Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
21/8/2016 · 2 min read · ~100 · 1
Alexa Steele
19/8/2016 · 2 min read · +300
To Writers and 5 more
You Talk Funny

You Talk Funny

The Musings of an American Copywriter To my friends across the pond: Is it possible to have a cuppa coffee? Or do you cringe at the very idea?Here in the States we’ll order a cup o’ anything. But in the UK, a “cuppa” specifically refers to...

Alexa Steele

Alexa Steele

Oh you poor dear! And here I thought Canadians had a reputation for being nice.

26/10/2016
David Lisle

David Lisle

Luverly stuff that. When I first came to Canada, at the wet behind the ears age of twenty, the family I stayed with would amuse themselves at barbeques by asking me if I wanted them to "knock me up in the morning," it is a phrase I had never used. But regardless of my answer they dissolved into peals of riotous laughter at my expense. I didn't understand until 'getting knocked up' was explained to me. After drinking a little too much of the vile beverage Canadians called beer I got sick, no I did not become ill, in my part of England getting 'sick' meant that one vomited, so I wasn't properly ill. However, it didn't seem to matter. To rid myself of the worst of my pronunciation, I came with a Black-Country/Birmingham dialect and spoke quickly, I took elocution and learned to say the letter 'a' as Canadians and Americans generally say it. I stopped saying 'aye' and said yes, and I dropped all nautical terms as no matter what phrase I used it was turned into something sexual. I really did need to get along well to have a decent life.

26/10/2016

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