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  1. ProducerDeb Lange

    Deb Lange

    Avoidance and Resistance to Change
    Avoidance and Resistance to ChangeAre you a Manager, a Team Leader, a Consultant who is committed to making a difference to your organization, your team, your client? Perhaps you want to foster cultures that promote both well-being and productivity?Do you feel like a kid on a...


    Deb Lange
    28/09/2016 #6 Deb Lange
    #3 David Grinberg, thanks for reading, taking the time to respond and sharing with others who may be interested. You are awesome!
    Deb Lange
    28/09/2016 #5 Deb Lange
    #3 #4 Dear @Jared Wiese - love your additional comments, feel free to share your ideas, they are great - it make so much sense to write something and have people interact with it - sometimes it seems pointless when writing ad posting on social media and no-one responds. So I really appreciate you taking the time to read, to think about what I wrote and then to share your ideas! You say, "I agree nobody likes to change" - I would add, I think we often do like change, BUT, when we get to create the change, not when it is out of our hands. If someone else wants to change us we feel controlled and we resist!
    Jared Wiese
    28/09/2016 #4 Jared Wiese
    #2 Okay, I have more to share 😃

    You said, 'protecting ourselves from being human, as we have become so used to living and working with abstractions, technology and "things" outside ourselves.'
    I think this ties perfectly with how you said: 'training, education, and meetings arose from believing in expert, top-down approaches.'

    'People don’t want to attend training or workshops as they experience them as a waste of time.'
    This comes down to culture. People may learn great things, only to have them not be applicable in the 'real world' - in their culture. Worse, if superiors attend the same training, people may not speak up, fully engage or succombe to "groupthink".
    Also, nobody likes change - unless it benefits them. The key is to ensure it does, in the real world.

    As you said, cultural norms are key. Management needs to set and show expectations that disruption is allowed and encouraged.

    I love your model idea, because a picture is worth a thousand words. It gets us to rally around a singular purpose or understanding. Especially since we are now in your knowledge era - everyone basically having the same information. Especially the actual people doing the work (as opposed to management).

    I also love your reference to kindergarten, which makes me think of the book All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten by Robert Fulghum. I love 'constantly seeing what works, what doesn’t, trialing, adapting and creating. They may fight in one second and are friends again the next as they learn how to cooperate.' Can't we all get along?!
    David Grinberg
    28/09/2016 #3 David Grinberg
    Thanks for sharing your important insights, which are most appreciated @Deb Lange. You're just full of great advice! Buzz on...

    cc: @Javier beBee @John White, MBA @Teresa Gezze
    Deb Lange
    28/09/2016 #2 Deb Lange
    #1 #1 hi Jared - I am glad you have some ideas. Come back and post what you do and what works and what else you learn when you try some of these ideas in practice. Love to hear. Deb
    Jared Wiese
    27/09/2016 #1 Jared Wiese
    Amazing post. So much great information and wonderful things to try in my next cultural learning. Thanks for sharing, Deb!
  2. ProducerMarcel Wilson

    Marcel Wilson

    Is change optional? The answer is as natural as breathing!
    Is change optional? The answer is as natural as breathing!Can you think of a time when you had 'a good dunking' at the beach or pool - short of breath, needing to get to the surface - desperate for air? Being underwater for longer than you feel comfortable can be a scary experience! We all have the same...
  3. ProducerAnurag Harsh

    Anurag Harsh

    How to Bring Disruptive But Lasting Change in the Workplace
    How to Bring Disruptive But Lasting Change in the WorkplaceWhen you want to change your circumstances, you have to commit fully. Action cannot wait. Taking the time to consider the pros and cons, to cook up a strategy, to weigh out the evidence is not precursor to change but rather a concerted effort to...
  4. Producerdebasish majumder
    OSMOSIS OF CHANGE!Once a Project leader made a promise to his associates, that if you all sincerely serve me to assist in my aspiration and after I may succeed, I am promising you, I will give you the share of profits as reward to you all. Accordingly, his...


    DILMA BALBI -Contratos e Gestão
    23/08/2016 #10 DILMA BALBI -Contratos e Gestão
    thanks for sharing such inspirated ideas @debasish majumder.
    I do also wonder if humility is not the "power".. the "tool" of perseverance.When I am not superior to the others I am able to really see then and I can open door" to sake of humanity only, not just for profit, lucre and wealth".. .. Those thoughts came to my mind after reading your beatifull buzz.
    Julio Perotti
    08/08/2016 #9 Julio Perotti
    El cambio, ante las adversidades.
    Ali Anani
    27/07/2016 #7 Ali Anani
    #6 I gave the dandelion the name @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 #2 #3 #4 "By the name of disgraceful ideology and fanatic religious beliefs, or expansion of market with unrestrained greed and hankering for profits and opulence, untoward incidents are in rise." This is perfectly exemplified by a Share from @Chas Wyatt View more
    #1 #2 #3 #4 "By the name of disgraceful ideology and fanatic religious beliefs, or expansion of market with unrestrained greed and hankering for profits and opulence, untoward incidents are in rise." This is perfectly exemplified by a Share from @Chas Wyatt, which inspired me to go produce more honey for more flavor. To this end, and philosophically (Dr. Anani shall be proud), I confabulated the word "Dysreality" in this piece, a living plant of this planted, deep piece. It is here for you and your kids, to keep them under their lids: https://www.bebee.com/producer/@margaret-aranda/dysreality-the-dysfunction-of-reality . Let me also show our same mindset, @debasish majumder by showing serendipity. A "Perseverance" Quote,attributed to me via Google and Goodreads (and not through me), uses this same picture to say: “Persevere. There is one dandelion that grows from the crack in the cement. Let that one dandelion be YOU.” Close
    Gerald Hecht
    27/07/2016 #5 Gerald Hecht
    #4 @Juan Imaz, yes lots of wisdom, tightly wrapped
    Juan Imaz
    27/07/2016 #4 Juan Imaz
    Very good indeed!
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    27/07/2016 #3 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    This is a brilliant piece @debasish majumder. I always narrow down what I read into my own simple thoughts, perhaps because during my position as an underwriter that was a requirement - simple and factual. So please don't be offended by my summation. From reading your post more than once, I feel there are people are very much into "what's in it for me" rather than "what can I do for you". And you last sentence "So, change for the sake of humanity only, not just for profit, lucre and wealth." Bravo!
    Gerald Hecht
    27/07/2016 #2 Gerald Hecht
    @debasish majumder This resonates dynamic truths...essences; thank you very much for writing and sharing this.
    Ali Anani
    27/07/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    Great thoughts and condensed ones too. One very important issue that you bring here is the past experiences. The story is illuminating in the sense even though we can't change the past still it has it residues in us and these residues trigger our action. Can we change without dealing with past residues such as removing them? Understanding them and dealing with them accordingly? Convert them so that they may trigger new behaviors? Use them to widen our choices? So many questions pop up in my mind at this late hour of the night. Thank you dear @debasish majumder for sharing this great post
  5. Flavio 🇯🇵 Souza
    Flavio 🇯🇵 Souza
    It’s a quantum world, we’re just living in it?
    grendz.com Google’s engineers just achieved a milestone in quantum computing: they’ve produced the first completely scalable quantum simulation of a hydrogen molecule. That’s big news, because it shows similar devices could help us unlock the quantum secrets...


    Sara Jacobovici
    24/07/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    Perfect example of the speed with which we are experiencing change. Can we keep/manage it under our control?
  6. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    Metaphorically speaking....
    Sara Jacobovici
    The Eight Metaphors of Organization
    www.ribbonfarm.com Gareth Morgan’s Images of Organization is a must-read for those who want to develop a deeper understanding of a lot of the stuff I talk about here. Though I’ve cited the book lots of...


    Sara Jacobovici
    24/07/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    "Organization as System of Change and Flux" is one of the metaphors used to describe organizations in this interesting article. Yet I would suggest that change and flux are the threads that run through all the other metaphors.
  7. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD wrote about responding not reacting to change. This is crucial as it helps us to understand that THE challenge to change involves the issue of control: react, you are not in control; respond, you are gaining control. I asked on a different hive if there is a difference between change and transformation. One answer may be that being in control of change provides the potential for transformation. Please read my brief example of how you can control change and allow for a transformation.
    Sara Jacobovici
    Are you dealing with changes at work or…
    www.linkedin.com ...are you going through a transformation? Knowing the difference will make the difference between struggling to achieve and reaping the benefits of a successful experience. What does knowing mean?...


    Ali Anani
    24/07/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    @Sara Jacobovici- you include two practical scenarios on how to transform our thinking to capture the opportunities change provides us with
  8. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Coping Skills and Change Management
    Coping Skills and Change Management/ by Dr Margaret Aranda /  When humans encounter change, I think we can categorize our brain's processes in two ways (1) The Fight-or-Flight Reflex (i.e., run or fight); or (2) Cope. In his treatise on The Change and...


    Brian McKenzie
    24/07/2016 #10 Brian McKenzie
    Enabling, supporting, launching and packaging change as Revolution since 1987. It wasn't us, we were never there......x 10
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #9 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 Bees, Beer, Change Management, Leaders who prompt with passion and 'go lightly' to accomplish world change. I've learned so very much, my beloved Dr, I can't believe how I woke up yesterday not knowing that today, the world and the personal interactions, the entire activism for humanity's sake...they all look different now. It's all good. Thank you for this ⚡️spark ⚡️ that has ignited to take flight 🚀!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 @Michael Angelo Icarus Yusufidis: 🔝WoW!🔝 https://www.prosci.com ! Change Management for individuals, businesses, and enterprises....psychology, neuroscience, and I see now that it is the Leaders who need to institute a "Culture Change" in an adverse or unethical practice can perhaps do so step-by-step, humming people along instead of being the dictators we resented with poor morale. WoW. It's a w e s o m e! I'll flutter and grasp what I can, and do wish I could take the class! But I shall, one day, and I can see that it would also do the utmost thing possible for any education: it would make the student a better person for society. Darn darn fantastic, sir! Thank you for showing me this whole new, scientific world...it is a grand puzzle that @Selim Yeniçeri @Ali Anani, @Lisa Gallagher, @Sara Jacobovici, @debasish majumder, @Deb Helfrich, @Randy Keho, @Brian McKenzie, and others! could also truly institute to be the 🌐Leaders and Changers🌐 that we desire to be (I was never a Leader and a "Shaker")...WoW. I wish we could all take the Courses together...wouldn't that be a Hoot of a Hive?
    Ali Anani
    24/07/2016 #7 Ali Anani
    I laughed reading your humor dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. My response is to be mined from my buzz of today "Bees and Beer" and I have no doubt you shall be able to
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 Just love sharing brains and respectful adoration with you and @Sara Jacobovici. On Fractal Thinking, Poetry, mathematics, psychology, left- and right-brains we are not separated, but intertwined. And the best notion is that it is galactic, for all!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 I love that you and I can talk about these things with all the men...lol. Sometimes I picture us all sitting in the same room, chatting away with wine and a cigar. We used to do that at Stanford, on Friday nights...brainstorming, brain-picking, together creating something better than the sum of all our parts. It feels like family. It is family, and I love you both tremendously. Now, Dr @Ali Anani Anani is our Professor Emeritus, and we are both his admirers, too. It's cozy.
    Michael Angelo Icarus Yusufidis
    24/07/2016 #4 Michael Angelo Icarus Yusufidis
    Check out https://www.prosci.com ... Change Management in a box.
    Ali Anani
    24/07/2016 #3 Ali Anani
    #1 I shared and commented on your post dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. I am thankful for your dedication and inspiration
    Sara Jacobovici
    24/07/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    Great Buzz @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. Insightful and thought provoking. Honoured to have any mention in your work. Thank you.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Dedicated to Ali Anani, Ph.D. Angular thinking from 'The Change and Adaptation Gap" by beloved @Ali Anani ( https://www.bebee.com/producer/@ali-anani/the-change-and-adaptation-gap ) was spurred on by @Sara Jacobovici to deeper thinking. After writing this piece here, I also had a more humorous touch, perhaps sarcastic and outlandish (and insomniatic), too....but that's what Fractal Thinking should do...and that extension of this read is: "On Musings" (https://www.bebee.com/producer/@margaret-aranda/on-musings ). So the Beez Buzz and Pollinate and Fractal Thinking turns into humor. Well, the Beez sure need a good laugh sometimes, for Laughter is the Best Medicine.
  9. ProducerAli Anani

    Ali Anani

    The Change and Adaptation Gap
    The Change and Adaptation GapChange is the only constant- this is a paradox that we live in. The constant is turning into variable. To keep up with change all living systems must adapt. We are in a constant wavy motion of change. I made a comment to @Sara Jacobovici In...


    Anees Zaidi
    27/07/2016 #56 Anees Zaidi
    #50 Dear brother @Ali Anani the truth is that you are a great discovery for most of us. Your 'affinitize asking' has taken us to our own 'unknown'. You helped us to rediscover our 'self'. Our return 'gifts' are still on the deficit side. But I have great hopes in continuing a learning journey with you.
    Ali Anani
    27/07/2016 #55 Ali Anani
    #54 Gift to us? Yes, you are @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/07/2016 #54 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #53 It's not me...surely you can see...it is simply a gift given back freely.
    Anees Zaidi
    27/07/2016 #53 Anees Zaidi
    #52 Dear brother @Ali Anani her sentence playing with "Ask' and 'Task' has just stopped my mind working. What a beautiful play with one alphabet 'T' that takes away 'affinity' from the word 'Ask' and make it just a 'Task'. Dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD your are beautifully amazing.
    Ali Anani
    27/07/2016 #52 Ali Anani
    #49 I do all that you ASK, for nothing with you is a 'TASK.' Asking isn't tasking- what beauty this is @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. I know what dear @Anees Zaidi would comment.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/07/2016 #51 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #48 You are too kind. Thank you, most humbly.
    Ali Anani
    27/07/2016 #50 Ali Anani
    #48 With all honesty my biggest reward here on beBee is first connecting with you brother @Anees Zaidi. A second bonus followed by connecting to the admirable @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/07/2016 #49 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #47 My beloved teacher, I do all that you ask, for nothing with you is a 'task.' You implore me to delve into myself like never before. Fractal thinking, poetry, and now philosophy shall all be because of "you." For you, my Professor, are the Father of "The Spotlight of Change." Thank you, bless you...I most humbly acquiesce despite my own rumblings of overcoming my own fractal mind hidden inside. Neuroplasticity requires that I track this road, and cement the brain's neurons to think in these different eons. My best thanks to you will be to create in myself the gifts that only you have told me. That will be my gift back to you, Oh Teacher and Mentor!
    Anees Zaidi
    27/07/2016 #48 Anees Zaidi
    #47 I concur with you brother @Ali Anani, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhDhas an amazing mind. By using the word 'capitulating' she has given an entirely mind boggling perspective to collective creation ability. She is right, what we do on beBee is 'affinitize creativity'.
    Ali Anani
    27/07/2016 #47 Ali Anani
    #45 Now, I have a new suggestion for you dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, which is to write on philosophy. I am very serious.Regarding your philosophical comment, in which you wrote "As we affinitize by capitulating on our ruminations, new creations and inspirations abound", I am truly amazed. I am writing a buzz on Imagination and creativity and I find this segment of your comment sending my mind into new directions
    Ali Anani
    27/07/2016 #46 Ali Anani
    #42 Tue what you wrote @Lisa Gallagher. We need to develop the habit of accepting change
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/07/2016 #45 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    My brain came back to muse, to choose the essence of it all. Humor me, please by allowing me to give it a try: "The Spotlight of Change" has become the evolution of ideas, musings, poetry, mitosis, symbiosis, laminar and turbulent flow of water, windmills, air, and blind kings. All necessary for life. I see the beezz so rightfully spurring on new ideas that culminate in fractals of galactic infinity. As we affinitize by capitulating on our ruminations, new creations and inspirations abound! And this, This...is what makes "beBee" what it is...concentrated honey that is timeless, raw, and pure. Extending beyond the insights, self-reflections and epiphanies lies the self-embraced teamwork of a pace that no other social media platform can replace. It's "To beBee and Beyond!" ~ @Ali Anani, @Lisa Gallagher, @CityVP Manjit, @Brian McKenzie, @Anees Zaidi, @Deb Helfrich, @debasish majumder, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman...and to: beyond2 = "Beyond", logarithmically spiraled into the mathematically 'squared.' Intense.
    Lisa Gallagher
    27/07/2016 #43 Lisa Gallagher
    thought provoking article by @Ali Anani
    Lisa Gallagher
    27/07/2016 #42 Lisa Gallagher
    I'm always open to change. Sometimes my brain fights it and that's where I may need to be more focused when this happens.. Excellent article @Ali Anani.
    Ali Anani
    24/07/2016 #40 Ali Anani
    "I need to unoccupy myself of change in order to notice my occupation with change"never you fail my expectations dear @CityVP Manjit and I love this quote from your comment. It is a lamp on the way
    CityVP Manjit
    24/07/2016 #39 CityVP Manjit
    I cannot embrace change if I do not embrace diversity first. It is not that change is the only constant but that as human beings we all change at different rates and in different ways. Once we know the relationship of change to our own way of being then we can let change be. The Arnold Schwarznegger of Change is a different proposition to the Pee-Wee Herman of Change. I need to unoccupy myself of change in order to notice my occupation with change. That is what Manjit or Many? was about, to prescribe a formula for change is to assume that our similarity as human beings is more important. I learn from differences but they are my differences processed by all the factors that make me who I am in this present given minute. A lot may happen in 60 seconds but if I observe change for 60 seconds nothing changes in that observation other than what I am occupied with in that minute.
    Ali Anani
    24/07/2016 #37 Ali Anani
    #35 So, this was progress that wasn't. But we learn @Antoinette Capasso-Backdahl
    Antoinette Capasso-Backdahl
    24/07/2016 #35 Antoinette Capasso-Backdahl
    #32 I've been injured many times in the name of progress. I've had to suck it up. Now to find a way past the digressive scab lists the progressives created. HA!
    Ali Anani
    24/07/2016 #34 Ali Anani
    #31 Thank you again @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD for your response to the lovely comment of @Antoinette Capasso-Backdahl reflects mine
  10. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    @Franci Eugenia Hoffman wrote a comment about change. It included these 4 characterisitcs: 1. change to change 2. adapt to change 3. managing change 4. change and intention. I would like to ask the following question; is change an innate function? We often refer to change as a process but given Franci's insightful characteristics of change it makes me wonder if change is not a process but a biological function? Would that make sense if we then look at how we talk about fear of change, agents of change, climate for change, time for change, and so on?

    image: vixlabs.com.au
    Sara Jacobovici


    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    22/07/2016 #7 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Thank you @Sara Jacobovici for expanding on my thoughts. I look forward to reading the continuing thread.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    22/07/2016 #6 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Change is the rule of the Nature. Anything static turns stagnant and in change there's life.
    Ali Anani
    22/07/2016 #4 Ali Anani
    #3 Thank you @Sara Jacobovici and I am trying to find a metaphor to answer your questions as well as mine. I shall keep you informed
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/07/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    #2 Great insight @Ali Anani. Great question, "The question I kept asking myself about- if change is much faster than our ability to adapt then we shall have a widening change-adaptation gap. Eventually, this gap shall be wide enough to cause---- " May I offer one possibility of filling in the gap; disequilibrium or disbalance?
    Ali Anani
    22/07/2016 #2 Ali Anani
    Amazingly I am working on same issue @Sara Jacobovici. The question I kept asking myself about- if change is much faster than our ability to adapt then we shall have a widening change-adaptation gap. Eventually, this gap shall be wide enough to cause---- and I am trying to fill in the gap. @Franci Eugenia Hoffman made this comment on my last bazz on fractal change and she stirred my mind with her comment as well.
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/07/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    @Anees Zaidi asks in a comment; "Do we resist the change or embrace it? Can we selectively forget the past and transform into something new?" This leads me to add the following question; are change and transformation independent processes?
  11. ProducerAnsel Oliver

    Ansel Oliver

    What Google and Office Space’s Initech Could Have—Should Have—Learned from Drucker
    What Google and Office Space’s Initech Could Have—Should Have—Learned from DruckerThis post originally appeared on our agency blog on November 11, 2015. See the original HERE.Any time I hear a startup boasting of a work atmosphere as being “laid-back,” “playful” or “innovative,” I hope for the employees’ sake that their...


    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    15/07/2016 #3 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    Thanks for sharing this piece on Drucker, Ansel Oliver. I think as a base he is a strong foundation, but also believe its good to try new techniques...now Google knows one thing which won't work, but have at the same time opened up management styles to further scrutiny and consideration. Each failure can at times take us closer to greater success! Drucker has earned his place as a key leader in the management field, I look forward to others finding their place.
    Irene Hackett
    14/07/2016 #2 Anonymous
    @Ansel Oliver - Thank you for this sound advice! Although cultural influence changes throughout history, the principles behind great leadership does not - they are ageless. Surely the deepest desire of every great leader is 'to serve'. And as as Bob Dylan so wisely said: "...you're gonna have to serve somebody".
    Tony Rossi
    14/07/2016 #1 Tony Rossi
    Count me in as a long-time Drucker fan. There does need to be a boss, so long as there's not too many cooks in the kitchen. That said, the business landscape has changed drastically even since his death, so I sometimes struggle to see how to heed his teachings as it relates to high-speed business, hyper-growth, and the blossoming of the entrpreneur. Established corporations still do well to study him though.
  12. ProducerRichard Claydon

    Richard Claydon

    How to get the best out of original thinkers during complex change
    How to get the best out of original thinkers during complex changeOur businesses are crying out for creative, original thought. But we are training it out of our children. And developing management practices that inhibit it.  In this post, I will look at how the practices of change management are hindering...


    Oliver Moloney
    06/06/2016 #4 Oliver Moloney
    @Richard Claydon, It's been wonderful to read my our articles this morning and the section referring to the creative process could not be more apt! When I reach stage 3 I take a step away from the project and give both myself and the project itself some time to breath. More like this for the future!
    Lisa Lee
    06/06/2016 #3 Lisa Lee
    Fantastic article @Richard Claydon. I especially enjoyed reading you rpoints on self doubt and doubt in the idea. I've seen allot of these symptoms over the years and it really has been the undoing on projects and the people behind them. Will happily share!
    NO one
    06/06/2016 #2 NO one
    I always love your buzzes Richard, even as a Designer and I think specially as one, I'm expected to be super original, full of ideas, and create amazing things/designs, but with daily chores and so much information on "how to be", "the best thing to do...", I end up caught in the "I don't know even if I'm original anymore thought" sometimes it is better to disconnect and procrastinate since it will lead you (if you let it) to being an original thinker as you write here.
    Kimberly Lewis
    06/06/2016 #1 Kimberly Lewis
    "you call it procrastinating, I call it thinking" this is such a mind opening post @Richard Claydon I usually do as Adam Grant and make a to do list, maybe because I'm usually a control freak but now I feel I should let go. In Human Resources there's also a need of creative and original ideas and for sure this change is much needed.
  13. Gonzalo Gadea

    Gonzalo Gadea

    Interesting article, take a look!
    Gonzalo Gadea
    Change Consultant Tips from a 40 Year Veteran
    www.imaworldwide.com A few tips from 40 year Change Management Veteran, Don Harrison, on how to succeed in the role of Change...
  14. ProducerMohammed A. Jawad
    Change Management for Improvements
    Change Management for ImprovementsWhen You Think of Improvements, Think of Change ManagementThe failure of organization change occurs for a variety of reasons, including overreaching, insufficient communication, and the failure to execute.The process of working with individuals and...


    Lisa Gallagher
    19/05/2016 #1 Lisa Gallagher
    Good article @Mohammed A. Jawad. You wrote: "Even working with “difficult people” can provide value when change managers treat communications with respect and are willing to reconsider some aspects of the change to accommodate sub-organizational needs while still fulfilling plan objectives." I agree 100%. The downside, when your managers are the difficult people and have no vision to be 'change managers.' I ran into this with my last job. Thank goodness in all my years of work it was a short lived experience.
  15. ProducerSuzan Chamberlain
    Are You Ready for Change? It's Coming!
    Are You Ready for Change? It's Coming!I recently worked for a company for 4 years that went through 2 back to back acquisitions in a 3 year period.  Talk about change! We experienced layoffs, closures of entire departments, sweeping replacements in both management and services to our...


    Javier beBee
    05/05/2016 #2 Javier beBee
    #1 thank for sharing such a good content !
    Suzan Chamberlain
    04/05/2016 #1 Suzan Chamberlain
    Thank you @Javier beBee for reading and sharing!
  16. ProducerJim Taggart

    Jim Taggart

    It’s About Brains and Leadership – Stupid!
    It’s About Brains and Leadership – Stupid!This post is about building the collective brain power of a nation, from which innovation and technology advancement emerge to strengthen its global competitiveness, and in turn its economy and standard of living.Some pithy quotations go down in the...


    Bill Stankiewicz
    03/05/2016 #3 Bill Stankiewicz
    Your very welcome Jim! regards, Bill Stankiewicz, www.savannahsupplychain.com
    Jim Taggart
    02/05/2016 #2 Jim Taggart
    #1 Thanks for taking time to read my post.
    Bill Stankiewicz
    29/04/2016 #1 Bill Stankiewicz
  17. ProducerRichard Claydon

    Richard Claydon

    Ironies of the Change Management Industry
    Ironies of the Change Management IndustryI have a PhD in irony. No, really I do. It isn't a funky joke. I spent years researching the relationship between organisations, leadership, change and irony. It's something I take very seriously. Which is perhaps ironic in itself.  It attempts to...


    Jim Taggart
    29/04/2016 #7 Jim Taggart
    An insightful commentary.
    Richard Claydon
    19/04/2016 #6 Richard Claydon
    #5 Thanks, Daniela.
    Daniela Umpierrez
    19/04/2016 #5 Daniela Umpierrez
    It was a very interesting read! I love you articles!! @Richard Claydon
    Richard Claydon
    19/04/2016 #4 Richard Claydon
    #2 Thanks, Carolyn. Much appreciated and I'm glad it resonated.
    Richard Claydon
    19/04/2016 #3 Richard Claydon
    #1 Life would be boring if we agreed about everything, Catalina. Hope it was an interesting read.
    Carolyn Kiel
    16/04/2016 #2 Carolyn Kiel
    Hi Richard, this is a fascinating article. I've done a lot of work that can be described as "change management" and it's really enlightening to see what works and what doesn't. Cynicism creeps in when leadership isn't committed in word and deed. Your point #4 about simple complex leadership really resonated with me. There's no single formula or model for great leadership; there are many paths and they all require a lot of work and self-awareness.
    NO one
    15/04/2016 #1 NO one
    Hi Richard, I agree of course in some parts, in some I differ. What stands out the most for me is point #3. I think that travelling is the best way to open people's minds, then exercising creativity, and experiencing something that takes you out of your comfort zone. At the end, being disruptive for me is doing something new to the extreme so people won't feel comfortable with it. I agree that nowadays the way people perceive the concept is wonderful, opening society's mind will bring so much development in all aspects.
  18. ProducerKevin Pashuk

    Kevin Pashuk

    Gramma's House, Hockey, & Sh*t Disturbers
    Gramma's House, Hockey, & Sh*t DisturbersWhen I was a kid, I loved visiting my Gramma, up to a point.My grandmother fit every stereotypical thing you could say about Grammas. There was lots of love, us kids were the most important thing in the world, there was a ton of food, and she had...


    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    12/09/2016 #31 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #29 We weren't so full of it once upon a time Nicole. Am just trying to return to being in-no-scent here ;) And when the #$it hits the fan no one's spared you know :) Apple Blossom LOL...that's a real stinky skeleton in the closet there!
    Nicole Chardenet
    12/09/2016 #30 Nicole Chardenet
    Black Widows In The Privy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5jv9RfcOqY

    (And you thought Shelob was a threat, @Kevin Pashuk!)
    Nicole Chardenet
    12/09/2016 #29 Nicole Chardenet
    #27 Wow Praveen. You know more about s**t than anyone else here! And 'colon-ialism'! LOL!

    My mother tells me that her grandparents took awhile before they bought into that whole newfangled water closet thing. In the meantime, when one came to visit, one had to deal with a s**t can in the closet. Yes really. Well one day the s**t can rusted out as my grandmother was lifting it for emptying and...it emptied in the closet which was not what she intended! So she cleaned out the closet but in an effort to get rid of the stench she sprinkled it with apple blossom perfume, which Mom said made it WAAAAAY WORSE. To this day she can't *stand* the smell of apple blossom perfume :)
    Diane Schultz
    10/09/2016 #28 Diane Schultz
    First, funny and inventive messaging. I first encountered at my husband's great uncle's farm. His daughter updated it and made it the nicest outhouse ever in remote Upper Michigan. Nevertheless, I could not think of using it having grown up with a modern convenience. You made me laugh. Thanks for great article.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    10/09/2016 #27 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    That's one helluva sh*tstorm in a ...er...pee cup for sure dear @Kevin Pashuk! Lol...the analogies...! Puttin it right back where it belongs...right up the class. Working class ;) If i were to relate things here, a few decades ago, indoor plumbing meant bringing the sh*t home from the outhouse(s)...there were distinct ones for the housekeepers/servants and landlords. Colon-ialism again ;) The outhouse kept the bad smells and critters away from the living quarters. Water was and still is the cleaning agent with mild soap. (So much water right down the drain). Of course there were challenges and perils of using those places at night. Well it all has to do with our diet anyway...the way we need so much stuff today to keep clean and stay in hygiene. Our ancestors had none of these darned sh*tty issues or even the science of crapology to delve deep into, thankfully. You will never ever forget this one though. It is said that the diet of a certain sect of highly spiritual and spartan dwellers once upon a time, was so well balanced with veges, fruits, fibre and all...that when it came to nature's call, all they had to do was to go behind the bushes, do a semi crouch with palms on knees bent forward slightly, breathe in, apply a little pressure and shoot out the relatively inoffensive fibre enforced digested solid pelleted waste. Like the goats, but varying in size and colour and of course, volume! Ahh the benefits and goodness of such pure living! Applied to modern work and ethics, I'd just say what goes in is what comes out. I believe we need doers and supervisors more than managers and sh*tsturbers just making a career out of shi*tsturbance.
    Nicole Chardenet
    10/09/2016 #25 Nicole Chardenet
    Don't tell me I don't know s**t. I know a lot more s**t about s**t after reading this s**tty post. And there *is* a more grownup point to it as well - spread the s**t disturbance far and wide. If you are on beBee, you are a s**t disturber. Embrace it. And share your s**t. :)
    Nicole Chardenet
    10/09/2016 #24 Nicole Chardenet
    #22 Good thing you didn't live in ancient Rome. When I was in Ephesus years ago I saw an ancient Roman toity for men which was a whole *room* full of holes lined up along stone benches. Let me tell you, taking a public dump was a communal experience back then. Maybe even a social experience.

    And just to make you shudder with horror, my brother researched this in his "History of Toilets" presentation to his son's class on Parents Day several years ago - complete with a Powerpoint with pictures - in which he explained that the ancient Romans didn't have toilet paper so there was a bucket of water with a sponge tied to a stick in it. You used it to wipe yourself, then put it back in the bucket for the next guy.

    There, see? You learned something new today! You're welcome. Sorry about the nightmares this weekend. :)

    Oh yeah, and point taken. I will share this on BeBee as well!
    Ken Boddie
    10/09/2016 #23 Ken Boddie
    Interesting to see parallels between Canada and Oz, Kev. We also have an abundance of sh-t stirrers but my attention was drawn to the rural outdoors dunny or long drop, a haven in our case for the redback spider. These little critters can deliver a very painful bite and subsequent swelling and are also occasionally found indoors. Being a man of some caution when it comes to pain, I always lift the toilet seat for a quick look prior to settling down to read the newspaper. Better risking a nip on the hand than on the 'dangly bits' to which you so aptly referred in a recent terrorist swan tale.
    Kevin Pashuk
    09/09/2016 #22 Kevin Pashuk
    #18 I could never figure out the logic of a two-holer... I don't want to share that space with anyone.
    Randy Keho
    09/09/2016 #21 Randy Keho
    Who the hell wants to be a mamby-pamby "Effluent Agitator?" "Sh*t Disturbers" unite!
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    09/09/2016 #20 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    BTW, all that have commented on this buzz are EA candidates and we need to bring @Jim Murray into the mix.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    09/09/2016 #19 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    This is a fun and amusing post @Kevin Pashuk. You're pretty good at stirring the pot and the proof is in this buzz. I believe we have a few good "effluent agitators", which is a good thing. We all can't portray ourselves as being on the same page all the time because we're not. This is good material for a hive?
    Aaron Skogen
    09/09/2016 #18 Aaron Skogen
    Ah, the good ol' outhouse. Well, at least it wasn't a Norwegian two-seater. . .

    "What a load of crap!" That is what I like to tell people when they tell me that "it won't work", or "we've always done it this way" @Kevin Pashuk View more
    Ah, the good ol' outhouse. Well, at least it wasn't a Norwegian two-seater. . .

    "What a load of crap!" That is what I like to tell people when they tell me that "it won't work", or "we've always done it this way" @Kevin Pashuk. The only constant in life is change, get over it and embrace it, life is more fun that way. While I am guilty of getting complacent at times in my career, I am considered a full-on "effluent agitator", and happy to call bullshit when I see it.

    This is no bullshit, a wonderful analogy and all around great post! Your an "Affluent Influencer" in my book man! Close
    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    09/09/2016 #17 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    #14 Count me in for two, size L. LOL,
    Phil Friedman
    09/09/2016 #16 Phil Friedman
    #14 @Kevin Pashuk - And here I thought that "AI" stood for "ain't so intelligent."
    Kevin Pashuk
    09/09/2016 #15 Kevin Pashuk
    #12 It's not 'lazy' @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian when it becomes more efficient.
    Kevin Pashuk
    09/09/2016 #14 Kevin Pashuk
    #13 I'm thinking of having t-shirts and other merch made up with the slogan "If I can't be an Affluent Influencer, I'm gonna be an Effluent Agitator!" How many shall I put you down for @Phil Friedman View more
    #13 I'm thinking of having t-shirts and other merch made up with the slogan "If I can't be an Affluent Influencer, I'm gonna be an Effluent Agitator!" How many shall I put you down for @Phil Friedman? Close
    Phil Friedman
    09/09/2016 #13 Phil Friedman
    @Kevin Pashuk - superb reasoning. I also applaud your coining of the term "Effluent Agitator", and will be adding it to my list alonside "Donkey Excavation." Cheers!
    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    09/09/2016 #12 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    Love it. If it ain't broke, break it! I've been known to stir the poop sometimes. It comes from being inherently lazy. I always keep a weather eye out for possible improvements. Early in my career, I had a boss who called me constructively lazy. I like that.
  19. ProducerMichael Angelo Icarus Yusufidis
    👀 Not the story.  👂The numbers. How the story broke online.
    👀 Not the story. 👂The numbers. How the story broke online.Check this ou via LinkedIn. Consider focusing on how the story broke online. That's fruit. ...


    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Our good Dr. Seuss. Always makes us smile, and glad he visits us often.