are unlivable, without food, mold growing which causes illnesses and no solutions in sight because we all know more hurricanes will hit once again. I'm sorry that you, your neighbors and everyone affected is suffering in one way or another. I think people would pay more attention to humanity as a whole if we talked about it more and focused on solutions rather than the media neglecting people who really need help. Getting the word out and keeping the news alive about the good, bad and ugly taking place helps (I think?) to motivate many to find ways to help their brothers and sisters.
    Gerald Hecht
    17/08/2016 #42 Gerald Hecht
    #39 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman That's good; I think that is the argument I was making; I wrote that comment after 48 hours without sleep; (after which) I fell asleep immediately after writing it. I just woke up and reread it, and in all honesty I didn't understand it; I didn't really remember writing it... I think that your summary is exactly the sentiment I was trying to express. Thank you so much; more importantly, thank you for for your empathic and kind thoughts, feelings and support.
    Gerald Hecht
    17/08/2016 #41 Gerald Hecht
    #40 @Wayne Yoshida Thank you so much for your kind support, and the HAM Radio volunteers; it is greatly appreciated! Information has (again) become a bit spotty; a curfew has been put in place in Baton Rouge starting tonight (Tuesday, August 16, 2016); because of various looting and armed robberies last night.
    Wayne Yoshida
    17/08/2016 #40 Wayne Yoshida
    @Gerald Hecht - Hard to find the proper words since we are so far away. But I am praying for you and your family and all the people out there in Lousiana.

    There are some organizations reaching out, but weather may be too heavy for the responders. Here is a story about ham radio volunteers gearing up for possible deployment. But - the article reminds people - they must not "self-deploy" - sometimes good-hearted volunteers get in the way of the professionals. And, they should be taking care of their own families first.

    http://www.arrl.org/news/amateur-radio-volunteers-responding-to-louisiana-flooding-catastrophe
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    16/08/2016 #39 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #38 Okay, O brilliant one. I pulled this portion out of your comment " The existential question facing each of is: Do we surrender into despair, into a futile search for a wise one who will redeem us" Nope, IMO
    "or do we integrate it into its rightful perspective:" escape and continue on our journey, in the company of those we hold most dear through the blizzard (in the snow globe) to our warm, candle lit camaraderie in the warm glow of loving friendship" Yes, IMO
    Gerald Hecht
    16/08/2016 #38 Gerald Hecht
    #37 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman I understand what it was you were referring to...in Kafka's time, it would have been surrealistic fiction (ala, "The Castle"...now --it really is the "snow globe" in which our entire existence Is contained. This isn't "a negative spin on "the news"; it's simply --the news. The existential question facing each of is: Do we surrender into despair, into a futile search for a wise one who will redeem us...or do we integrate it into its rightful perspective: "Here We are, enjoying seeing ourselves on the Jumbotron on Times Square", then, freeing ourselves from that whimsical moment of capture --escape and continue on our journey, in the company of those we hold most dear through the blizzard (in the snow globe) to our warm, candle lit comraderie in the warm glow of loving friendship...
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    16/08/2016 #37 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    My last comment is referencing the story "Louisiana Loses Its Boot" linked in Gerald's comment.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    16/08/2016 #36 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #35 Wow, this is some story. Corrupt politics and no one on the same page. It angers me that this can happen and no one owns up to their mistakes.
    Gerald Hecht
    16/08/2016 #35 Gerald Hecht
    #34 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman they keep getting us out of here...but there's no place to go for very long; if you can find the buzz with me and @CityVP Manjit --this is the real story: https://medium.com/matter/louisiana-loses-its-boot-b55b3bd52d1e#.xdqiuzp4k
    The "boot of Louisiana" is "Swiss cheese"
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    15/08/2016 #34 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #33 I've been watching this on the news. There have been some amazing rescues and I get chills just watching them. Don't wait it out, be safe and get out of there.
  13. Producerdebasish majumder
    OSMOSIS OF CHANGE!
    OSMOSIS OF CHANGE!Once a Project leader made a promise to his associates, that if you all sincerely serve me to assist in my aspiration and after I may succeed, I am promising you, I will give you the share of profits as reward to you all. Accordingly, his...
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    DILMA BALBI -Contratos e Gestão
    23/08/2016 #10 DILMA BALBI -Contratos e Gestão
    thanks for sharing such inspirated ideas @debasish majumder.
    I do also wonder if humility is not the "power".. the "tool" of perseverance.When I am not superior to the others I am able to really see then and I can open door" to sake of humanity only, not just for profit, lucre and wealth".. .. Those thoughts came to my mind after reading your beatifull buzz.
    Julio Perotti
    08/08/2016 #9 Julio Perotti
    El cambio, ante las adversidades.
    Ali Anani
    27/07/2016 #7 Ali Anani
    #6 I gave the dandelion the name @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 #2 #3 #4 "By the name of disgraceful ideology and fanatic religious beliefs, or expansion of market with unrestrained greed and hankering for profits and opulence, untoward incidents are in rise." This is perfectly exemplified by a Share from @Chas Wyatt View more
    #1 #2 #3 #4 "By the name of disgraceful ideology and fanatic religious beliefs, or expansion of market with unrestrained greed and hankering for profits and opulence, untoward incidents are in rise." This is perfectly exemplified by a Share from @Chas Wyatt, which inspired me to go produce more honey for more flavor. To this end, and philosophically (Dr. Anani shall be proud), I confabulated the word "Dysreality" in this piece, a living plant of this planted, deep piece. It is here for you and your kids, to keep them under their lids: https://www.bebee.com/producer/@margaret-aranda/dysreality-the-dysfunction-of-reality . Let me also show our same mindset, @debasish majumder by showing serendipity. A "Perseverance" Quote,attributed to me via Google and Goodreads (and not through me), uses this same picture to say: “Persevere. There is one dandelion that grows from the crack in the cement. Let that one dandelion be YOU.” Close
    Gerald Hecht
    27/07/2016 #5 Gerald Hecht
    #4 @Juan Imaz, yes lots of wisdom, tightly wrapped
    Juan Imaz
    27/07/2016 #4 Juan Imaz
    Very good indeed!
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    27/07/2016 #3 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    This is a brilliant piece @debasish majumder. I always narrow down what I read into my own simple thoughts, perhaps because during my position as an underwriter that was a requirement - simple and factual. So please don't be offended by my summation. From reading your post more than once, I feel there are people are very much into "what's in it for me" rather than "what can I do for you". And you last sentence "So, change for the sake of humanity only, not just for profit, lucre and wealth." Bravo!
    Gerald Hecht
    27/07/2016 #2 Gerald Hecht
    @debasish majumder This resonates dynamic truths...essences; thank you very much for writing and sharing this.
    Ali Anani
    27/07/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    Great thoughts and condensed ones too. One very important issue that you bring here is the past experiences. The story is illuminating in the sense even though we can't change the past still it has it residues in us and these residues trigger our action. Can we change without dealing with past residues such as removing them? Understanding them and dealing with them accordingly? Convert them so that they may trigger new behaviors? Use them to widen our choices? So many questions pop up in my mind at this late hour of the night. Thank you dear @debasish majumder for sharing this great post
  14. Producerdebasish majumder
    BIZARRE PHILOSOPHY OF CRIME!
    BIZARRE PHILOSOPHY OF CRIME!Crimes are myriad, big and small Like high tide and low tide Attracts few to cause mayhem Annihilate many without any reason to blame A trajectory, should condemned vehemently, no acclaim Stringent should be action against all...
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    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/08/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 #1 #3 #4 #7 Do let us leave 'religion' aside for a moment, and ponder the quandery of this scenario: I had just thrown my graduation cap up in the air, USC alumni now, no excitement to spare! And POOF! My first patient was in the Jail Ward and the hard, 'real' world upset all my heart. My first patient held his girlfriend hostage at the butt of a gun, placed to her head for hours after dreaded hours. Finally, the LAPD gunned him down. At 19 years old, I walked in on this human that I was bound, by the Hippocratic Oath, to 'heal.' He was now a quadraplegic, no movement but could feel every needle stick every morning I had to draw from his atrophied right arm. He shed real tears, begging me, "No! Not again! Please, no, I beg" whenever my white coat walked in filled instead with blood. He expressed great sorrow, for now his todays were the same as all his tomorrows. My struggle inside went from rage, < outrage, < outrageous in the extreme for what he had done, and I never lost sight of the girlfriend he had once won. "I am forced to take care of him." That was my first thought.....until day 30 of the rotation, when I was sorry that I had to leave him. To someone else who may not care. I still think of him every day. / ...and now I'll bring my religion in to say, that also, I pray.
    Charles David Upchurch
    25/07/2016 #9 Charles David Upchurch
    #1 @Jeet Sarkar you wrote that "[what] hurts the most is that brutal activity of the criminals. Truly, criminals have no religion. Humanity is a term which those criminals hate, i think so. They are inhuman."

    While I understand the pain of other victims of crime (having repeatedly suffered both property and violent crimes), I believe that you, and @debasish majumder and at least a billion other human beings have all lost your way in dehumanizing abnormal, aberrant, and anti-social behavior.

    We are ALL people, human beings. NONE of us is always without fault. Part of our growth from the innocence of babies is that we make mistakes while learning how we should and should not treat one another in our families, our communities, and the greater world. Some learn from fewer mistakes how and why to be kind to one another. Others, because their most basic needs have not been met, or because they missed some important lessons along the way about the value of EVERY person (including themselves) make more mistakes which harm others. A VERY small percentage (perhaps 1/10 of one percent) are genuinely social psychopaths, meaning that they lack the emotional intelligence to recognize the humanity of others (no matter how many mistakes they could otherwise have learned from) and to simply CARE about others more than just themselves. Yet no matter how inhumanely a person thinks and feels, even the most abhorrent actions must honestly be acknowledged as a [small and very dark] part of what it means to be a human being. As @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD was suggesting, below, the answer relies on us accepting everyone's humanity while also rejecting inhumane behaviors.
    Charles David Upchurch
    25/07/2016 #8 Charles David Upchurch
    #7 @Ray Looker, I am not an expert, but that doesn't sound right. It also doesn't sound to me like respectful and civil discourse. If you are to make such a vociferous assertion, I would kindly ask you to state your historical (not simply religious) references for that claim. Thank you, sir.
    Ray Looker
    25/07/2016 #7 Ray Looker
    Muhammad did not teach love. He was a butcher, a rapist and child molester.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 #4 We should not be looking to outside people or forces to change the tide. We need to look within ourselves, and live true to our God even at the mercy of a terrorist. We love minute-by-minute, 100% pure. "All it takes for evil to reign is for one good man to do nothing." ~ Albert Einstein
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 That is really insightful and truly loving!
    Jean L. Serio, CPC, CMC
    06/07/2016 #4 Jean L. Serio, CPC, CMC
    Another thought-provoking post, @debasish majumder which dives deep into todays unfortunate - and often unspeakable - issues. With so many questions to ponder, answers to consider, I wonder if they will be answered in my lifetime. I ask the same question as @Anees Zaidi - will the Millennials take up the gauntlet and make the changes necessary in the world?
    Anees Zaidi
    06/07/2016 #3 Anees Zaidi
    @debasish majumder this is the desperate call of an innocent 'soul'. What to do? We failed to hold it. Can our millennial friends do something? I know this is our 'shit' (excuse me for my word) but it can't be left laying and decaying. Desperate call of an old man.
    INDU RANI SINGH
    06/07/2016 #2 INDU RANI SINGH
    Hi devashish sir,I enjoyed ur post.I really appriciate ur examine to responsibility our society.so nice for it but I want say something about ur post image...teachers always learnt how to grow myself?

    without love any nouns &adjective r not safe.....but actually they
    alive.& daily face to living movement.this is realty so we couldn't give them same answer .
    Jeet Sarkar
    06/07/2016 #1 Jeet Sarkar
    With the development of the society, i think we are actually moving backward instead of moving forward. Racism and discrimination based on religion has nowadays become very common, which is very unfair. But which hurts the most is that brutal activity of the criminals. Truly, criminals have no religion. Humanity is a term which those criminals hate, i think so. They are inhuman. However, thank you for the post sir. enjoyed reading.
  15. ProducerPascal Derrien 🐝
    Otto Dix: When Ambivalence Has No Equivalence
    Otto Dix: When Ambivalence Has No EquivalenceI have the option to work from home or from the office when it suits me, when I am in the company building one of my habits at lunch time is to grab a paper and read a couple of articles over my salad and favourite granola yoghurt. Last month that I...
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    Pascal Derrien 🐝
    04/08/2016 #29 Pascal Derrien 🐝
    #26 thanks for adding some context and other pointers to the discussion :-)
    Pascal Derrien 🐝
    04/08/2016 #28 Pascal Derrien 🐝
    #27 thanks @Don Kerr and thanks form sharing :-)
    Don Kerr
    25/07/2016 #27 Don Kerr
    I too just came upon this post and am so glad to have found it. Like @Dean Owen I have been missing your missives here. Perhaps it is the lack of Irish lilt I find lacking with other writers;) @Pascal Derrien 🐝 Regardless, the Otto Dix story was clearly waiting there for you to be picked up and although his images are grim they are visceral and truthful unlike some wartime art which was used to glorify battle. Thanks for illuminating this aspect of history. Will share.
    CityVP Manjit
    25/07/2016 #26 CityVP Manjit
    Having finished reading this I simply needed to know more and as I found a Guardian article that satisfied this curiosity https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/may/14/first-world-war-german-art-otto-dix more is what I got. This helped me understand the role of Dada, the connection to German War Artists and the difference between English War Poets.

    I got a sense of a highly patriotic man who was curious about war and on realizing the reality and brutality of it, shared his psyche of that which drove other war artists mad - I am sure a part of this is self-preservation of Dix's mental state, otherwise to keep such horror in one's head is a recipe for madness or suicide. That he also survived the Nazi's who were very much aware of his "degenerate" art only makes Dix even more fascinating to me.

    The guardian article provided me with intro's to the world of George Grosz and I quickly understood from reading that Otto Dix was living his art, whereas another painter Max Beckermann is more representative of art movements. In this regard I identify with Otto Dix as I have already identified with Henri Matisse - in the case of Matisse I enjoyed his originality and humility, which is quite a contrast to the ego and extrovertly admired and loved Picasso.

    Even though I only have this and the Guardian article to go by, I can see in Otto Dix an extraordinarily honest being, maybe initially naive enough to be seduced by patriotic callings to fight a war that took war into an even uglier mechanized dimension. That it took only 21 years for the world to make the same mistake twice tells me that very few paid attention to Otto Dix's hellish warning. I am not sure that global leaders still identify with this for global leaders won't risk their own children where there is hell.
    Gerald Hecht
    24/06/2016 #25 Gerald Hecht
    #24 @Pascal Derrien 🐝 this whole piece is great --and then I just happened upon your piece, the way you happened upon the story...
    Pascal Derrien 🐝
    24/06/2016 #24 Pascal Derrien 🐝
    #23 every now and again I get it somewhat right :-) thanks for the encouraging comment too
    Gerald Hecht
    24/06/2016 #23 Gerald Hecht
    #22 @Pascal Derrien 🐝 it really was an unexpected stimulant this morning
    Pascal Derrien 🐝
    24/06/2016 #22 Pascal Derrien 🐝
    #21 no problem @Gerald Hecht :-)
    Gerald Hecht
    24/06/2016 #21 Gerald Hecht
    @Pascal Derrien 🐝 thank you for putting this in a place, where I was able to stumble upon it!
    Pascal Derrien 🐝
    24/06/2016 #20 Pascal Derrien 🐝
    #19 comment right on the button :-) @Ken Boddie
    Ken Boddie
    24/06/2016 #19 Ken Boddie
    Not often, @Pascal Derrien 🐝, that we stumble by chance across something that tugs at our emotions. This picture paints a thousand words, telling of the woeful reality of war - blood, guts and all. Thanks for sharing, and for reminding us that when we ignore history it has a nasty habit of repeating itself.
    Pascal Derrien 🐝
    24/06/2016 #18 Pascal Derrien 🐝
    #17 thank you for taking the time to read and commenting :-)
    debasish majumder
    24/06/2016 #17 debasish majumder
    Great post sir @Pascal Derrien 🐝. enjoyed reading. thank you very much for sharing such insightful post.
    Pascal Derrien 🐝
    24/06/2016 #16 Pascal Derrien 🐝
    #15 thank you for dropping by @Joanna Hofman :-)
    Joanna Hofman
    24/06/2016 #15 Joanna Hofman
    Awesome post, Pascal. I understand your point, yes, our path to knowledge is more about our personal journey than university education. I graduated two universities but a real journey to the knowladge has started after graduation. Thank you for this wonderful piece of share...
    Pascal Derrien 🐝
    23/06/2016 #14 Pascal Derrien 🐝
    #13 the power of evolution versus static history in one way I guess he anticipated the contradicting forces at play :-)
    Deb Helfrich
    23/06/2016 #13 Deb Helfrich
    Very Hieronymous Bosch, as well as the comparison to Goya. Thanks for sharing what you learned, @Pascal Derrien 🐝, because this is an interesting case study in how the art - the images - stand the test of time, while the words that were said back then about him seem old of place and wrong based on our future perspectives.
    Pascal Derrien 🐝
    23/06/2016 #12 Pascal Derrien 🐝
    #11 actually think you are right @Kevin Pashuk :-) I started the draft on the same day I read the article and let it rest for couple of weeks
    Kevin Pashuk
    23/06/2016 #11 Kevin Pashuk
    That's why I like the concept of serendipity @Pascal Derrien 🐝. There was a reason all the other papers were missing. You were able to get the inspiration for this post, which I thoroughly enjoyed.
    Pascal Derrien 🐝
    23/06/2016 #10 Pascal Derrien 🐝
    #8 yes agree @Donna-Luisa Eversley the only description I could come up with was un=humanly human I don't even know if it correct in English but I guess people will get my point :-)
  16. ProducerFatima Williams

    Fatima Williams

    20/07/2016
    They say time is medicine ; I now believe it's a myth
    They say time is medicine ; I now believe it's a mythIf time were medicine it would heal our wounds but no amount of time could ever make us not miss you dada.You are missed so badly ; my heart can't explain how much, each day I wake up I wish you were still there.To tell us where we're lacking and...
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    Milos Djukic
    01/08/2016 #11 Anonymous
    Fractals are forever dear @Fatima Williams.
    Dean Owen
    30/07/2016 #10 Dean Owen
    Just read this again, brought a second tear to my eye...
    CityVP Manjit
    23/07/2016 #9 CityVP Manjit
    #8 Dear @Fatima Williams, you and @Sara Jacobovici honour your respective fathers immensely by being beautiful souls, for no parent wants to see their children in a state of hurt but in a state of blessing. That is the reality of love, we all know love when the magnitude of love quakes within our own heart - and my intention here is not to awaken that hurt but to show how awaken that love is within you both - for it is this awakened state that showers strength into the life we have and hence become the substance of winged blessings. For sure our time provides us more gifts than simply the photograph but our hearts contain the gifts that a greater relationship gave us. Now as I absorb the meaning of the love you express, this is what enriches me in my own life - and this the grounded reality of how we choose to interact in this virtual space - that the gifts we find in that are more precious than success. Did you lose a father or did you win love? If winning is society's chief credo this is the only kind of winning I want to seek.
    Fatima Williams
    23/07/2016 #8 Fatima Williams
    #7 Thank you @Sara Jacobovici . I'm guessing the scar can never heal, I'm going to look at this as a tatoo that remains with me till the end. And I admire what @CityVP Manjit has graciously mentioned in the comments below, on how we can create an online virtual space where loved one's can come and visit and pay respects online. Where my unborn children or family in the near future can reminisce the memories of our loved ones. This is absolutely, a brilliant thing and I wish my parents had done the same, it would have helped connect with my grand parents whom I hardly remember as they had partrd when I was very young.
    Sara Jacobovici
    23/07/2016 #7 Sara Jacobovici
    I felt and heard your words coming straight from the heart @Fatima Williams. It's been 20 years for me since my father passed away. I miss him today as much as the day he passed but the wound is a separate experience. I find that each year a layer of scar tissue covers the wound. It just makes breathing easier when I do miss him. Wishing you all the best Fatima.
    Fatima Williams
    23/07/2016 #6 Fatima Williams
    #3 Thank you @Anees Zaidi for your kind words
    Fatima Williams
    23/07/2016 #5 Fatima Williams
    #4 Thank you @CityVP Manjit for reading and commenting.
    CityVP Manjit
    22/07/2016 #4 CityVP Manjit
    The online space has opened up for creating memories of loved one's that have passed https://www.everplans.com/articles/the-top-10-online-memorial-websites View more
    The online space has opened up for creating memories of loved one's that have passed https://www.everplans.com/articles/the-top-10-online-memorial-websites and here memory capsules as a hive serves to do the same thing. My view is that personal space is not just about our work life, it is the expression of life. As time passes and the virtual world merges with the physical one, spaces where loved one's can come and visit and pay respects online will become far greater in form than it is now.

    The stories of Philip Clinton Williams live within you and this is where I differentiate between sharing as publishing and a life shared. This is also a very delicate line because it involves highly emotional aspects of our life - and in a world driven largely by marketers and professionals one cannot assume that people who have used advantage as a strategy, have the same motivation as those who genuinely read obituaries.

    I do read obituaries because the best one's give me a sense of life. Since often I do not know these families or people, I am free respect human life as a human being. I also read these obituaries because I want to be intelligent about grief, and there are myths about grief that we are not cognoscente of and if a part of life is increasing our intelligence about mortality. There is great reverence in the one thing that we all have a commonality with. At the same time I also note that the spiritual also contains ego.

    We continue to treat social and business networks from the view of connection - but affinity is far greater than that. I want to understand my relationship with grief, just as writing this buzz provides comfort for you and can be highly cathartic in that regard. Affinity needs to be as close to authenticity and the heart as possible, and that in it self inspires in us greater intelligence. Close
    Anees Zaidi
    22/07/2016 #3 Anees Zaidi
    Thank you dear @Fatima Williams for remembering me on such an emotional moment. Neither I met you nor I met your father. But I see your dad in you. I know he was kind like you, he was loving and caring like you. The change is inevitable - sooner or later this has to happen. The best we can do is to put our steps in the shoes of our loving parents and continue their journey. May God bless you with all His bounties and give your dad a place in the Heaven.
    Fatima Williams
    22/07/2016 #2 Fatima Williams
    @Anees Zaidi I thought about you when I was writing this for my dad a day ago, because you said your daughter has my name. Thank you for making me feel special by saying that.
    Dean Owen
    21/07/2016 #1 Dean Owen
    Beautiful. I am sure he reads these words and smiles....
  17. CityVP Manjit

    CityVP Manjit

    17/07/2016
    Andrew Gold died in 2011 from heart failure at the age of 59. In 1976 he attained a hit with Lonely Boy. He denied it was about his own life even though the dates in the song match facts known about him. Later on he said it may be about him but not in the way anyone would think. Whatever the story behind the song, when I was 15, this was one of the saddest songs I had heard other than Terry Jacks Season in the Sun which I found way more haunting especially when that release came the year I became a teenager. Both songs are unique and highly memorable, especially anyone who was around when it was released.
    Andrew Gold - Lonely Boy
    Andrew Gold - Lonely Boy From his 1976 album "What's Wrong With This Picture?" (There are actually 32 things wrong with the picture. http://www.classroomtools.com/wronglst.htm...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Chas Wyatt
    17/07/2016 #5 Chas Wyatt
    #4I found a copy of Wendy Waldman's "Strange Company" in mint condition in a thrift store- not a scratch on it. It was like new. She did have a compilation of "best of" released on CD.
    CityVP Manjit
    17/07/2016 #4 CityVP Manjit
    #2 Astute move, vinyl is making a comeback thanks to the millennials - which also makes me feel like I made a big, big mistake leaving all my vinyl behind in England when we emigrated.http://www.forbes.com/vinyl/#5fa1f26910fc
    Chas Wyatt
    17/07/2016 #3 Chas Wyatt
    #2Kenny Edwards passed away, also. As far as I know Wendy Waldman and Karla Bonoff are still among us. Wendy has a YouTube channel and has actually left comments on videos people have posted there.
    Robert Bacal
    17/07/2016 #2 Robert Bacal
    #1 Wow. Chas, I think I still have some Waldman vinyl around. Kept it cause I figured she would never have them released on cd. Also remember Karla.
    Chas Wyatt
    17/07/2016 #1 Chas Wyatt
    I seen Andrew Gold in the group "Bryndle" in the early 90's and which was originally formed in the late 60's. It consisted of Karla Bonoff, Kenny Edwards, Andrew Gold and Wendy Waldman. They met in high school.
  18. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    NOTE: You may get PTSD if you are disabled with an Invisible Illness that took a long time to diagnose. You may find this to be quite healing.

    How do these Youth know how we really feel inside when we suffer trauma, are disabled, or have an Invisible Illness?

    How do they just KNOW?
    Paralyzed (NF) lyrics
    Paralyzed (NF) lyrics lyric video for Paralyzed by NF. I don't make many of these but I decided to since you guys love it when I share music that I know you can relate to. this...
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    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #27 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    "#23 #22 Yes, it is an Invisible World, and there are Invisible Children, Invisible Youth, Invisible Professionals like me who are reduced to being bedridden; Invisible Vets, Invisible Homeless, Invisible Home-Bound with no family or friends to bring them milk or bread. Not even for their own nieces. We all need to be fed. So increasing awareness is #1, and thank you for keeping us inspired by knowing that we have touched one: you.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #25 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #21 Yes, it is a journey but isn't it so nice when someone else understands it exactly perfectly? I'm still struggling with how these kids could think of this song, these words.. this Passion....as they are all young and healthy. It is a gift, indeed, and comforting to know that No One is Alone.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #24 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #17 No thanks ever, ever needed. It is all my Calling, my Pleasure, my Reason for Being.
    CityVP Manjit
    14/07/2016 #22 CityVP Manjit
    #21 Dear Kirstie I am reading honest accounts from honest people and you are teaching me much about a part of life I had never been exposed to. Your voice is important because when I now Google I begin to see articles that never caught my attention such as this one by NPR http://www.npr.org/2015/03/08/391517412/people-with-invisible-disabilities-fight-for-understanding You and Margaret are making us see.
    mohammed khalaf
    14/07/2016 #17 mohammed khalaf
    #15 thank you for big soul
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/07/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #10 You offer me and all of us much comfort and gratitude. Thank you for giving us hope and understanding, and believing in what we are trying to do. Because we can't do it alone. Sick people can't help sick people with everything they need. And just like Doctors without Boarders (I did Lifeflight while at Stanford up in a helicopter where no stethoscope can hear a heart beat above the shattering fan of the copter blades). It's another world, but one that we hope to impart so that the empathy and plight is shared with those who are better equipped to actually help. Thank you. Your comments go a very, very long way.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 I'm so sorry, it is hard to know what to say either as a patient sufferer myself, or as a physician in Critical Care and such. Words are just not enough. I am working on bringing in some Pain doctors, and other professionals to help with some of these issues.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 It is normal and real, @NO one, yes. It's hard and soft, both at once. It's an experience.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/07/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 Yes, I suffered the pain, too. I was relatively obsessed with this song for weeks; I still turn back to it with that 'gut' you mention. And for all the tears I shed, it was still bittersweet but good that I wasn't the only one....and I like the tribute at the end, where they say, "You are Not Alone."
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6...and this is just the version with only lyrics and no images. A more compelling video was made by several others, focusing on Troops and Veterans in war. It definitely applies, and should help families and loved ones to understand those with PTSD after war. It's all good that this young Christian group could grasp what the old eyes of our young men walk away from, after battle. I just don't know how the group knows how to write such things....a gift from God.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/07/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 We totally understand one another, especially given the past traumas. I'm one of "those people" who actually visited the door of Heaven in a Near-Death Experience, and it's all in Chapter One of my first book, a Memoir: No More Tears: A Physician Turned Patient Inspires Recovery. I came back with several gifts that I did not have before, worthy of future Buzzes in themselves. I will say that I have the gift of Prophecy, and it's not just because I 'think' I do.....just for reassurance, I have walked up to total strangers and told them that God did not want them to commit suicide today. Every one of them broke down and crumbled, asking me how I knew...and then telling Me that I must talk to God.
    CityVP Manjit
    14/07/2016 #10 CityVP Manjit
    #8 This is why I think of Doctors Without Borders are doctors who relate http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/ because here we see doctors who have transcended looking at their practice as a business and who have gone out into the world to make a difference - whereas I think most of us who are not trained in healthcare, live in fear of pandora's box - i.e. that we keep a tight lid on what we personally find uncomfortable - but when open that lid, we see the world as it is, not the world as we would like it to be or the world we feared seeing. Then the challenge for me is to recognize that is the world, not the nice comfortable one we may live in - and it is a world that Doctors Without Borders also lives in. Pandora's Box is our fear of being overwhelmed by what we do not understand, but to understand anything is to be mindfully exposed. When you addressed the turmoils of Venezuela, that exposed me to the issues in that area, here the invisible is being made visible - in appreciating invisible illness.
    mohammed khalaf
    13/07/2016 #9 mohammed khalaf
    that matter of paralyzed is feeling me to sad because my daughter to be exposed to accident during the battles between USA army and miltia in 2006 ,now she she is suffering from abasia of two limbs and that final report from her private doctor: 12 years old female, she is aknown case of transverse Myelitis.At time of diagnosis the physician (Neurologist) gave her acourse of ACHT (synacthen) & Baciofen. After that the physician repeat the course of treatment (Baclofen alone). Then the physician increases the dose of Baclofen , but without improvement . The patient still complaining from lower limb weakness (spastic paraparesis)&urine incontinence . lastly the physician said that (Baclofen pump) is an indication for her. Baclofen test (intrathecal Baclofen)was given ,but unfortunately ther was no responce.
    NO one
    13/07/2016 #8 NO one
    Thank you for this message @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD it is hard to take in and hard to see but in a good way. It of course resonated with me and made my cry a little bit, but it is normal and real.
    CityVP Manjit
    13/07/2016 #6 CityVP Manjit
    Powerful beyond measure.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 I totally get it. I listened to this over and over again on the day I first heard it by chance, just scrolling through Christian videos on YouTube. I was pretty shattered and @Leckey Harrison View more
    #3 I totally get it. I listened to this over and over again on the day I first heard it by chance, just scrolling through Christian videos on YouTube. I was pretty shattered and @Leckey Harrison would appreciate my shaking, trembling sobs. I was hooked on it. Someone understood. How could they know? Honestly, how could these kids possibly jUsT .... kNoW? I don't get it. I was stuck there, in that trance of incomprehension until I realized that it was a gift. We just can't explain all that happens to and around us, but I've learned to take away the positive. For every lemon, a little lemonade is truly possible. So I force myself to believe that later on, someday, I'll know why 'this' happened. I trust in that. And over and over again, it all works together for good. Perhaps...I know what to say to help another, or I give a hug without any words being spoken. I classify that as a gift that I never would have received if I hadn't been through everything that I've been through. It all made me who I am. I wouldn't want to be anyone else, and I'm grateful for lots of things ~ the best of which is meeting someone like you, whom I otherwise never would have been here to meet. And knowing you? That's a bigger gift that is worth the price of all of the past put together. I wouldn't trade you in for anything. So, Believe. Close
    Randy Keho
    12/07/2016 #3 Randy Keho
    #2 You're right, it sparked a good deal of emotion and a few tears squeaked out. I recall that lack of feeling and perpetual questioning without answers. The dark thoughts seem to never stop.. Sleep becomes the only sanctuary, and sleep only comes from the mental exhaustion. I don't think I'll ever feel the level of joy and happiness I did before the arrival of depression more than 20 years ago. Those feelings seem foreign to me now, nothing more than a memory. At this point, it's not so much a lack of feeling as it is a feeling of trepidation. "The price I'll eventually have to pay for today's joy and happiness will be more costly than its worth when it comes due tomorrow," It's a horrible way to live. A self-fulfilling prophecy.@Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    On Invisible Illnesses: Asking my friends to react to this and let me know your emotions. Being a patient with multiple Invisible Illnesses, this resonated with me to the core. Warning: May trigger PTSD; may lead to crying. And crying can be a great release, as well as knowing that "Together, We Are Strong." You are not alone! @Selim Yeniçeri, @Randy Keho, @Leckey Harrison, @Gary Sharpe, @Deb Helfrich, @Lisa Gallagher, @Sara Jacobovici, @Gerald Hecht, @Elizabeth Harris, @Irene Hackett, @Mohammed A. Jawad, @Kirstie-Sweetie Louise, @Pamela L. Williams, @Louise Smith, @Max Carter, @Michele Williams, @CityVP Manjit, @Neal Rauhauser, @Nick Mlatchkov, @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian, @William Rakow, @Robert Bacal, @Randy Smith, @Sujan Sivagurunathan, @Catalina Serrano, @Flavia Toro Rodriguez, @NO one, @Paul Walters, @John White, MBA, @Anees Zaidi, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    This is mind-boggling.
  19. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    11/07/2016
    An Armed Robbery, Psychological Trauma, and My Daughter: Part II
    An Armed Robbery, Psychological Trauma, and My Daughter: Part IIThe apparently uncontrollable rise in the seemingly senseless violence in the United States is directly related to economics. It's not guns. It's not race.They're a hideous manifestation of the problem, but they are not the cause.There, I've...
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    Comments

    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    26/07/2016 #29 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    That is good news @Randy Keho.
    Randy Keho
    25/07/2016 #28 Randy Keho
    My daughter appears to be doing fine. Actually, the police just apprehended the guilty parties. My daughter and her boss picked them out of a lineup. Progress is being made. My local police force is on the job.i#27
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #27 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Hi @Randy Keho, 🎀just wondering how your lovely daughter is doing, sending you all good cheer and blessings and hoping that all is as well as can be. Letting you know you are in our thoughts, and thanking you for just being 'you!' 🎀!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    19/07/2016 #26 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #25 WoW. Sad state of affairs on the general level in the community, and it makes me feel safer for you that the community is behind you. For certainly, you deserve it and people still have to have compassion amidst it all. I believe your Path is laid out before you, and you will continue to serve others and do a damn good job at it.
    Randy Keho
    15/07/2016 #25 Randy Keho
    #24 I'm extremely thankful for the support I've received in response to both of these buzzes. It's been a trying time, not just for my family, but for all the residents of my community. There's been no slowdown in the crime and violence. There's been a bank robbery everyday this week -- everyday! Add two murders, numerous drive-bys, and no suspects apprehended. The security videos clearly show their faces. My best friend is a retired Illinois State Police Commander, with 30 years service. He never had to draw his weapon -- not once.. Now, he's thinking of carrying a gun, again. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    15/07/2016 #24 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #21 I'm pleased that you liked the speech. I searched to find one just for you, @Randy Keho, since I really wanted to give you something that money can't buy. And I can't always put things into my own words ;-).
    Deb Helfrich
    14/07/2016 #23 Deb Helfrich
    @Randy Keho. I am so tremendously sorry that your daughter had to go through this horrific experience. I applaud you for sharing how this has affected her and brought you to the point of needed to write out the injustice of it all.

    You are right. This is all about economics. We have plenty of money coursing through the productivity of this country. Why are we not taking a stand to see it properly allotted to each and every citizen? Every person should have the right to a living wage in exchange for a day's work.

    But the crux of all the current inequity lies in this question - Why have we allowed our country to be ruled by corporations? All of the investment that should be in social programs, infrastructure, and civic governance is now tied up in a cycle of increasing shareholder value every three damn months. Let's start challenging why so very few of us are worthy of employment to begin with & so expendable when as expenses that can be jettisoned.

    I have no answers, but I think a lot more questions need to be leveled at the powerful niche corporations have granted themselves.
    Selim Yeniçeri
    14/07/2016 #22 Selim Yeniçeri
    #21 We can't stop them, @Randy Keho. You're right. But we can do a lot to minimize their influence over our own lives and the lives of the ones around us.
    Randy Keho
    14/07/2016 #21 Randy Keho
    Thank you for your support, Franci and Margret. That's quite the motivational speech, Margret. In regard to our leaders, France, I believe we got hoodwinked into putting too much trust into those in authority, both in business and government, and allowed them to play politics in the backroom with our futures. They don't represent us, anymore. And we can't say, "Wait a minute, that's not what we want." We just can't stop them.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    14/07/2016 #20 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    It's difficult for me to see and hear what is happening in this country. In addition to lack of good and honest leadership in the US, I believe you nailed it this statement: "If much greater number of people had a decent-paying job, there would be less need to rob, steal, and kill to survive and our daughters would be able to sleep well at night." Thank you for tackling a difficult topic with a superb post Randy Keho.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/07/2016 #19 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #10 Perhaps one good place to start is self-empowerment and positive thinking, a 'cheerleading' of sorts that allows one to set their sites for the prize...even if it is not well defined. You go at it, @Randy Keho View more
    #10 Perhaps one good place to start is self-empowerment and positive thinking, a 'cheerleading' of sorts that allows one to set their sites for the prize...even if it is not well defined. You go at it, @Randy Keho, and keep going! You do it! What a fine example you are, and an outstanding citizen to boot! And you know what? This is my gift for you today, in hopes that it restores you and all souls who feel weathered at what life has brought them. For now. ;-). I'm giving this all that I've got: https://youtu.be/AFGWnqNf6t0 Close
    Randy Keho
    13/07/2016 #18 Randy Keho
    Thank you, @Don Kerr , for your kind words. As I'm writing this, local police are searching for three bank robbers in a wooded area behind the bank. It just doesn't stop. A local man is handing out blue light bulbs for residents to use in their porch lights to show support for the police. What a great idea. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD @Selim Yeniçeri and Franci Eugenia Hoffman.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #17 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #16 @Don Kerr: Hear! Hear! Right on the spot!
    Don Kerr
    12/07/2016 #16 Don Kerr
    "Let's hope that our business and governmental leaders can somehow get past their "Darwinian" views and return us to the forms of economics that led to the greatness -- before we have another civil war." AMEN @Randy Keho View more
    "Let's hope that our business and governmental leaders can somehow get past their "Darwinian" views and return us to the forms of economics that led to the greatness -- before we have another civil war." AMEN @Randy Keho Given the rawness of your daughter's experience and the understandable passion you must have felt, you are remarkable in your restraint and rationality. I applaud you for that and for making the time to let your voice be heard. I just watched the film The Big Short. It provided what you would hope was a fictionalized, dramatized view of the 2008 housing crisis. It was neither fiction nor drama. It was a sad statement of reality that drove people all around the world into an incessant cycle of poverty simply to create obscene wealth for a few. It appears that similar financial vehicles are reappearing to line the coffers of the already stupidly rich. It does not augur well for an outcome other than the 'Darwinian'. Close
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Randy Keho: Just stopping by to let you know that many of us care. It may not seem like it, but for every one person that expresses compassion, there are 100 or 1000 more that are too embarrassed or uncomfortable to speak. So, just know that you and your family are in our prayers and you are very beloved to us here on beBee. I'm working on building a stronger internal structure of people who can speak to provide the needed human touch....and I light a candle to keep you warm and let your light continue to shine. That is my prayer for you. Amen.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 @Randy Keho, You are definitely not alone, sir! Perhaps those best equipped to begin to think of the cusp of these matters are those that have seen death and human destruction the most. I think perhaps @Dr. Allen Brown and @Leckey Harrison.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Randy Keho: Exactly my thoughts when I made my first comment. Just so much to bear. Needs processing, it is written so dam profoundly.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 Another unspoken yet glaring question: Where is God in all of this? Millions and billions of people are calling this scenario a Sign of The End Times ~ evil reigns despite God's Commands. This glares out: 2 Timothy 3 ~New King James Version:

    Perilous Times and Perilous Men
    3 But know this, that in the last days perilous times will come:
    2 For men will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy,
    3 unloving, unforgiving, slanderers, without self-control, brutal, despisers of good,
    4 traitors, headstrong, haughty, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God,
    5 having a form of godliness but denying its power.
    Randy Keho
    12/07/2016 #11 Randy Keho
    #6 Thank you, Franci, thoughtful engagement and team-building are powerful forces.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    12/07/2016 #10 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #9 Yes, I agree and that can open up a completely new subject. Together we have a chance and now we need to choose the right path.
  20. ProducerDean Owen

    Dean Owen

    21/06/2016
    A little information with a pinch of awareness
    A little information with a pinch of awarenessNote: By no means I am trying to offend someone or put the blame in a country, group, society or person. This article was written with information I gathered from some of my research for my thesis on the Master in Political Communication. If there's...
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    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #37 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #35 idk. It's not highlighting my comment in your comment, and I can't remember my original comment, so can you comment on my "specific comment" so I can comment back? Thanks!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #36 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #34 Now THAT's what I'm talkin' about, @NO one! You completed the circle! Off and Buzzzin' to donate now! Muaaah!
    Nick Mlatchkov
    12/07/2016 #35 Anonymous
    Margaret, I don't get what rats u are talking about?
    NO one
    11/07/2016 #34 NO one
    #25 #32 There are various NGOs but sometimes I don't know if I can trust not them but the gob blocking them. I leave here a link to one that is based in UK but Venezuelans run it and I think it could be a good one; it is for children in need: http://www.chamos.org.uk/ View more
    #25 #32 There are various NGOs but sometimes I don't know if I can trust not them but the gob blocking them. I leave here a link to one that is based in UK but Venezuelans run it and I think it could be a good one; it is for children in need: http://www.chamos.org.uk/ If I encounter in my research another one I'll put it here in the comments. Close
    NO one
    11/07/2016 #33 NO one
    #22 Dear Mags, yes it is outrageous how people in Venezuela are being treated inhumanely not only for clothes or dental higiene but they are being deprived of food and water. I feel so mad about this!! #24 @William VanDorin View more
    #22 Dear Mags, yes it is outrageous how people in Venezuela are being treated inhumanely not only for clothes or dental higiene but they are being deprived of food and water. I feel so mad about this!! #24 @William VanDorin I totally agree with you, transparency is one of the solutions and steps needed to change this madness but it is all an ongoing circle that only the "leaders" can stop. It is also super concerning how the wealth (not only economic) and the resources are so unjustly shared between the members of the society. Thank you for your comment. Close
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    10/07/2016 #32 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #31 So what is the plan, @NO one? What organization is working to help the masses? Because one person at a time, today and now, each one of us can make a difference in one life. And isn't that what we would want for ourselves? I want a Solution. Or tell me that there is nothing out there to help some of the people, and I can take it from there. This is staying on my desk. 👍🏽
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    10/07/2016 #30 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #26 Nice historical point, @Nick Mlatchkov; don't know how you'd know such historical fact....must have been personal to you at the time. But now we are free, and the rats that raced from one country to the next...where will they be when they are 45 years old? We need to keep helping one another. I wish for a magic formula.!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    10/07/2016 #29 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #25 Solutions. Yes! Every single problem has a solution. @NO one....is there a nonprofit out there? Can we mail them some clothes that we wear? For what shall we Do as we don't live in a shoe! We have hands to help...just tell us how to stop yelling.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    10/07/2016 #28 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #24 @William VanDorin, yes, the leaders look into their pockets more than into the eyes of their own people...and just like a stranded Felix the Cat on an island, he begins to look at his friend as his food, when his money/sustenance runs out. But pity the person that simply throws hands up in the air, for nothing is ever lost completely to despair. Not when helping hands are willing to go and do all the things without fear of the foe.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    10/07/2016 #27 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #23 @Paul Walters ~ was under the weather lol ~ good to be missed! So..yeah...I'm back. Just like Arnold....
    Nick Mlatchkov
    10/07/2016 #26 Anonymous
    A necessary clarification:
    Chavez introduced the low prices of gas in Venezuela long b4 the international rates dropped drastically as a result of the development of shale gas extraction in the US.
    William VanDorin
    09/07/2016 #24 William VanDorin
    The desire to affect a positive change by compassionate people is all to often corrupted by the power of the positions they are elected, or appointed to. It is unfortunate for us all that the established leadership does not support solutions equitable to the population, and is often driven by a completely different agenda. Though some countries are conspicuous in their excesses and abuse of power, this is a human ailment of self imposed ignorance Too many people stand in peril and countries on the edge of collapse through the manipulation of economies and resources. The diversion of resources and attitude away from warfare to humanitarian relief efforts would prove less costly and far more productive in fostering human and national relations. There is an understandable animosity towards countries of affluent decadence by impoverished populations fostered by our leadership. The walls of division are obvious, it's architects are not. There is no obvious solution and violence simply compounds the problem. There obviously is a dire need for transparency in our leadership, and severe penalties for political corruption imposed. Unfortunately for the population, our leadership is already profoundly corrupt, and the tragic irony is only they could implement such policies.
    Paul Walters
    09/07/2016 #23 Paul Walters
    #22 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Hi ho wondered where you were ?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    09/07/2016 #22 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @NO one, without reading others' comments first, I can tell you the one thing that screams from this page more than anything else: the picture of the woman screaming from the page. She represents all that is lost: clothing, hairstyle, lipstick, the dentist, a toothbrush, and eventually, human dignity. In this new world of such inhumanity, only darkness can thrive together with the other shadows. What she needs is not further condemnation for a plight that is not of her own doing, nor platitudes for poets to dream of describing. She needs damn help. And she needs it from everyone around the world. Period. The message is so clear that I can't comprehend any other words without simple, basic compassion. If it was a dog or a dolphin instead of a human, perhaps she would be heard more humanely. Is every individual everyone "else's" problem? God forbid, NO! She is our problem. She is MY problem. Tell me what to do to help. Give me a Solution. Because I don't mind listening to the Problems in life. But I'm all about Solutions. And in 3 sec flat, I went from a complete stop to 100 mph. And I'm here. Tell me how to Help! And if there isn't a "Way," let's MAKE ONE! Today! It Can Be Done. Nothing is Impossible.
    Maja Vujovic
    07/07/2016 #21 Maja Vujovic
    #20 Thank you, Cat dear, for joining it so competently!
    NO one
    07/07/2016 #20 NO one
    #19 @Maja Vujovic thank you so much for the great initiative!
    Maja Vujovic
    05/07/2016 #19 Maja Vujovic
    Corruption and complaisance are two sides of the same coin and @NO one raises her voice against both, with this June author's pick we couldn't let you miss.
    Leckey Harrison
    21/06/2016 #17 Leckey Harrison
    It appears that some time revolution is the only answer. Our own Declaration is evidence of that, and we are at a tipping point soon here in the US. I find comments along the line that "they brought this upon themselves" incredibly insensitive and narrow minded. No one chooses corruption. No one chooses oppression for themselves. That is the choice of oppressors, and the powerful who have no moral compass.
    NO one
    21/06/2016 #16 NO one
    #15 Thank you for the comment tocaya! I better have a good grade since it'll mean that the project will be useful to make Venezuela a better place or at least it'll be my small contribution to a wonderful country =)
    Catalina Serrano
    21/06/2016 #15 Catalina Serrano
    Great post tocaya! There's an extremely sad situation in Venezuela since long time ago and I don't know how the hell are they going to change all this mess. Sad, very sad without any doubt. Anyway, good research, thanks for the info, keep doing like this and your thesis will have a very good mark! :)
  21. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Focus on Lecky Harrison: Turning Tradegy into Triumph
    Focus on Lecky Harrison: Turning Tradegy into Triumphby Dr Margaret Aranda / Dedicated to Leckey Harrison / Lots of us have suffered psychological or bodily stress for months, years, or decades. Physical trauma and pain can lead to emotional, petrifying suffering that leaves one literally despondent...
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    Leckey Harrison
    25/07/2016 #35 Leckey Harrison
    #33 To be a certified trainer requires Module 1 and 2 workshops, requirements beyond that determined m=by minimums and whatever the trainer decides you need. I am a Provider, not a trainer, which means I can teach individuals and groups for their own use, I have not yet been invited to become a trainer. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, since you live in LA, you live ostensibly near one of TRE's finest, Nkem Ndefo, who owns and operates TRELosAngeles, and has some of the highest, if not the highest, standards of all the trainers I have known.

    Those workshops are only available live. As to TRE treating Parkinson's, I have heard that it helps decrease the severity of tremors, it reduces stress which makes Parkinsons worse, as well as some of the difficulties clients have initially allowing TRE tremors due to their cognitive and emotional associations with Parkinsons.
    Deb Helfrich
    25/07/2016 #34 Deb Helfrich
    #33 We absolutely know that there is something here. We watched an introductory video and he said this is uncanny - I make some of these moves and find release in others. We also have some info from an Eastern perspective that makes tremendous sense about it being a problem with the parasympathetic/sympathetic axis and an injury along the stomach/small intestine meridian channels. And of course, digestion stops when our lives are in danger or we perceive so - it just can't be a proper priority. So, yep - @Leckey Harrison we'd love to work together. I am ready to hit the island - whenever you might have some time!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #33 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #25 Sweet! So glad I understand! #26 #27 #30 We're building a mountain! Leckey, are your Classes online? Does TRE(R) apply to treat Parkinsons? Can you tell us briefly about the types/levels of training you offer? I also wonder what @Gary Sharpe View more
    #25 Sweet! So glad I understand! #26 #27 #30 We're building a mountain! Leckey, are your Classes online? Does TRE(R) apply to treat Parkinsons? Can you tell us briefly about the types/levels of training you offer? I also wonder what @Gary Sharpe and @Deb Helfrich assess here, specifically due to muscle tremors. Lovin' the Buzz! Close
    Dale Masters
    24/07/2016 #32 Dale Masters
    #31 Done. You're on my list.
    Leckey Harrison
    24/07/2016 #31 Leckey Harrison
    #30 One of my freinds and neighbors wrote the book on co-housing: https://www.amazon.com/Cohousing-Handbook-Building-Place-Community/dp/0865715173

    My skype tag is leckey.harrison. Send me an invite.
    Dale Masters
    24/07/2016 #30 Dale Masters
    #28@Leckey Harrison We should have a LONG conversation! I went to college to become a CPA, and even though I had to quit (STUPID BODY!!!!), I've learned a LOT about starting and organising such a place.
    Leckey Harrison
    24/07/2016 #28 Leckey Harrison
    #26 Such an intentional community would be a great idea. Our community re-purposed an apartment complex that was for sale in the heart of our town. There are myriads variables, but I have thought the same thing in terms of a smattering of communities across the US where wounded people can live, and then the services are brought to them, like in aging in place. There are also the advantages of community gardens, and I now know I could ramble for an hour....
    Dale Masters
    24/07/2016 #27 Dale Masters
    #15 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Babies know instinctively what reality truly is (see my post directly below this one). It's contact with the "fabricated world" that makes us lose what babies instinctively have. Time for a good, strong dose of TRUTH.
    Dale Masters
    24/07/2016 #26 Dale Masters
    #3 I, too, dream of such a center...except it's a community, where the wounded can find apartments and houses to live in, and the entire town takes care of one another. It's an extended family in the truest sense, in that it recognises on a soul level that the problems of one are (concretely) the problems of all.
    It could be considered a "commune" in the truest sense of the word.
    No ego...no "keeping up with the Joneses"...no competition. Just a deep, abiding love that includes rather than excludes. No "intrusion" into people's private affairs...just a sense of belonging that is nonexistent in the present world.
    The truth of the matter is that there is far, far more that connects us than separates us. THIS is reality...not the unnatural greed, corruption, and fear/hatred that has infected humanity for far too long.
    It's time to take the blue pill...& wake up.
    Leckey Harrison
    23/07/2016 #25 Leckey Harrison
    #24 Very good! Sounds like a TRE practitioner in the making!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/07/2016 #24 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #22 Great synopsis. I'll re-word it and see if I am on target: The brain develops learned pathways for traumatic stresses in childhood. Children, however, do not usually have a "coping mechanism" to re-do the wiring, so to speak, hence (C-)PTSD occurs. Although, happily, as you stated, some have applied TRE(R) to infants and children to stop or inhibit the formation of 'traumatic brain tracts.' In adults, the flower is already bloomed, and the brain is what it is. But we can change it. Whether it is coping with either childhood trauma or new-onset trauma, an adult can re-wire and re-program the brain, due to something called neuroplasticity. The coping mechanisms that adults can learn with your expertise in TRE(R) assist in coping with mind, body, soul by first "undoing" the bodily instincts that arise under stress. Specifically, the stress-triggered muscle tremors, jaw tightening, muscle flenching, shaking, sobbing, can be 'unlearned' with exercises that first re-wire the body's natural reactions, then re-wire the brain through neuroplasticity. The patient can then be made whole. So there is much hope that poly-pharmacy, doping medications, counseling ad nauseum, and/or pillow-fighting are not necessarily the first treatment to stress and PTSD. Instead of 'fighting' the body's natural instincts to stress, you actually work with them, at the 'automatic' or autonomic nervous system level, to heal. It's so amazing to have a fresh, no-nonsense approach that is natural, self-realizing, and allows one to regain control of the mind:body responses. Awesome. If I am even close to the target and haven't shot my arrow into the trees instead, I'm happy to understand the tip of the iceberg here. Many, many thanks for your patience and unhesitating willingness to help. You ROCK! @Leckey Harrison
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    23/07/2016 #23 Mohammed A. Jawad
    When worldly life is taken as a timely ordeal then there will be enough space and energy to turn every tragedy into triumph.
    Leckey Harrison
    20/07/2016 #22 Leckey Harrison
    #20 Here's how I break it down, since C-PTSD isn't a true classification yet. C(omplex)-PTSD is the result of long term trauma officially. I apply that to adverse childhood experiences, where others are trying to get that diagnosis to be Developmental Trauma Disorder. Either wy, what happens is that in childhood trauma, there is effect on the developing brain and psyche, whereas in adults, all things being equal, that's done. The treatment of C-PTSD requires not just releasing it, but also re=patterning to allow for the experiences of development (connection, attachment, trust, autonomy, love/sexuality) to create new neural networks while dismantling the old. It begins with connection, and primarily tot eh self first, as that is the first disconnect in developmental trauma. We work with the body, and while the client experiences re-connection to their body sensations via tremoring, the presence of the provider allows the beginning of the rebuilding of positive attachment and trust. I know that adult onset PTSD can become complex. Then the challenge may not necessarily be the developmental issues as much as it is the rebuilding of identity, beliefs, emotional regulation, cognitive capabilities, and embodiment which can be complex enough.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/07/2016 #21 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #19 Oh, your reviews are always appreciated for their humane insight, @debasish majumder, and it is so nice to have you amongst us in this Hive. The only thing that I now wish is that you would join us on our Memoir Madness Project....your life has had interesting childhood tales and it is only befitting and helpful to share your experiences with us. You were so blessed in your childhood. Let us see more. Please?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/07/2016 #20 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #18 Can you please explain the difference between PTSD and C-PTSD to our viewers?
    debasish majumder
    15/07/2016 #19 debasish majumder
    Great post madam @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD unique reflection of trauma which have nowadays a perennial impact on myriad owing to numerous untoward incidents, precisely in war torn areas, where ordinary civilians turn into refugees, their trauma is leading then almost into verge of extinction! nice insight with empathy. thank you very much for sharing the post.
    Leckey Harrison
    11/07/2016 #18 Leckey Harrison
    #17 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD: You are very, very welcome. I am determined to be the best I can be, and since I experienced misattunement and have clients with C-PTSD, David Berceli was my teacher, and a I had profoundly good trainer (Nkem Ndefo right there in LA - TRELosAngles), it became a par of me early on to allows be curious and learning. How does one apply TRE to C-PTSD as well as PTSD was a naturally arising question.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    10/07/2016 #17 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #16 @Leckey Harrison: It makes total sense. Thank you for having your fingers dipped into so many different dimensions here...and this one, the pediatric nurturing of the 'diminished stress response' is noteworthy. Another topic to expound on...just buzzing all the way! Thank you, my friend.
    Leckey Harrison
    10/07/2016 #16 Leckey Harrison
    #15 That's what good mothering does. It didn't happen with me, but I'm watching my neighbor do it, and I've seen it in action at a yoga studio open house.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    10/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 @Leckey Harrison, yes, down-regulating the SNS is an awesome concept...can we teach our babies to do it from birth? Somewhere along the way, we 'internalized' instead of 'felt.' It just seems like we lost something that a confident, innocent child has.
  22. CityVP Manjit

    CityVP Manjit

    11/07/2016
    @Gerald Hecht shared a book in one of his buzzes called Capture by David A. Kessler - I have this marked down as a future read. One of my earliest memories was the assassination of Robert Kennedy. I was 7 years old and my father was painting the front room of our house in London, England. A small black and white was on sitting on a draw that I was looking up towards, when I felt a great disturbance run through me. I could not understand the news report but I instinctively knew this was something terrible - about 10 years ago I got a chance to visit Robert Kennedy's grave in Washington and was surprised to find only a small wooden cross, among monuments and white gravestones of Arlington Cemetery.
    CityVP Manjit
    Capture
    books.google.ca Dr. David A. Kessler, the dynamic and controversial former FDA commissioner known for battling the tobacco industry, has spent the past two decades studying how certain addictive substances influence our behaviour. In his first two books, Dr....
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  23. ProducerLisa Gallagher

    Lisa Gallagher

    24/06/2016
    Suffering From Anxiety Disease and Social Implications
    Suffering From Anxiety Disease and Social ImplicationsWarning- This post will be bluntly honest. Many of you that follow me know that I suffer from Anxiety and Panic Disorder. My mom passed away in January and it seems my Anxiety has been full blown for the past 4-6 weeks.  The only way I can describe...
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    Comments

    Lisa Gallagher
    01/09/2016 #50 Lisa Gallagher
    #48 Hi @Paul Walters, I'm sorry you've been afflicted with Anxiety and depression too. There is oft times no predictability to its pattern which is extremely frustrating. It comes and goes without warning. I have breaks from it. It always lurks. I think many times we try to put on our happy and fake demeanor to accommodate those around us and that alone, can take a physical toll on the body. There are people who say they understand but I dont think its possible if they've never experienced it. I see a lot of people who write about "anxious " times in their lives and how they overcame them etc.. thats great and I admire those people but if they really had Anxiety disease, the illness, they'd find its different than dealing with issues that cause a person to become anxious. I dont read articles about self help, perspective etc.. when it comes to illnesses like heart disease, thyroid disease and on the list goes. Why, because they are medical illnesses just like Chronic Anxiety disease and other illnesses classified as MENTAL, there in lies the problem, the stigma associated with the damn label and lack of education on behalf of many. Sorry I ranted, it hasn't been a good week , it came back with a fervor last week. Hoping your week was better! :)
    Lisa Gallagher
    01/09/2016 #49 Lisa Gallagher
    #47 Hi Robert Mckormic, sometimes people need drugs to get over the hump period, but they are not a cure. I agree, they are over prescribed and CBT is a good standard therapy that produces welcome results with many.
    Paul Walters
    01/09/2016 #48 Paul Walters
    Thanks @Lisa Gallagher When one digs a little one finds that often people you know well suffer from this terrible affliction, I bing one of them. I wrote a piece a few years ago on the subject of anxiety and depression and I was astonished at the amount of responses I received . Its an affliction that receives no sympathy but oftimes scorn as on the 'outside' you look fit and healthy. Its a battle that I have discovered is never really won, some days you have defeated the demon only for it to return with a few more heads !!!! However, from what I read, you are eloquent and focussed and I guess focussing on those two elements is the first steps to keeping the beast locked in its cage where it belongs .
    Robert Cormack
    31/08/2016 #47 Robert Cormack
    A study done at the University of Toronto found that CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) is just as effective as drugs (based on heat source MRIs). The problem for MDs? People want a quick fix. They want a pill. As you say in your article, issues associated with anxiety are longstanding and deeply ingrained. A pill isn't going to change what you've continually ignored from your past. CBT takes a lot of commitment, but when you understand the "triggers" of anxiety, they become easier to deal with and tolerate. I'll post an article I did for The National Post called: In Hollywood, Anxiety is the New Alcoholism.
    Lisa Gallagher
    29/08/2016 #46 Lisa Gallagher
    #45 So young! Ironically, I was diagnosed with nerve damage in my left ear too @Debbie O'Halloran, a virus destroyed the balance nerve in my left ear. I take medication for life which for the most part keeps the vertigo away but the brain also learned to compensate some what with exercises. OMG, running out of the house, well if rolling over something got you over the panic, that's awesome LOL!
    Debbie O'Halloran
    25/08/2016 #45 Anonymous
    #44 @Lisa Gallagher, I was diagnosed at age 8. When I was diagnosed, I was told that I was born with it. Of course that was the early 70's and that's what we were told. Now the doctor thinks it was a virus that I had as a toddler. Unfortunately, this same virus caused nerve damage in my left ear.

    The panic started in 1997. The last attack I had in May, forced me out of the house, in pouring rain, and I ended up on a short drive. I ended up rolling over something with my husband's car and leery him with a flat. Got me over my panic attack. LOL!

    Thanks for your kind words!
    Lisa Gallagher
    23/08/2016 #44 Lisa Gallagher
    #43 Hi @Debbie O'Halloran, I'm so sorry I missed your comment. I'm also sorry you suffer from Panic Disorder, it's a tough battle at times. Were you diagnosed a child with Juvenile diabetes or as an adult? I have a brother in law who developed type 1 Diabetes at age 29, they think a virus affected his pancreas. Sending good thoughts to you!!
    Debbie O'Halloran
    16/08/2016 #43 Anonymous
    Thank you for writing a Buzz I can totally relate to. Panic disease is horrible. You feel helpless. It is exactly as you describe it. By the way, I also have type 1 diabetes too.
    Lisa Gallagher
    23/07/2016 #39 Lisa Gallagher
    #38 Thanks for sharing your experience @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. I don't take issue with mental health. I do however, despise the term Mentally ill, or Mental Illness. It's vital to focus on the mind, body and spirit, they are all connected. Thanks for you comment!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #38 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #34 #35 #36 : As a medical student, I was taught 'differently.' Apparently. Not only did we have a Nutrition class (the only mandatory one in the nation), but we focused on mind, body, and soul. So because the "Mind" is often "left out of the healing equation," I give credence to the word "Mental" only because it increases awareness and categorizes a huge need. And on that point, I do not use "Mental Illness" at all. Never. I use "Mental Health." For that is the point of healers: to focus on the positive, to give smiles and laughter, to do good, and to keep a laser-vision on 'health.' Period.
    Lisa Gallagher
    07/07/2016 #37 Lisa Gallagher
    Thanks for sharing my buzz @CityVP Manjit!
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/07/2016 #36 Sara Jacobovici
    #34 Amen to that @CityVP Manjit.
    Lisa Gallagher
    07/07/2016 #35 Lisa Gallagher
    #34 @CityVP Manjit what a great response! I'm glad to hear someone else dislikes the term mental. The brain is one our vital organs yet when something goes wrong that can't be seen, people use terms that do cause stigmas and it also makes others afraid to seek help or possibly share what they are experiencing- it becomes a vicious cycle. My new granddaughter does give me renewed hope and I couldn't agree more, it's my HOPE too that the next generation will be much more enlightened, less judgmental and compassionate. Thanks so much for your wonderful comment!
    CityVP Manjit
    07/07/2016 #34 CityVP Manjit
    I love your courage Lisa Gallagher because the very nature of anxious suffering includes seeing it as a stigma which is even more challenging. I also respect your dislike of the word "mental" - and I can well understand why you do not like this word. Being that I responded on the night of 7th July - when you look at your newly arrived grand-daughter the great hope is that her generation will be far more enlightened than prior generations were, so that conscious awareness hopefully moves us all to an increasingly more thoughtful future, one which is an era of far greater personal understanding.
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/07/2016 #33 Lisa Gallagher
    Thanks for the share @John White, MBA!
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/07/2016 #32 Lisa Gallagher
    Thank you for sharing my buzz @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD! You sure do buzz around and fast.. you are quite the bee!! :))
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/07/2016 #31 Lisa Gallagher
    #30 Thanks for your kind comments @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD :))
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #30 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Another huge WoW here. My heart it. It's just growing
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #29 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #13 Great point @Dean Owen, straight from the heart. As time progresses, I can see two things evolving: the bonds are being made with one another, and the chains of despair and sadness and all that is negative? The chains are being broken. God Bless you and your family.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #28 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 @Diane Schultz: "Lord God, we pray in the Power of Two that @Lisa Gallagher gets a touch from Your hand. Let her find the peace that passes all understanding, the No More Tears of heaven, where the lion plays with the lamb. We know this is found in You, Christ. Help her, guide her. Lead her, and let her follow as a good servant without fear. For you said 365 times in the Bible, 'Do not be afraid.' "Have no fear." And we agree that we shall all have this freedom from that deep fear that belongs nowhere near us. We pray this in Jesus' name, as he promises us that you shall give us that which we ask in His name. Amen."
  24. ProducerJoelson Madeira

    Joelson Madeira

    06/07/2016
    Vidas corriqueiras de um cotidiano rotineiro
    Vidas corriqueiras de um cotidiano rotineiroOriginalmente publicada em: http://entrecabelosebarba.com.br/vidas-corriqueiras-de-um-cotidiano-rotineiro/ Despertador toca, já é hora. Torço para que ele tenha enlouquecido, torço para ganhar mais alguns minutos de sono. Mas é em vão. Já é hora…...
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    CityVP Manjit
    06/07/2016 #2 CityVP Manjit
    In the ideal world we have the Beatles singing "Eight Days a Week" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tgCFopu30Q View more
    In the ideal world we have the Beatles singing "Eight Days a Week" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tgCFopu30Q and hardly anybody lives in that world. McCartney and Lennon both wrote songs that do reflect this post. In McCartney's case he wrote "Another Day" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2eW1eEtAKpA which is how most of our lives spin, without talking about "them" or "they" - and this reality is common. This post by Joelson goes far more deeper and reflects the words of post-Beatles John Lennon when he wrote his first song after his band decided to "let it be" - which is "Working Class Hero" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmKL20UHWHA and at 2.20 of this song Lennon sings "but your still f---king peasants as far as I can see". This song is as far removed from his song Imagine can be - but Lennon did sing Imagine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASWx4owQxyk - and that is what is important at the individual level, it is our imagination that keeps us from falling into the darkness. Lennon never promised us peace, he said that this world works on messages and adverts and selling things to us - so why not sell "peace" - to use the same instrument of media that we think is controlling us - and that is what leads me to break the cycle of despair - that becomes us vs them. The chief thing we control is our own imagination and if that imagination leads us to loving someone eight days a week, imagine the possible - but I also understand the "working class hero", because that is a reality also. Yet another way I express Eight Days a Week is "flow" and here 10 minutes of Mihaly changed my own perspective https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8MD6zdnicg Close
    Tifany Rodio
    06/07/2016 #1 Tifany Rodio
    Adorei suas crônicas. Sobre esta, o que temos mesmo é que romper com essa "programaçao mental" de que só podemos aproveitar as sextas-feiras e os fins de semana, e passar a realmente viver e aproveitar cada dia como se fosse único. Desde que eu comecei a aplicar isso, tenho sido muito mais realizada :)
  25. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Step Outside
    Step Outsideby Dr Margaret ArandaStirred along and spurred to imagination, from the encouragement of @Ali Anani, Ph.D. This is in dedication to him as my very first poem. He told me I could write poetry, and that has never been on my 'map.' So here's to some...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/07/2016 #24 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #20 I totally admire all that you do...and goodness knows that when a problem is so big that we can't wrap our arms around it, we do need to focus on the most 'invisible' to get the 'cure' going. For without the 'curers' we would all be nowhere. So, hat's off to you! I put it all here: https://www.bebee.com/producer/@margaret-aranda/focus-on-lecky-harrison-turning-tradegy-into-triumph
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/07/2016 #23 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #19 Some people never 'get' this, right? It's our job to increase the awareness of our 'real' selves to who we think 'we' are....quite the introspective journey, and thank you. I do believe it takes "a special brand of daring."
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/07/2016 #22 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #18 @Anees Zaidi, the man of the childhood garden, thank you. Such a compliment from you is one to behold, and I shall continue this pursuit with your encouragement. Thank you so much!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/07/2016 #21 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #17 You got it. Very well said!
    Leckey Harrison
    06/07/2016 #20 Leckey Harrison
    #15 Burn patients were the hardest. You're correct, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, that all staff need to be considered in any setting when it comes to trauma. Our nonprofit was designed to serve those that responded to a call, and it was a tough call to leave out the ER folk. Initially though it was designed to help volunteers only, as they have little to nothing in the way of support.
    Joel Anderson
    06/07/2016 #19 Joel Anderson
    "So have no fear; And Dare Every Day"--Well done. Dare to be different, Dare to make a difference and take the necessary steps to mold your pot of clay. Bravo
    Anees Zaidi
    06/07/2016 #18 Anees Zaidi
    Dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD your 'Poetry Brain's is as beautiful as your 'Story Telling 'brain. Keep producing. I simply love your this very first poem.
    CityVP Manjit
    06/07/2016 #17 CityVP Manjit
    #16 Exactly Margaret - see the whole. Chief problem of healthcare is how it is divided into parts and then we look at the human body as parts also, Whether it is nurses, firefighters, police, techs, physicians or EMT's - they are all contributors to emergence - which is how I look at emergency.- and that point we truly "step outside".
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #13 @CityVP Manjit: by the way, thank you for the article in the nursing journal. Emergency Room nurses and techs are often overlooked while the physicians and EMTs get 'all the attention' on this. We have to see the whole Emergency Room 🚒 , with our eyes. And everyone in it.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #13 You are right in assessing that First Responders need introspective help on all the ghastly and traumatic human suffering that they witness, and are yet expected to "perform" nonetheless. Without making one mistake, or the current...or the next patient dies. @Leckey Harrison, with all his firefighting experience (and I can tell you that patients with 'burns' are some of the most difficult to manage as a physician...and most survivors of terrible, horrific burns want to commit suicide and wish they had never been resuscitated....we all need help, each one of us. And yes, I don't think that any First Responder gets used to it all. Each day brings the varieties of new flashbacks-in-the-making. But Leckey's expertise is on how we can deal with is thanatophobia & 'melt-down' syndrome...and that is the good news. People care.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #12 It's a whole different culture, yes? A whole different language...
    CityVP Manjit
    06/07/2016 #13 CityVP Manjit
    I welcome those in the field of emergency care work to have such outlets that allow themselves to express themselves, for not only do we all depend on every single emergency care worker when we need them most, but because the graphic is hidden from us, we don't get the full sense of the human being who must also face in practice what we will not stomach even as a verbal description. I read a piece just now on thanatophobia (which is death anxiety among emergency workers) http://journals.rcni.com/doi/pdfplus/10.7748/en.23.4.32.e1448 Right at this minute there are emergency care workers involved in life and death situations and unpleasant situations. To expand horizons and think in galactic ways, when human beings find conscious relief in poetry this is a means of touching the galactic ways. There are limits for certain people how they can absorb this reality but as a part of my own learning, for me this is about the emergency care worker and not whether I am personally resilient whenever I am subjected to an account of something I am not used to - as Margaret says well - none of us are.
    Randy Keho
    06/07/2016 #12 Randy Keho
    #11 Serving the less fortunate can be a trip. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I taught English on a part-time basis for two years at a state correctional center (medium security prison) while attending graduate school. Inmates from STC (Special Treatment Center) and G-POP (General Population) were segregated everywhere, but in educational unit. If they faked taking their medication, they were a real treat to deal with in class.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 @Randy Keho: Yup. I also did 2 grueling months at the LAC-USC Medical Center's Jail Ward...got the luck of the draw twice. That's where Rodney King was taken. We used to pull out tazer fish-hooks from body searches on handcuffed, arrested patients. We searched through their worn and tattered hair to unscrew them from the scalps...and all the while, the patient was telling us (s)he was HIV positive and wanted to give us AIDS. So we were darting to and fro, avoiding the spit, bites, and gnashing of teeth while making them well. So surreal. I had just thrown my hat up in the air with the rest of my graduating class in 1990, and here I was, wondering what the heck I was doing in a lock-down facility in a heat wave with primarily gang members. Oh, is that the 2nd Buzz now? Oh... the stories.....
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 @Ali Anani, PhD, I realize that I've seen so much more than others...even so much more than I could have ever imagined...but I just reflected on why I wrote the poem, and all the unsaid things that were behind it. So I hoped to bring much deeper depth to the original poem, too...and thank you for validating me, my teacher.
    Randy Keho
    05/07/2016 #9 Randy Keho
    Your poignant poem should be posted in all juvenile rehabilitation centers. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD My ex-wife was a health unit coordinator in the emergency room of a local hospital. A few of my friends were city cops and state troopers. They also dealt with the realities of "Stop Outside." At the time, gun violence was very rare. Today, my city ranks fifth in the nation for violent crime for cities with a population of 100,000+. One particular neighborhood ranks third. Youthful street gangs randomly shoot at each other, but more often hit innocent bystanders. The emergency room now resembles a M.A.S.H unit.
    Ali Anani
    05/07/2016 #8 Ali Anani
    Thank you @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD for the new introduction and the dedication. As demanding (and even terrifying) reading your introduction is; yest it has two interesting elements that kept me reading. These are your storytelling style combined with poetic description in between. You captured my attention wonderfully.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/07/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 @Sara Jacobovici: As always, you are the sweetest honey-Bee! 🌺 🌻 So kind and gracious! 🌺 🌻 Thank you for good cheer! I think I caught a wink of pride in opening up this new 'poetry brain.' And it's all due to our beloved @Ali Anani. Muaah to all!
    Sara Jacobovici
    05/07/2016 #6 Sara Jacobovici
    No laughing matter @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. I appreciated reading your poem very much.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/07/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 @Joel Anderson: Aweee...((Blush)). Thank you, and thanks to @Ali Anani!
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