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Dr Margaret Aranda: Age Management Medicine for Women - beBee

Dr Margaret Aranda: Age Management Medicine for Women

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  1. ProducerAlexa Steele

    Alexa Steele

    19/08/2016
    You Talk Funny
    You Talk FunnyThe Musings of an American Copywriter To my friends across the pond: Is it possible to have a cuppa coffee? Or do you cringe at the very idea?Here in the States we’ll order a cup o’ anything. But in the UK, a “cuppa” specifically refers to tea,...
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    Tony Brandstetter
    22/08/2016 #28 Tony Brandstetter
    Great stuff, here in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania we have our won language and sometimes it even confuses the locals, Yinz know what I mean?
    Andrew Porter
    22/08/2016 #26 Andrew Porter
    #24 Its wonderful being able to interact and pass on different meanings of words from the English vocabulary...to a certain extent, as we wouldn't want to upset anyone, but if we had too many brewski's over here in Yorkshire then we would be 'addled'
    Reginaldo Afonso Bobato
    21/08/2016 #25 Reginaldo Afonso Bobato
    'm sorry but I did not understand your limguistica proposition. I'm slim, slender and elegant, like little meat, plenty of vegetables and nothing, absolutely nothing alcoholic drink as alcoholic drink changes the behavior of the person and ends talking nonsense and then repents a psychology office. repentance, we must think of the future of health and health future.
    Alexa Steele
    21/08/2016 #24 Alexa Steele
    #21 Actually, if you REALLY want to sound like a local, call it a "brewski."
    Alexa Steele
    21/08/2016 #23 Alexa Steele
    #19 I'm not sure I understand your question, but I will try to explain: @Andrew Porter says they use the word 'brew' to mean 'tea' in Yorkshire. But in America 'brew' means 'beer.' I also told him there are some Americans who speak in such a localized way that I can not understand them ('subtitles' are the translations you see at the bottom of a foreign film.)
    Alexa Steele
    21/08/2016 #22 Alexa Steele
    #17 I think it's cool, too. That's why I now close most of my emails with "cheers."
    Andrew Porter
    21/08/2016 #21 Andrew Porter
    #15 That's fine at least asking for a 'brew' is one word that shouldn't upset anyone in the US....and if I may say I don't mind a pint, or should that be a brew!
    Reginaldo Afonso Bobato
    21/08/2016 #20 Reginaldo Afonso Bobato
    This is very good, learn and have a lot to teach us. You heard the merchant Marco Polo, as he traveled without English ... Do not drink anything alcoholic, lots of drinking water
    Reginaldo Afonso Bobato
    21/08/2016 #19 Reginaldo Afonso Bobato
    #15 I would like to know the meaning, I promise that I will not be mad or crazy
    Aurorasa Sima
    21/08/2016 #17 Aurorasa Sima
    #13 Yeah, we say Cheers. We think we´re cool if we throw in an English word here and there. Sometimes we use them wrong. We don´t mind, we have fun. Have you ever tried our Coke light?
    Aurorasa Sima
    21/08/2016 #16 Aurorasa Sima
    #12 I feel it´s so much easier to produce more content as you can write about everything on here. On LinkedIn you think longer about if you should than it takes you to write the post...
    Alexa Steele
    21/08/2016 #15 Alexa Steele
    #11 Ask an American for a "brew" and you'll get a beer!

    We have a lot of dialects here, too. In fact, there are at least 2 (Appalachian and Cajun) for which I need subtitles!
    Alexa Steele
    21/08/2016 #14 Alexa Steele
    #10 I am impressed with anyone who speaks a second language, and even more so when teaching yourself!

    Since you like idioms, I found this for you: http://www.idiomsite.com/
    Alexa Steele
    21/08/2016 #13 Alexa Steele
    #8 Pleased to meet you as well, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. Thank you for sharing my post. I'll be sure to check out your hive.

    I learned to use "cheers" as a greeting from a German woman. I'm the only American I know who uses it for anything other than a toast!
    Alexa Steele
    21/08/2016 #12 Alexa Steele
    #6 Thank you for your kind words @Aurorasa Sima. beBee has really encouraged me to up my game in terms of my writing.
    Andrew Porter
    21/08/2016 #11 Andrew Porter
    We don't say cuppa over here in Yorkshire we actually say 'brew' but its amazing just how many different dialects there are in the UK alone, and different meanings of words from one county to the next...and even country which can sometimes get you into a little trouble if one is slightly lapse!! but all good fun non the less.
    Reginaldo Afonso Bobato
    21/08/2016 #10 Reginaldo Afonso Bobato
    I speak, write and read some English, I expand my dictionary a little every day, and not turn into crazy, I know that the size of English extends and there is particular even from person to person, and every time I can translate a text that comes from Bebee is a great learning of the English language, I am humble to admit. I would like to have access to idiomatic expressions of the English language like this To my friends cross the pond. It is a delight being able to learn and teach and have a fascination science we are teaching effectively. I use too much of google translator, it is very hard to write well, but many words in the English language is rich in analogies and Latin are similar to the Portuguese language, which facilitates learning. I read all the English translation, when I notice something bizarre, I reread the wrong phrase in Portuguese language and immediately correct them, one wrong letter, google can not translate it.
    .I Must admit that the best way to develop a language as a second language is to have deepened the native language.
    Aurorasa Sima
    21/08/2016 #9 Aurorasa Sima
    #7 Yay, thanks! I did not know that I use like 100 British words. I learned a lot of my English through Harry Potter and Artemis Fowl...
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    21/08/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 @Alexa Steele: So glad to meet you here! I'm Sharing this to Hives: Age Management Medicine: Women; Musings and Dr Margaret Aranda: Stirring Authors Along ~ won't you join us in MEMOIR MADNESS: Ages 1 - 31? ((Cheers!))(Wait! Does that mean what I mean? lol)
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    21/08/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 Funny, So Funny you should mention "Schoolmasterly," swee @Aurorasa Sima! I couldn't help myself and before reading your Comment, I found this site for British children to learn some American slang! Deserving of yet another Buzz, I really love this humor and teaching combo ~ It's just entertaining of mind, soul and body ~ for Laughter is the Best Medicine! Check it out for more laughs! (Sausage) 🐤 http://resources.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/glossary/