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Doctors by Oath - beBee

Doctors by Oath

~ 100 buzzes
Humanitarianism naturally exibits the "knotting together" for one patient goal: to 'do no harm.'
Buzzes
  1. Donald Grandy

    Donald Grandy

    08/07/2016
    “Those who can’t find time for exercise will have to make time for illness.”
    Donald Grandy
    Healthy Body
    yourdream.smartlivingtoday.com
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    Comments

    Dale Masters
    31/07/2016 #5 Dale Masters
    What if...1) the connective tissue holding your abs together is weak, and you have a herniation in the front...AND 2) Your spine is crumbling, your disks are a mess, and your spine is being held up by bone spurs? I used to lift weights. I worked in physical jobs all my life. At one point I was on one end of a 300 lb bundle of steel...and helped to unload the entire truck. What do I do?? My legs are getting progressively weaken, and have a birth defect in my left shoulder that I'm told will regrow bone spurs over and over again as fast as they're removed! I am terrified.
    Donald Grandy
    23/07/2016 #3 Donald Grandy
    #1 So many people take their health for granted. Take time for fitness or you will be taking time for your sickness..
    Donald Grandy
    15/07/2016 #2 Donald Grandy
    #1 Amen!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    15/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    This should be on a Billboard so those who can use their bodies, do use their bodies.
  2. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    10/07/2016
    An Armed Robbery, Psychological Trauma, and My Daughter: Part I
    An Armed Robbery, Psychological Trauma, and My Daughter: Part IIt was Father's Day morning. I was sitting on the couch and surfing beBee on my laptop. My daughter, Meghan, wished me a happy Father's Day as she left for work. She works at the local cellphone store, which is only a few blocks from our home....
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    Comments

    Phil Friedman
    14/07/2016 #14 Phil Friedman
    I am sorry for your daughter's experience and trauma. I hope she heals soon. I grew up in inner-city Chicago, and a number of my extended family were retail merchants of one sore or another, so I am no stranger to harrowing stories of being robbed at gunpoint. We used to say hope that you get robbed by a pro, who will be calm enough not to shoot you or beat you, if you do not resist. And it seems bizarre to compare "level" of armed robbery, but the level of gratuitous violence seems to have risen. I think this is likely because of increased anger, but also because of a slow slide into oblivion of the ability to empathize with anyone, anywhere. I am following you, and will be watching for your subsequent reflections on this critical topic.
    Pamela L. Williams
    14/07/2016 #13 Pamela L. Williams
    Randy, I'm so sorry this happened to you and your daughter. I understand what it feels like. I've been involved in two shooting incidences.
    The first I was in my car when a guy walking down the road suddenly raised a double barrel shotgun and emptied it into the front of my car. Ironically I was married to a law officer at the time. He heard the report on the CB radio he kept by bed (he worked third shift). Before his fellow officers could get there my husband was out of bed and had tracked down the shooter from the description. He knew exactly who it was and where he was going (my husband knew everyone in town!). When the backup arrived my husband had kicked in the door and had the shooter pinned to the wall by the throat. (oops) The second incident I had my 5 yr. old in the car when we drove through a shootout. In one movement I unbuckled her and shoved her to the floor (kids could still ride in the front seat then). What we also forget is the family's of these officers. So many are threatened by the criminals their husbands or wives arrest. My husband came home early to fine a guy he had arrested breaking into our home through an open window. It was 4AM and I was sound asleep inside. I knew nothing until my husband woke me up covered in blood from where the guy 'tripped' and fell into a hard brick wall. I feel no sympathy for any of these people. Case Closed. Officers are put in difficult situations constantly. Some can handle it and keep their head on straight, others develop what I called a All-Powerful complex and these are the ones that end up overreacting. It is up to their leaders to recognize this and address it before things go too far. I thank our officers often for their service because I would hate to imagine what it would be like without them. Again, I'm so sorry your daughter went through this horrible incident. My best to her and you. Sorry for the long comment. This is a subject for which I have deep feelings.
    Randy Keho
    13/07/2016 #12 Randy Keho
    Local police are now being issued shotguns that fire bean bags and a local man is handing out blue light bulbs for residents to use in their porch lights to support the police. What a great idea. @Lisa Gallagher View more
    Local police are now being issued shotguns that fire bean bags and a local man is handing out blue light bulbs for residents to use in their porch lights to support the police. What a great idea. @Lisa Gallagher @Dale Masters @Leckey Harrison Close
    Lisa Gallagher
    11/07/2016 #11 Lisa Gallagher
    #7 I am not comfortable with handling a gun, so I love the idea of turning yourself into a weapon. Many people have their own guns used on them sadly. Our guns are locked, ammo is locked elsewhere. We have no open weapons to use for defense at home.
    Dale Masters
    11/07/2016 #10 Dale Masters
    @Randy Keho I cannot imagine what that must have been like. Words cannot express my grief, or sorrow. I have PTSD...and ow, so do your daughter and you. May the Most High bless you and keep you safe. There seems to be a race war building in the US---I hope I'm wrong, but I just shred a buzz that hits home. There is an evil force that is affecting this country like a viral pandemic.
    Leckey Harrison
    11/07/2016 #9 Leckey Harrison
    @Randy Keho, will you PM me please?
    Leckey Harrison
    11/07/2016 #8 Leckey Harrison
    Wow, Randy. I am sorry to hear about that. I've had guns pointed at me a couple times, and didn't care for it one damn bit. Like Selim, I turned myself into a weapon, and that training does help in these situations even if you never use it. My best to your family going forward.
    Selim Yeniçeri
    11/07/2016 #7 Selim Yeniçeri
    First of all, I'm very sorry to hear this happened to your family @Randy Keho. I know how traumatising it can be from experience. My opinion about such matters are quite marginal, I know. But personally, since I don't like keeping a firearm where my 11 year old son lives with us, and I've been sick and tired of all the bully types in the past, I turned myself into a weapon, which I can hold a total control over all the time. From what I read here, I believe the robbers weren't professionals (thankfully), or they wouldn't leave witnesses behind, neither they would show their faces. At the other hand, it's obvious that they're not afraid of law enforcers, probably believing they're inadequate. Moreover, yes, I agree that some law enforcers tend to use their power over innocent people, so they should be kept in check, but laws slow them down to react in such situations, too. So, my suggestion is for one to have a good training for self-defense. "You're a victim unless you're a warrior" is never going to be an old belief unless mankind is out of living in cave age.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 @Randy Keho: so many thoughts revolving in my head...dread. I want our older world, instead. But thank God your baby girl is fine, at least on the outside for now, she has survived. Yes, I see the car following her home, much as her mind will tend to look over her shoulder. Nice entry for @Leckey Harrison to provide insight as a fireman and First Responder who has learned how to cope with multiple trauma on such a wide scope. And yes. I believe in shooting ranges and home protection, too, but I went to my gun shop, filled with gang-bangers and remiss...and my eyes opened to the underground world we all want to dismiss. It exists. Like undercover TSA on an airplane, we need "planted" John Wayne's with their guns ablaze to live in the middle of the haze of drugs and stench. And we should pay them well so they aren't tempted by the love of all that cash, that is covered with the blood of heroin needles and hash. Law enforcement, multi-ethnic, should stand firm and large, so little boys and girls will still wish to be like them, hands waving from the garage. The cop cars pass us by, and this is what we need to do. Wave. The blacks needn't run inside when the white cops are on their turf, because just like you and I, they are victims too, slaves to their own brothers. I love you and will keep up this. I will never forget.
    Robyn Shulman
    11/07/2016 #5 Robyn Shulman
    Hi @Randy Keho, I read through this story with tears in my eyes. I did not check to see if you lived in Illinois, but my instinct told me different. My heart breaks for your daughter and I cannot imagine what she is going through, along with your family. I will keep you all in my thoughts and prayers. Warmest, Robyn
    Don Kerr
    11/07/2016 #4 Don Kerr
    Thanks so much for sharing this story @Randy Keho it provides a frightening glimpse to a frightening world.
    Mamen Delgado
    10/07/2016 #3 Mamen Delgado
    Woww @Randy Keho, all my loving care for your daughter and your family, and for you. I can not imagine living a situation like the one you describe, it's like a infamous movie's scene. Looking foward to your next buzz about gun control, it's been a very difficult week in the USA. All my love from Spain and thanks so much for sharing your experience.
    Lisa Gallagher
    10/07/2016 #2 Lisa Gallagher
    @Randy Keho, I'm so sorry this happened to your daughter! As a parent, I can only imagine how you must feel. That's unnerving to hear she was followed and had to move in with a friend. I hope they catch these SOB's! My heart was pounding as I read this because I could almost imagine the fear you must have felt (understatement) after you received the call and on the drive to her workplace. I'm glad to hear they didn't do something much worse. I'm sorry for the trauma she did experience. I hope she receives counseling- I'm sure this would cause PTSD. We own guns and my husband keeps telling me he wants to take me to the shooting range to learn to shoot one. He's owned guns since I met him at the age of 18 because he's a hunter. It seems crime is on the increase everywhere. I live in a small town, and one of our pharmacies has been robbed at gunpoint once- broken into 2 times. They now have shatter proof glass and bullet proof glass around the counter of the Pharmacy. Major drug busts going on all the time. Heroin use is quite prevalent here too. The world we live in is no longer the world I knew growing up. My best to your daughter & you!
    debasish majumder
    10/07/2016 #1 debasish majumder
    heart rending post Randy Keho. perpetrators have no color. criminals have no religion. offenders are offenders, whether they are from law enforcement agency or from common folk. unless, they are being indiscriminately treated with harshest punishment, this incidents will go on, making us more vulnerable. thanks for sharing the post sir.
  3. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    11/07/2016
    An Armed Robbery, Psychological Trauma, and My Daughter: Part II
    An Armed Robbery, Psychological Trauma, and My Daughter: Part IIThe apparently uncontrollable rise in the seemingly senseless violence in the United States is directly related to economics. It's not guns. It's not race.They're a hideous manifestation of the problem, but they are not the cause.There, I've...
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    Comments

    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    26/07/2016 #29 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    That is good news @Randy Keho.
    Randy Keho
    25/07/2016 #28 Randy Keho
    My daughter appears to be doing fine. Actually, the police just apprehended the guilty parties. My daughter and her boss picked them out of a lineup. Progress is being made. My local police force is on the job.i#27
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #27 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Hi @Randy Keho, 🎀just wondering how your lovely daughter is doing, sending you all good cheer and blessings and hoping that all is as well as can be. Letting you know you are in our thoughts, and thanking you for just being 'you!' 🎀!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    19/07/2016 #26 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #25 WoW. Sad state of affairs on the general level in the community, and it makes me feel safer for you that the community is behind you. For certainly, you deserve it and people still have to have compassion amidst it all. I believe your Path is laid out before you, and you will continue to serve others and do a damn good job at it.
    Randy Keho
    15/07/2016 #25 Randy Keho
    #24 I'm extremely thankful for the support I've received in response to both of these buzzes. It's been a trying time, not just for my family, but for all the residents of my community. There's been no slowdown in the crime and violence. There's been a bank robbery everyday this week -- everyday! Add two murders, numerous drive-bys, and no suspects apprehended. The security videos clearly show their faces. My best friend is a retired Illinois State Police Commander, with 30 years service. He never had to draw his weapon -- not once.. Now, he's thinking of carrying a gun, again. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    15/07/2016 #24 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #21 I'm pleased that you liked the speech. I searched to find one just for you, @Randy Keho, since I really wanted to give you something that money can't buy. And I can't always put things into my own words ;-).
    Deb Helfrich
    14/07/2016 #23 Deb Helfrich
    @Randy Keho. I am so tremendously sorry that your daughter had to go through this horrific experience. I applaud you for sharing how this has affected her and brought you to the point of needed to write out the injustice of it all.

    You are right. This is all about economics. We have plenty of money coursing through the productivity of this country. Why are we not taking a stand to see it properly allotted to each and every citizen? Every person should have the right to a living wage in exchange for a day's work.

    But the crux of all the current inequity lies in this question - Why have we allowed our country to be ruled by corporations? All of the investment that should be in social programs, infrastructure, and civic governance is now tied up in a cycle of increasing shareholder value every three damn months. Let's start challenging why so very few of us are worthy of employment to begin with & so expendable when as expenses that can be jettisoned.

    I have no answers, but I think a lot more questions need to be leveled at the powerful niche corporations have granted themselves.
    Selim Yeniçeri
    14/07/2016 #22 Selim Yeniçeri
    #21 We can't stop them, @Randy Keho. You're right. But we can do a lot to minimize their influence over our own lives and the lives of the ones around us.
    Randy Keho
    14/07/2016 #21 Randy Keho
    Thank you for your support, Franci and Margret. That's quite the motivational speech, Margret. In regard to our leaders, France, I believe we got hoodwinked into putting too much trust into those in authority, both in business and government, and allowed them to play politics in the backroom with our futures. They don't represent us, anymore. And we can't say, "Wait a minute, that's not what we want." We just can't stop them.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    14/07/2016 #20 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    It's difficult for me to see and hear what is happening in this country. In addition to lack of good and honest leadership in the US, I believe you nailed it this statement: "If much greater number of people had a decent-paying job, there would be less need to rob, steal, and kill to survive and our daughters would be able to sleep well at night." Thank you for tackling a difficult topic with a superb post Randy Keho.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/07/2016 #19 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #10 Perhaps one good place to start is self-empowerment and positive thinking, a 'cheerleading' of sorts that allows one to set their sites for the prize...even if it is not well defined. You go at it, @Randy Keho View more
    #10 Perhaps one good place to start is self-empowerment and positive thinking, a 'cheerleading' of sorts that allows one to set their sites for the prize...even if it is not well defined. You go at it, @Randy Keho, and keep going! You do it! What a fine example you are, and an outstanding citizen to boot! And you know what? This is my gift for you today, in hopes that it restores you and all souls who feel weathered at what life has brought them. For now. ;-). I'm giving this all that I've got: https://youtu.be/AFGWnqNf6t0 Close
    Randy Keho
    13/07/2016 #18 Randy Keho
    Thank you, @Don Kerr , for your kind words. As I'm writing this, local police are searching for three bank robbers in a wooded area behind the bank. It just doesn't stop. A local man is handing out blue light bulbs for residents to use in their porch lights to show support for the police. What a great idea. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD @Selim Yeniçeri and Franci Eugenia Hoffman.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #17 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #16 @Don Kerr: Hear! Hear! Right on the spot!
    Don Kerr
    12/07/2016 #16 Don Kerr
    "Let's hope that our business and governmental leaders can somehow get past their "Darwinian" views and return us to the forms of economics that led to the greatness -- before we have another civil war." AMEN @Randy Keho View more
    "Let's hope that our business and governmental leaders can somehow get past their "Darwinian" views and return us to the forms of economics that led to the greatness -- before we have another civil war." AMEN @Randy Keho Given the rawness of your daughter's experience and the understandable passion you must have felt, you are remarkable in your restraint and rationality. I applaud you for that and for making the time to let your voice be heard. I just watched the film The Big Short. It provided what you would hope was a fictionalized, dramatized view of the 2008 housing crisis. It was neither fiction nor drama. It was a sad statement of reality that drove people all around the world into an incessant cycle of poverty simply to create obscene wealth for a few. It appears that similar financial vehicles are reappearing to line the coffers of the already stupidly rich. It does not augur well for an outcome other than the 'Darwinian'. Close
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Randy Keho: Just stopping by to let you know that many of us care. It may not seem like it, but for every one person that expresses compassion, there are 100 or 1000 more that are too embarrassed or uncomfortable to speak. So, just know that you and your family are in our prayers and you are very beloved to us here on beBee. I'm working on building a stronger internal structure of people who can speak to provide the needed human touch....and I light a candle to keep you warm and let your light continue to shine. That is my prayer for you. Amen.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 @Randy Keho, You are definitely not alone, sir! Perhaps those best equipped to begin to think of the cusp of these matters are those that have seen death and human destruction the most. I think perhaps @Dr. Allen Brown and @Leckey Harrison.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Randy Keho: Exactly my thoughts when I made my first comment. Just so much to bear. Needs processing, it is written so dam profoundly.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 Another unspoken yet glaring question: Where is God in all of this? Millions and billions of people are calling this scenario a Sign of The End Times ~ evil reigns despite God's Commands. This glares out: 2 Timothy 3 ~New King James Version:

    Perilous Times and Perilous Men
    3 But know this, that in the last days perilous times will come:
    2 For men will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy,
    3 unloving, unforgiving, slanderers, without self-control, brutal, despisers of good,
    4 traitors, headstrong, haughty, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God,
    5 having a form of godliness but denying its power.
    Randy Keho
    12/07/2016 #11 Randy Keho
    #6 Thank you, Franci, thoughtful engagement and team-building are powerful forces.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    12/07/2016 #10 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #9 Yes, I agree and that can open up a completely new subject. Together we have a chance and now we need to choose the right path.
  4. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Doctors who take the Hippocratic Oath with intensity and fervor will realize that just as we can not judge a book by its color, a patient can smile through so many tears. It is up to the Doctor to establish the relationship, so this just spills and appears. @Dale Masters, @Randy Smith, @Randy Keho, @Lada Prkic, @Lisa Gallagher, @Sara Jacobovici, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Paul Walters, @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian, @Max Carter, @Mohammed A. Jawad, @Ali Anani. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
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    Comments

    mohammed khalaf
    14/07/2016 #15 mohammed khalaf
    indeed the doctor same of clemency angel ,he can recovering patient by touch
    CityVP Manjit
    12/07/2016 #14 CityVP Manjit
    One of the big decisions my family makes is finding a doctor relationship which aligns with our family values. In that regard we have been lucky twice, including the physician we deal with today. Both physicians and patients exist in the diverse range of human beings and there are awe inspiring physicians and patients and their are annoying physicians and patients. There is a problem with the system of healthcare that pays very little regard to value-based practice because incentives and constituencies have been built into the system that detract this outcome. Where compassionate care is an essential part of the physician-patient relationship there are great short-comings, but advocating common sense comes smack against incentives and political constituency - so these are systemic issues from which I am beginning to hear more and more horror stories - sacrifices that include the patient as the quiet warrior and physicians who themselves maybe quiet warriors - the key is getting the quiet warriors together, and that as a political constituency in healthcare, has the makings of a very powerful one, one that has to rival payers, pharmaceutical lobbies, specialist groups etc etc
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    12/07/2016 #13 Mohammed A. Jawad
    In fact, doctors ouught to hold their patients in esteem, listen to them with calmness and leverage their moods to liveliness while treating them. That way every doctor champions the righteous path and becomes a comforter to patients.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 Rereading, I believe you bring up the concept of the metaphor, rather than alluding that I had done so. Although I graduated from USC Medical School, I "grew up" at Oral Roberts' University Medical School on a full scholarship to serve as a missionary. We all prayed with one another, especially before our first human anatomy dissection class, and then with our patients as a natural part of 'being' a doctor. So I have no capacity to understand other doctors who simply are not healers. None. And perhaps not-so-obviously, I've been disabled for 10 years after a tragic car accident, becoming the feared physician-turned-patient. I self-diagnosed all my Invisible Illnesses and have been the recipient of doctors who still think that I am 'pretending' to be sick. These are my experiences I've shared: https://www.bebee.com/producer/@margaret-aranda/invisible-illnesses-we-are-paralyzed and https://www.bebee.com/producer/@margaret-aranda/is-the-hippocratic-oath-still-the-hippocratic-oath and https://www.bebee.com/producer/@margaret-aranda/distracted-driving-derails-an-innocent-doctor and https://www.bebee.com/producer/@margaret-aranda/what-is-a-doctor-by-oath ... and more still in my head! Thanks for your passion...it is real life.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    12/07/2016 #11 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Doctors are very special people to their patients as someone to trust, confide in and look up to. As in any profession, there will those that set bad examples, which is unfortunate. There must be caring, compassion and empathy and I mean this is something a person in the medical profession is born with and not learned.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 @Sara Jacobovici: I'm missing the book metaphor part, but that could just be my brain injury... Emphatically and Absolutely, no 'real' doctor who abides by the sworn Hippocratic Oath can ever do anything at all, but have honest and true empathy and compassion for each individual human being who comes to her for healing help. It is utterly enigmatic for me, as a Doctor by Oath (DBO) to think of being any other kind of person, let alone 'doctor.' All the 'bad doctors' out there give many purely undefiled doctors great sadness and rage.
    Max Carter
    11/07/2016 #9 Max Carter
    As an Empathic Healr I often have a knowing of what lies beneath if I am not already experiencing their emotions over it.
    Lada Prkic
    11/07/2016 #7 Lada Prkic
    My mother is one of those patients who can smile through so many tears. She is the quite warrior, as you are, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD.
    Ali Anani
    11/07/2016 #6 Ali Anani
    !@Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD- I could't agree more. I discussed in one of my recent buzzes the factors hat bring patients to hospitals and particular MDs. These are confidence, intimacy, ride and passion. WIthout feeling the passion a doctor is a human without heart.
    debasish majumder
    11/07/2016 #5 debasish majumder
    patients are victim of circumstances, while doctors can comprehensively understand their limitations. now, sympathy can only i guess, can instill an enormous energy to enhance his or her immunity, enabling to fight against the odds and eventually win. doctors are the most effective catalyst with an eye to identify bacteria or viruses, reason for the patients drudgery. empathy is the tool through which a doctor can cure his patient.. patience and perseverance are the only tool through which a doctor diagnose and unfortunately most of them are oblivious to it and obsessed with multinationals bait and unfortunately themselves become the worst victim of this most dreadful vice, paving the greed to annihilate him helplessly! however, lovely intriguing post. thanks for sharing @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD.
    Michael Angelo Icarus Yusufidis
    11/07/2016 #4 Michael Angelo Icarus Yusufidis
    I can relate to this as a patient. It's also important that patients realize Drs are human too and that we need to get better at understanding and articulating symptoms accurately as to provide Drs with the guidance and information they need to diagnose and treat accurately, especially when treating chronic illness. It's a two way street.
    Lisa Gallagher
    11/07/2016 #3 Lisa Gallagher
    I find this to be so true @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. My husband has dealt with numerous health conditions as I've written on a few of your posts. He is never one to complain and will smile through his tears. As a matter of fact, he's so gregarious when he see's his Dr's, I've had to remind him to be honest and show a bit of frustration because they can only treat what they are aware of. That's why I go with him, I'm his voice of reason. I think it helps to have someone with you if a person is unable to be honest and feels they need to hide what's really going on. There are Dr.'s not matter what they hear who still minimize issues and that scares me.
    Sara Jacobovici
    11/07/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    Agreed @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. Uisng a book as a metaphor is very relevant. If a docotr is made up of the sum of memorized information from books without realizing that is the relationship with the human being and the complexity of who we are that is the most influential aspect of treatment, then that doctor is literlly working in the dark..
  5. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    What is a "Doctor by Oath?"
    What is a "Doctor by Oath?"by Dr Margaret Aranda /A "Doctor by Oath" is not just a 'regular' doctor. Oh, no. / Indeed, let us call her the "Doctor By Oath", or DBO (singular, in possession form). Allow me to introduce this term. A DBO is an endangered species, an entity unto...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 @Dale Masters: all great points, my sweet. So great to have these conversations here with you! ...and physics, too? lol. And yes, lots of content in your concise statement, and I do believe that doctors on an Indian reservation will also learn the true meaning of the word, "grateful," for the patients are amazingly humble and it is something to behold. And just as a historical note, while on an Indian reservation outside of Tulsa, Oklahoma, I was a medical student rotating on the Ob/Gyn maternity floor. I delivered the baby of a woman whose last name was "Tulsa" and when I asked, she confirmed that the city was named after her great-great-great grandfather, a tribal Chief. Ahh....such richness.
    Dale Masters
    11/07/2016 #2 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Those who are not DBOs do more harm than good. I believe the suffix "MD [DBO]" should be permitted, as it would allow patients to choose a REAL doctor. (I also believe that misuse of the term should result in a prison sentence, but you and I both know that the probablity of that happening exists in the region of negative numbers.) I also think that every doctor should be required to spend a year at an Indian reservation, learning the true meaning of the word "healer".
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    To those who need to know this the most, so that it brings great depth of value first to themselves, then back to the profession. @Dale Masters, @Gary Sharpe, @Deb Helfrich, @Randy Smith, @Randy Keho, @Brian McKenzie, @Kirstie-Sweetie Louise, @Dr. Allen Brown, @CityVP Manjit, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani. For starters ;-).
  6. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Invisible Illnesses: ME/CFS and "Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease"
    Invisible Illnesses: ME/CFS and "Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease"by Dr Margaret Aranda / In dedication to Luminescentfeeling, Across the Pond and Still, Oh! So Fond!Is Myalgic Encephalomyopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) a "real" illness? Are you surprised that for decades, millions of patients knew that...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #18 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #17 You bet!
    Dale Masters
    11/07/2016 #17 Dale Masters
    #15 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Sometimes just an hour (or minute) at a time.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #13 @Deb Helfrich: In the 70's, for the first time, a mom found a straight razor blade in her baby's jar of creamed food. I was daunted. So even in 1979, my son never ate baby food out of one single baby food jar. Why would I trust how someone else feeds my precious boo-boo? So I bought a little food grinder with a hand-held spinning handle....and in 2002, when I had my 2nd baby, I did the same thing. Except this time, "everyone" was buying that same exact food grinder, and I was shocked that I had made my own baby food back in the 70's. Today, after both my children refused candy and cookies even at 8 years of age, I am so proud that they are both extremely nutrition-cautious. And as a physician who went to the only medical school with required Nutrition Classes in the 80's, I'm elated to have kept up my own trend to study Immunonutrition. I introduced it to the public in my Women's Health book of 2014. It still hasn't caught on. But I keep at it: https://www.bebee.com/producer/@margaret-aranda/hey-let-s-eat-watermelon . Be interested to know your opinion here. Thanks!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #12 @Dale Masters: ibid on the reasons for being here. Perhaps it is a gift or a curse, to know so much that the future is not unpredictable. Just one day at a time, yes?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 @Neal Rauhauser: Let us know how it goes! Best to you! And thank you again, @Deb Helfrich!
    Deb Helfrich
    11/07/2016 #13 Deb Helfrich
    #10 Food is medicine - was for much of our history. So the concern for the food chain is truly one of the top issues. And the conglomerates simply do not have a heart - their requirement to put shareholder profit first means they cannot be expected to ever show concern for health. Their only model is do whatever they want and beg for forgiveness later.
    Dale Masters
    11/07/2016 #12 Dale Masters
    #10 That is my wish also, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD...however, know that I'm here for a reason, and as vile and miserable as the world has become, my desire to achieve my objective gets stronger and stronger.
    Neal Rauhauser
    11/07/2016 #11 Neal Rauhauser
    #5 That seems a simple test, I'll give it a try.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 I worry about the food chain. Take this math: (1) Bayer(R), who has killed and maimed (in my opinion) thousands of child-bearing women (tons of data, all before Congress now) with their corruptly-FDA-approved ( I watched the video myself and it was a joke, with snickers and sneers and one man who was later ousted for accepting too much money from the company - he will be judged -) medical device Essure(R).... + (2) Monsanto wines, who killed the world's bees and whose pesticides reportedly only allow their own GMO produce to grow. Add those up as Bayer wants to buy Monsanto = grow your own organics & learn to become your own bee-keeper, for real. Or, just go live on a farm so you'll always have your own food. I hope I die before the world wreaks all this havoc. I've had enough already.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #9 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 @ Dale, I think you are absolutely right that the code of ethics for doctors to prescribe pain medications is being curtailed by some evil force. What do 'they' want? Do they want all the disabled people in chronic pain to kill themselves? Ha. I don't think that they have any idea of how strong we really are. We are not wimps. That, my friend, is for certain. If they wanted to institute some 'survival of the fittest' here, perhaps it is the very 'fit' who will 'out-fit' the average, normal 'fit' person. Ha.
    Dale Masters
    11/07/2016 #8 Dale Masters
    Living in a sea of microwave radiation doesn't help, either.
    Dale Masters
    10/07/2016 #7 Dale Masters
    WOW!
    I wonder if my streak of getting strep throat 6 times in 5 years set the stage for me...and walking in waist-deep snow for an hour & a half to get to work (only to be told 4 hours later when my clothes were still wet that I had to shovel snow) was the kicker.
    I do know that after that day, I had to go up the stairs to my apartment (3 stories) on my bottom, because my legs couldn't lift me.
    I do know that if 100 million people in America (excluding children and the elderly) are in chronic pain, and the response from the AMA is to exclude pain as the 5th vital sign (along with the CDC's collusion with the addictions recovery industry regarding the new opioid guidelines), it adds up to a violation of the UN Convention on Torture.
    1.3 BILLION people in the world (that's a little less than 1 in 7) suffer from chronic pain worldwide...and pain is not the 5th vial sign????

    Something sadistic, dangerous, and evil is going on here. I suspect it has something to do with "population control" (AKA eugenics).
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    10/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 @Deb Helfrich: Great tidbit...harmless enough as long as any Rx's don't 'like' an acidic environment in the stomach. But hey, if it works, that would be a real Qualty of Life issue for @Gary Sharpe. You are so kind to make this suggestion.
    Deb Helfrich
    10/07/2016 #5 Deb Helfrich
    @Neal Rauhauser, I have a simple thing to try. Who knows? As we age our stomach acids decrease and when I went very low carb, I had some very serious pains. I started taking a tablespoon of Apple Cider Vinegar with meals and these serious pains that I would describe as a lead balloon inflating after eating pretty much resolved. from that first meal. I spent a few months adding ACV whereverI could or taking lemon water in a one to one ratio as preventative and now no more pains. Lemon worked in January for @Gary Sharpe's gall-bladder pain when eating fats. When it comes to process of elimination, what could be easier? See if your stomach needs more acid for digestion.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    10/07/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 @Neal Rauhauser: I went back to your first Comment, to get the aligned commentary. Happy to advise you of one thing: the patients know more than the doctors. If you really let that sink in, you'll get the epiphany that you are better off taking your "Chief Complaints" (=doctor language) to a Group of Lymies on FB. Many have the same experiences as you...and can tailor your medical management to a tee. 👀That's what this Bee sees. 👀Clearly.
    Neal Rauhauser
    10/07/2016 #3 Neal Rauhauser
    #2 I had my first ER visit since 2014 a few days ago. I'm relieved I don't have liver cancer or a gall bladder that might burst. I do wish it had proven to be gallstones or something else easily resolved surgically, I hate this whack-a-mole process.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    10/07/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 @Neal Rauhauser: We are living in the same "Invisible Illnesses" and "Invisible Disabilities" world of the humiliated and mentally stressed and 're'-stressed at every single ER visit. I totally get it, my friend. I have your back covered if you need anything that I can do. And that's not an invisible offer. You know that. We're tried and true.
    Neal Rauhauser
    10/07/2016 #1 Neal Rauhauser
    This is my life. Off to the hospital, pain in upper right quadrant of abdomen. Ultrasound, blood tests, no gall stones, no inflammation, it just hurts and if I eat the wrong thing I sleep all day. Getting the "it's all in your head" rap from doc who practically assaulted me, jabbing the sore spot over and over, as if I was faking the pain. This is an experience I've repeated three or four times since catching Lyme in 2007, always the same condescending attitude. Glad to see there are studies and names for it now.
  7. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Starting this Hive with my qualifications. While my CV is plain for all to see, what is unwritten is the nature of my being. I thrive on resistance, I toil firmly in the slippery waters of our ship at wretched, stormy sea. And I never, ever give up. I fall, just like you. And then, I get back up again. Against all odds. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    10/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    This is the Award that brings me most humility. Given by the Invisible Disabilities Association for work to increase awareness of dysautonomia while my lips were blue from fainting to the floor in my undergarments, this is 2011 The Perseverance Award. It will never be in the 'past tense.' It lives with me daily, for I live to serve.