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CDU Things To Read - beBee

CDU Things To Read

~ 100 buzzes
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  1. ProducerAri Kopoulos

    Ari Kopoulos

    18/11/2016
    How to Distil an Unforgettable Personal Brand
    How to Distil an Unforgettable Personal BrandTo Brand or Not to Brand?“All of us need to understand the importance of branding. We are CEOs of our own companies: Me Inc. To be in business today, our most important job is to be head marketer for the brand called You.”– Tom Peters, Fast...
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    David B. Grinberg
    18/11/2016 #1 David B. Grinberg
    Kudos, Ari, on an exemplary buzz with awesome advice. You really nailed the subject matter here. All bees should take notice and apply your promising practices. I've shared this in three hives. Buzz on, my friend!
    cc: @Javier beBee View more
    Kudos, Ari, on an exemplary buzz with awesome advice. You really nailed the subject matter here. All bees should take notice and apply your promising practices. I've shared this in three hives. Buzz on, my friend!
    cc: @Javier beBee @John White, MBA @Teresa Gezze Close
  2. ProducerSandra Crowe

    Sandra Crowe

    16/11/2016
    Use These Tips From 6 Successful Bloggers to Blog Your Way to Riches
    Use These Tips From 6 Successful Bloggers to Blog Your Way to RichesBeing a full-time blogger is a real career these days. While everyone might claim to be a blogger, very few actually turn their blog into a business that generates revenue. Anyone can start a blog and begin to publish content -- but building an...
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  3. ProducerbeBee in English
    6 Professions Born With The Internet -Part I- (Infographic)
    6 Professions Born With The Internet -Part I- (Infographic)The paper era is long gone and with the explosion of the Internet world and the appearance of the overabundance of information stage, many things have changed. The way people use the Internet and consume information is no longer the same and some...
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  4. ProducerJoel Anderson

    Joel Anderson

    14/11/2016
    Lines in the Sand
    Lines in the Sand“Never be afraid to raise your voice for honesty and truth and compassion against injustice and lying and greed. If people all over the world...would do this, it would change the earth.” ― William Faulkner I saw this photo and for...
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    Comments

    Joel Anderson
    17/11/2016 #18 Joel Anderson
    #17 @Sara Jacobovici Indeed. Thank you.
    Sara Jacobovici
    17/11/2016 #17 Sara Jacobovici
    #14 #15 @Joel Anderson and @Deb Helfrich, your returning to DANCE reminds me of the fact that where there is life, there is movement.
    Joel Anderson
    16/11/2016 #16 Joel Anderson
    #15 Thank you @Deb Helfrich Not that I am fixated on the topic of lines but your comment reminded me of a moment in time when my daughter and I were having a conversation about early childhood development. The discussion reminded me of a poignant experience in my life. Every once in awhile, my schedule would allow me to engage with my kids in their classrooms. On one occasion, I found myself sitting down with one of my daughters and a group of youngsters in a small classroom filled with a lot of these little future contributors. It was coloring time. One of the kids was getting frustrated and would color, stop, color, stop, look exasperated. I came over to see what the issue was and why the tears were welling up during an activity that was just supposed to be fun. I looked at this youngster, and then at the very clearly defined lines of a picture that were supposed to be colored within. In this particular case, the lines and marks of the crayons were all over the place. I just looked at the picture and this young child and said, "this is one of the most beautiful pictures I have ever seen." In an instant, the tears subsided, a smile arrived and the coloring went on with a renewed passion and sense of purpose. And it didn't hurt that I was handed a crayon to help color my own lines. My initial inclination was to color within the lines but was told with emphasis--"Its Ok to color outside of the lines." It is all about perspective. :)
    Deb Helfrich
    16/11/2016 #15 Deb Helfrich
    #14 This is perhaps one of the best responses I have ever gotten, @Joel Anderson. And I have pondered a little more about leaving footprints and lines in the sand. Because it is important to take the difficult stands and draw the crucial lines.

    I think that it is not the marks themselves that matter, it is the ability to make them again and again and again when life gives us the moments that matter. And to be willing to make the marks so often - DANCE! - that we become known as people who will make the footprints and lines.
    Joel Anderson
    16/11/2016 #14 Joel Anderson
    @Deb Helfrich I have thought a lot about your comment and have gone back to the picture multiple times since I posted this piece. As I thought about the messiness of it all, I was reminded of a quote attributed to Alan Watts "The only way to make sense out of change is to plunge into it, move with it, and join the dance." Which then led me to think about a few lines from Lee Ann Womack's "I hope you Dance" "And when you get the choice to sit it out or dance, I hope you dance. I hope you never fear those mountains in the distance, Never settle for the path of least resistance, Livin' might mean takin' chances but they're worth takin'." You and the others like you are the ones who inspire me to just want to dance despite the fuzzy lines and messiness of it all.
    Joel Anderson
    15/11/2016 #13 Joel Anderson
    #1 Thank you @Savvy Raj Keep making a difference.
    Joel Anderson
    15/11/2016 #12 Joel Anderson
    #7 Thanks @CityVP Manjit
    Joel Anderson
    15/11/2016 #11 Joel Anderson
    #8 Thanks @Deb Helfrich and thanks for the link to Andres Amador--very nice. Don't stop making those lines.
    Joel Anderson
    15/11/2016 #10 Joel Anderson
    #9 Thanks @Pascal Derrien All the best to you.
    Pascal Derrien
    15/11/2016 #9 Pascal Derrien
    Was thinking about lines and ... borders this morning when I bumped on your article. An encouraging comment and invitation on your last sentence :-)
    Deb Helfrich
    15/11/2016 #8 Deb Helfrich
    I have been mesmerized for hours over that photo, @Joel Anderson. I can't remember if you have been around when the playa paintings of Andres Amador have been shared - I simply never tire of his work: http://www.andresamadorarts.com/

    I have always celebrated that my own lines are swirling and complicated and situational - I refuse to trace from anyone else's lines. And to offer a slightly different perspective, if I am not attached to my lines, if I can be at peace with the thought that they can disappear with the wind or the tide, then I am available to shift into what is occurring rather than relying on the belief of lines that may have evaporated with a changing world.

    We are aligned in the necessity of making lines as part of fixing what is broken and moving the world forward into a more sustainable future for the planet and all its ecosystems.
    CityVP Manjit
    14/11/2016 #7 CityVP Manjit
    What a beautiful picture. Privacy is one of the lines I like and another is mental and emotional bandwidth. As Clint Eastwood said in a far different contest "a man's gotta know his limitations". Once I have established a firm foundation which is akin to what is said in Matthew 7:24 - "to build your house on rock and not sand" - then the world opens up to me as a change agent.

    I don't make it a raison detre to change the world, nor want to change a single thing about Joel Anderson or any other person. The transformations that incur in me, occur because of sound values, learning from my mistakes, appreciating my strengths, valuing the love that is around me, count the blessings of a wonderful life and have the humility to learn and develop.

    As each one of us become a light, we add one more unit of brightness into the world. Then I can deal with the lines that imprison us, the lines that do not make sense yet continue to persist and as I engage all these kind of lines, get back to the picture of the lines in the sand and acknowledge the wonder of it all. What a precious thing life is and even more precious when it is priceless.
    Joel Anderson
    14/11/2016 #6 Joel Anderson
    #5 Thank you @Sara Jacobovici
    Sara Jacobovici
    14/11/2016 #5 Sara Jacobovici
    @Joel Anderson writes: "I want to leave footprints and lines in the sand that will make a difference and help make the world a better place. I hope that you do too."
    Sara Jacobovici
    14/11/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    @Joel Anderson, this buzz proves that you're walking the talk; you're leaving footprints. The beautiful image you offer is non-linear reflecting, from my perspective, that our movement in time is non-linear. Seems that everything related to time occurs more in patterns like those in the sand. The word "before" has a double meaning; either of something that came from the past or is placed ahead of us. More like moving around in circles ;-)
    Joel Anderson
    14/11/2016 #3 Joel Anderson
    #2 thanks Harvey. In some respects it reflects a conscientious decision to either stay at no, or do something different and get to Yes.
    Harvey Lloyd
    14/11/2016 #2 Harvey Lloyd
    The symmetrical lines are captivating. Seeing the chart and the timeline certainly does give one pause to consider are current status and how it may impact our future. The quote is appropriate and would add that the definitions of honesty and truth have been blurred. I believe that your growth chart demonstrates why.

    Technology has globalized our reach and we can share experiences and find confidence on our personal truth/honesty that comes with no performance requirements. Before technology your truth was tested and formed within a community's survival, everyday.
    Savvy Raj
    14/11/2016 #1 Savvy Raj
    Yes indeed Joel Savage . Great message in these lovely lines! The choice we make is, was and always will be in our hands . The need of the hour is to choose wisely.
  5. ProducerJohn White, MBA

    John White, MBA

    05/11/2016
    (Copy)editing and the Self-Publishing Revolution
    (Copy)editing and the Self-Publishing RevolutionA revolution is not a bed of roses. A revolution is a struggle to death between the future and the past. - Fidel Castro, January 5, 1961 Many people believe that writing a book is mystical.Dream on.The key to writing is the willingness to grind,...
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    Comments

    debasish majumder
    08/11/2016 #12 debasish majumder
    nice post @Karin Sebelin! enjoyed read. thank you for sharing the post.
    Randy Keho
    08/11/2016 #11 Randy Keho
    Good copyeditors are worth their weight in gold. By the way, how much do you weigh?
    Sorry, that was uncalled for, but it felt right at the time. I apologize.
    During my stint at a mid-size daily newspaper in the Great Midwest, I was responsible for the obituary page.
    Boy, you make a mistake in an obituary and you can expect death threats from caretakers and family alike.
    Fortunately, we had a little-old lady who manned the newsroom phone. She looked like your great-grandmother and a bun-headed librarian all rolled into one.
    But, she had the keenest eye east of the Mississippi.
    I ran everything past her and, as a result, I never published a mistake -- that anyone could definitively pin on me.
    I will forever be indebted to her.
    David B. Grinberg
    06/11/2016 #9 David B. Grinberg
    Excellent advice, Karin. If publishing a book were easy, more writers would likely publish -- especially with the advent of e-books and self-publishing. However, as you note, it's laborious work and a so-called "slow burn." Thanks again for the great tips!
    Irene Hackett
    06/11/2016 #7 Anonymous
    Sound advice. Sharing on twitter as well!
    Ben Pinto
    06/11/2016 #6 Ben Pinto
    Great tips for those aspiring to having their work published. @jesse kaellis after reading the above and thinking of the reslity of it all, I think blogging is probably a lot more fun for those that love to write, though it may not pay all of the bills.
    John White, MBA
    05/11/2016 #4 John White, MBA
    Great buzz, @Karin Sebelin. I shared into 3 more hives!
    Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes
    05/11/2016 #3 Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes
    You to teil this produce
    Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes
    05/11/2016 #1 Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes
    Upsss are very clever interesting
  6. ProducerSara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    08/11/2016
    Making sense of patterns.
    Making sense of patterns.Image credit: www.quoteikon.com From philosophy to fMRI’s humans have been trying to understand what role emotions play in our lives. The arts have been a source of expression and communication of our...
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    13/11/2016 #16 Sara Jacobovici
    #15 Thank you @Praveen Raj Gullepalli. Your response is encouraging.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    13/11/2016 #15 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Great way of looking at events and classifying them as productive or non-productive for learning dear Sara. Might actually help folks overcome negative emotions and also increase workplace productivity!
    Sara Jacobovici
    10/11/2016 #14 Sara Jacobovici
    #13 Enjoyed this as well @John Vaughan, plus am getting ready to read up on the metaphors.
    John Vaughan
    10/11/2016 #13 John Vaughan
    #12 perhaps not as pretty as "Music by Birds on a Wire", @Sara Jacobovici, but still ... https://jcvtcsblog.wordpress.com/patterns/
    Sara Jacobovici
    10/11/2016 #12 Sara Jacobovici
    #10 Dear @John Vaughan, what a wonderful share and connection! I have never seen anything like it. Enjoyed it very much. Thank you.
    Sara Jacobovici
    10/11/2016 #11 Sara Jacobovici
    #9 Thanks for your contribution to the discussion @Deb Lange.
    John Vaughan
    10/11/2016 #10 John Vaughan
    Pretty Patterns
    https://jcvtcsblog.wordpress.com/2016/03/01/patterns/
    Deb Lange
    10/11/2016 #9 Deb Lange
    Well done @Sara Jacobovici - it reminds me of helping teams with what they desire to create by going backwards from outcomes, to what decisions we need to amke to achieve that outcome, to what information do we have and need to make decisions, to how are we feeling about our desied outcome and the choices we have made -FIDO - we can go backwards or forwards - people often miss out how do we feel about x? I will enjoy your next case study.
    Fatima Williams
    09/11/2016 #8 Fatima Williams
    #7 Thank you @Mohammed Sultan Yes I believe it is one of the main principles on which team bonding happens.. That door needs to be opened and it plays a vital role as well. Thanks once again.
    Mohammed Sultan
    09/11/2016 #7 Mohammed Sultan
    #6 @ Fatima WilliamsYour thoughtful emotion and creativity open up the pipelines to direct our emotions to reach solutions to our corporate problems.In principal,to reach a good solution to any problem,the step of generating the emotion should be separate from the step of evaluating and deciding and this can't be done by one member. Very often the decision is a compromise between various emotions and sometimes is not the best solution.We should open the door for mixing of emotions or mating of ideas from cross-functional teams to be more creative and to avoid blocking of emotions .Normally the solution recommended is of a win-lose nature ,one proposal wins and the others are rejected.This is one of the principal on which brainstorming or group think tanks are built.
    Fatima Williams
    08/11/2016 #6 Fatima Williams
    This is amazing @@Sara Jacobovici a brilliant fantabulous team bonding exercise and I believe it be very effective in coaching and employees engagement exercises too. Most of the time it becomes difficult for an individual team member to Confront an emotion that is affecting his//her performance and doing a team exercise will make everyone comfortable with confrontation of these performance blocking emotions. Thank you once again
    Sara Jacobovici
    08/11/2016 #5 Sara Jacobovici
    #4 I am at a loss for words @Mohammed Sultan. You give me much encouragement. Thank you. In response to your question regarding which route to follow (I hope I don't disappoint you with my response), my first route would be with creating an environment in which the workers, supervisors and managers are reconnected to the product. From my experience, I have witnessed a detachment on the part of the workers from the product and an added detachment by the supervisors and managers not only from the product of the company but from the workers themselves.On the level of the directors, there is an additional detachment from the original vision or mission statement of the company. So, reconnecting and attaching would be the way to go.
    Mohammed Sultan
    08/11/2016 #4 Mohammed Sultan
    @ Sara Jacobovici .You have the emotion of a creative problem- solver.Have you been in a consulting work before? Productivity is one of the major problems facing many companies and in most cases requires an outside intervention by an experienced consultant to define the starting points of the problem ,proposed solution and evaluation and then make follow up action.These are the starting points of low productivity;decreasing work morale or lack of supervisions ,others may jump to a solution asking for more investment or call for more effective leadership .These are the routes to follow which of them will you recommend?I am certain that your answer will be Einsteinian !
    Sara Jacobovici
    08/11/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    #2 Your response is very encouraging @Ali Anani Thank you! I will follow this up with a real example.
    Ali Anani
    08/11/2016 #2 Ali Anani
    The best theory is an applied theory. Dear @Sara Jacobovici your buzz gives a comprehensive clarification of what I mean. Your extension of the emotions branching tree to teams is wonderful. That we may see beneath the surface by comparing the emotional footprints is a great idea. I am privileged to have indirectly contributed to this buzz. I shared on three hives, but also wish I could also share it on human resources hive, but I am limited to three. I suggest you also share it there.
    In brief, a great and practical buzz and you provide a roadmap for managers to follow. May be you also would consider providing one example of your application of your great idea.
    This buzz is the proof of inoculation of ideas to which beBee and @Javier beBee should be proud of.
  7. ProducerGraham Edwards

    Graham Edwards

    07/11/2016
    Never lose your sense of wonder, or in other words...
    Never lose your sense of wonder, or in other words...never lose your sense of feeling surprise mingled with admiration, caused by something beautiful, unexpected, unfamiliar, or inexplicable. I was reminded of this recently when I found myself exploring the local aquarium. As a land dwelling biped, by...
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    Comments

    Graham Edwards
    13/11/2016 #10 Graham Edwards
    #9 Thanks for your comment @Katja Bader. I will check out your buzz for sure !
    Katja Bader
    08/11/2016 #9 Katja Bader
    Yes, so true. From time to time we should put our focus on the small and unspectaculary things near us. We can find so many beauty and magic in them if our minds and eyes are open. Please have a look at my buzz "Take care of your childishness".
    Graham Edwards
    08/11/2016 #8 Graham Edwards
    #4 Thanks for the comment @James McElearney... I'm forever learning things from my daughter.
    Graham Edwards
    08/11/2016 #7 Graham Edwards
    #3 Thanks for the comment @Praveen Raj Gullepalli... judgemental is a great addition to the list.
    Graham Edwards
    08/11/2016 #6 Graham Edwards
    #2 Thanks for the comment @Laura Mikolaitis. I also like the reminder "Wonder is everywhere; especially when we open our eyes and hearts to it."... thanks!
    Graham Edwards
    08/11/2016 #5 Graham Edwards
    #1 Thanks for the comment @mohammed khalaf
    James McElearney
    08/11/2016 #4 James McElearney
    What a fantastic buzz Graham, we so often take things for granted as human beings, we think we've been there, done that, worn the t-shirt. Sometimes when we stop and take the time to really look, and let ourselves fall in to the moment, is when we realise what is really around us. It incredible to think we know more about outer space then we do of our own oceans. We discover new species on a daily basis and many of the things we take for granted are the things that make this planet such an awe inspiring place. As adults it's too easy to get wrapped up in our own lives and we lose that sense of wonder we all have as kids. I'm pretty sure we can learn as much from our kids as they can from us
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    08/11/2016 #3 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    That is so true dear Graham. To quote you: ''I was reminded that having or revealing an exaggerated sense of one's own importance, knowledge or abilities is limiting''. In addition to the seven consequences/side effects you mentioned, i think it also makes a person judgemental. When the sense of wonder ceases, the layers (one, few or all) of cynicism, satire(unwarranted), prejudice, presumption, intolerance, envy, condescension, etc fog the perspective, befuddling one's very reasoning mind. One jumps to hasty (and nasty) conclusions, causing bitterness and pain to himself and hurt to others who are just being awed and are dealing with the magnificence of what nature can do to one's heart and mind the best they can and trying to express it! I have seen this happen in recent times here and was shocked and dismayed at how things can get so totally skewed out of perspective just because one has lost the sense of wonder. I quote from a meme I read recently - Some folks hurt you and then act like you hurt them! ;)
    Laura Mikolaitis
    07/11/2016 #2 Laura Mikolaitis
    I love to watch the jelly fish. They are so illuminating and captivating to me. Of course my other favorite, is the sea turtle. Whenever we go to the Aquarium, I could stand there and watch her forever. I love how you tied this piece together @Graham Edwards View more
    I love to watch the jelly fish. They are so illuminating and captivating to me. Of course my other favorite, is the sea turtle. Whenever we go to the Aquarium, I could stand there and watch her forever. I love how you tied this piece together @Graham Edwards. Wonder is everywhere; especially when we open our eyes and hearts to it. I always say "it's the moments that count" and so I try to savor them every chance I get. Thank you for sharing this. Close
    mohammed khalaf
    07/11/2016 #1 mohammed khalaf
    I think that few trips for navigating crucial conversation thanks for pick
  8. ProducerDavid Chislett

    David Chislett

    07/11/2016
    The Dreams of Electric Sheep
    The Dreams of Electric SheepScience is doing more today to convince me that our world is truly magical than any ideas of magic or science fiction I have ever read. The deeper we delve into the so-called reality that we can perceive with our sense, the more bewildering,...
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  9. ProducerSara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    26/10/2016
    Synchronicity or Being In Time
    Synchronicity or Being In Time(Image credit: The Zozo Phenomena) “Don’t manage time, manage yourself”, were my opening words to a group who had come to hear me speak about time management. “Accept it. We cannot control time.” What makes it so hard for us to accept this...
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    Comments

    Chas Wyatt
    30/10/2016 #47 Chas Wyatt
    #43 I love your story @Deb Helfrich; I have many more, deeper, more meaningful stories regarding synchronicity than the one I just shared.
    Sara Jacobovici
    30/10/2016 #46 Sara Jacobovici
    #45 Thanks for taking the time to respond @CityVP Manjit. I will take the time to read your links and reread your comment. Although my gut instinct is to disagree, this is a great opportunity "in real time" to look at how learning takes place within an environment of diversity of ideas and perspectives. Will get back to you as soon as I can.
    CityVP Manjit
    30/10/2016 #45 CityVP Manjit
    #40 Hi @Sara Jacobovici the way I see it fit the space/time of synchronization is the blindspot we all have within our judgement. Just as we can become alert to our sixth sense, to our intuitive expression that emanates from emotional awareness, we may miss the space/time between those we do not see, and in seeing that connect with a wider touch of synchronicity.

    It goes back to the idea of sawabona/shikoba (measures of respect) so I combine this http://www.innerself.com/content/personal/intuition-awareness/intuitive-awareness/8640-synchronicities-invisible-world-becoming-visible.html with this http://exploringyourmind.com/two-powerful-words-sawabona-shikoba/ and the triad is completed by the physicality of the invisible becoming visible. At this meeting point we are strangers in the night, but at all levels of society we can be human beings.

    In your work you do Sara you do see the grassroots of human existence, and I am in touch with that also in recent years, but for a large swatch of society, synchronicity flows where it is visible - in the place it gets noticed more, such as the middle class. If that is a judgement then that is a judgement but where we label someone poor because they are poor, yet we can remove that blindfold of a label and the prize is the inflow of synchronicity as the invisible is made visible.

    I learn most from people who are different from me, but in this world where diversity is spoken as an expression, it is time that diversity is awoken even more as a practice.
    Sara Jacobovici
    30/10/2016 #44 Sara Jacobovici
    #43 Universe loves you back @Deb Helfrich.
    Deb Helfrich
    29/10/2016 #43 Deb Helfrich
    #3 @Chas Wyatt - thanks for opening me to noticing. I cannot believe what just occurred. A kid who I nannied while I was in college before he was in preschool, just popped up in my People You Might Know Window on the top of LI - in the very next browser tab to this article!!! I almost never get suggestions there because there is always some thing happening to my connections.

    I am utterly astounded. It felt spooky. Good spooky but unfathomable.

    His parents were professors at my university in Pittsburgh, PA, so I said, relatively likely he might have went there, that would be our connection - but surely almost 50k kids have attended since my time there and since it was so long ago for me, I don't have many of my college peeps in my network. I check and he is a Technical Program Manager @ Amazon in Seattle.

    Universe, I adore you.
    Irene Hackett
    29/10/2016 #42 Anonymous
    #41 "It is only when we tap into that "sixth sense" or look at things through our "third eye", that we can see beyond the immediate need for our physical survival." What an exciting idea! Is it then, when we see beyond our physical survival that we are possibly 'leveling up' in our experience of being? Again, an area that is vast and fertile with ideas!
    Sara Jacobovici
    29/10/2016 #41 Sara Jacobovici
    #39 100%, @Irene Hackett, our sensory system is limited in many ways; even as sophisticated as it is. What is also interesting is that our sensory systems' ability to "record" input is based on our fundamental and primal needs of survival; interpreting our environment and everything and everyone in it. It is only when we tap into that "sixth sense" or look at things through our "third eye", that we can see beyond the immediate need for our physical survival.
    Sara Jacobovici
    29/10/2016 #40 Sara Jacobovici
    #38 Leave it to you @CityVP Manjit to pull a phenomena from outside a physical state into the "grounded" physical experience. Your perspective is invaluable. Not but, just a however....I may be reading too much into your comment but I feel there is a judgment thread that I don't necessarily see how it fit into the space/time state of synchronization and synchronicity. I see a difference between someone who needs to work as a waiter as a stop gap and someone whose profession is a waiter. Regardless of the motive, I am very appreciative of the difference the waiter's attitude in relation to me as a customer will have on the quality of my dining experience. It is never right, under any circumstance, to lose sight of the human to human contact and objectify that person.
    Irene Hackett
    29/10/2016 #39 Anonymous
    #36 "However, perception, from my perspective is first a raw innate experience stemming from our sensory and central nervous system and only becomes man made when we assign or attach meaning to the illusion." Yes, I can see the solidity of your interpretation. I find it interesting too, that our senses are limited - as in the example of optical illusions - what we see with our eyes may not be reality. Vast material here to work with. Love it!
    CityVP Manjit
    29/10/2016 #38 CityVP Manjit
    Right now it is the physicality side of synchronicity that I am in touch with. "When you are keeping your clocks in time, you are synchronizing". I note that when we are keeping our clocks in time we are synchronizing. The position where synchronicity becomes a high level topic rather than a grass-root reality is where we are clocking in. This is the domain of the everyday worker, the raw reality of regimented time, where physical energy might create muscle or fitness but the physicality leaves us without the energy to be in touch with our conscious being. It is the place where a student with a degree may begin their work-life, and until that student can step beyond that physicality of general labour - they endure life where time is physical energy. I rarely visit restaurants these days, but I used to with the professional classes and the appreciation for synchronicity is available to us, but then I would see the waiter, who is only a considered a waiter - but I have already seen in their eyes and subtle movements, that this is well educated young person, doing what they need to do to get by. Perhaps there is synchronicity in that contact, but the blockage in that synchronicity is that the mind of this highly educated waiter has been drawn to the tip for service rendered, rather than the human connection. That synchronicity is released from the prison of this physicality when we stop eating and start appreciating or at least reflecting for even the briefest moment, the human life that we call our "waiter".
    Sara Jacobovici
    29/10/2016 #37 Sara Jacobovici
    #29 Wonderful comment @debasish majumder. I highlight this statement; "...in every moment we are evolving, and one state is converting to other where the quality of previous state no longer exist." Intriguing on many levels. One thing it reminds me of is where in Einstein's theory of relativity there is the following description (it is an excerpt taken from this link http://everythingforever.com/einstein.htm) "If they were able to travel at the speed of light, their time would cease completely and they would only exist trapped in timelessness."
    Sara Jacobovici
    29/10/2016 #36 Sara Jacobovici
    #27 Your questions bring much value to this discussion @Irene Hackett. Thank you for your kind and generous words and for your insightful comment."So time and separation both an illusion", yes, except I interpret the illusion of separation as "man-made" and of time as "perception made". Now you can say it's all a matter of semantics because after all it's man's perceptions. However, perception, from my perspective is first a raw innate experience stemming from our sensory and central nervous system and only becomes man made when we assign or attach meaning to the illusion.

    PS Thanks for the Star Trek reference; "live long and prosper" Irene.
    Sara Jacobovici
    29/10/2016 #35 Sara Jacobovici
    #26 Your on going support and encouragement is very much appreciated @Irene Hackett. Thank you.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    29/10/2016 #34 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #32 The other day @Aurorasa Sima and me were discussing her logo and some variants and all of a sudden I lost that thread totally. Each time I clicked her response notification i could only see a Page Not Found Error 404...and then i could see two different profiles of her for a while...dunno where that conversation went too!
    Irene Hackett
    29/10/2016 #33 Anonymous
    Shared on twitter as well..
    Irene Hackett
    29/10/2016 #32 Anonymous
    @Praveen Raj Gullepalli, it happened to me in another buzz today - not sure what's happening!!
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    29/10/2016 #31 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #28 Irene, wozzatmean? Gotta be some glitch...
    debasish majumder
    29/10/2016 #29 debasish majumder
    absolutely stunning and intriguing post @Sara Jacobovici! i guess, whatever the universe exist surrounding us having the elements, driving us to imagine and triggering our potentials to express accordingly, as per our comprehension is concern, obviously in relevance to the available external conditions and environment we are dwelling with. the matter in and around possess the quality which reflects in our brain, inducing to explore it accordingly. in every moment we are evolving, and one state is converting to other where the quality of previous state no longer exist. a new design of dispensation we experience. past, present and future is just the manifestation of such continuous change and one entirely obliterate by manifesting a new shape or presentation. we are mere a system of particle, just being trigger to accelerate in due fashion according to the designed milieu. however, wonderful post madam. enjoyed read. thank you very much for sharing such enriching post.
    Irene Hackett
    29/10/2016 #28 Anonymous
    @Chas Wyatt @Praveen Raj Gullepalli The links to you in previous comments did not come through for some reason
    Irene Hackett
    29/10/2016 #27 Anonymous
    2/2 - Time being held by cultural belief as something extremely valuable and precious and yet being explained by Science as illusory, jars the mind! This is probably what leads me to the same place as Chas Wyatt, resonating most with Fernando R. Goñi , "... synchronicity is our relationship with the total, Psychic and Physical Universe and therefore it connect us with the unconscious." The idea of "non-temporal" coming into the discussion again. As with Jung's Scarab illustration, when we become aware of non-temporal connections (synchronicity) in our reality, only then can that 'shift in perception' take place, a new neural path is formed, homeostasis achieved. The concept of connecting patterns within this framework intrigues me; something about it feels as bold truth. It is no wonder that discontent and dis-ease arises as one experiences the illusion of separation. So time and separation both an illusion - in the words of Spok: "fascinating"! When Goni speaks of imagination being the "bridge" enabling 'travel' at a higher speed, I am brought to the outstanding comments of our friend Praveen Raj Gullepalli who raises excellent points about consciousness and vibration. Is imagination a type of high speed 'vibration'? Is synchronicity the product of high frequency energy? Is vibration a type of 'energy' - and can we can "control" it? Or can we flow with it? What remains for me in all this excellent exploration, is loads of questions. And as I've said before, this is true learning. You are one of the most fascinating minds on beBee dear @Sara Jacobovici; thank you for this outstanding parting of knowledge and thought sharing - a piece most excellently researched, organized and framed.
  10. Charles David Upchurch
    WPD Factor (Wonderment, Passion and Drive)
    WPD Factor (Wonderment, Passion and Drive)
    WPD Factor (Wonderment, Passion and Drive) Sara Jacobovici- "Go ahead. Bee passionate and change the world." Fatima Williams - “…we don't need to be an expert at something to make a change or do something different. All we need is the passion and drive to do something different .”
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  11. ProducerRobert Bacal

    Robert Bacal

    26/10/2016
    What Are Kids Learning From The 2016 USA Election Campaign, and What Parents and Teachers Can Do About It
    What Are Kids Learning From The 2016 USA Election Campaign, and What Parents and Teachers Can Do About ItWhat Are Kids Learning From The 2016 USA Election Campaign, and What Parents and Teachers Can Do About It By Robert BacalThe following appeared on the Building Bridges Between School and Parents Website. While it's about what our children may be...
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    Comments

    Brian McKenzie
    27/10/2016 #5 Brian McKenzie
    They should be learning that politicians are paid liars and globalist view them as fodder, vermin, or livestock depending upon the inning of the game they are playing. This should service them for nearly their entire lifespan.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    27/10/2016 #4 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #3 Yes Sirree! Avidly! You shd see the Trump memes floating around! There is always a lot of talk around the US elections...and foreign policy implications with neighbouring nations and the US Visa angle. You know how it is. Every Indian professional is considered incomplete unless he or she is US-returned (sadly that is happening less nowadays as folks go and never come back..brain drain). On an aside, Bill Clinton visited our facility (the place that i work at) many years ago when he was in power, along with the Chief Minister of our state. The sapling that he planted is now a tree. However, one cannot get high on its leaves! ;)
    Robert Bacal
    27/10/2016 #3 Robert Bacal
    #1 Praveen, when in doubt talk about the curry, or enjoy it, or cook it. Interesting to hear that people in far off countries are interested in the election. Do you think it's common in your country to follow it?
    Martina Baxter
    27/10/2016 #2 Martina Baxter
    Thank you for the reminder that we are all role models for our children, parents, teachers, even politicians.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    26/10/2016 #1 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Dear Bob...being on this side of the planet I was taken aback a few evenings ago when my kids - son 14 and daughter 19 - brought up the election over dinner. I was shocked to find the elder a demo and the younger a repo. Taking sides. I was totally at a loss for words as much as America seems to be at a loss for choice. I let them argue for a while...and steered the conversation to the chicken curry in a hurry! ;) Wifey was pleased to have the table discuss her cooking. Cooking is her trump card and any way the conversation was far from being hillarious ;)
  12. ProducerSusan Rooks

    Susan Rooks

    27/10/2016
    Thursday's Thought: It Takes a Village . . .
    Thursday's Thought: It Takes a Village . . . Are you familiar with the expression "It takes a village to raise a child"?Well, this is a quick story of a village that changed a life forever, although it isn't about a child.All my life I've been an introvert. I have always preferred my own...
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    Comments

    Lisa Gallagher
    29/10/2016 #24 Lisa Gallagher
    #21 Thats me too @Franci Eugenia Hoffman and oddly, it's since I've become a bit older too. Noise and large crowds never bothered me much even 10 years ago.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    29/10/2016 #23 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #22 thank you and you too
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    28/10/2016 #21 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    I don't like large crowds since I have gotten older but I am referring to a concert size crowd. Sports bars, etc. I don't mind if they are familiar territory. I enjoy "my" time, but I prefer some background noise, preferably music.
    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    28/10/2016 #20 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    #19 Yup, I will be reading it after lunch, while my pizza dough is proofing. Thanks a bunch, Mel
    Melissa Hughes
    28/10/2016 #19 Anonymous
    Yay! I hope you enjoy the book, @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian. I'm eager to hear your thoughts! #16
    Lisa Gallagher
    27/10/2016 #18 Lisa Gallagher
    #16 #17 I guess that makes me somewhat of an introvert too. I don't care for large crowds and gatherings either. I will do my best to avoid them, actually. I love socializing but just with a few people or one on one. I actually get nervous if we have to be somewhere and there's going to be a large crowd.

    Even loud noise bothers me. I don't like eating at a Restaurant that has a band playing for example, or a loud sports bar... no thanks! I also LOVE my alone time. That doesn't mean I prefer being alone all the time but I do treasure it. @Susan Rooks, I had to laugh about your comment, I can "put on an act" if I need to, I totally understand that one! ;-)
    Susan Rooks
    27/10/2016 #17 Susan Rooks
    #16 You're so right, @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian! I'm not shy, but I do not like large crowds or noisy gatherings. I like a small group. I can "put on an act" if I need to, but my nature is very solitary.
    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    27/10/2016 #16 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    Introvert does not mean "shy" or "anti-social." It is simply a preference for solitude to a greater or lesser degree, depending on circumstance and mood.

    Few people would peg me as an introvert. "But you're not shy at all!!" LOL

    Anyway, I just got my copy of @Melissa Hughes ' "Happy Hour with Einstein." I plan to crash out and read it tomorrow afternoon!
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    27/10/2016 #15 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Susan, as long as you're happy, that's what matters. You seem to be at a high point in your life.
    Kevin Pashuk
    27/10/2016 #14 Kevin Pashuk
    Enjoyed this Susan. Thanks @Ken Boddie for tagging me. As a self-professed raging introvert I totally get this. We really don't hate people... (at least not all people). We can be our own best friends, but truly love having a cadre of close friends and community... which is what your village is providing for you, even if they are only 10' away.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    27/10/2016 #13 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Bless thee too! Truth be told, the two quoted paragraphs below, sum me up to a great extent, right up to my thirties that is ;) A new life began in the forties, like they all say ;) but I do indulge every now and then in preoccupied solitude. Old habits die hard, whether John MacLaine likes it or not!

    All my life I've been an introvert. I have always preferred my own company over that of others. I like other people just fine; don't get me wrong! But basically people wear me out, and I run home to find peace and solitude.
    I've always had friends, but just a few. I participated in a few activities. But I was still happiest when I could sit and read a book, and not be "forced" to smile and nod and listen and speak . . .
    Susan Rooks
    27/10/2016 #12 Susan Rooks
    #5 Well, @Tony Rossi, you certainly made an interesting point and I thank you for that!
    Susan Rooks
    27/10/2016 #11 Susan Rooks
    #7 What's funny, @Praveen Raj Gullepalli, is that I am almost never bored with my own company. I am active, but I am still just a lone wolf type of person. And thanks for the laugh on "rubberneck" again! Bless you, man!
    Susan Rooks
    27/10/2016 #10 Susan Rooks
    #8 Oh yes, @Ken Boddie! Mostly we put our smiling faces on, our masks -- because it's tough to show anything inside to those who are "just" names and faces on social media. Truth be told, I am a happy and very content woman, especially after having found such a special place to live.
    Susan Rooks
    27/10/2016 #9 Susan Rooks
    #4 Yes I do love iving here, @Lisa Gallagher! There's something very primal about seeing the ocean every day; it changes constantly and that's kind of a metaphor for us all. I'm gld you're happy where you are, too! Daughters are great, aren't they?
    Ken Boddie
    27/10/2016 #8 Ken Boddie
    Thanks for sharing some more of yourself with us, Susan. These are the stories that many of us enjoy, when we see glimpses of how our bees live and enjoy live ouside the facade of social media. The perfect complement to your earlier story on your wee house by the sea.......@Dean Owen, @Kevin Pashuk
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    27/10/2016 #7 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Dang! You just got bored to death o yourself there dear Susan! ;) There is indeed a limit to how much time one can spend with oneself :) I guess you were building up the inventory to share with others all that time basically. And you share great! Abby and Gibbs look so grateful and benign. Comfort is all about the spirit of the place and what one is willing to share in terms of personal space. Happy Weekend! PS: Am still stuck on Rubberneck! Still losferwords!
    Tony Rossi
    27/10/2016 #5 Tony Rossi
    #1 It's funny how fluid the surface of life can be with our soul as the constant underneath it all, @Susan Rooks... One of my coaches re-introduced me to Susan Cain some years after I first saw her TED talk, and had me read "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Cannot Stop Talking." In your village story, your surroundings didn't change who you are deep down inside, but found a new way to nurture and energize your natural introvert.
    Lisa Gallagher
    27/10/2016 #4 Lisa Gallagher
    I love that YOU love where you live. I think where we live plays a major role in our lives (even the town/State) we reside in. I moved away from family and friends years ago. We only live 2 hours from Ohio but the drive seems to get longer with each trip back. I miss living closer to my siblings, I miss my friends in Ohio. I miss Ohio. Pennsylvania really differs from where I grew up. The only reason we still reside here, my daughter! Your dogs are cute @Susan Rooks!
    Brian McKenzie
    27/10/2016 #3 Brian McKenzie
    It has been my experience that anytime 'It takes a Village' appears is that some talking head is lining their pockets 'for the communal good' - while fleecing your pockets to do it. I am not interested in living there, visiting there, nor certainly starting a business there.
  13. ProducerRenée Cormier

    Renée Cormier

    18/10/2016
    Nine Ways to Wonderful: How to create an engaging newsletter
    Nine Ways to Wonderful: How to create an engaging newsletterCompany newsletters are often a missed opportunity to build employee engagement. A boring, ugly, tedious read will never positively impact your culture. Here are a few tips to help make your company newsletter more interesting!Be inclusive. Dedicate...
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    Comments

    Renée Cormier
    27/10/2016 #9 Renée Cormier
    #8 Thank you, Mohammed!
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    27/10/2016 #8 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Aha...best nine tips to chisel one's skills for compiling brilliant, impressive content!
    Renée Cormier
    27/10/2016 #7 Renée Cormier
    Thanks for sharing @Javier beBee. You're the best!
    Renée Cormier
    26/10/2016 #6 Renée Cormier
    Thanks for sharing this, @Charles David Upchurch!
    Loribeth Pierson
    26/10/2016 #5 Loribeth Pierson
    Great tips @Renée Cormier, thanks!
    Renée Cormier
    22/10/2016 #4 Renée Cormier
    #3 I agree, David. Thanks for the feedback!
    David B. Grinberg
    19/10/2016 #3 David B. Grinberg
    Thanks for these helpful tips @Renée Cormier. I agree that a company newsletter can be an effective internal communications tool to enhance employee engagement, breakdown silos, promote collaboration across divisions, and boost morale. The only tip I'd add is to consider spotlighting an employee in each issue with a personal profile or Q&A interview to humanize it. Good buzz!
    Renée Cormier
    18/10/2016 #2 Renée Cormier
    #1 Thanks, my son!
    Kevin Pashuk
    18/10/2016 #1 Kevin Pashuk
    Shared in Directors and Executives Hive Renée
  14. ProducerGary Sharpe

    Gary Sharpe

    21/10/2016
    Supernova Eternities
    Supernova EternitiesAs I fast approach the first 100,000 reads of my Niume articles, there may be an explosion of activity from me as, counter-intuitively, I pause for thought.Indeed, I do need to spend some time today Gathering My Thoughts. Quite literally in...
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  15. ProducerJohn Vaughan

    John Vaughan

    18/10/2016
    Priming the Pump
    Priming the PumpDefinition: to do something in order to make something succeed for example: covertly setting money in a tip jar before anyone else has left "real" tips in order to ease the flow of tips by making customers feel more at ease with the idea of leaving...
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    Comments

    John Vaughan
    19/10/2016 #25 John Vaughan
    Part 1

    There seems to be a fascination in with word-smithing 'advocacy' and 'influence'.

    As becomes clear in the "Buzz" section of my article, there are LOTS of closely-related terms for LOTS of trendy socialNet marketing techniques. Many of them overlap - because they are so close in meaning, in intent, o The whole arena of dark-ish marketing remains something of a nebulous, moving target. How appropriate.

    For simplicity's sake, I ask: "What is the intention of advocacy?"
    A reasonable, short answer: "To influence."
    What remains is ... branding.

    You'll pardon me if I don't participate in the debate. "Techniques differ. Intent is consistent."
    John Vaughan
    19/10/2016 #24 John Vaughan
    Part 2

    Yes, @Sara Jacobovici, #10 the response stream on this article is *for the most part* pleasantly divergent from the usual knee-jerk beBee reaction. More on that later.

    Kudos and sincere thanks to @Milos Djukic for laying some much-needed groundwork - and providing us with a lot of thoughful material (which deserves to be an article in its own right, Milos). Your support - both direct and indirect - has helped me get through some draining times here.

    Sincere thanks also to @Phil Friedman for his longstanding support and well-reasoned arguments over a period of several very tough months in which beBee-as-a-socialNet-platform proved itself to be "not a welcoming or supportive environment for critical opinion."

    Sadly, beBee's saccharine-but-toxic environment is not mere happenstance. It is policy. #21
    We've still got a ways to go.
    Laurent Boscherini
    19/10/2016 #23 Anonymous
    Thank you John Vaughan for sharing your insightful and experienced point of view. Diversity is also part of beBee in its expression of freedom.
    Fatima Williams
    19/10/2016 #22 Fatima Williams
    Every buzz to me on beBee is new, has a different perspective and has something to learn from or is an experience that we can either have ourselves or avoid.

    I take want I want and leave the rest behind. This is pretty interesting to read. Analysis is often reacted to as criticism. And criticism is usually perceived as being negative but if I may add its not by all and sometimes it ends up into constructive analysis IMO.

    Priming the pump has some very detailed analysis which is pretty interesting and Thanks for sharing this with us @John Vaughan
    Javier beBee
    19/10/2016 #21 Javier beBee
    #11 @Renée Cormier everyone is allowed to express an opinion on beBee ! that is great ! Also beBee team is free to share the potential success with the professionals we think they spread our positive buzz around the world ! have a great day :-)
    Ali Anani
    19/10/2016 #20 Ali Anani
    Amazing buzz with its powerful analysis and selection of titles that cause "priming the pump". Very well written buzz @John Vaughan
    John White, MBA
    19/10/2016 #19 John White, MBA
    @Milos Djukic: thank you very much for those reslurces and added context to this discussion.

    @John Vaughan: thank you for another great post. Your feedback and observations are always highly appreciated.
    Milos Djukic
    19/10/2016 #18 Anonymous
    Yes @Phil Friedman, I am setting the initial tone for a rational discussion because the initial tone and many other tones within this post did not provide, not only the initial tone, but any chance for a rational discussion. I predict that this discussion is completed. And rightly so. We (nor anyone in social network) are not judges, nor are they accused. Period.
    Phil Friedman
    19/10/2016 #17 Phil Friedman
    #16 thank you, Milos, for setting the initial tone for a rational discussion, which tone benefits beBee and us all. I for one welcome your influence (if I may use that term in its neutral meaning) in a discussion such as this. Cheers!
    Milos Djukic
    19/10/2016 #16 Anonymous
    #14 @Phil Friedman, Thanks for your quintessential interpretation.
    Phil Friedman
    19/10/2016 #15 Phil Friedman
    #9 Milos -- Pt II -- A general in the procurement division of the military who advocates for a particular contractor cannot say he or she is not being compensated simply because the promised compensation is in the form or a future payment to be made after that general retires from the military. Likewise, we cannot accept that beBee Ambassadors are not being paid simply because the promise is for future contingent compensation. Contingent future compensation is still a present incentive and influence.

    The objection I have in general to influencer marketing (as opposed to what I term celebrity endorsement marketing) is that social media influencer represent themselves as providing independent third-party endorsement and opinion, whereas. in fact, they are secretly paid to say what they are saying. Social media natives do not seem to take exception to this deception, but I do, and so do genuinely ethical journalists. That is why some paid-for content is clearly labeled as "advertorial" --- paid advertising composed to look like, and give the impression that it is pure editorial.

    Although it may not be my place, I would like to make the following suggestion for avoiding in the future potential blowback over the advocacy marketing that beBee is very clearly pursuing: beBee ownership and management have made the terms of being a beBee Brand Ambassador pretty clear --- in several articles that have been widely distributed. I, therefore, suggest that all potential misperception as to what is going on when, for example, a beBee Ambassador goes on to LinkedIn to advocate for beBee, is to simply ALWAYS identify his or her position as a beBee Brand Ambassador. This could be accomplished by adding "beBee Brand Ambassador" to one's name in one's profile. That way no confusion could possibly arise. And this would also protect beBee in the marketplace. IMO.
    Phil Friedman
    19/10/2016 #14 Phil Friedman
    #9 Milos, thank you for all of the references. The list is long, and I personally am missing the relevance of several of the citations, including my own. And I am not at all sure that this discussion can ultimately move in a comfortable direction. And I would highly recommend that anyone interested read relevant material and draw his or her own conclusions.

    That said, the piece by Nigel of Qube Media on advocate versus influencer marketing is, to my mind, on point for at least one of John's observations:

    "Advocates generally have less [sic] followers and fans on social media websites than influencers. Therefore, harnessing the power of advocates at scale - recruiting hundreds - is vital to success ... Influencers are mainly defined as people who have a large online following on social media sites like Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Influencers often make a living from their online influence - they spend time and money building their online profiles and enter into commercial relationships to promote brands." (Nigel, Qube Media)

    Even this definition of the difference between advocacy and influencer marketing is insufficient to capture the beBee case, to wit: 1) Most beBee Brand Ambassadors do not under the above definitions seem to qualify as Influencers. 2) In most respects, most Ambassadors appear to fall within the definition for "advocates". 3) With the exception that they are all being paid, except for those who have stated formally that they relinquish any current or future claim to contingent future compensation. continued... pt II
    Sara Jacobovici
    19/10/2016 #13 Sara Jacobovici
    #7 Thank you @Milos Djukic for your mention of my buzz.
    Sara Jacobovici
    19/10/2016 #12 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 So glad you are the first to respond @Milos Djukic. You not only provide a wealth of information but the ability to enable an open and productive exchange. Thank you for contributing to the "Freedom to develop and grow together."
    Renée Cormier
    19/10/2016 #11 Renée Cormier
    John, you say, "Much of beBee's content, engagement, and promotional "buzz" is created by people who have (or believe they have) an equity stake in the enterprise." @John Vaughan, I am not sure how you came to that conclusion. I am a brand ambassador and you certainly never asked me if my time spent on beBee had anything to do with beBee's indication that there "may" be a financial stake in the company for me. It doesn't, by the way. I haven't met an ambassador yet, who actually applied to become one. I know I didn't. To the best of my knowledge beBee brand ambassadors are completely surprised to learn of their status. Being appointed is really only the result of already being engaged and supportive of the community. I have been actively publishing here since July. Most of my posts are from past blogs, so I already have lots of content to work with. I participate in discussions, like this one because that is the kind of person I am. My stuff gets circulated because people read it and like it. I am pretty certain that beBee admin supports the work of all active contributors, regardless of their status, provided they actually find it relevant. I have a few posts that did not get widely distributed, even after becoming an ambassador, so I think you can't really state that there is an agenda to vigorously promote the work of ambassadors. It seems you don't know anything for sure, but you claim to have done research. Maybe you need to dig a little deeper. @Javier beBee, what are your thoughts?
    Sara Jacobovici
    19/10/2016 #10 Sara Jacobovici
    Well done @John Vaughan. You produced a well written and informative article and a catalyst for an important discussion. I am also grateful to see that its first response came from @Milos Djukic who transcended the potential predicted types of responses you suggested.
    Milos Djukic
    19/10/2016 #9 Anonymous
    Some additional resources, part III:

    11. Are you an Influencer or an Opinionator?, post by @Randy Keho:
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@randy-keho/are-you-an-influencer-or-an-opinionator
    12. "What is beBee ? Why is beBee disrupting the current model of social media ?", post by @Javier beBee:
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@javierbebee/what-is-bebee-why-is-bebee-disrupting-the-current-model-of-social-media
    13. "Building Engagement on Social Media", post by @Phil FriedmanPhil Friedman@Phil Friedman:
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@friedm
    14. "CLIQUE", post by @Karen Anne Kramer ~ CNN Women Leaders 2015:
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@karen-anne-kramer/clique
    Milos Djukic
    19/10/2016 #8 Anonymous
    Some additional resources, part II:

    6. beBee post by @John White, MBA, "My take is that celebrities offer very little value on social media." - John White, beBee post by @John White, MBA and discussion: https://www.bebee.com/content/753412/758061
    7. "Influencer marketing in social media and networks... YES or NO?" beBee post by Milos Djukic and discussion: https://www.bebee.com/content/709027/708464
    8. "The Fractal Ambassador" beBee post by @Ali Anani and discussion:
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@ali-anani/the-fractal-ambassador
    9. About The UNfluencers" group, beBee post by @Charles David Upchurch and discussion:
    https://www.bebee.com/content/728441/734611
    10. "My World of Bees, Buzzes & Honey" beBee post by @Fatima Williams and discussion:
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@fatima-williams/my-world-of-bees-buzzes-honey
    Milos Djukic
    19/10/2016 #7 Anonymous
    Some additional resources, part I:
    1. "WHAT IS INFLUENCER MARKETING?", beBee post by @Luisana Cartay and dicussion:
    https://www.cer/@luisana-cartay/what-is-influencer-marketing
    2. "I Wish, I Wish for... a Perfect Publisher" beBee post by @Phil Friedman and discussion:
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@friedman-phil/i-wish-i-wish-for-a-perfect-publisher
    3. "On the countries of beBee", beBee post by @Gert Scholtz and discussion:
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@gert-scholtz/on-the-countries-of-bebee
    4. “Why Future Business Leaders Need Philosophy”*, beBee post by @Sara Jacobovici and discussion:
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@sara-jacobovici/why-future-business-leaders-need-philosophy
    5. "Why I’m on beBee? Who am I?", beBee post by @Qamar Ali Khan and discussion:
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@qamar/why-i-m-on-bebee-who-am-i
  16. ProducerSushmita Thakare Jain
    India-Once Golden Sparrow still believes Infertility a Taboo! Why? #InfertilityNotATaboo
    India-Once Golden Sparrow still believes Infertility a Taboo! Why? #InfertilityNotATabooHello Everyone,A day prior I was introduced to a noble cause, it was a Blogging Contest to raise awareness regarding Infertility.I at the same moment decided to write about it, not because I was interested in the price money but because it is a...
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    Comments

    Sushmita Thakare Jain
    16/10/2016 #6 Sushmita Thakare Jain
    #4 @Amina Alami was not aware of the situation regarding the issue in Morocco. We must support women, mostly emotionally. Society has always been more tolerant towards men and inferiority is always what we have been facing from a long time. Women must come together to fight back for themselves.
    Sushmita Thakare Jain
    16/10/2016 #5 Sushmita Thakare Jain
    #3 @Donna-Luisa Eversley sadly it's the truth in this part of the world and it's high time we need to come together and take a stand, it's time to change what is wrong. Life is about helping and supporting our families and friends it's not about leaving them alone when needed the most.
    Amina Alami
    16/10/2016 #4 Amina Alami
    Thank you for bringing up this sensitive issue Sushmita Thakare. Women infertility is still a taboo in many other developing countries including Morocco. Women who can't have children are considered to be incomplete and a curse to the family. They feel embarrassed and ashamed, and have to bear terrible injustices. But, on the filp side, society seems to be more tolerant of men infertility.In these countries, women are still inherently inferior to men. It's high time that we took a stand!
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    16/10/2016 #3 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    A worthy and Noble cause @Sushmita Thakare Jain. It is very sad that women can be treated as chattels and inferior because they want and desire an independent mind and an opportunity to think. It is a difficult culture to accept and even try to understand. I stand in solidarity with your cause. You are more than able , to be a mother when the time is right. It is even more sad that adoption is not treated as an excellent alternative . There are so many children who need to be cared for and loved. My heart breaks...I feel your emotion in my own way. #hugs
    Sushmita Thakare Jain
    15/10/2016 #2 Sushmita Thakare Jain
    #1 It's high time we must take stand and support the cause, change is necessary.
    Aurorasa Sima
    15/10/2016 #1 Aurorasa Sima
    I understand that there is a lot about your culture that I don´t understand. Thank you for educating me and even more for raising awareness for that topic.
  17. ProducerJohn Vaughan

    John Vaughan

    10/10/2016
    the US Presidential Debate : Analysis
    the US Presidential Debate : AnalysisThis is a verbatim post from US journalist Dan Rather's facebook page.  I'm sharing it here because I believe that it's a fairly accurate assessment of the event, in the context of our larger situation.  "I am not sure it is possible to truly put...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Jared Wiese
    13/10/2016 #34 Jared Wiese
    hear! hear!
    John Vaughan
    12/10/2016 #33 John Vaughan
    #32 "What Difference At This Point Does It Make...?" asks @Albert Gibel, asking and answering his own question. Followed by a frothing-at-the-mouth litany of the Same Old Stuff: Ad hominem labels, cherry-picked misleading, unjustified and unverified factoids, and accusations that have already been investigated-multiple-times-and-dismissed (only to be re-litigated ... and re-litigated ... and re-litigated ...)

    I realize that this stuff is your life's blood, Albert, but it really has very little to do with the substance of this article. I sincerely suggest that you publish your arguments as a separate, dedicated article where they can be discussed on their merits. In the meantime, please try to focus your observations in this Comment thread on the topic at hand.
    Jared Wiese
    12/10/2016 #29 Jared Wiese
    #28 #24 #17
    Wait, "The poll has a credibility interval"? So much for SERLING and Mr. Albert.
    Gerald Hecht
    12/10/2016 #27 Gerald Hecht
    #26 @Jared Wiese me too --I missed it as well--we could both be trapped in the wrong zone 🚀💥
    Jared Wiese
    12/10/2016 #26 Jared Wiese
    #24 Glad you were in the Zone to catch my typo :)
    John Vaughan
    12/10/2016 #23 John Vaughan
    #19 Yup. Bernie.
    Beyond the squabbling ... He gets it and actually does it. With integrity and consistency. I can't claim to be in anywhere near the same league, but I like to believe that I get it, too.
    Gerald Hecht
    12/10/2016 #22 Gerald Hecht
    #21 @Jared Wiese they are more bam! To the point 🎯'S!
    Jared Wiese
    12/10/2016 #21 Jared Wiese
    #19 @Phil Friedman, I'm beginning to think your words are more chilling than anything we've read so far. Well said.
    Gerald Hecht
    12/10/2016 #20 Gerald Hecht
    #19 @Phil Friedman Yep! I think ole Dan did a decent job on this one; more diplomatic than he wanted to be (I'm assuming)...but pointing at every screw to be turned (without actually turning them...and free of charge
    Phil Friedman
    12/10/2016 #19 Phil Friedman
    The issue of who "won" the debate is a red herring of the highest magnitude. The fact is that Trump demonstrated for the umpteenth time that he iss the paragdigm megalomaniac by insisting that he, and he ALONE can fix what's wrong with this nation's economy and political structure. Without providing even the barest outline of how he plans to do it. Every time he was asked for even a hint of his plans, he responded with "Well, Hillary hasn't done it in 30 years, so it's time for a change." Or with, "Well, something has to be done, and I am the only one who can do it." Even more chilling was his threat to "put Hillary Clinton in jail". Our policial system has survived all these years because of the accepted principle of peaceful transition of power, and refraining from jailing losing candidates and political enemies. To overtly move away from that principle not only shows Trump does not understand the underpinnings of US democracy, but also that he is an authoritarian who could easily morph into a dictator, and a true and present danger to this republic. I hold no book for any of the current crop of Wahsington politicians (except for Bernie Sanders, who gets it), but to my mind the highest order of priority at this point is to keep Trump out of office.
    Jared Wiese
    11/10/2016 #18 Jared Wiese
    #16 Yes... and perhaps a flash of Rod Sterling
    Gerald Hecht
    11/10/2016 #16 Gerald Hecht
    #14 @Jared Wiese it's weird --as soon as I read Mr. Rather's opener ---it felt like one of those "Dylanesque prophetic heartbeat skippers"...
    Gerald Hecht
    11/10/2016 #15 Gerald Hecht
    #12 @John Vaughan ah, the wonder of UX ...🚀
    Jared Wiese
    11/10/2016 #14 Jared Wiese
    #13 Indeed, chilling. Hopefully not probable.
    Gerald Hecht
    11/10/2016 #13 Gerald Hecht
    #8 @Jared Wiese and just the opener; chilling: "Rome was once a proud republic that devolved into a place of barbaric spectacle epitomized by the savagery at the Colosseum...."
    John Vaughan
    11/10/2016 #12 John Vaughan
    Part 1
    #9 "... before being retracted & deleted from the public domain, American voters overwhelmingly in poll after poll, voted that Trump Won The 2nd Presidential Debate." sez Albert Gibel

    JV> Well, Sort of ... but not really.

    There's already been credible analysis on the issue - and I hope you'll check it out. In the meantime, here's a thumbnail response from Vox (http://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/9/27/13072668/debate-trump-clinton-polls):

    "The key difference is the kind of poll the candidates are citing. Trump is going on unscientific online polls, which don’t have any controls to make sure they are actually representative of American voters. Clinton’s claim relies on more rigorous scientific polls — those like CNN’s — that apply controls to try to be representative of US voters.

    The difference between unscientific and scientific polls

    The polls that Trump is relying on let anyone vote with absolutely zero checks. If you’re online at the time and find the poll, you can vote. You don’t have to live in America or be a US citizen. And you can vote multiple times — by reopening a browser tab, going behind an internet proxy, or logging on to a different account.
    John Vaughan
    11/10/2016 #11 John Vaughan
    Part 2
    #9 "... before being retracted & deleted from the public domain, American voters overwhelmingly in poll after poll, voted that Trump Won The 2nd Presidential Debate." sez @Albert Gibel

    This can lead to some very skewed results. For example, if an active online community — like r/The_Donald, the Reddit community that supports Trump — gets a bunch of people to vote on a poll (as they did), this can lead to Trump supporters overwhelming the results with a higher percent of Trump supporters than would otherwise be present in a typical sample of American voters. With such a skewed sample, it’s impossible to take the results seriously — it turns into a contest over which online community is most enthusiastic about winning unscientific polls, not how US voters feel about who won the debate.

    This is how Trump came ahead in a few online polls, including those at Drudge Report, Time magazine, and CNBC."


    I suppose one can dispute this analysis, but it makes sense to me.

    Perhaps more telling is the tsunami of rejection coming from an otherwise-highly-disciplined Republican party leadership. In response, Mr Trump - in true Trumpian fashion - doubles down on resentment. It's over, Albert. The only real question is how we - as a nation - deal with the reality of it. It's sorta the heart of Mr Rather's warning in his article.
  18. ProducerShelley Brown

    Shelley Brown

    09/10/2016
    Middle Age
    Middle AgeI am either having a mid-life crisis or just one of my usual nervous breakdowns or maybe both. It’s been really ugly. I’ve been really ugly. I know the usual nervous breakdown part started with the holidays but the middle-aged crisis started...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Shelley Brown
    15/10/2016 #15 Shelley Brown
    @Lisa Gallagher Thanks so much for your lovely sentiments. It's funny, I remind myself the same thing. I bought myself a dozen roses the other day. Miss connecting regularly but sucked up by the corporate vortex. Hope you are well. I have never met you and I know you are beautiful because of your spirit.
    Lisa Gallagher
    13/10/2016 #14 Lisa Gallagher
    @Shelley Brown, you are lovely both on the inside and out. I think women really tend to be hard on themselves. I'm sort of going through something similar right now, so I can relate. I keep trying to remind myself that I do not choose friends etc... based on their looks. I'm attracted to others based on how they treat others. I'm attracted to others who accept me for who I am. I think it's good to remind ourselves to accept who we are and where we are in life. Even give ourselves a big high five once in a while!!
    Mario Alarcon
    13/10/2016 #13 Mario Alarcon
    #11 But we are more than what meet the eyes.
    Completly agree. !!!!!
    Thank you !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Paul Walters
    11/10/2016 #12 Paul Walters
    @shellyBrown Great piece and whatever you think I think you are fabulous and we haven't even met! Salamat Sukses from Bali !
    Laura Mikolaitis
    11/10/2016 #11 Laura Mikolaitis
    @Shelley Brown, you are beautiful both on the inside and out. It radiated when we first spoke so many months ago and it shines in your writing. Embracing our naked self is challenging, as we've discussed in posts before and we can often get sidelined and side tracked. I struggle with it myself - letting my outside guide my inside. But we are more than what meets the eye - underneath we are strong, intelligent, vulnerable, and caring human beings. We are flawed, but who isn't? I so, so love this post and I love that you've let your vulnerability shine through. You are an amazing person, Shelley and I am glad that we crossed paths. Here's to embracing all that we are!
    Shelley Brown
    10/10/2016 #10 Shelley Brown
    Thank you Mario Alarcon
    Mario Alarcon
    10/10/2016 #9 Mario Alarcon
    Never feel down your mind by your age, no give up never !!!!
    May i know you? beautifull woman, especially your foots.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    10/10/2016 #8 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    A beautiful confession! I think the word ACCEPTANCE too belonged in that list at the end ;) Most of us, if not all, would eventually have to look in the mirror and perceive not just one's imagined reflection, but reality - pleasant or not. I think it is the hardest to accepts oneself as we are...as we have been made...and it might take years or even lifetimes! For the real life begins then. When you learn to work within the limitations and strive to overcome them and use the situation to the best advantage. LOL yeah, Madonna sure gave some a boner...but it was a goner for me when i read somewhere (mind you, no way for me to validate!) that when she got started she had noticeable B.O. and B.B. ...underarm hair suspect in the former issue. Still love her heartshaped face...and some of those old numbers...all this reminds me of another contemporary of hers - Cyndi Lauper with her squeaky cuteness fun overload...Time after time...Thanks Shelley Brown, for reminding me of the dark moments in my life that I outgrew only after accepting that though it is inspiring to dream, it is healthy to accept reality.
    Chas Wyatt
    10/10/2016 #7 Chas Wyatt
    @Shelley Brown, it is all relative. I remember when "Like a Virgin" came on the radio waves, because someone I worked with was enthralled with Madonna, and at the time it made me wince. But, my co-worker thought Marilyn Monroe was still alive and couldn't understand why she dressed like she was living in the 50's- go figure. I couldn't help it; I had to pop her bubble. I eclipsed "middle-age" a long time ago, although I may look a good ten to 15 years younger than most of the people I meet around my age; I still have long dark hair, well, there's some smoke on top of the chimney, but, I certainly don't expect to live to 120 and my body is starting to tell me that I'm not as young as I think I am. Madonna may be one thing, but, how's this?- Gwen Stefani just turned 47. "Nobody grows old merely by living a number of years. We grow old by deserting our ideals. Years may wrinkle the skin, but to give up enthusiasm wrinkles the soul." ~Samuel Ullman.
    Christine Baker
    10/10/2016 #6 Christine Baker
    I absolutely love this! You have such a human experience to your writing, and it resonates with me. Kudos!
    Deb Helfrich
    10/10/2016 #5 Deb Helfrich
    #4 Thank you for being able to write with wit and charm and honesty. It helps people get out of our cycles of stinking thinking.
    Shelley Brown
    10/10/2016 #4 Shelley Brown
    @Deb Helfrich I have always admired you for shunning societal based thinking regarding certain things we've discussed. I have glimpses of it from time to time when my brain reminds me. Thank you for who you are.
    Shelley Brown
    10/10/2016 #3 Shelley Brown
    @John White, MBA thank you so much. On here because of our mutual pal @Jim Murray. Happy to be here even with time constraints. Looks like you've really started something awesome here!
    John White, MBA
    09/10/2016 #2 John White, MBA
    Having recently turned 40, this resonated with me. It's great to see you on beBee!
    Deb Helfrich
    09/10/2016 #1 Deb Helfrich
    Perhaps gratitude comes in smelling for rabbits.....inhabiting primal urges can put aside all the layers of accumulated thought. Unfortunately, the honest truth is you will forget to revel in a sunset, but our big brains are there to help us remember to turn them off of societal-based thinking as often as we can remember.

    I just saw a video of two vocal geniuses, wearing every bit of the ravages of age they had experienced, throwdown simply for the joy of still being alive.... the year he died - Rick James and Teena Marie. I am moved precisely because of how unpolished the whole proceeding is. Nothing to judge here, just something to experience.
  19. Lada Prkic

    Lada Prkic

    08/10/2016
    CAN SHY PERSON BE A LEADER AT ALL?
    https://www.projectmanager.com/blog/why-introverts-make-great-leaders
    Lada Prkic
    Relevant

    Comments

    Phil Friedman
    09/10/2016 #29 Phil Friedman
    #28 Lada, speaking for myself and @Gerald Hecht, we are overjoyed to find another devotee of the Wisdom of Chung King, whose wise words can feed one's soul.

    I think, moreover, that you have offered great insight into your own question, when you say that you "... prefer working alone, where it is possible, and spending time with my family or the closest friends." I suggest that we need to distinguish between being socially shy and being an introvert. I agree that introverts and extroverts exist on a continuum, but would like to suggest that the differences between them are in terms of how they approach life.

    At the extreme end of introversion, I would put a religious monk who seeks above all personal spiritual peace, even withdrawing from the world to achieve it. At the other end, I would place a world statesman (not politician) who is not content unless leading the world to a better existence. These differences are independent of being either socially shy or outgoing and gregarious.

    To your original question, in order to lead, one has to somehow interact with the world. Which means overcoming social shyness, to some extent. However, one must also be to some extent an extrovert, at least to the extent of seeking to have impact in the world.

    I hope that in the spirit of Chung King, this is not too many words to be understood. Cheers!
    Lada Prkic
    09/10/2016 #28 Lada Prkic
    #23 Phil, I expect nothing less of you than such eloquent comment. :) Although it appears that the discussion is driven by the graphic, its purpose has only been in drawing attention to the article.
    People come in many shapes and colours but also with many different states of mind. Not all introverts or shy people are the same, as there are many grades and shades.
    Speaking in general, there are some properties which characterize certain group of people, including shy and introverted. I don't like to theorize about it and can speak only for myself.
    I'm a great listener who truly listens and absorb what has been said.
    Being an introvert doesn’t mean I want to hide in a dark place deep underground. I'm fully functional manager who just prefer working alone, where it is possible, and spending time with my family or the closest friends.
    However, if I had been remained shy and taciturn, I don’t think I could carry out my managerial tasks. I concur with @Vincent Andrew's comment.
    But sometimes being taciturn has its advantages, like Chung King said: “Multiplying words may actually multiply the probability of being misunderstood so, we should be as wise as taciturn.” 🤐
    Lada Prkic
    09/10/2016 #27 Lada Prkic
    #5 Thanks for the share @Michele Williams. I like your phrase about introverts and sensemakers. I can partly find myself in it.
    Lada Prkic
    09/10/2016 #26 Lada Prkic
    #14 Thanks Lisa. You describe me. :-) I like the term initial shyness. We are alike in many ways.
    Lada Prkic
    09/10/2016 #25 Lada Prkic
    #17 Thank you Milos, You're welcome, my friend.
    Robert Bacal
    09/10/2016 #24 Robert Bacal
    One of the Psychological theories on I-E (Don't know how current it is), is that Introverts have a higher level of arousal internally, and so don't seek out additional external stimulation, while extroverts are the opposite. To reach the optimal level of arousal, they need external stimulation.

    So Introverts can be overwhelmed (overstimulated) by people, noise, too much itneraction,, trying to multitask, while extroverts become bored, restless, etc without that stimulation.

    Shyness may be a "symptom" of being overstimulated, but it's more likely orthogonal, since it can be a result of many things besides being introverted.

    Does any of this match up with the issue of shy leaders?
    Phil Friedman
    09/10/2016 #23 Phil Friedman
    #19 Lada, to answer your question, and since it appears that the discussion is driven by the graphic, I refer only to it, although the article itself is much more substantial.

    Only point #1 actually answers the thematic question, which is how does (can) an introvert lead. Points #2 and #3 are simply posit about the nature of introverts, with which I disagree.

    Introverts do not in my experience necessarily operate at a deeper level of discussion. Indeed, their introversion often gets in the way of genuine exchange of ideas and opinions.

    Moreover, introverts do not in my experience necessarily listen more closely than other. Indeed, they may be too consumed with discomfort in the context to truly listen at all.

    Being quiet is not the same as being reflective. And being open and outspoken is not the same as being consumed with the sound of one's own voice. However much some "introverts" might like to think so.

    Can introverts lead? If that means affect the direction of process and contribute to positive outcomes, then yes, positively. 1) By interacting one on one, 2) by using non-face to face means of communication, 3) by stellar example and strength of intellect, and 4) by learning to trust others more, which is the real hallmark of teamwork.

    In the words of Chung King, "Mistake not silence for depth of thought, nor open and honest expression for boastfulness." (Second Scroll, circa 650 AD). @ @Gerald Hecht.
    Lada Prkic
    09/10/2016 #22 Lada Prkic
    #2 Dear Deb, I always enjoy reading your comments. I am in agreement with you about the importance of being aware who we are and what we are capable of becoming, or what we want to achieve in life. I share this article because, inter alia, it has link to Susan Cain's website on the Quiet Revolution movement and a real power of introverts. I recommend reading the Thomas Deakin’s story.
    My question was set up because the visual title refers to shy leaders, but the explanations are related to introverts. Being shy and introverted is a lethal combination. 🤐 I am an introvert person and I was also shy in my younger days, but I’m not shy anymore. When I realized that my shyness would affect my career I forced myself out of my comfort zone and found a way to cross over the obstacles. Now, when I look back and see how far I’ve come, I know that it has been the right decision.
    I also believe that leadership come in many shapes and sizes so, introvert people can be successful leaders. I'm still an introvert and that's something I wouldn't want to change. Like Thomas Deakin said in his story, “Introverts are simply the other, quieter side of the human coin.”
    Vincent Andrew
    09/10/2016 #21 Vincent Andrew
    'Can a shy person be a leader at all?' I think shy people make good informal leaders Lada. I say this because in my context shy people do not receive the attention they deserve perhaps because it may seem they may have nothing or little to contribute (as judged by their quietness or reservedness) when in fact they 'tend to listen more closely' and as a result they 'are better able to synthesise information and respond more effectively'. I would also argue they can be good formal leaders although they may need some opportunities to develop into a more confident person leading a larger group of people. Interesting buzz!
    Deb Helfrich
    09/10/2016 #20 Deb Helfrich
    #10 Your opinion as to whether people read the graphic and/or the article is not a truth. You were, in fact, the first person to comment entirely off the topic Lada introduced which was about whether introversion and shyness are interchangeable words, not about reading comprehension on the internet.
    Lada Prkic
    09/10/2016 #19 Lada Prkic
    #7 Dear Phil, I'm glad you think my shared items raise interesting questions for reflection. That' s why I would really like to know what you think about this topic rather than what I think whether the commenters read the linked article or not. Cheers!
    Milos Djukic
    09/10/2016 #18 Anonymous
    @Lada Prkic, Yes it can :) Leadership is about social influence, mutual support and organizing of people in order to achieve a common goal.
    Milos Djukic
    09/10/2016 #17 Anonymous
    #16 Dear @Lada Prkic, , Perhaps I am a little obsessed with academic citations :) Thanks again for the nice discussion. Best, Milos
    Lada Prkic
    09/10/2016 #16 Lada Prkic
    #7 #11 Dear @Milos Djukic and @Phil Friedman, I was a little surprised by your comments about references. I shared the original article with original visual from the article and my question for discussion. What further reference is needed? The name of author is on the top of the article. Regards and cheers! :-)
    Lisa Gallagher
    09/10/2016 #15 Lisa Gallagher
    #6 And, here's one for the introverts, I wish my last manager would have been one. "Introverts are more likely to let talented employees run with their ideas, rather than trying to put their own stamp on things,” she added, “and they tend to be motivated not by ego or a desire for the spotlight, but by dedication to their larger goal.”

    Not sure if I have a term for my last manager ;-)
    Lisa Gallagher
    09/10/2016 #14 Lisa Gallagher
    #5 Couldn't agree more @Michele Williams, I know quite a few, they are calm, listen well and most certainly help others to find answers when facing complex situations. I hope my response below is understood for what I meant, I was answering @Lada Prkic's question above and replying to her first post about shy people, not introverts. As she said, they differ.
    Phil Friedman
    09/10/2016 #13 Phil Friedman
    #11 Milos, I agree, although in this case, the author's byline is right at the top of the article, immediately visible if you click through to read it. So I personally understand fully why Lada might not have included it in the share. It seems that only on social media and in politics do participants believe it unnecessary to read something before commenting on it.
    Milos Djukic
    09/10/2016 #11 Anonymous
    Thanks a lot @Lada Prkic. It is advisable to specify a reference (the name of the original author). Kind Regards, Milos.
    Phil Friedman
    09/10/2016 #10 Phil Friedman
    #9 Well, Deb, if I ever pointed out a truth that you did not take as an insult, I would start to question whether I was losing my edge. Thank you for commenting.
    Deb Helfrich
    09/10/2016 #9 Deb Helfrich
    Well, Phil, whenever someone is ready to write an article about the argumentraverts versus insultroverts.... we will clearly be able to refer them to someone with a fantastic overlap of both relatively elusive personality types. With all due respect, satire obviously intended.#7
  20. ProducerJavier beBee

    Javier beBee

    02/10/2016
    Spain & Tourism
    Spain & Tourism By 2015 Spain was the third most visited country in the world, recording 68.1 million tourists which marked the third consecutive year of record-beating numbers.If you consider population and size of the top three most visited countries (France, US...
    Relevant

    Comments

    CityVP Manjit
    30/10/2016 #54 CityVP Manjit
    The furthest south I went in Europe was Southern France, Spain is way too much a beautiful country for me not to visit at least once in my own lifetime.
    Pamela L. Williams
    29/10/2016 #53 Pamela L. Williams
    Well now I know why my oldest and dearest friend is retiring in Spain! I'm going to have to squeeze myself into her suitcase and fly with the baggage! Thank you for the tour Javier! Sharing in my Cultures of the World hive
    Lisa Gallagher
    13/10/2016 #52 Lisa Gallagher
    I want to visit Seville! My son and husband went to the Canary Islands, over to Tenerife and golfed. On the way back they had a layover in Scotland and my husbands luggage was lost. We never got re-imbursed and they never found it. They had fun though and wow- the photos were astounding. After seeing this again, Wow- so many beautiful places to visit in Spain @Javier beBee, I think I would need 3 weeks to take all that I'd want to see :))
    Aurorasa Sima
    08/10/2016 #51 Aurorasa Sima
    #50 Yes, yes with Rioja (: I like how you think, @Mamen Delgado
    Mamen Delgado
    08/10/2016 #50 Mamen Delgado
    #43 😂 😂 @Aurorasa Sima, my favorite dessert is Manchego with half a cup of red wine. I know your feeling... 😉
    Lisa Gallagher
    08/10/2016 #47 Lisa Gallagher
    #46 Each day I become even more excited when I log on @Javier beBee, I didn't know that would be possible!! I'm going up to a friend's home in the next week to do a live buzz of her horse farm (it's very large) and she has an acre of blueberries she grows we are going to video too. It's beautiful where she lives and it's only 15 minutes from me but about 6 miles up the hill, the Alleghenies are at her backdoor!
    Javier beBee
    08/10/2016 #46 Javier beBee
    #44 @Lisa Gallagher beautiful words ! Let's dream big together!
    Javier beBee
    08/10/2016 #45 Javier beBee
    #43 thanks @Aurorasa Sima, you are welcome !
    Lisa Gallagher
    07/10/2016 #44 Lisa Gallagher
    #42 These are exciting times @Javier beBee!! Many of us share in your dream and one day soon it will become reality. It's evident by the growth we all see daily!!
    Aurorasa Sima
    07/10/2016 #43 Aurorasa Sima
    On the first look (and having been there about 20 times) Spain has it all: Beautiful country, Manchego, nice sounding language, great weather, Manchego, stunning ladies and the guys have the good of "macho" without being players, Manchego, awesome food.
    Javier beBee
    07/10/2016 #42 Javier beBee
    #41 @Lisa Gallagher I try to sleep and I use to rest, this is an important part of our lifes, but beBee is a BIG DREAM :) ... beBee will go on working for you ! We want to get the best platform ;)
    Lisa Gallagher
    07/10/2016 #41 Lisa Gallagher
    #38 Thanks, you too @Javier beBee? Ps: More time, do you sleep 😜?
    Javier beBee
    07/10/2016 #40 Javier beBee
    #39 @Henri Galvão yes, Andalucía is amazing!
    Henri Galvão
    07/10/2016 #39 Henri Galvão
    This is wonderful. Spain is the country I'd most like to explore (specially Andalusia). I was fortunate to spend a few hours in Málaga and Tenerife, but I still have a lot to learn about these places.
    Javier beBee
    07/10/2016 #38 Javier beBee
    #37 @Lisa Gallagher, my goal is you to expend more time on the platform :-) have a great day !!!
    Lisa Gallagher
    07/10/2016 #37 Lisa Gallagher
    This is so detailed, it should be in a travel magazine @Javier beBee!
    Declev Reynier Dib Ferreira
    04/10/2016 #36 Declev Reynier Dib Ferreira
    #32 Destas, eu conheço Salamanca, Santiago de Compostela, Barcelona, Madri. Ainda falta muito pra mim, na Espanha... rs Gostei muito de Barcelona, onde já fui duas vezes, e Salamanca. Salamanca é uma grandiosidade! Gosto muito.
    Andrew Porter
    03/10/2016 #35 Andrew Porter
    This is a wonderful insightful buzz about Spain its cities and what they and this country have to offer tourists who are planning to visit, well presented @Javier beBee
    pedro santos
    03/10/2016 #34 pedro santos
    ES UN HONOR MUY GRANDE PARA MI,
    Rose Spot
    03/10/2016 #33 Rose Spot
    I forgot to say that even if spanish people tell you they don't, most of them speaks english which is really helpful for tourists...
  21. ProducerSophie Perrin

    Sophie Perrin

    06/10/2016
    Visiter Marrakech en 3 jours
    Visiter Marrakech en 3 joursCes derniers jours j’ai pas mal publié de photos de Marrakech, donc j’ai finalement décidé de faire un article pour vous parler de mon expérience dans cette magnifique ville.Un ami voyageur, Gérard ne m’en disait que du bien, j’ai donc fini par...
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    Comments

    Sophie Perrin
    10/10/2016 #12 Sophie Perrin
    #9 Merci pour votre commentaire @Deb Helfrich!! J'espère qu'un jour vous aurez l'occasion de goûter le couscous de Café Terrasse el Badii, vous ne serez pas déçue :)!
    Sophie Perrin
    10/10/2016 #11 Sophie Perrin
    Thank you for your comment @Pamela L. Williams !! My article is in french but if you neef any advice, don't hesitate to ask me :) !
    Sophie Perrin
    10/10/2016 #10 Sophie Perrin
    #7 @Pascal Derrien Je n'ai pas encore eu la chance de visiter Tanger mais si vous avez des recommandations, elles sont les bienvenues :)
    Deb Helfrich
    09/10/2016 #9 Deb Helfrich
    Incroyable, @Sophie Perrin Le plus proche que je suis allé à Marrakech est de Madrid et le meilleur couscous que j'ai jamais eu était sur le boulevard Montparnasse à Chez Berber, donc je vraiment apprécié ce buzz.
    Pamela L. Williams
    08/10/2016 #8 Pamela L. Williams
    It is for posts such as this that I love Google Translator! It has it's issues but I can still be taken on magical trips to foreign lands. I enjoyed the tour of the old city and the food looked delicious! I love couscous, it's one of my favorite pastas. Thank you Sophie for taking us on this wonderful adventure in the Marrakech.
    Pascal Derrien
    08/10/2016 #7 Pascal Derrien
    Moi je preferes Tanger mais bon Marrakech c est bien aussi ☺
    Dean Owen
    08/10/2016 #6 Dean Owen
    What a fantastic article on a magical city. Jemaa el-Fna is just incredible. I could spend whole days watching the snake charmers and trying to get photos without people demanding money from me! The tanneries? All I can say is bring nose plugs! I love Villa des Orangers if you are looking for a place to stay on your next trip. You might enjoy this - https://www.bebee.com/producer/@dean-owen/the-last-harem
    Sophie Perrin
    06/10/2016 #5 Sophie Perrin
    Thanks @Netta Virtanen for your comment :) !!! Hope you can go to Marrakech one day! You will love it for sure!
    Netta Virtanen
    06/10/2016 #4 Netta Virtanen
    @Sophie Perrin
    Je voudrais aller à voyager au Maroc! Il semble exotique, excitant et coloré! Enchanteur! Thanks for your lovely buzz!!! Can't wait to reaad your next one. =)
    Sophie Perrin
    06/10/2016 #3 Sophie Perrin
    #1 @David Gamella Pérez si tu as besoin de conseils n'hésite pas ;)
    Alexia Morant
    06/10/2016 #2 Alexia Morant
    Je ne suis pas encore allée au Maroc mais après avoir lu ton article, je pense que je vais y réfléchir plus sérieusement :)
    David Gamella Pérez
    06/10/2016 #1 David Gamella Pérez
    Trop beau! J'ai vraiment envie d'y aller ;-P
  22. ProducerPaul Kearley

    Paul Kearley

    03/10/2016
    One Person Can Make A Difference
    One Person Can Make A DifferenceKind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless.   ~Mother TheresaRain, intense torrential rain. I was in Halifax, sitting in wall to wall traffic, my car was being buffeted by high velocity winds and pelted by the...
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    Comments

    Paul Kearley
    06/10/2016 #40 Paul Kearley
    #39 @Laura Mikolaitis you made my day. Thank you for reading and taking the time to respond.
    Laura Mikolaitis
    06/10/2016 #39 Laura Mikolaitis
    A beautiful story about random kindness, strangers and the intersections that present us with opportunities to do good. Thanks, @Paul Kearley for sharing this. We shouldn't need so many reminders to stop, take a breath and practice kindness, but many times we do. Myself included. I really love this post and I am so glad that I had a few minutes to read it and contribute to such a wonderful conversation in the comments.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    05/10/2016 #38 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    This post is enlightening. We seem to live in a world of hurriedness and impatience, not stopping to give someone a hand. "You can make more friends in 5 minutes by being interested in others than you can in five years by trying to get them interested in you." is a great quote by Carnegie, one we should live by.
    Paul Kearley
    04/10/2016 #37 Paul Kearley
    #36 wow thanks @John White, MBA how have you been?
    John White, MBA
    04/10/2016 #36 John White, MBA
    Paul congrats on a buzzworthy post! We have shared it to beBee's company Facebook and LinkedIN pages.
    Lisa Gallagher
    04/10/2016 #35 Lisa Gallagher
    #28 @Paul Kearley, "The hurrier I go, the behinder I get." Love the quote your grandmother used! Sounds like something my Scottish Grandmother would have said. And, well said below, "The best way to convey these is to "Be" these lessons." I think focusing on patience is part of the lesson. Patience of the mind can clear the mind so we are able to think on a deeper level and consider others as well.
    David Lisle
    04/10/2016 #34 David Lisle
    I think this story speaks volumes about what is still right with our society. As @Charles David Upchurch points out our old heroes don't cut the grade anymore. But this story is about the little heroes that have always been with us and are people whose habit we do well to imitate sincerely. Thanks @Paul Kearley.
    Paul Kearley
    04/10/2016 #33 Paul Kearley
    #32 The best way to convey these lessons is to "Be" these lessons. As Ghandi said, "Be the change you wish to see in the world". Thanks for your comment @Charles David Upchurch
    Charles David Upchurch
    04/10/2016 #32 Charles David Upchurch
    I hope we can convey these lessons to coming generations.

    The old heroes have turned into villains, and today's superheroes are no longer inspiring greatness of spirit, nor traits like patience and acceptance.

    Random acts of kindness and paying it forward happen most, and happen best, when we are not so absorbed with ourselves that we cannot see and act compassionately towards our neighbors' needs.
    Deb Helfrich
    04/10/2016 #31 Deb Helfrich
    #30 #29 Well then, I might have a tiny bit to do with the kindness impetus but the hashtag was @Sarah Elkins' inspiration!

    All things considered, I think we've found a place where we can practice #KindnessReigns2016
    Aaron Skogen
    04/10/2016 #30 Aaron Skogen
    #29 No, I would agree. I simply will not take credit for that which is not mine :-). Also, this post will run on my twitter feed several times per day for the next five days using the #kindnessReigns2016 hashtag (and a few others)! Have a great day Paul and thanks again for a great post!
    Paul Kearley
    04/10/2016 #29 Paul Kearley
    #27 Thanks @Aaron Skogen I suppose it matters not who coined the hashtag as long as it gets used, But that being said, Thanks @Deb Helfrich and Sarah @Sarah Elkins for your pay it forward thinking.
    Paul Kearley
    04/10/2016 #28 Paul Kearley
    #23 @Lisa Gallagher even though I know how I SHOULD be, I am often faced with situations where I am in a hurry and someone is in my way and I "toot my horn" when I know better. I retold that piece to remind me again of a quote my grandmother used to say: "The hurrier I go, the behinder I get". Timeless. Since that incident a month ago, I have repaid this kindness a couple of times. I think it would be great to have some kind of record as to just how many people stop and think and respond positively as a result of this post. #KindnessReigns2016
    Aaron Skogen
    04/10/2016 #27 Aaron Skogen
    #24 @Paul Kearley, I shared to twitter with the hashtag, feel free to retweet :-). For the record, I cannot take credit for the hashtag, that goes to @Deb Helfrich and @Sarah Elkins!
    Paul Kearley
    04/10/2016 #26 Paul Kearley
    #22 Thanks @Deb Helfrich It is a good option to remember that there is ALWAYS a kinder option than impulse and reaction. I appreciate you taking the time to comment.
    Paul Kearley
    04/10/2016 #25 Paul Kearley
    #20 Why thank YOU @Jared Wiese for reading, and then taking the time to respond. It means a great deal to have your comments.
    Paul Kearley
    04/10/2016 #24 Paul Kearley
    #17 Wow @Aaron Skogen what a great idea to hashtag that story #KindnessReigns2016. Thanks!!
    Lisa Gallagher
    04/10/2016 #23 Lisa Gallagher
    What a great story you shared @Paul Kearley! Admirable man. I might have sat honking my horn too. I have a feeling the healthcare professional in me would have kicked in and I might have gotten out of my car to make sure she wasn't having a heart attack or something of that nature. He was smart, and in tune. Poor woman was having anxiety. I think we can all miss opportunities to help but when we see someone else help another, it's a good reminder to stay alert to the needs of others. I'm working on patience the older I get!
    Deb Helfrich
    04/10/2016 #22 Deb Helfrich
    I wanted to save this for awhile and it was well worth the anticipation, @Paul Kearley. I used to be the impatient type, especially behind the wheel, as driving comes naturally to me. After reading this eye-opening story, I doubt I will forget that there is another option.
    Jared Wiese
    04/10/2016 #21 Jared Wiese
    #17 Well described, @Aaron Skogen... random act of kindness and paying it forward.......
  23. ProducerAurorasa Sima

    Aurorasa Sima

    01/10/2016
    Do you want to search or find?
    Do you want to search or find?When someone buys a book or attends a training class often they will later say: "I did not learn anything new." "I knew all of that." Some people get even annoyed when you tell them something they already knew. "Tell me something new."And when you...
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    Comments

    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    15/10/2016 #61 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #60 when the music starts, your motivation will not end. We are a people of rythmn.. Music is like water during carnival... @Aurorasa Sima😊
    Aurorasa Sima
    15/10/2016 #60 Aurorasa Sima
    #58 Hell, yeah. We´re actually in the age where we need less sleep than in our twenties. I´d dance any ecstasy kid to the ground (: (: (:

    The right motivation? You might like BASS?
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    15/10/2016 #59 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #57 Thank you, @Aurorasa Sima, thing get harder only if you let them. My life, in the past, was harder than it is now. I feel lucky I have come this far. #56 @Donna-Luisa Eversley, music has always been part of my life and always will. Rock on.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    15/10/2016 #58 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #57 @Aurorasa Sima, I'm 47, seeing that we are disclosing age here hahaha...don't worry, I'm pretty sure, for the right motivation you will party all night. Maybe you should come to Trinidad for carnival next year...and you can join a band and put on a costume to dance in the streets with 100,000 gaily decorated masquaraders. I can promise you will enjoy it so much, when you can't stand on you feet for days, it will be worth it 😀😉
    Aurorasa Sima
    15/10/2016 #57 Aurorasa Sima
    #55 To be honest, I thought you´re maybe fifty something - just from the way you write. I could imagine that with 70 some things get harder and I love your attitude. Thank you for not taking my comment the wrong way.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    15/10/2016 #56 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #55 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, I am with you on this..even when I can't get out, I am with my music , or still trying to enjoy life...my kindred spirit.😉 You sure rock!!
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    15/10/2016 #55 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #54 When I was 46, I partied with the best of them. I still party with the best of them and I am 71. Life is not a dress rehearsal. it's the real thing so I want to live it to it's fullest.

    I read a variety of posts, some more deep than others. Variety is the spice of life, you know.
    Aurorasa Sima
    14/10/2016 #54 Aurorasa Sima
    #53 You know what I noticed ... I´m 46 now. I told someone: "Oh, no. I can´t party through the nite anymore. Too old for that, I need my sleep". Then I thought about it. In reality, I felt like cra.... the next too, when I was young. I just did not care.

    It does not apply to all changes but to many. Carelessness is an important happiness skill. I´ve currently lost mine a little bit, I´ll get it back. Maybe you have just not been attempting to read so many so complex posts or something. Your light is bright (:
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    14/10/2016 #53 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #51 Thank you for your encouraging comment, @Aurorasa Sima. 🌸
    Aurorasa Sima
    13/10/2016 #52 Aurorasa Sima
    #49 I´m happy if you are inspired to write an article. No credit necessary (:
    Thank you for sharing your experience regarding your weight loss clients.
    Aurorasa Sima
    13/10/2016 #51 Aurorasa Sima
    #47 Oh, I don´t believe that your light is dimming, dear @Franci Eugenia Hoffman. (:
    Aurorasa Sima
    13/10/2016 #50 Aurorasa Sima
    #48 A Master Searcher? That´s the perfect way to be, John. Thank you for your comment!
    Lori Boxer
    11/10/2016 #49 Lori Boxer
    @Aurorasa, almost every point you make in your post ‘spoke’ to me as relates to my business and my interactions with weight loss clients.

    You say you often hear “I knew all of that.” I wish I had just $1 for every person who, either when they call for the first time and we have a shorter initial chat or when they come in for a longer consultation and I talk to them about a whole range of health-related/obesity-related issues will say, “Yeah, I know all that” . . . and sometimes in a flippant sort of way as to cut me off.

    Your response is, “So, are you using the knowledge.”

    My response always is, “So, how did knowing it all work out for you, eh? I don’t see that it has.”

    You write, “Most people perceive only things that are new to them as interesting. The danger is that they never dig deep into a topic.”

    In my world, too many overweight and obese people (a) don’t want to stick with any quick-fix diet too long because they can’t, and they move on to something new . . . the next quick-fix, the next scam, the next easy-out, etc., always searching and searching for the ‘magic’ pill or potion and (b) they, too, almost never want to dig into the topic of why they became overweight/obese in the first place.

    There’s more comparisons I can make between what you wrote and my experiences, and you have inspired a topic for me to write about in one of my next blogs (and due credit will be given!). Thank you for the thought-provoking post. I appreciate it.
    John Rylance
    11/10/2016 #48 John Rylance
    In answer to your question Aurorsa, I want to search and find, even if it is only what I already know/do. Similarly I want to continue to search, once I think I have become a master. Basically to continue to refine/add to what I already know. Aim to be a Master Searcher.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    11/10/2016 #47 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Using what we already know is refreshing. It makes us feel somewhat proud that what we learned is useful to us. Also, using what we know repetitively keeps it fresh in our minds. Enlightening post as it brightens that dimming light in my head. 😉
    Aurorasa Sima
    11/10/2016 #46 Aurorasa Sima
    #45 I hear you. Today, we are focused on learning how to pass a test.
    Phillip Hubbell
    11/10/2016 #45 Phillip Hubbell
    Thank you @Aurorasa Sima, I had to take a math skills test the other day and was so thankful that when I took math in school they still understood that repetition was essential to learning.
    Aurorasa Sima
    11/10/2016 #44 Aurorasa Sima
    #43 Haha, thank you. I wrote this when I was researching a neuroscientific topic. I was about to download the third pdf eBook when I realized that it made more sense to read one first. Thank you for reading and commenting (:
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    11/10/2016 #43 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @Aurorasa Sima...this is why interesting. Using what one knows to find answers, or tapping into what you know already... Very Alice in Wonderland. Paying attention to self. 😊 great post!
    Aurorasa Sima
    08/10/2016 #42 Aurorasa Sima
    #40 Let´s do it
  24. Jared Wiese

    Jared Wiese

    02/10/2016
    Morning Ritual Affirmations For Changing Your Life
    Morning Ritual Affirmations For Changing Your Life Get Morning Ritual Mastery: http://www.morningritualmastery.com In this video, Stefan share with you some morning ritual affirmations that will change your...
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  25. ProducerNicole Chardenet
    In Defence Of Funny Muslims & Other Hilarious People
    In Defence Of Funny Muslims & Other Hilarious PeopleIs there anything funny about Muslims? Can you say anything about them and not have them, you know, burn down the city in violent protest?Apparently so, on both counts, because Canadians laughed through five seasons of the old CBC show Little Mosque...
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    Comments

    Charles David Upchurch
    06/10/2016 #17 Charles David Upchurch
    I had no idea it ran for so long. Like I said, I only saw about 5 episodes, probably in the first or second season (starting with the recruitment of the "modern" young imam).
    Nicole Chardenet
    04/10/2016 #16 Nicole Chardenet
    #15 I stopped watching after the fourth season because it was losing its edge, but I have those four seasons on DVD.
    Charles David Upchurch
    04/10/2016 #15 Charles David Upchurch
    #4 I was lucky enough to watch about 5 episodes of 'Little Mosque on the Prairie' and I LOVED it. The show also did a great job of showing multiple points of view.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    03/10/2016 #14 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #9 You are so hotdiggity right on the keys there Nicole! It is always the powers that be that divide so that they can rule sadly.
    Nicole Chardenet
    03/10/2016 #13 Nicole Chardenet
    #3 Hi Donna-Luisa, over the weekend I was reading articles about misogyny and white male reaction to Hillary Clinton and how we're going to hear the word 'bitch' used far more often in the coming years (let's be real, she's gonna win...) And one article suggested that it's time for forward-thinking women to reclaim the word 'bitch'...particularly after Tina Fey's sketch on Saturday Night Live re Clinton where she said, "Bitches get stuff done." We're in for as much misogyny in the next four years as we've gotten for racism in the last eight...it's time to meet the easily-emasculated with a grin and a smirk rather than a raised fist ;)
    Nicole Chardenet
    03/10/2016 #12 Nicole Chardenet
    #4 Thank you Dean, your support is much appreciated! As someone already pointed out - and as I realized myself as I uploaded the post a few weeks ago - it's not the timeliest story on beBee. I'd actually intended for it to cover more than Little Mosque, which ended production a few years ago, but it just kind of took over. I have been thinking lately of political correctness and how the right is correct (to a certain degree) when it claims PC is ruining political discourse. I've felt that way for years, and I think it's time for some pushback.
    Nicole Chardenet
    03/10/2016 #11 Nicole Chardenet
    #6 Some people use "humour" as a cover to just be nasty, and then accuse the victims of being thin-skinned. It does vary in the eyes of the beholders (or the targets), and some folks for sure are too sensitive, and I think we've catered enough to the thin-skinned, who sometimes really do need to grow up a little. There may be some future honey from me on this...
    Nicole Chardenet
    03/10/2016 #10 Nicole Chardenet
    #7 Hey Lisa, if you can't find it on Netflix it may be available elsewhere. We need to start challenging the easily-offended, though. Humour is a great way to mend fences and make ourselves and others seem less scary. If some thin-skinned Muslims had had their way, Little Mosque would have never made it to air - yet I thought it humanized them and made them less scary. I didn't laugh *at* them, I laughed *with* them.
    Nicole Chardenet
    03/10/2016 #9 Nicole Chardenet
    #8 Praveen, when I first moved to Canada & into my friend's home he met me out in the driveway. He gestured to the neighbours on one side - "Muslims to the left" and to the other side - "Hindus to the right." "We're not going to get caught in the crossfire, are we?" I joked. Turns out we were in a heavily immigrant neighbourhood with lots of Indians and Middle Easterners. Everyone got along with everyone else. It's not as hard as people think.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    01/10/2016 #8 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    I saw a few episodes of Citizen Khan and loved the "protagonist" for his ability to poke fun at himself and others in equally good humour! He too did rile some folks I hear. That said, human nature is the same everywhere, though there are groupings with some characteristic peculiarities. So more than likely it is the same drama in all homes...kids vs parents, daughter-in-law vs Mother-in-law...sibling rivalries...some of my best buddies are muslims and i love their company, their welcoming homes and affection. I blame power politics, religion driven politics, and the resultant mob mentality for creating and sustaining the divides. You will be floored and dumbfounded to see how much Hindu and Muslim friends and families do for each other in this country of mine. It is not easy to co-exist at such close proximity but we have been managing for ages. Because many do believe in the same-blood, same race paradigm.
    Lisa Gallagher
    01/10/2016 #7 Lisa Gallagher
    @Nicole Chardenet, awesome read. I never heard of this show but I wonder if I can find it on Netflix? I agree, there's a lot to be said about humor and those who can laugh at themselves are people I adore. I admit, I've had a few stories I wanted to share but was afraid of offending. Good advice about not being afraid to put it out there.
    Phil Friedman
    01/10/2016 #6 Phil Friedman
    @Nicole Chardenet, to my mind, you are correct in the main about humor... er, humour. I tend, however, to disagree when you say that some humor can be viscous and eviscerating. It's simple the case that not everything that represents itself as humor is funny. Cheers... and ribbet, ribbet, ribbet. :-)
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    01/10/2016 #5 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    No matter who, what, where or why we are, it does hurt to laugh. It's why we laugh that matters.
    Dean Owen
    01/10/2016 #4 Dean Owen
    I am surprised that not many picked up on this article as it is the best and most relevant article I have read all year. I read it the day it was published and wanted to see how the community reacted while making a mental note to come back to it and comment/share if it was overlooked. I certainly hope it was just an oversight and not anything to do with the title and title picture. Well done Nicole. I am a big fan.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    22/09/2016 #3 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @Nicole Chardenet thank you very much for sharing the other side...everyone has a funny bone, and in the silly season of politics everyone has become quite serious. It is good to laugh every now and then...more now than then...the world will hopefully laugh again after the USA elections, coming soon to a live stream near us all 😀
    Nicole Chardenet
    14/09/2016 #2 Nicole Chardenet
    #1 Yeah...I know the show's been over for awhile but godz, the world has gotten so humourless and politically correct I just *had* to say something. And Muslims are very much under the microscope these days.
    Pascal Derrien
    13/09/2016 #1 Pascal Derrien
    Timely article :-)
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