logoSign upLog in
Executive Coaching - beBee

Executive Coaching

+ 100 buzzes
Expert coaching and support for talented individuals at the key transition points in their professional lives
Buzzes
  1. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    13/01/2017
    Leadership Is Not What I Thought It Was
    Leadership Is Not What I Thought It Was"Leadership is not what I thought it was" – this was the comment from one of my students earlier this week as I sat in on one of the small group discussions into which the students break during class time. When I asked her to explain what she...
    Relevant
  2. Simon Gray

    Simon Gray

    12/01/2017
    My latest blog post on the excellent platform that is beBee – hope you find it useful and thought-provoking. Please feel free to share comments and feedback. https://www.bebee.com/producer/@simon-gray/are-you-really-the-architect-of-your-career
    Simon Gray
    Are you really the architect of your career?
    www.bebee.com The original title of this blog post was 'time is running out for us all', but at first glance this appearing somewhat morbid, I decided to...
    Relevant
  3. ProducerAli Anani

    Ali Anani

    10/01/2017
    The Smell of Disengagement
    The Smell of DisengagementThe couple got engaged and then disengaged- what happened? The employee got so engaged in work and then got disengaged? What happened? The people got engaged in an environmental issue and then disengaged? What happened? The investors got...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Ali Anani
    12/01/2017 #36 Ali Anani
    #34 I do appreciate your feedback @Zacharias Voulgaris
    Ali Anani
    12/01/2017 #35 Ali Anani
    #33 I am glad that I tagged you dear @Sara Jacobovici for you expanded wonderfully on the comment of dear @Amina Alami
    Zacharias Voulgaris 🐝
    12/01/2017 #34 Zacharias Voulgaris 🐝
    Very insightful and to the point! Thank you for sharing
    Sara Jacobovici
    12/01/2017 #33 Sara Jacobovici
    #31 Thank you to @Ali Anani for bringing your comment to my attention @Amina Alami. It is great to see the same words being viewed from a different perspective. I find our perspective of the value of newer or older employees, their degree of freshness in relation to their engagement very important. For me it brings up the complexity of the sense of smell experienced from the view of the "ventilation" system of the environment. If newer employees come in with a fresh smell only to be prevented from "blossoming" (referring to Dr. Ali's next buzz The Butterfly Effect of Passion) in a well ventilated environment, they may temporarily engage and will either leave their current environment or become older employees still engaged in spite of losing their fresh smell. They adapted to the environment producing the same low quality smell, rather than either leaving to preserve their freshness or contributing to the environment by breathing fresh air into it. Thank you Dr. Ali and Amina for the opportunity to engage in this dynamic discussion.
    Ali Anani
    11/01/2017 #32 Ali Anani
    #31 Thank you dear @Amina Alami for writing a profound comment. If you would read the comment of @Sara Jacobovici then she also offered her explanation of same paragraph. Fresh employees may disengage easily. This is a paradox of its own because freshness means to me they are still fragrant and yet they ae the first to disengage. You make me think deeper. Thank you
    Amina Alami
    11/01/2017 #31 Amina Alami
    This article is astounding Ali Anani! You so beautifully stated," this was a refreshing smell of disengagement. What a paradox!" In my humble opinion, the young and fresh employees may disengage easily, even if they smell right, when their company doesn't practice leadership development programs and mentoring to keep them fully engaged. On the other hand, the wrinkled employees, even if they may not smell so right, they could still be fully engaged if they finally found their fulfilling job.
    Harvey Lloyd
    11/01/2017 #30 Harvey Lloyd
    #21 Yes, the mentoring word is what we speak. Expectations are designed and built by many aspects of our life. We all need that feeling of confidence and in most cases with our next generation that confidence has set up expectations that are unrealistic. I can say this was the case for myself and the many i have discussed employment with at our firm.

    Could we make the statement, expectations developed on poor understanding will always produce poor engagement.

    @Jared 🐝 Wiese you have interpreted my comments and extended the discussion into new realms. My conspiracy theory might be that we are placing a large portion of our hiring expectation on education. Given this we now assume "soft skills" are present. We judge our newer generations with this in mind.

    I'm not a ridged fan but none the less a fan of Maslow's hierarchy. Soft skills allow us to self actualize through experience. We cant gain experience unless someone engages us and our expectations will never shift. The individual experiencing this will struggle through out their career and many other areas.

    Just a few minutes a day, or changing how we interface with others could increase another's opportunity for success. But in the end each individual has to choose their path. So as you say they need to be released.
    Ali Anani
    10/01/2017 #29 Ali Anani
    #23 You have a reason to ask dear@debasish majumder- but would the artist be happy with his work if soon it tumbles down or breaks into pieces?
    Ali Anani
    10/01/2017 #28 Ali Anani
    #22 What to say except that your comment is deep and spot on dear @Mohammed Sultan. In few words you explained a lot. Thank you
    Ali Anani
    10/01/2017 #27 Ali Anani
    #21 I hope @Harvey Lloyd would read your comment @Jared 🐝 Wiese. I love the idea of engagement vs expectation.
    Ali Anani
    10/01/2017 #26 Ali Anani
    #20 Upper management not adhering well- you really summarized the concept of the buzz remarkably well @Jared 🐝 Wiese
    Ali Anani
    10/01/2017 #25 Ali Anani
    #19 @Sara Jacobovici- you hit the nail on its head by writing "The glue has to permeate the surface while it is still wet before it will take hold; it needs time to make itself felt". Your comment is truly the synopsis of the buzz. Your comprehension is again very impressive.
    Ali Anani
    10/01/2017 #24 Ali Anani
    #18 Yes and you read my mind @Sara Jacobovici. I expected you to comment on this paradox being "The Queen of Paradoxes". I am still pondering on your explanations of it.
    debasish majumder
    10/01/2017 #23 debasish majumder
    lovely insight sir @Ali Anani! but, i am bit confused, how far an artist bothered about glue, when he is only focused on his creative inclination? will it be sensible to be bothered about glue, instead of being absorbed with his creative frame of mind? besides, i believe, quality lies with his creation, not with mere ostentation with its eye catching form. content is the soul of his creation, not the mere form only. it is equal to the metaphor, that we must judge from one tree to judge about the entire forest and its beauty and attractive quality is the only determining factor to gauge the potentialities of its distinctive dispensation, for which it eventually make sometimes epoch making presentation! however, intriguing post indeed sir. enjoyed read. thank you for the share.
    Mohammed Sultan
    10/01/2017 #22 Mohammed Sultan
    One of our main tasks is not to build a single charismatic leader with a smell of fragrance,but to build a whole organization around its own fragrance.
    The beauty of the organizations with enduring smell begins when they build internal and external organizational streams that will never dry,going up and down and in all directions causing no wrinkles.
    Jared 🐝 Wiese
    10/01/2017 #21 Jared 🐝 Wiese
    #12 Harvey, I think I see what you mean - even from a big business perspective ;)
    I have mentored and trained many college grads and new hires. Interesting ties to this discussion.

    Some are there for a paycheck (expectation) while others want to fit in and move up (engagement).
    Some you can tell something once and they not only do it but run with it and expand on it. Others, eventually don't "fit in" and are fired.

    This is why, when I interview people, I put more "glue" on the soft skills: expectations ("So, what's the pay and when do I get YOUR job?!") and attitude ("Ask not what your [company] can do for you";), hunger and thirst, ability and desire to learn and contribute to the team.
    Jared 🐝 Wiese
    10/01/2017 #20 Jared 🐝 Wiese
    This resonates so well: "Wrinkles form when the top layer dries faster than the bottom layer or when top layer is applied on a contaminated surface. The top layer in organization is the upper management. If the upper management interest in the organization dries up then the glue that bonds the organization together."
    Great metaphors! I've seen so many upper management come in and - let's say - not adhere well. They are soon gone like the wind, with those who are more engaged and dedicated feeling the breeze.
    Sara Jacobovici
    10/01/2017 #19 Sara Jacobovici
    Part 2/2 Thank you @Ali Anani for bringing my attention to @Harvey Lloyd's comment and thank you Harvey for the mention. I will take a couple of lines from Dr. Ali's buzz to reflect on expectations and engagement. Dr. Ali writes, "Not all glues are the same [and painting] the "organization wagon" with low quality paint will lead to all sorts of problems..." You both touched on the "fit" or shared vision. If the leader, who is the glue, is best suited for a certain type of surface or purpose and the team members or staff are made up of other "stuff", it will not lead to engagement. The glue has to permeate the surface while it is still wet before it will take hold; it needs time to make itself felt. And the quality of the paint, or the investment in the company, whether time and/or effort, will determine the quality of the environment. Unfortunately, some leaders are "blind" to the impact they have on their environment and its influence on the rest of the people involved. If their focus is away from the results of the poor quality of engagement, they will only experience the outcome when things begin to "fall apart". As always, gentlemen, thank you for the opportunity to engage at this level of quality!
    Sara Jacobovici
    10/01/2017 #18 Sara Jacobovici
    Part 1/2 Another expanding and provoking buzz @Ali Anani. I am sure you were waiting for me to comment on, "This was a refreshing smell of disengagement. What a paradox!" I do find this remarkable, a refreshing smell produced the behavior of not engaging. My gut reaction would be that there may have been mixed sensory messages; on one hand the refreshing smell but on the other hand the visual/tactile message of the plastic covers of the books that may have given the signal of "do not disturb".
    Ali Anani
    10/01/2017 #17 Ali Anani
    #16 You are a very wise man dear @Mohammed Sultan. Science is in agreement with your comment. People give the sense of smells different meaning. THis issue is a buzz on its own. The smell paradox is in action because giving different meaning to smells lead to different emotions and thoughts and actions accordingly. All your examples are in alignment with these research findings.
    I might write a dedicated buzz on this issue. Thank yo
  4. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    30/12/2016
    Networking – Growing Your Business in 2017 and Beyond
    Networking – Growing Your Business in 2017 and BeyondVince Lombardi, the well known and loved US football coach, is known, among other things, for his famous speech, “What It Takes to Be Number 1”. In a nutshell his central message is commitment; that to be a success in anything is to be committed...
    Relevant
  5. John Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    24/12/2016
    John Whitehead
    Relevant
  6. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    23/12/2016
    Leadership is a Continuous Journey
    Leadership is a Continuous JourneyLeadership is a continuous journey — we should never stop learning. One of the most effective ways of learning and growing, according to Kouzes and Posner (Learning Leadership, Willey, 2016), is to look for "stretch" assignments; areas for...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Liesbeth 🐝 Leysen, MSc. beBee Ambassador
    07/01/2017 #3 Liesbeth 🐝 Leysen, MSc. beBee Ambassador
    leadership is about growth, yes and that should never stop.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    07/01/2017 #2 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @John Whitehead it really is continuous! Leadership is like learning to walk, even when you think you have mastered it, something can happen and you must relearn what you think you already know. You must always be ready to listen and desire to learn more. Great article.
    Kevin Baker
    23/12/2016 #1 Kevin Baker
    Awesome, love this sentence >>>> He states that he did it just for the sake of taking the course and learning something new and different.
  7. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    16/12/2016
    Setting Targets for the New Year?
    Setting Targets for the New Year? It’s that time of year when we start to take a look ahead at what we want to achieve in the coming New Year and at the same time reflect on how far we have come since this time last year. It is fascinating to read the posts that start to appear on...
    Relevant

    Comments

    John Rylance
    18/12/2016 #5 John Rylance
    The start of a New Year gives us the opportunity to set new goals, start with a blank canvas, plan and make changes in out lives, forget the negative aspects and celebrate the positives of the past year. In ditching the negatives ( they are so last year), I look to turn them where possible into positives. We are often looking for reasons/opportunities to change and a New Year can provide that impetus.
    Nic Fester
    16/12/2016 #4 Nic Fester
    I agree, it's just that the beginning of a year creates a natural reaction for anyone to want to reflect and hit the reset button. More often than not it's because you've found some rest and you are ready to fight on.
    Zacharias Voulgaris 🐝
    16/12/2016 #3 Zacharias Voulgaris 🐝
    I agree 100% on the learning part. For me a quite feasible and healthy goal for 2017 is to reduce my sugar intake and replace it with honey. Not just physically but on other levels too. For example I plan to abstain from LinkedIn as much as possible and focus on other, more nourishing social media.
    Mohammed Sultan
    16/12/2016 #2 Mohammed Sultan
    @John White.We begin the new year saying "Happy New Year" and very often end it up unhappy.If you look at deep-seated social change ,you realize that the slow,peaceful resolutions have never made a difference.Every time we dream of changing the world to become a global village,our march even didn't change a small village.Happy New Year,John.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    16/12/2016 #1 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Let's make a good beginning. Let's rejuvenate our spirits with new resolutions!
  8. ProducerGraham🐝 Edwards
    This is such an exciting time of the year... an unconventional reason.
    This is such an exciting time of the year... an unconventional reason.It's December 14th and for many people the magic of Christmas is everywhere... an exciting time, particularly if you are under the age of ten. While I very much enjoy the meaning and trappings of Christmas, there is also another reason why this time...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Graham🐝 Edwards
    23/12/2016 #8 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #4 Thanks for reading @debasish majumder
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    23/12/2016 #7 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #3 Thank you for reading @FancyJ London... glad I could write something worth while.
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    23/12/2016 #6 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #2 Standing?... why thank you @Tony 🐝 Rossi
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    23/12/2016 #5 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #1 Yes @Renée 🐝 Cormier it's also your Bday... Happy Bday!
    debasish majumder
    16/12/2016 #4 debasish majumder
    lovely insightful post @Graham🐝 Edwards! enjoyed read. thank you for the share.
    FancyJ London
    16/12/2016 #3 FancyJ London
    This is so relevant, and definitely my kind of buzz!!! Thank you for sharing this. Cheers :) @Graham🐝 Edwards
    Tony 🐝 Rossi
    16/12/2016 #2 Tony 🐝 Rossi
    *insert standing ovation here*
    Renée  🐝 Cormier
    14/12/2016 #1 Renée 🐝 Cormier
    You know, December 14th is a special day for another reason, too. You were so busy planning and blogging that you forgot! You are right, though. This is a really good time to start reviewing your year and planning ahead. We've got a lot to accomplish in 2017. Let's get 'er done!
  9. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    10/12/2016
    Leadership…. A Few Blisters
    Leadership…. A Few BlistersWe usually think of blisters in a negative way. They can hurt, if not looked after can cause infection, and depending where they are, have a frustrating tendency to get in the way. Another way of looking at blisters is that they are the result of...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Tony 🐝 Rossi
    11/12/2016 #1 Tony 🐝 Rossi
    We get so caught up in the glamour and success of leaders, aiming to get to that next pedestal ourselves, that it's easy to forget that nothing comes to be without work. Often hard work, that without astonishingly good luck, always comes with a few lessons to be learnt - some more painful that others.
  10. ProducerHarry Groenert

    Harry Groenert

    08/12/2016
    Kann man sich selbst coachen?
    Kann man sich selbst coachen?„Im Prinzip ja, aber ist schlecht für die Coaching-Industrie.“, würde Radio Eriwan antworten. Die Geschichte, in der sich Carl Friedrich von Münchhausen am eigenen Schopf aus dem Sumpf gezogen haben will, lebt dagegen im Begriff...
    Relevant
  11. ProducerAlexandra Galviz
    5 things stopping you from getting on the career ladder
    5 things stopping you from getting on the career ladderThere are so many things that can stop you from getting on the career ladder, people telling you your dreams are too unrealistic to random hurdles appearing in your way. But one of the main things that tends to get in the way of our hopes and dreams...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Alexandra Galviz
    08/12/2016 #4 Alexandra Galviz
    I really enjoyed your theory on corporate ascension, I hadn't thought about it from that angle. Thanks for your comment @Tony 🐝 Rossi!
    Alexandra Galviz
    08/12/2016 #3 Alexandra Galviz
    #1 Thanks @Cepee Tabibian! :)
    Tony 🐝 Rossi
    07/12/2016 #2 Tony 🐝 Rossi
    The Jim Rohn quote says it all: believing in yourself is the FIRST act of change, and as you argue, the most important! Really well presented position, @Alexandra Galviz, and the resurgence of the imposter syndrome is likely due to the fact that much corporate ascension has been stagnated as the large population of boomers hit their prime years and stuck around. Now there is lots of room for younger generations to take big leaps forward, instead of small incremental career improvements.
    Cepee Tabibian
    07/12/2016 #1 Cepee Tabibian
    Another strong post @Alexandra Galviz! I agree with all of the above. :)
  12. Simon Gray

    Simon Gray

    05/12/2016
    Is 2017 the right time to start your own business? Only you can decide! I share some thoughts and advice in my latest beBee blog post. https://www.bebee.com/producer/@simon-gray/is-the-new-year-the-right-time-to-start-your-own-business-part-1 Simon Gray
    Relevant
  13. ProducerKevin Pashuk

    Kevin Pashuk

    29/11/2016
    What do You, Bill Gates, Warren Buffet, and Bono have in common?
    What do You, Bill Gates, Warren Buffet, and Bono have in common?It's easy to tell you what you likely DON'T have in common with them - fame, fortune, and good looks...Okay, Fame and fortune... ... but here's what you DO have in common with Bill, Warren, and Bono. 24 hours in a day, and a sphere of influence....
    Relevant

    Comments

    Ken Boddie
    05/12/2016 #18 Ken Boddie
    Undoubtedly, Kev, as mature leaders in our chosen career path or discipline, we have a duty to ensure that "passion will drive us towards doing something in the service of something larger than ourselves". But let's spare a thought for the many less fortunate out there who, for various reasons, are trapped in survival mode from day to day, and are slowly being robbed of their passion. How can we recognise them and include them in our "service of something larger"?
    Jared 🐝 Wiese
    05/12/2016 #17 Jared 🐝 Wiese
    #16 Sounds like a very good thing that you are out of that job! I hope you can tap into your unique talents and passions to find a much better match.
    Suzanne Dwillies-Khan, Pharmacist and Musician
    05/12/2016 #16 Suzanne Dwillies-Khan, Pharmacist and Musician
    #15 I tried the best out of a bad job but I ended up in the Hospital. But yes we try our best when our health isn't jeopardised. Thank-you for this list :)
    Jared 🐝 Wiese
    05/12/2016 #15 Jared 🐝 Wiese
    More to think about from the author:
    http://www.danpink.com/2012/04/50-centuries-of-work-5-important-lessons/

    "Here’s what Pillemer calls the “refrigerator list” of the five lessons gleaned from all that experience:

    1. Choose a career for the intrinsic rewards, not the financial ones.
    2. Don’t give up on looking for a job that makes you happy.
    3. Make the most of a bad job.
    4. Emotional intelligence trumps every other kind.
    5. Everyone needs autonomy." Close
    Jared 🐝 Wiese
    05/12/2016 #14 Jared 🐝 Wiese
    Thanks for this, Kevin! I loved your summation, your passion nudge and RSA Animate's animated version of the book!

    (I am CC'ing those who found my share of RSA Animate's video relevant in https://www.bebee.com/content/983566/934468 View more
    Thanks for this, Kevin! I loved your summation, your passion nudge and RSA Animate's animated version of the book!

    (I am CC'ing those who found my share of RSA Animate's video relevant in https://www.bebee.com/content/983566/934468:
    @Javier 🐝 beBee, @Julie Hickman, @Allison Obrien, @Suzanne Dwillies-Khan, Pharmacist and Musician)

    I had heard or read the amount of money most people need to feel happy at work caps out at $70-80,000. Then I saw this video and learned more about the research that makes so much sense.
    I've also heard of studies that show more than 75% of people are unhappy at work. Why?

    Dan Pink "demonstrates that while the old-fashioned carrot-and-stick approach worked successfully in the 20th century, it's precisely the wrong way to motivate people for today's challenges."

    You asked after working hard to be successful, "How will you know you've arrived?"
    Today, people need to use their passions and be fullfilled. Otherwise, they are "unhappy" - without really explaining why - but consider themselves part of the 75%. Close
    Mohammed Sultan
    30/11/2016 #12 Mohammed Sultan
    Kevin Pashuk.I always like such light posts which feature the real meaning of success.Although each one of those titans was driven by different motives,all were able to go against the logic of many others and their unprecedented success took place in the framework of their high expectations about their business.
    They have achieved spectacular success not because of their core skills or experience or qualification ,but because they have the passion ,the will and the motivation to keep going and not to regress to mediocrity or spectacular failure.I wonder whether those people have applied their own creativity or have been inspired by Aristotle when he quoted-success is a state concerned with choice,laying in a mean and being determined by reason and practical wisdom.
    April Lynn
    30/11/2016 #11 April Lynn
    #10 Well Said and Appreciated. Leaves a much better after taste; bring on the honey!
    🍯🐝💤
    Kevin Pashuk
    30/11/2016 #10 Kevin Pashuk
    Thanks for the kind words April. Conversations over coffee (or other beverages) tend to work for me. Taking on serious issues without getting too serious is my intent. There's enough esoteric things out there that will give you brain blisters. My writing won't be part of that.
    April Lynn
    30/11/2016 #9 April Lynn
    Becoming a big fan of your buzzes @Kevin Pashuk

    You have a way of keeping great topics light, pleasantly approachable, and more importantly digestible, keeping the reader as a welcome friend to toss ideas around with over tea/coffee. :)
    Kevin Pashuk
    30/11/2016 #8 Kevin Pashuk
    Thanks David.
    David B. Grinberg
    30/11/2016 #7 David B. Grinberg
    Nice buzz, Kevin, you offer up a lot of good pointers which are worth remembering.
    Kevin Pashuk
    29/11/2016 #6 Kevin Pashuk
    #4 As Meat Loaf sang... "Two Outta Three Ain't Bad"
    Kevin Pashuk
    29/11/2016 #5 Kevin Pashuk
    #3 Yes Randy. The loan is indeed interest free... as in "I'm not interested!"
    Pascal Derrien
    29/11/2016 #4 Pascal Derrien
    I work for Microsoft, Bono lives 20 km away from me and ..... damn I don't know Warren :-)
    Randy Keho
    29/11/2016 #3 Randy Keho
    #1 Can you spot me an interest-free loan, @Kevin Pashuk? Just until my passion begins to generate revenue.
    Zacharias Voulgaris 🐝
    29/11/2016 #2 Zacharias Voulgaris 🐝
    Insightful and inspirational article
    Kevin Pashuk
    29/11/2016 #1 Kevin Pashuk
    Another post about PASSION @Javier 🐝 beBee....
  14. ProducerGraham🐝 Edwards
    The way of the contrarian...
    The way of the contrarian...I was reminded a couple of days ago that I am a contrarian; it was not the first time and usually not meant as a compliment. For those not familiar with the word, a contrarian is a person who takes an opposite or different position from other people...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Vincent Andrew
    16/11/2016 #58 Vincent Andrew
    I see a contrarian in myself, often disagreeing with what I hear in meetings or suggesting something different from what's being offered. I agree this is a critical role to challenge groupthink. My ideas may not be liked by all but they offer people a different way of thinking. Thanks Graham for this.
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    25/10/2016 #57 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #56 Thanks for the comment and your perspectives @Jackie Pantaliano. They are appreciated.
    Jackie Pantaliano
    25/10/2016 #56 Jackie Pantaliano
    After a visit to Salem, MA this weekend, with the reminder about the hysteria of the Salem witch trials and all who went along with them, as well as thinking back to all who followed Hitler, recalling those who defended slavery and believed women should not have the right to vote, I applaud this article and viewpoint. If the contrarians hadn't pushed through in all of these instances I shudder to think where we'd be today. Actually, the frightening thing is, you could say, that Trump hearkens back to those days and those followers. Great article.
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    24/10/2016 #55 Graham🐝 Edwards
    Thanks of the note @Deb🐝 Lange. You are right new perspective are like new windows to look out of.
    Deb🐝 Lange
    23/10/2016 #54 Deb🐝 Lange
    How great that you found a story to represent this practice. I absolutely agree we need to listen to people who see the world with different eyes, who sense different perspectives, who feel different energies. This is where the gold lies - in the intersections between what is commonly known and a new window, opening into new perspectives.
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    06/10/2016 #53 Graham🐝 Edwards
    As a contrarian @Charlie Accetta, I would have to say "no I wouldn't"... : )
    Charlie Accetta
    06/10/2016 #52 Charlie Accetta
    Yep. I would say more, but then you would think I was one of those groupthink zombies.
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    06/10/2016 #51 Graham🐝 Edwards
    Thanks for the comment @James O'Connell. I knew a leader who used to raise his hand and say "RED ALERT" and then offer his perspective.
    James O'Connell
    06/10/2016 #49 James O'Connell
    Good story and good point. I think I too am a contrarian though I never heard that term before now. I seen it more as being a critical thinker and as such when a room agrees on something without exploring all the perspectives available, including imagined, alarms sound (' ' ,)
    Harvey Lloyd
    06/10/2016 #48 Harvey Lloyd
    #46 Absolutely. Although painful sometimes to the dream it has valuable info imprinted.
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    06/10/2016 #47 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #44 Thanks for the comment @Franci🐝Eugenia Hoffman
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    06/10/2016 #46 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #43 Thanks for the comment @Harvey Lloyd... sometimes I don't want to know what's on the other side but I do know it's important so I always "grin" and flip over the coin.
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    06/10/2016 #45 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #42 Thanks for the comment @Kevin Pashuk... I definitely will check out that post.
    Franci🐝Eugenia Hoffman
    06/10/2016 #44 Franci🐝Eugenia Hoffman
    Without people that disagree or are of another opinion, where would we be? Think about it. Interesting post, Graham.
    Harvey Lloyd
    06/10/2016 #43 Harvey Lloyd
    I have always understood that we do not live on a one dimensional plane. There are always two sides to the coin. "Contrarian" describes the other side of the coin. Regardless of which side it's always the opposite. I believe that Attorneys consistently build the other attorneys case before working on their own. This is probably why people don't enjoy the experience. They have to listen to what the other attorney is going to do.

    Great piece @Graham🐝 Edwards. But until we discover that we do live on a one dimensional plane i always want to know what's on the other side.
    Kevin Pashuk
    06/10/2016 #42 Kevin Pashuk
    You have a much more succinct way to say things Graham. I took far longer with my post "Grandma's House, Hockey, and Sh*t Disturbers". I eventually came to the same point you did, only instead of a contrarian, I called them 'Effluent Agitators'.
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    30/07/2016 #41 Graham🐝 Edwards
    Thank you for you comment @DILMA BALBI -Contratos e Gestão
    DILMA BALBI -Contratos e Gestão
    29/07/2016 #40 DILMA BALBI -Contratos e Gestão
    Great post! It reminds me that when everybody says "good" it does not necessary means "good" to everybody... thanks for sharing
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    25/07/2016 #39 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #38 Thanks very much for the comment @John Valledor.
    John Valledor
    25/07/2016 #38 John Valledor
    I wholeheartedly endorse this article. One of my biggest reflections post battalion command of infantry is the value of having contrarian thinkers in my inner circle. Think about it (literally), how can you ever achieve "synthesis" if you don't have a means for "antithesis"--the true value in valid means for contrarian thinking? In fact, nowadays I mentor new generations of Army leaders to seek out contrarian thinkers and add them to their teams. Nice article!
  15. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    18/11/2016
    The Most Challenging Aspect of Leadership?
    The Most Challenging Aspect of Leadership?I am currently working with a client in Saudi Arabia conducting a couple of courses on Leadership and Interpersonal Communications, so far it’s been an incredible experience. The timing has meant that I have not had time (or energy – jet lag can...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Monica Chetal
    20/11/2016 #3 Monica Chetal
    Yes, rightly mentioned. I have coached some senior people where apart from other things, they have been living in guilt as they have not had any 'time' to spend with their children. Thanks for sharing this post
    John Whitehead
    19/11/2016 #2 John Whitehead
    #1 Thank you for taking the time to respond and adding to the conversation #Harvey Lloyd
    Harvey Lloyd
    18/11/2016 #1 Harvey Lloyd
    You have illuminated an area of leadership that skills dont help. Perseverance, self-awareness and courage are the character traits we need to pull back and clear our minds. The era of Bobby Fisher and the chess playing between Russia and America spawned the movie. The coach during a dramatic scene wiped all the pieces from the board and asked Mr. Fisher to see the board.

    Sometimes we do get into the rabbit hole and forget why we are there or maybe get to far away from the team. Resetting once a week to know why we do what we do is a great habit.

    Steven Covey calls this sharpening the saw. His simple story of two men sawing away at a tree when a woodsman approaches and watches them for a few hours is a metaphor for this concept. The woodsman asks, Why dont you stop and sharpen the saw? No time is the response.

    When your answer is you are to busy to most anything, you might need to sharpen the saw. Thanks for the reminder @John Whitehead.
  16. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    11/11/2016
    Leadership vs Management – Encourager!
    Leadership vs Management – Encourager!There is a certain quote uttered by one of the US presidential candidates that keeps coming back to me. Perhaps you can guess which one said it. “I am a great leader; I tell people what to do and they do it”. I cringe every time I hear that quote...
    Relevant

    Comments

    John Whitehead
    12/11/2016 #2 John Whitehead
    #1 thank you Maria
    María Loureiro Pernas
    11/11/2016 #1 María Loureiro Pernas
    Very good post, John. Thank you very much for sharing!
  17. ProducerSimon Gray

    Simon Gray

    11/11/2016
    The power of networking!
    The power of networking!Over the past few weeks I've been asked by a number of my clients about the importance of networking. How to balance an offline strategy with communicating a personal brand online have been questions raised, in addition to when and how often?For me...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Simon Gray
    16/11/2016 #12 Simon Gray
    #2 Thanks Mohammed – glad to hear you found it useful. Best wishes, Simon
    Simon Gray
    16/11/2016 #11 Simon Gray
    #1 Thanks Vishesh :-).
    Simon Gray
    16/11/2016 #10 Simon Gray
    #3 Hi John, yes indeed – patience is a virtue as they say. Thanks for taking a read and for your comment.
    Simon Gray
    16/11/2016 #9 Simon Gray
    #4 Thank you Federico :-).
    Simon Gray
    16/11/2016 #8 Simon Gray
    #5 Thanks Kevin – I couldn't agree more. My latest post is all about personal branding, which is very important for networking too.
    Simon Gray
    16/11/2016 #7 Simon Gray
    #6 Thanks for the great feedback Derek – much appreciated.
    Derek Wildman
    14/11/2016 #6 Derek Wildman
    Very true and yes networking/sales is always done when you need it most as oppose as a hobby. A great read and thank you for sharing it
    Kevin Pellon
    14/11/2016 #5 Kevin Pellon
    @Simon Gray great share! It's extremely important to continue to network, especially considering all the social media platforms, like @Javier 🐝 beBee had provided us. The opportunities are endless and the reach is amazing!
    Networking has changed, but in my opinion still a valid art on how to be noticed! Being prepared when you do this is very key! Know who your networking to and do your homework!
    John Whitehead
    14/11/2016 #3 John Whitehead
    Definitely agree with your premise that in networking be prepared to give and not just to show up to "get". My experience is that being prepared to provide value, without expectation of any return, does come back. Maybe not right away so patience is a requirement
    mohammed khalaf
    11/11/2016 #2 mohammed khalaf
    Very WISE COUNCIL
    Vishesh Khanna
    11/11/2016 #1 Vishesh Khanna
    So true!
  18. ProducerSteven Marshall

    Steven Marshall

    10/11/2016
    "Lead Me, Follow Me or Get Out of My Way!"
    "Lead Me, Follow Me or Get Out of My Way!"Editor's Note: One of my pet peeves and a quality that I search for but rarely find. Read on and enjoy. As always, you can find all my blog posts from 2013 to the present on my website at...
    Relevant
  19. ProducerGraham🐝 Edwards
    Business Transition by "Revolution"... (aka, Part Three)
    Business Transition by "Revolution"... (aka, Part Three)Transition (the noun) is defined as the process or a period of changing from one state (or condition) to another*, and with respect to business, I will say this is a constant state... the exception I suppose is when a business is stagnate (showing...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Graham🐝 Edwards
    07/11/2016 #4 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #2 Thanks for the comment @Tony 🐝 Rossi... you are right, more often than not the plan goes out the window when it enters the "real world". I like your message around "hoping what it will be"... as I was taught a long time ago, "Hope is not a strategy". Very much appreciate you reading !
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    07/11/2016 #3 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #1 Thanks for the comment @Renée 🐝 Cormier... the encouragement is greatly appreciated !
    Tony 🐝 Rossi
    07/11/2016 #2 Tony 🐝 Rossi
    You've got to focus every single day on keeping the blinders off. Talk with one another, see the situation for what it is, not what you're hoping it will be or what it was supposed to be. No battle plan survives contact with the enemy, right? Same thing with change in business - it will NEVER occur exactly as planned, so don't pretend that's what's happening... Bravo, @Graham🐝 Edwards - I hope the internet is listening to you!
    Renée  🐝 Cormier
    04/11/2016 #1 Renée 🐝 Cormier
    Yes, all business transitional phases can be tumultuous, but the revolution, or "big change" is potentially the most upsetting. I like your advice about not letting yourself get sucked into the emotion. The most disengaged employees love these troubled times in companies because they can rally even more support and grow their ranks. If you are leading a revolution, then job number one needs to be to fire the toxic people first. No one will miss them and you can minimize the emotional factor by clearing them out of the ranks right from the start. I love your insight, @Graham🐝 Edwards. Keep it coming!
  20. ProducerAmy Blaschka

    Amy Blaschka

    04/11/2016
    A Friendly Reminder: Use Your Time Wisely and Intentionally
    A Friendly Reminder: Use Your Time Wisely and IntentionallyImage via https://www.su.edu/blog/2014/04/22/the-institute-for-entrepreneurship-drawing-a-line-in-the-sand/ Earlier this week I had the pleasure of enjoying lunch with a good friend whom I...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Amy Blaschka
    04/11/2016 #3 Amy Blaschka
    Thanks for the share, @Javier 🐝 beBee!
    Amy Blaschka
    04/11/2016 #2 Amy Blaschka
    #1 Well said, @mohammed khalaf!
    mohammed khalaf
    04/11/2016 #1 mohammed khalaf
    Treat your guests with genuine care, anticipate their needs, shower them with generosity, go out of your way for them, respect them regardless and always celebrate them! True hospitality will crate "craving" fans of your LIFE who will never leave you.
  21. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    04/11/2016
    Intentions and Expectations
    Intentions and ExpectationsLeadership is… making clear what are the Intentions and Expectations. A large percentage of my career has been in sales management and leadership, where I have been responsible for 30 or more direct reports at a time. Sales management, at its...
    Relevant

    Comments

    John Whitehead
    06/11/2016 #2 John Whitehead
    #1 well stated @Mohammed A. Jawad
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    05/11/2016 #1 Mohammed A. Jawad
    That's true Mr. John. I presume that, as a leader one ought to harbor right intentions to chart out what's to be done and then, with positive expectations we ought to persevere for the desired outcomes.
  22. ProducerKevin Pashuk

    Kevin Pashuk

    04/11/2016
    Churn Happens
    Churn HappensIf you've ever managed people, you are familiar with the little tap on your office door, followed by "Got a minute?" Even if you have an open door policy and this person is in your office regularly, you've come to recognize the slightly hesitant...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    10/01/2017 #19 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @Kevin Pashuk
    ..Good topic for discussion. I like the way you have shared this.Too many times managers become antagonistic when faced with someone they admire or a great performer leaving. Transitional change is a part of life we must be ready for.
    Randy Keho
    05/11/2016 #18 Randy Keho
    #13 Leaving to work for a direct competitor usually results in being escorted out the door, giving notice is simply a tradition.
    When I left Pepsi to work for Coke I fully expected to be escorted out the door, I'd seen it before. However, my superiors didn't believe me. They thought I was kidding. When I confirmed my decision they were at a loss for words and told me to just go about my day and we'd talk about it later.
    When I returned at the end of the day, they told me I could just leave. No escort.
    Robert Cormack
    05/11/2016 #17 Robert Cormack
    Good points, Irene. We have become a "warm bodies" hiring complex. #15
    Robert Cormack
    05/11/2016 #14 Robert Cormack
    I had that problem for years, Kevin. I was always on call. The only reason the agency didn't have a "two deep" philosophy was because they were too cheap. We were always running around with a million things to do. I think the real trick is to have people smart enough to pick up your work, handling it professionally, without being a relief pitcher. I've seen agencies (small) where everyone's capable of that. But nobody feels like the agency is hedging with two people. It's a subtle difference, but the second example I've given you has kept their employees for years. #12
    Javier 🐝 beBee
    05/11/2016 #13 Javier 🐝 beBee
    #1 When I decided to leave Oracle and I told them I was going, they just wanted me out the door that day. I couldn't enter to the garage to collect my belongings :-) If someone turns in their notice, most often we don't want them sticking around for the transition/notice period, they are out the door that day. In my humble opinion, they have their minds elsewhere. One of the issues we face sometimes in the past is about getting all the information they had. Now. the cloud solves this past problem.
    Kevin Pashuk
    05/11/2016 #12 Kevin Pashuk
    #11 The other side to "two deep" Robert, especially on a smaller team, is that people can actually take a vacation without being on call... Especially those responsible for critical systems.

    ... But I understand your perspective.
    Robert Cormack
    05/11/2016 #11 Robert Cormack
    The "two deep" philosophy is a good one, Kevin—but also a bad one. We've reached a point in corporate thinking that everyone is expendable. When we reach that point, it's like a relationship. We're always a little distant. Everyone can sense in—especially the employee. And like with a relationship, that person goes from being committed to being guarded. That's the first thing headhunters look for. When they cold call, they're listening to your voice. When they say, "Have you ever entertained the idea of working somewhere else?" The committed person doesn't have to think. They simply say, "No." The guarded employee will pause. It's the pause good headhunters want. There's leverage. That's how you lose good employees. You can pay them well, encourage them, offer a wonderful working environment, but they know you have a "two deep" philosophy, they're never going to be completely loyal.
    Tony 🐝 Rossi
    05/11/2016 #10 Tony 🐝 Rossi
    #5 I sit firmly against the counter-offer practice. If you could afford it, you should have done it already. So either you can't actually afford it (vis-à-vis @Randy Keho's story) or you put yourself in a weak position with everyone else going forward. The best thing to do (presuming you weren't proactive per @Kevin Pashuk's advice above) is to support the exiting employee, maintain positive connections, learn from the loss, and hope to win them back one day.
    Mohammed Sultan
    05/11/2016 #9 Mohammed Sultan
    @ Kevin Pashuk. It's really a great post.Good career decisions have to be based not just on your aptitude but also on your deep interest .Before joining a new job you are going to need some systematic way of thinking through what you know about yourself .When you think through those moments in your career when you were deeply excited about your past success ,and at each of these moments you were doing differently and were deeply engaged, and then properly analysed these moments,you will pick up a thread that runs through them and connect them.This thread is your core interest.When you find a job that reflects your core interests ,not necessarily your core skills, you will never left to flounder or churned a way as a mass product.
    Ken Boddie
    05/11/2016 #8 Ken Boddie
    The best ones are the most ambitious and need to know there is an advancement path laid out for them within the organisation. This may need to be reinforced at frequent appraisals, whether formal or otherwise.
    "Churn lead to chunder,
    If your staff are left to flounder."
    But, in spite of good leadership and management, it's always the best ones who move on first. Yes, 'sh_t happens' , but we can avoid an avalanche if we keep the others appraised of their future path and track their performance. 'Closed doors' and "too busy to chat" doesn't cut it with the upwardly mobiles these days.
    Paul Walters
    05/11/2016 #7 Paul Walters
    @Kevin Pashuk I always hated that , " got a minute" and when you grant them that minute they kick you in the guts. years of training, investing time and money in them and then they go and sell their souls to a competitor. Oh well these days It is I who does the " got a minute' scenario to editors and publishers for whom I no longer want to work for

    Onwards and upward but thanks for a great piece as always !!!
    Don 🐝 Kerr
    04/11/2016 #6 Don 🐝 Kerr
    Interesting to gain another perspective @Kevin Pashuk Where I came from in the designed communications business if a knock came on your door (OK, we didn't have doors so if someone hung over your wall) announcing a resignation the next step was a walk to the person's desk with a little cardboard box for their belongings and a smart escort to the door. We had some notion of client confidentiality and figured that if the person left the building immediately all of their recollection of what they had worked on for years would vanish. Stupid? Yup. Pro-forma? Yup. I, like @Dean Owen, used to target a 15-20% annual turnover in staff regardless as simply a way to keep fresh blood coming in and to prevent complacency. Surprisingly, most of the objective was achieved through natural attrition and or people moving on to better and/or different opportunities so unless we were in for a major bloodletting due to the loss of a client very few terminations had to happen. That was a good thing 'cause I almost puked everytime I had to do one.
    Kevin Pashuk
    04/11/2016 #5 Kevin Pashuk
    #4 Interesting story Randy. In many organizations, there doesn't appear to be an upside in accepting the counter offer given as incentive to stay. After all, if they didn't see you as having that value before, what has really changed? This of course assumes that you have tried every avenue to rectify things before you went out and found another position.
    Randy Keho
    04/11/2016 #4 Randy Keho
    We recently had this situation arise and, like a good corporate organization, it found a way to take advantage of it.
    Our HR manager wasn't happy with the pay grade that corresponded with her title, so she found another job and turned in her notice.
    Downsizing has already stripped every department to the bone, so they bumped her up a title, which included a higher pay grade.
    She told me It was a substantial increase in pay. She was quite satisfied and stayed. At least she was for about a month.
    That's when they chopped one of the four remaining heads and split the duties between the remaining three, including her.
    #3
    Kevin Pashuk
    04/11/2016 #3 Kevin Pashuk
    #2 Thanks for visiting Erroll. Even with the best communications between a manager and their team, an employee is not likely going to let the manager know they are in an interview process until they have secured the position. But as I mention in the article, it should NOT be a surprise. In the case I described above, there were several conversations about opportunities for promotion, which in the case of our organization were extremely limited.
    Erroll -EL- Warner
    04/11/2016 #2 Erroll -EL- Warner
    A manager who took his subordinates for granted. This tend to show lack of a professional working environment. He was disconnected from his workers. Connected managers usually become familiar with employees decisions.
    Dean Owen
    04/11/2016 #1 Dean Owen
    Very different story in financial services. If someone turns in their notice, most often you don't want them sticking around for the transition/notice period, they are out the door that day. As such, although we didn't have a "2 deep", we always ensured members of the team could take over responsibilities without a hiccup. All part of BCP/disaster recovery processes (having learned our lesson through 9/11, Taiwan earthquake etc). We also had mandatory 2 week continuous vacation where access to systems/email etc were terminated during the time off. In a way it is harsh (ensuring nobody is indispensable), but had to be done. On a sidenote, I've always been a proponent of a healthy 20% turnover rate per annum, again harsh, but necessary.
  23. ProducerSimon Gray

    Simon Gray

    01/11/2016
    How would you handle a pre-offer salary negotiation?
    How would you handle a pre-offer salary negotiation?Once all the hard work has been done to define, find and then secure the executive position you set out to be offered at the outset, it's time to maximise the return on your investment.Your investment here is two-fold:1) Your career history that has...
    Relevant
  24. ProducerGraham🐝 Edwards
    Can you envision the "potential"?
    Can you envision the "potential"?A while ago we were looking to buying the parcel of land (which in fact we now own), and I remember spending an hour and a half wandering the property. Sometime during our trek I looked at my uncle Tom and asked him what he thought. His response was...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Graham🐝 Edwards
    31/10/2016 #10 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #8 Thanks for the comment @Renée 🐝 Cormier... this sounds like a couple of blog topics for sure; particularly when it comes to hiring people. As I think of my career and all the people I've interviewed and hired I think it will make for a great discussion. I definitely will put pen to paper... virtually speaking ... hahaha
    Renée  🐝 Cormier
    30/10/2016 #8 Renée 🐝 Cormier
    Potential is something that has always excited me. Looking at what something could really become is, for me, at least, way more exciting than looking at what something actually is.
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    30/10/2016 #6 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #3 Thanks for reading it it greatly appreciated @debasish majumder
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    30/10/2016 #5 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #2 Thanks of the comment @Irene Hackett. My experience, in a business scenario, is that ultimately it is the individual who owns understanding their potential, and the manager is there to determine where that potential fits relative to the current situation and more importantly down the road... I think it is a of being a good leader if you can understand a persons potential... I think it is the sign of a great leader if they help develop it.
    Graham🐝 Edwards
    30/10/2016 #4 Graham🐝 Edwards
    #1 Thanks for the comment @Chas ✌️ Wyatt... I can't help thinking happiness is directly lined to the "road travelled" to reaching ones potential. What that potential is, well that is based on the person.
    debasish majumder
    29/10/2016 #3 debasish majumder
    nice insight @Graham Edwards! enjoyed read. thank you for sharing the post.
    Chas ✌️ Wyatt
    29/10/2016 #1 Chas ✌️ Wyatt
    A lot of people have potential. Not everyone realizes theirs.
  25. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    30/10/2016
    Practicing What We Preach
    Practicing What We PreachI’m taking a break this week from my series on leadership because I have been spending a lot of my time preparing to teach two Soft Skills and Leadership Development courses overseas in a couple of weeks. This has been an interesting experience....
    Relevant
See all