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Dr Margaret Aranda: Age, Time, and Notes - beBee

Dr Margaret Aranda: Age, Time, and Notes

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This is what she wants Beez to give: A Part of Themselves that made them who they are.
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  1. ProducerPaul "Pablo" Croubalian
    Getting Started on beBee:  The Big - Assed List
    Getting Started on beBee: The Big - Assed ListAngus Grady messaged me yesterday, Angus seemed to remember that I once wrote a getting started guide for beBee. He couldn't find it.I actually wrote a few.I thought I would assemble them all here.I listed them in some semblance of what I consider a...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/08/2016 #19 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #16 Accolades for making our jobs easier in Welcoming in NewBeeZ! I was trying to do this 'Piecemeal' here and there, This is #1! Question (you know me lol): How will I get updates for Hive 🐝"Dr Margaret Aranda: My NewBeeZ"🐝? Can you track all who Comment & Request so you Auto-Buzz us in? I'd like to get Tagged on all future renditions, please! Mercí / Gracias / Abogado / 🌺 🌻!
    Froilán Pérez
    22/07/2016 #17 Froilán Pérez
    @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian what an outstanding and well-organized "List". Will share. Have a great weekend and again thank you for your excellent contributions. BZZZZ 🐝🐝🐝
    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    19/07/2016 #16 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    By popular demand, I added a link to this on my profile.
    Sara Jacobovici
    19/07/2016 #15 Sara Jacobovici
    You are a great resource @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian! Much appreciated.
    Mamen Delgado
    19/07/2016 #14 Mamen Delgado
    Superb @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian!! All the information together!! 👏
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    19/07/2016 #13 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Thanks for putting this together, @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian. It is very helpful.
    Loribeth Pierson
    19/07/2016 #12 Loribeth Pierson
    Thanks Paul, for putting this together. Yes, put a link to this on your profile. (◕‿◕✿)
    Federico Álvarez San Martín
    19/07/2016 #11 Federico Álvarez San Martín
    #10 hahahaha thanks Mr. Ambassador Pest. ;)
    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    19/07/2016 #10 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    #9 Sure, Fede. ask whatever you want... It will be your turn to be The Pest heheheheh
    Federico Álvarez San Martín
    19/07/2016 #9 Federico Álvarez San Martín
    #7 Claro @Javier beBee. Cualquier duda sobre este buzz le pregunto a @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian. Thanks!
    Miriam Rogado Luesma
    19/07/2016 #8 Miriam Rogado Luesma
    #7 WIP!
    David Grinberg
    19/07/2016 #6 David Grinberg
    Thanks for another awesome post, @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian. This is excellent social marketing material I will be using for cross-channel pollination for beBee.
    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    19/07/2016 #5 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    #2 Thanks, @Graham Edwards... I can be chatty, I didn't realize how many beBee How-to posts I had written
    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    19/07/2016 #4 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    #3 Good idea, Dean. I just did that and scheduled 84 tweets on it. I wonder if anyone notices the links on profiles? Anybody have thoughts on that?
    Dean Owen
    19/07/2016 #3 Dean Owen
    Great idea to centralize everything. Maybe put a link to this on your profile?
    Graham Edwards
    19/07/2016 #2 Graham Edwards
    Thanks for this buzz @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian. I really, really like the Bee's manifesto btw!
    Pamela L. Williams
    19/07/2016 #1 Pamela L. Williams
    Perfect Paul! I re-shared several of these yesterday. You just made my job easier :-). I can now point newBees to one post! Note to self: Must save this link to paste in Welcome to beBee emails!!!
  2. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Age 3: In the Blink of a Car
    Age 3: In the Blink of a Car/ by Dr Margaret Aranda / (Third Edition of previous post on my Author blog, www.drmargaretaranda.blogspot.com ; "Perseverance")"She is still "mi muñeca," the baby doll of my cuddly kittens when I was Age Two. I held mi muñeca so close,...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #19 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #18 I could easily blast out his name, and the hospital, too. Neither one was helpful to help me get through. I ended up with my 2nd Traumatic Brain Injury with DI; a torn left shoulder rotator cuff that needed surgical repair, and months of Rehab that set me back 5 years. But you know me. I Survived and RROOOAAARRED alive with God's spirit aflame in me....because I have a Purpose here on earth, one that is destined to be.
    Dale Masters
    22/07/2016 #18 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I would love to meet that neurologist. I REALLY would...
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #17 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #10 Absolutely right, for "Being able to write about your experience is a major step toward healing." It is a tough road, to write about such things, yet what always rings in my mind is the other people that will find solstice or rhyme with the memories in their own minds. I just hope it helps instigate compassion, love, and here, the importance of the bond between mother:child. There are many women whose children have been taken away from them through divorce, and much without cause. That is yet another Buzz on its own, and I'll try to get my friend Robin Karr to come in, so that she can best explain. See? We all can have a 'win' and open the doors to help more. That's enough for me. The reflections of my writings reward me to see that they mean something, they touch people, it draws out compassion, and that's what the world needs. So thank you, my friend and mentor, for assuring me more. I need to know this, for my own good.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #12 I know there are some cultures that don't even have a 'word' for hate, as their thinking does not even go there. For Randy, in this context (hey, and only for him! lol), it's perfectly understood. And I so love that you consoled him immediately, when I wasn't there in time. So Hat's Off to You and A+, too, for being a "real person" to fill a real need. Just awesome.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 I get it, @Randy Keho, and I truly get it all. I almost mentioned your name in it, warning of its likelihood to trigger PTSD and cause anger and angst. I know what you are saying is coming from a place of love, because that's the relationship we have (even though I have yet to poke my finger in your dimples). So thank you, because I know without a doubt that you would keep me safe no matter what kind of danger I would ever be in...and that is just love, and love so sweet. Thank you, as I love you, too🙋🏽.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 Your poetic comments intrigue and allure me in, and my eyes slow down to read and absorb it...I can't get it all the first time, and that is good because I am so humbled, even though I stumble...so I save it for tomorrow again. Thank you so much.
    Randy Keho
    21/07/2016 #13 Randy Keho
    #12 That's exactly want I meant, Charles. Thanks for the clarification.
    Charles David Upchurch
    21/07/2016 #12 Charles David Upchurch
    #11 @Randy Keho I doubt that hate is the right word. It's not that it's too strong. It's that it's misdirected. If the story touched you deeply enough for you to need to vent like that, then the quality of the writing was probably excellent. You might just be afflicted with the very-common tough-guy syndrome. Generations of guys like us were raised to deny pain and vulnerability, so our go-to emotional expressions were anger and blame. I could be wrong, but I am guessing that you hated how the story made you feel, and hated that such a terrible accident could happen to anyone. I doubt that you hated the way the story was written, had it been about a happier event. Peace, dude.
    Randy Keho
    21/07/2016 #11 Randy Keho
    I can't help but hate this story, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD , I feel the pain and agony you experienced and it pains me deeply. I can't imagine the physical and mental suffering you endured. I know hate is a strong word and I don't often use it, but, in this case, I feel justified. I guess I just needed to get that out.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    21/07/2016 #10 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    You are amazing @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. Yes, you are courageous because you chose to share your story with us. Being able to write about your experience is a major step toward healing.
    debasish majumder
    21/07/2016 #9 debasish majumder
    we all are in motion. our thought are in motion. our reflections are spirally reveals to us in motion. nature gives us honestly the reflection, though in opposites. our courage will trigger us to reach at least nearer to the nature, combating with it sometimes, forgetting the force within us in motion always contradicting with us. not necessarily all may conclude harmoniously, but we should be contented that we are the finest creature in this planet, dominating it with our mental prowess, capable to understand and fight with the nature's reflections, which no creatures perhaps have. however, great insight being revealed from your post. a mental strength truly commendable. thanks for sharing such inspirational post madam @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    21/07/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 ((Awe)) again! I am not sure what courage really is, but one thing I do know - and that is how to be hard-headed! Thank you, my mentor and loving friend.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    21/07/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 Yes, that is surely the exact thing to do, because stories about stories can only encapsulate a portion of an iota of all the 360 degrees surrounding the event, ~From one person's perspective (i.e., 'Mama'). ~And we multiply that times another person's 360 degree perspective (i.e., mi muñeca) and the minuscule iota of the angle becomes even more infinitesimally infinite. So I partially solved the complexities of the story by telling it simultaneously from (1) an outsider; (2) myself, in the past then, and again now; (3) and in the third person, from the eyes of a child. That's the best I could do. And I like that it was complex. Such things just are, aren't they?
    Ali Anani
    21/07/2016 #6 Ali Anani
    I wish we all would have the courage @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD has. I now of your story and yet when you tell it it sounds anew to me.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    21/07/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 I am the Mama, yes, it is true. You can see me in the Video Exhibit #1. I'll go back and leave the 3-min link to the Channel 7 Eyewitness News reel Interview where then you can again see what you think 🙇🏾! And there are no rigid rules in this MADNESS MEMOIRS Challenge that tell me that I cannot write Age 3 through the eyes of my child....so the rebel in me likes to break all the rules, but still stick to them in a backwards kind of way. That, as you know, is the pure fun of being an artist. Ahhhh, freedom🏋🏾!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    21/07/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 Awe ((Blush))((Blush)). I cannot take full credit, dear @Nicholas Fester (hmmm we're not connected?)....here on beBee someone else went from the story back to (his thoughts in italics) over and over...so I got this style from him. Perhaps @Ali Anani View more
    #1 Awe ((Blush))((Blush)). I cannot take full credit, dear @Nicholas Fester (hmmm we're not connected?)....here on beBee someone else went from the story back to (his thoughts in italics) over and over...so I got this style from him. Perhaps @Ali Anani or @Anees Zaidi or @debasish majumder can recall. You know, yes, this was me on the day of my/"our" car accident that now has left me mostly bed-ridden for the last 10 years. But the PTSD won't allow me to tell the story in 1st Person. It's still a place where my brain doesn't want to go. And yes, it is all true ~ as are most of life's true stories that just couldn't be 'made up,' @Charles David Upchurch (Hmmm...please accept me as connection also?). Rumors abound on an internet search of my book, written from my brain-injured hospital beds (No More Tears: A Physician Turned Patient Inspires Recovery): Is this a true story? Yes, it is. I survived! If you watch the video, you can see why. ~ Close
    Nicholas Fester
    21/07/2016 #3 Nicholas Fester
    I Googled to gain context :)
    Charles David Upchurch
    21/07/2016 #2 Charles David Upchurch
    I seek first to understand, Margaret, so please tell me (either here, or privately, and only if you are willing to do so)...

    Was this your own story, or the story of another who, as you wrote, has (or had) "no voice"?

    If it's not yourself, then is the Mama of the story still alive, still recovering? I hope so.
    Nicholas Fester
    21/07/2016 #1 Nicholas Fester
    Wow how emotional! You have a very unique style @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Story telling is your thing!
  3. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    The Making of a Woman Intensivist: Age 2
    The Making of a Woman Intensivist: Age 2/  by Dr Margaret Aranda  / (Third Edition, post on my Author blog, www.drmargaretaranda.blogspot.com ; "Perseverance.")                                                               Image 1. Awakening. / There was no 'gradual' awakening.           ...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    09/08/2016 #29 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #26 #27 Why, thank you for not only Sharing, but for the 🐝'beBee' thing ~ 🐝Caring! You ROCK!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    09/08/2016 #28 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #24 @Ivan Campos: I apologize I only saw your lovely note today! Please Write MADNESS MEMOIRS with us today! Here's the Starting Point: (1) Join Hive ~ Dr Margaret Aranda: Stirring Authors Along ; and then read this post (and the Buzzes in the Hive are so fun and solemn, too ~ very personal accounts of childhood, or the inability to recall childhood at all): 🌺Starting Line: https://www.bebee.com/producer/@margaret-aranda/starting-line-writing-challenge-memoir-madness-is-on / Great to have you!
    Bill Stankiewicz
    27/07/2016 #27 Bill Stankiewicz
    A great post here that I needed to share
    Salma Rodriguez
    24/07/2016 #26 Salma Rodriguez
    Cute! We all needed to "get to greater things that were unseen". It was magic. Fantastic! As a later child (we are still children, as she was and always should be, forever young), I still want to see more things unseen, reveal truth, see the world with the mind of a child! Thank you for sharing with us, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD!
    Ivan Campos
    20/07/2016 #24 Ivan Campos
    #23Hello Doctor Margaret Aranda, I am thrilled to see beautiful words spoken by your person in relation to the modest texts, written by a mere apprentice of writing and wisdom or the word gift. By this, I tell you, I am ready to cooperate with the said project, it only will you pass me your coordenaas to do so. That the light of wisdom and sensitivity, will bring us a beautiful design.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/07/2016 #23 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #22 Yes! It is so true...and you write with much poetic articulations; I wish you to join us on the Memoir Madness Project! Please think on this for me! We need you!
    Ivan Campos
    18/07/2016 #22 Ivan Campos
    #21 Hello my friend Dr. Margaret Aranda, love that transcends the core of existence, will lead all by the creator is able to lead us will endless horizons .We stayed closest that love when we cherish with the beauty that life offers us.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    18/07/2016 #21 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #20 Yes, the love of God is the purest form of fatherly love to me, and even though my earthly father passed away, I still get strength from the Almighty, and from who my dad allowed me to be. He never stopped me from being anything I wanted to be. He was a rocket scientist, and taught me from a young age that I could fly 🌀to the moon.... and beyond. And being a girl would never stop me. ✔️
    Ivan Campos
    17/07/2016 #20 Ivan Campos
    #19 Hello Dr. Margaret Aranda .Toda existence, I believe it is conducted by a master of creation .All we are inspiring, see your case, how degree of wisdom alcanssastes.Sempre tried to lead my life with humility, harmony and happiness, even having to overcome barriers, because I always believed in two forces, will my own will and most important of all of God's will and maravilhoa criação.Obrigado doctor by beautiful words and the reverse is true.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #19 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #16 Yes, you value babies. ....sets you apart.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #18 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #17 You are an inspiration! There's much joy awaiting you, with no more pain. You found God.
    Ivan Campos
    17/07/2016 #17 Ivan Campos
    His story is beautiful Dr. Margaret Aranda.Tambem will show that molded my life around the serenity and harmony, briefly esplanando my life. Through the chaos of human existence in the open to his fate, he was created without a father, without mother .Favelas, bridges, streets, basements, casinos, brothels, cable hoe, saw the trash to luxury and how to life in it is a school, for good or for evil. Thanks to my stubbornness, persevered and worked hard, studied and graduated, I won my roof, I married, have two children formed, following their lives with dignity all .Today me very ill meeting, despite being receiving high doses of chemotherapy to disease does not stop moving, making gradually lose me all movements of the body .But not surrender, keep persevering with serenity and harmony.
    mohammed khalaf
    16/07/2016 #16 mohammed khalaf
    thus we the east love the childhood thought ,although the hard conditions we yeaning kids#15
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #14 @mohammed khalaf: this thought is so easy for you. So loving. There are many, many fathers who abuse their children or who just abandon them altogether. Or, they make their wives motherless by stealing the children away in divorce. So it reminds us all to look into the eyes of our children every day, and tell them how much we love them.
    mohammed khalaf
    16/07/2016 #14 mohammed khalaf
    we think Margaret always in your kids because those are part from livers .
    #13
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 Awe, @mohammed khalaf, what great compliments for any writer! Lovely that this made you think of the children. Just lovely.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman...more to come, and an invitation to join in the fun!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 It still makes me laugh! ...and I left room for the reader to perhaps think twice, and realize that she was actually looking for her kittens, her babies...and asking the invisible "Mama" where they were. But getting no answer, she went outside by herself, the little independent woman! Yeah!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 @Randy Keho, oh my! I just realized the '...fast forward 30 years..." part....hahaha.....we'd have to 'fast-torward uhm...54 years, and I'm darn proud to have fought the good fight, and still be alive to tell! (30 years....you're killin' me with kindness!)...💃🏽 ...perhaps the pink bow in my hair makes me look younger!
    mohammed khalaf
    16/07/2016 #9 mohammed khalaf
    I could relate to every word you wrote! I had tears of joy reading this because it is so different being my small daughter vs. a parent. I have a special bag that has 'special things' inside of it to pull out when my sons are here. I love the part where you mentioned the sugar etc.. ,I think our most important role, by far, is to believe in our grand kids so much, that we help them discover who they are, to try new things, and to look at the world in wonder.
  4. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    What is a "Doctor by Oath?"
    What is a "Doctor by Oath?"by Dr Margaret Aranda /A "Doctor by Oath" is not just a 'regular' doctor. Oh, no. / Indeed, let us call her the "Doctor By Oath", or DBO (singular, in possession form). Allow me to introduce this term. A DBO is an endangered species, an entity unto...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 @Dale Masters: all great points, my sweet. So great to have these conversations here with you! ...and physics, too? lol. And yes, lots of content in your concise statement, and I do believe that doctors on an Indian reservation will also learn the true meaning of the word, "grateful," for the patients are amazingly humble and it is something to behold. And just as a historical note, while on an Indian reservation outside of Tulsa, Oklahoma, I was a medical student rotating on the Ob/Gyn maternity floor. I delivered the baby of a woman whose last name was "Tulsa" and when I asked, she confirmed that the city was named after her great-great-great grandfather, a tribal Chief. Ahh....such richness.
    Dale Masters
    11/07/2016 #2 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Those who are not DBOs do more harm than good. I believe the suffix "MD [DBO]" should be permitted, as it would allow patients to choose a REAL doctor. (I also believe that misuse of the term should result in a prison sentence, but you and I both know that the probablity of that happening exists in the region of negative numbers.) I also think that every doctor should be required to spend a year at an Indian reservation, learning the true meaning of the word "healer".
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    To those who need to know this the most, so that it brings great depth of value first to themselves, then back to the profession. @Dale Masters, @Gary Sharpe, @Deb Helfrich, @Randy Smith, @Randy Keho, @Brian McKenzie, @Kirstie-Sweetie Louise, @Dr. Allen Brown, @CityVP Manjit, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani. For starters ;-).
  5. ProducerDr. Allen Brown

    Dr. Allen Brown

    03/07/2016
    Why Wait Until They Die
    Why Wait Until They DieWhen I first heard the story of Joan of Arc, I was movied for many reasons. A young woman who heard her calling and despite what others had to say. In spite those who thought she was crazy. Some said it behind her back and others said it to her...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    15/07/2016 #9 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 Oh my sweet @Ali Anani, you're going to make me cry.
    Ali Anani
    15/07/2016 #8 Ali Anani
    #7 To get the maximum work we need to go into infinitesimal steps. This is what I call "The Law of Integration". So, when you write my friend @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD "Best to live minute-by-minute, conscious of each micro-action" I tend to agree because this this how we make then the maximum of time. I wonder then Margaret who is the mentor- you or I?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    15/07/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 ...yes, @Selim Yeniçeri and we are also reminded that 'to whom much is given, much is expected.' Best to live minute-by-minute, conscious of each micro-action. It is @Ali Anani who teaches me of the fractals of thinking, most gratefully.
    Selim Yeniçeri
    05/07/2016 #6 Selim Yeniçeri
    #5 Actually you mentioned about something that I'm always aware of, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. I always say that one of the strangest, the most mystic, and the most mysterious aspects of being an artist or a thinker is that you can never know whose life you touch with your words, your music, or your art. You my not know it, but what you do, or what you say can change or save lives. Or opposite. So one should always be careful about the message given.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/07/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 @Selim Yeniçeri:....and you are my equal, personified more vibrantly in staunch power, my "John of Arc." Let it be so, and let us conquer the world of the voiceless, the invisible, the destitute, and let that remain so natural that we never really realize what we are doing. We seem to be 'awakened' only when someone of sweet experience and implicit knowledge like @Dr. Allen Brown reverberates with us, and vice versa. The GrassrootsTalks Radio Show is our Sword, going out to all the world, far more than we know. We shall remain diligent.
    Selim Yeniçeri
    05/07/2016 #4 Selim Yeniçeri
    I've been told a lot of good things about my art and work throughout my entire life, but never felt so humbled. All I can say is "Thank you!" @Dr. Allen Brown. And yes, I always loved this character, and I'm in love with the embodied one in this age, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Dr. Allen Brown, @Selim Yeniçeri, @Brian McKenzie: WoW. How silent I am, never thinking this would ever come up in my lifetime. Words are insufficient. I am just humbled. How did you know that Joan of Arc is my female hero? Wow. 🗝 You invisibly unlocked my deepest recess in my heart. 🗝
    debasish majumder
    03/07/2016 #2 debasish majumder
    lovely post @Dr. Allen Brown. enjoyed read. thank you very much for sharing the post.
    Milos Djukic
    03/07/2016 #1 Anonymous
    A great person deserves no less. Tell people: "You are Great", while they are alive. Kudos @Dr. Allen Brown.
  6. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    What Kind of Doctor is an "Intensivist?"
    What Kind of Doctor is an "Intensivist?"by Dr Margaret ArandaThe specific doctors that "specialize" in making life-and death decisions in America's Intensive Care Units (ICUs) are highly skilled and have undergone rigorous 'regular' doctor training plus painstaking and demanding...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 @Dale Masters: Well, we won't see you in the ICU any time soon, but I'm so glad I picked this topic ~ you can be in tuned. Share with us whenever you want...because the more the merrier, even if death in the ICU isn't something we actually want to appear to flaunt. No. Just keep it real, and that is what's best.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #12 @Dale Masters: Awwe! Smack! CoW! That hit me unexpectedly! ~~ ... awesome! And you are one of my best "everythings!"
    Dale Masters
    06/07/2016 #12 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD You know that you're one of my heroes, right?
    Dale Masters
    06/07/2016 #11 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Having been in the ICU more times than I can count (or care to remember), I have to say that Intensivists remind me very much of military personnel on a battlefield. One of those times, I had a doctor assigned to me that told the nurses to page him IMMEDIATELY if I so much as broke wind (his words, not mine). He saved my life, as did all the other Intensivists and MDs when I was in dire straits.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 Once again, I am flattered, @Paul Walters, and this is an introduction to the blast that's coming at you next. Then, we can go over all the things in the middle. Ha. I'm playing a game within the Hive of the man-cave, picking my berries and rearranging them to save...only to come out again in hopes of the big rave. .. time will tell...soon, as well as I'm off to Bzzzz the way that I wazzzz. Bzz~
    Paul Walters
    02/07/2016 #9 Paul Walters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD And there I was thinking that an 'intensivist' was one of those people who sprout on at dinner parties about their political beliefs or whatever. Great post thank you ...see one learns something new every day!!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 @Ali Anani: Your "Ali Anani Love Festival" overflows into the ICU now, where big human and ethical decisions, end-of-life care, the Patient's RIghts, the medical directive, and shades of ethical decision-making leave shadows festering in the mind, should the wrong decision be made. Just pristine. Sharp. Raw. Uncensored.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 @debasish majumder: I see that we are great Co-Administrators of the Hive "Dr @Ali Anani, PhD" as we just adore him to pieces! For myself, these are some shoes that I would like to keep walking in...those of our dearest Dr Ali Anani.
    Ali Anani
    01/07/2016 #6 Ali Anani
    #5 I appreciate your kind words @debasish majumder;. Your comment is a reflection of mine and I say it loudly and proudly
    debasish majumder
    01/07/2016 #5 debasish majumder
    #4 i am honored for you finest sense of humility sir Dr. @Ali Anani . from you only i learn this philosophy. a mentor of high caliber like you can only enable to hone the insight of me like insignificant pupli sir. thank you very much.
    Ali Anani
    01/07/2016 #4 Ali Anani
    #3 I find the comment of @debasish majumder speaking my mind. Great sharing @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Tons of doctors do not know that the presence of anesthesiologists was birthed in 1975 by Myer H. Rosenthal, MD at Stanford. Anesthesiologists are uniquely qualified for the ICU due to their extensive knowledge of pharmacology, physiology, anatomy, and clinical acumen with patients that do not talk. They are also used to discussions, decision-making, arguments, and occasionally, surgical instruments being thrown across the OR. Hmmmm. Perhaps all of that training, thrown in with a heap of ethics to be extreme in advocating for the unconscious patient, makes us good advocates for ICU patients as well. We show our love by caring, no matter the personal cost of speaking up for what is right. @debasish majumder, @Ali Anani.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 @debasish majumder: Oh...this is only the intro. Stay tuned on all your thoughts, as I have a Series lined up on this! I ran out of Hives to share, so would appreciate it going out to Authors, writers. I'm getting mixed up with all my own posts, so I have developed my own system of filing. However, I feel that if I post to "beBee English," I won't put it in the small niche that I like so far. I want to always have this 'friendly bee' feeling, no matter how much honey I produce. Bzz! Bzz~
    debasish majumder
    01/07/2016 #1 debasish majumder
    Amazing post madam @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD! what a vivid picture you drawn about the distinction between life and death! yes, a doctor of your caliber can do it only i guess, who can truly translate the reality, after one die, how instantaneously he or she become a mere a body only! prior to that, to provide a balm to his or her close associate is an emphatic testimony of humanity. thank you very much madam for sharing such wonderful post.
  7. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Is The Hippocratic Oath still "The Hippocratic Oath?"
    Is The Hippocratic Oath still "The Hippocratic Oath?"by Dr Margaret ArandaYou should know that today, no American medical school is required to use the original Hippocratic Oath for the graduating medical doctors.  This is surprises most people. Much like marriage vows, each American medical school...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    With all the bad-mouthing that doctors get today (and I can speak to this personally as a physician and a patient), you need to know that there are still good doctors out there. They care. They over-perform. They jump through hoops relentlessly for their patients. In the old day and still in many non-Western countries, these are still the doctors whose patients come to the office bearing gifts. Fruit, garden flowers.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #14 @Dale Masters: But there's nothing to actually 'do' hon, just enjoy!
    Dale Masters
    11/07/2016 #14 Dale Masters
    #12 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD NOoooooo...I have things to do, and I'm exhausted already!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    11/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 And you and I both know it, too. We see it, we are in the thick of it. And it is not a good place to be. So you will like my piece today, "Doctors of Oath." Oh. And I started my own Hive: Doctors of Oath, too. I''m just waaayy too passionate about how I think things should be. And I don't think that I am thinking 'too highly' or expecting too much from real doctors. Actually, the 'real doctors' are already in the choir, singing alto and soprano with their knees unlocked. So they don't need the message. But I do believe that patients need to Know that there Are doctors out there who swore by this oath, and they behold it not to the gods of old, but to God Himself. And so it shall be for me, and nothing and no one can change it. Amen!
    Dale Masters
    06/07/2016 #11 Dale Masters
    #10 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD When corporatisation of medicine started to take place, that spelled the end of true medicine, which purpose, as you know well, used to be healing. Now everything is subject to the bottom line. I believe strongly that this is the reason that so many doctors are drug addicts and alcoholics...and have such a high suicide rate. I had a dear friend who is a doctor, and I remained friends with her from the time she was a premed student till the time she received her DO. I am no longer included in her circle of friends, and was told by her once that I'm "too eccentric for [my] own good". Over time, I was excluded from her social circle, since we "no longer had anything in common".Since my childhood best friend's father was my doctor I found this behaviour very odd. I was hurt...but not offended. The sea change in medical focus is a very evil thing....and most doctors know it.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 Doctors used to be 'a' trusted member of the family, I think, @Dale Masters...not 'like' a trusted member... but how/when did that change? Was it 'bad' doctors, or greed? Bad technology that got us into places we never should have been, with fertilized, frozen eggs being literally flushed down the drain? Or the sperm donors that fertilize thousands of women, so that half- 'brothers' and 'sisters' will and must be having babies subject to congenital abnormalities? Oh...the list goes on, and it's a fantastic exercise for all. We must talk about these things. Because patients need to trust the good doctors. They have to...or else there is no hope. My opinion, and I'm sticking to it (you know I like this quote 🌞). ~ Awesome insights here.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/07/2016 #9 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 The problem is, I think, that everyone has a different set of morals. And back in the days of Hippocrates and beyond, people couldn't be kept alive with dead brains on a ventilator...technology has brought in a multitude of ethical questions, all balanced by the benefit:risk ratio, too. Do the benefits outweigh the risks? This is a question that every doctor asks herself, every day. It's a huge can of worms, a Pandora's box of mystical, philosophical, humane issues with great passion. Sometimes, we as physicians are not 'able' to do "NO" harm. We just have to pick the "least worst" of a situation, @Pamela L. Williams. Great conversation.
    Dale Masters
    03/07/2016 #8 Dale Masters
    #7 " If you can't swear to that then you have no business being a doctor. period" TRUTH! Doctors used to be like a trusted member of the family; now, they're being eaten alive by corporatism.
    Pamela L. Williams
    03/07/2016 #7 Pamela L. Williams
    Very interesting Margaret. I think a lot of people Think they know what the original oath said, but I'm afraid they would be sorely mistaken. No, I don't think the oath is pertinent but there should be an oath to uphold the laws of the land and that the ethical care of the patient should come above all else. Treat each patient as if they were your child, your wife, or whoever you hold most dear. If you can't swear to that then you have no business being a doctor. period
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Vincent Andrew, my friend, the short answer is "yes."

    The concise, more insightful answer is this: If honorable doctors were allowed to be honorable doctors (without a personal or professional geopolitical agenda), patients would hand on every word, trustingly. And they would do as the doctor asks, or says. The problem is that there is no more trust, doctors aren't allowed to be doctors, and the physician:patient relationship is often cut off by the dagger of influential families or loved ones that can't accept death. We all die in our physical bodies. I'll throw the question back at you: "Do you want to die with a hole in your neck on a ventilator, and a hole in your intestines to feed you forever?" You and I need to talk to our Families, and let us have the dignity that each person is innately born with ~ don't take away patient dignity. Just let us do our jobs with our morality and intellect.

    But who actually trusts their doctor with their lives, anymore?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 @Dale Masters: You and me both, my sweet friend. You and I am millions of young women (and men) who have been degraded because the doctor doesn't know Rare Diseases. There's a sentiment that, "I have never heard of that." Mostly, this is silently said. But the attitude and demeanor of the physician crinkles his (and I won't say "Her" for the female MDs are much more sympathetic to female patients) forehead, with silent fumes beginning to steam out of his ears. The doctor thinks, and many times actually has the audacity to SAY: "If I haven't heard of it, then it must not exist."

    Doctors need to get rid of that attitude and be open to learn from their patients. Period.
    Doctors need to follow the model of Larry Chu, MD, Stanford's Department of Anesthesia has caught on to this concept for the last 5 years, on an International Platform, Stanford Medicine-X: http://medicinex.stanford.edu/
    Vincent Andrew
    02/07/2016 #4 Vincent Andrew
    "I will use treatment to help the sick according to my ability and judgment, but never with a view to injury and wrong-doing." If every graduating doctor were to uphold the Hippocratic Oath, would the quality of health care received by all patients be better than what it is now @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD?
    Dale Masters
    02/07/2016 #3 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD From what I've seen, they should change it to the "Hypocritical" oath.
    Can you tell I've had some run-ins with certain physicians? :)
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    In the beginning, Hippocrates was clearly adamant that abortion, euthanasia, and lethal drug injection for the death penalty are immoral.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    How long has it been since you read these words of the Hippocratic Oath? And look at how much it has changed from what its original intent was.....I personally like this Oath better than 'making up a poem' or revising it. For what good is history if we are not to learn from it?
  8. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Age 1: A Baby in the Sky for Father's Day
    Age 1: A Baby in the Sky for Father's Day/ by Dr Margaret Aranda /  (Third Edition of previous post on my Author blog, www.drmargaretaranda.blogspot.com ; "Perseverance.")It was my Father.  I knew him. I had no fear.My Father held me, the scent of his cologne permeating my brain such that...
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    Salma Rodriguez
    24/07/2016 #30 Salma Rodriguez
    Wonderful! Parents keep us from flying at an early age. I also wanted to fly :-D I still want to fly! I enjoy the idea of lifting "[h]igh...above the clouds". Yet, they keep us honest to ourselves, helping us learn WHY we are and WHAT--- purpose? reason? A truth-seeker's quest! I had no father, only a cherished mother who helped me learn WHO--- it is not about "me" because there are other "me"s out there, including you :-) Thank you, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD!
    Dale Masters
    22/07/2016 #29 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I LOVE how your words paint a picture in my mind! It's a buzz...but it's a portrait, too!
    Now I really miss my Dad...
    Cat Gal U.
    21/07/2016 #28 Cat Gal U.
    This is beautiful Mags you took me also to my beautiful past with my family, which I miss so much. Thank you for bringing up such warm memories of yours so I could relive mine. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Lisa Gallagher
    21/07/2016 #27 Lisa Gallagher
    If you missed this, a great read by @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/07/2016 #26 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #25 You are too poetic and you must become the writer that is inside you. To put words on a piece of paper, and to make some one like me cry....that is something that @Ali Anani, @debasish majumder, @Selim Yeniçeri, and only a few have done. So please I beg you to join my MEMOIR MADNESS Project and let us get your writing skills perked up for the rest of the world to see! For you have a gift that God gave you, and you must touch it with us all, not just me! Here is the link to get you started, kind sir. Please. Start here: https://www.bebee.com/producer/@margaret-aranda/memoir-madness-update-july-20
    mohammed khalaf
    20/07/2016 #25 mohammed khalaf
    God is rewarding the best reward and I salute you#24
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/07/2016 #24 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #23 YEs, thank you. I cry at your words, as I didn't realize how good he was when I was a child. I only appreciated it later, and I did my best to honor him when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. I stayed by his side until a tragic car accident took me away from my spot there. He died 6 months later, but not without my daughter knowing exactly who "Grandpa" was, and watching her walk the halls with him. He still held out 2 fingers at his side, and the little girl in all 6 of his own girls...she, now my own daughter, walked and subconsciously just reached up and grabbed those two fingers, as if it was the most natural thing in the world to do. This is the vision of him that I love the most: the man inside.
    mohammed khalaf
    20/07/2016 #23 mohammed khalaf
    I think the effort of your father not loss because he is born Dr Margaret #22
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/07/2016 #22 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #21 Yes, I hold on to what he taught me by doing what he would have loved the most: spreading the message on to other girls, and teenagers. I love telling them inspiring stories, and being able to impress upon them the smallest gift of self-confidence. It honors my father all over again, in all the lives that he still touches.
    mohammed khalaf
    18/07/2016 #21 mohammed khalaf
    please hold on to that matter,and pray to him #20
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    18/07/2016 #20 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #18 Like so many others, my family has broken my heart so many times that there is much isolation and condemnation. 💔 But...This unconditional love of my father is within me. and no one will ever take it away. I carry it in me, always and forever. 💜
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    18/07/2016 #19 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #17 I thought that every man was like my father. He gave me so much unconditional love, laughed at my foils, and allowed me to be "me." I don't think that most fathers appreciate just how much their little girls will always adore them, no matter how old the girl is. She is always, "Daddy's little girl." 💞
    mohammed khalaf
    17/07/2016 #18 mohammed khalaf
    may God blessed to you family
    Vincent Andrew
    17/07/2016 #17 Vincent Andrew
    "I knew it was him, and therefore, I had no fear." This will give me a good platform to have a conversation with my daughters. Thanks for sharing this @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD.
    Mamen Delgado
    17/07/2016 #16 Mamen Delgado
    Beautiful @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD!! You are very lucky...
    Lisa Gallagher
    17/07/2016 #15 Lisa Gallagher
    Such a relatable story for so many gals who adored (or adore) their fathers. What a cute picture of you as a child! Thanks for sharing this, it put a smile on my face @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #13 no worries....there'll be 31 when you're done! Invite in your Inbox...goes out to all!
    Irene Hackett
    17/07/2016 #13 Anonymous
    #12 so many stories, so little words...hmmmm - I'm still thinking!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #10 @Irene Hackett: I hope you join in sharing your stories, too! I kmow you have a story to tell!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman: ...and thank you for your encouragement in support of all who would like to join in, too!
  9. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Permanent Birth Control for Couples: Don't Let Your Woman Die About it
    Permanent Birth Control for Couples: Don't Let Your Woman Die About itMedical Disclaimer: Talk to your own doctors, please. This is not meant to be comprehensive advice or recommendations. Each woman is different, and you get individual choices.                    What are their options for the happily-married couple...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/07/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 Hon, I can send you the e-book.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 Oh...so sorry for your stress response to that. And I also boycotted Bayer for all their untold trouble. Stupid.
    Dale Masters
    06/07/2016 #9 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I've also bookmarked this post, so I have all the references. I'll follow up on them as soon as my mind clears. (Stupid brain. Stupid headaches. Stupid (or evil...I think it's the latter) CDC.)
    Dale Masters
    06/07/2016 #8 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I know the damage vaginal mesh can cause (albeit second-hand). It affected my anxiety level for almost 6 years, till a REAL surgeon (who is now my OB/GYN) fixed the problem. She did an excellent job, too. (If only I could remember her name. :P ) I have also boycotted Bayer for decades because of their history and affiliations.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    18/06/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 @Brian McKenzie: Thanks for the great input. On many levels, and in intricate ways, you are perfectly correct. Hat's Off to You! And P.S. for men who know that they would not do well with a "family," be yourself. Don't EVER let anyone change who you ARE. No one knows you but YOU. ~ and that goes for women, too.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    18/06/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 @Sara Jacobovici: Women die from permanent sterilization, and it's my job and duty as a person, a physician, and a researcher to bring the news out to the public in an understandable way. So many women can "read" and "understand" most of this article. It is quite scientific for lay people, but women are getting smarter ;-). And thank you, again. It is my pleasure. My essence.
    Brian McKenzie
    17/06/2016 #4 Brian McKenzie
    Men, the vasectomy is cheap, easy effective and reliable. Had it done at 18, and it has been a key factor to keeping kids and wives out of my life.
    Sara Jacobovici
    17/06/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    Important information and an important message @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. You write, "Research first, and make a comfortable decision for you." Research that will involve individuals who make up a support team or network. You are part of that team for all the girls and women out there. Thanks Margaret.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/06/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Huge issues for the last several years, still fighting in the USA Congress, with Congressman Mike Fitzpatrick taking the political LEAD for WOMEN and their tragedies. Women and husbands, be aware!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/06/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    In the News for Years, and affecting the lives of millions of women worldwide: Hysterectomy, the Essure contraceptive coils, the Power Morcellator, Vaginal Mesh, and more. Let us not just sit and watch. Let us make things better for our daughters, nieces, and sisters.