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Geographic Information Systems (GIS) - beBee

Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

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  1. ProducerPrashant Kumar

    Prashant Kumar

    06/11/2017
     Increasing Demand for Remote Sensing Solutions in Land Use and Coverage | Remote Sensing Services Market
    Increasing Demand for Remote Sensing Solutions in Land Use and Coverage | Remote Sensing Services Market The report "Remote Sensing Services Market by Platform (Satellites, UAVs, Manned Aircraft, and Ground), End User (Defense and Commercial), Resolution (Spatial, Spectral, Radiometric, and Temporal), and Region - Global Forecast to 2022", The remote...
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  2. ProducerPrashant Kumar

    Prashant Kumar

    02/11/2017
    Remote Sensing Services Market worth 21.62 Billion USD by 2022
    Remote Sensing Services Market worth 21.62 Billion USD by 2022The report "Remote Sensing Services Market by Platform (Satellites, UAVs, Manned Aircraft, and Ground), End User (Defense and Commercial), Resolution (Spatial, Spectral, Radiometric, and Temporal), and Region - Global Forecast to 2022", The remote...
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  3. ProducerPrashant Kumar

    Prashant Kumar

    01/11/2017
    Remote Sensing Services Market by Platform - 2022
    Remote Sensing Services Market by Platform - 2022The report "Remote Sensing Services Market by Platform (Satellites, UAVs, Manned Aircraft, and Ground), End User (Defense and Commercial), Resolution (Spatial, Spectral, Radiometric, and Temporal), and Region - Global Forecast to 2022", The remote...
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  4. ProducerPooja Patange

    Pooja Patange

    22/09/2017
    Geographic Information System (GIS) Market Information
    Geographic Information System (GIS) Market InformationThe factors driving the market include the development of smart cities and urbanization, integration of geospatial technology with mainstream technologies for business intelligence, and growing adoption of GIS solutions in transportation.The...
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  5. ProducerPooja Patange

    Pooja Patange

    11/08/2017
     Geographic Information System (GIS) Market worth 10.12 Billion USD by 2023
    Geographic Information System (GIS) Market worth 10.12 Billion USD by 2023 The geographic information system (GIS) market was valued at USD 5.33 Billion in 2016 and is expected to reach USD 10.12 Billion by 2023, growing at a CAGR of 9.6% between 2017 and 2023. Download PDF Brochure:...
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  6. ProducerLouise Smith

    Louise Smith

    01/07/2017
    DOWN UNDER NO LONGER - BUT WERE WE REALLY THERE TO START WITH?
    DOWN UNDER NO LONGER - BUT WERE WE REALLY THERE TO START WITH?WHICH WAY IS UP? "The Blue Marble" is a famous photograph of the Earth taken on 7 December 1972, by the crew of the Apollo 17 spacecraft en route to the Moon at a distance of about 29,000 kilometres (18,000 mi).   Earth seen from Apollo 17...
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    Comments

    Wayne Yoshida
    10/07/2017 #32 Wayne Yoshida
    #31 Traffic circles! Not too many in Calif. But the most excellent and funny example of traffic circle / roundabout confusion is displayed in the Chevy Chase movie, "European Vacation."
    Louise Smith
    10/07/2017 #31 Louise Smith
    #30 Thank you @Wayne Yoshida Yes I think so too
    It is the easiest way to choose the most commonly held point of reference
    But it can sometimes lead us into danger without thinking
    or up the garden path without thinking
    or to the wrong destination (can also blame GPS) without thinking
    I have only been to Washington, DC and didn't drive
    But you should try driving in Canberra ACT Aus Capital
    There are so many roundabouts that it's almost impossible to choose a point of reference
    The Aus Parliament is there which makes sense as Pollies are always going around in circles !
    Wayne Yoshida
    03/07/2017 #30 Wayne Yoshida
    Thanks Louise. interesting comments from the Bees.

    I was thinking about this in simple terms: When one floats in space (zero gravity) or flies in the air (on a plane, for example) the directions are artificial. One must "force" the use of a point of reference. And this is what we are thinking of - both figuratively and literally. Choose one frame of reference and go from there.

    Sort of like driving around in Washington, DC or Boston, Mass. Or Miami, Fla. . . .
    Louise Smith
    03/07/2017 #29 Louise Smith
    #28 A fantastic image @Joyce 🐝 Bowen Brand Ambassador @ beBee !
    I wish we could.
    Sometimes there is so much injustice in the world, it get's overwhelming.
    I try to remind myself the best I can do is support the people who come to see me everyday.
    If everyone did the same, the world would be a better place !
    Joyce 🐝 Bowen   Brand Ambassador @ beBee
    03/07/2017 #28 Joyce 🐝 Bowen Brand Ambassador @ beBee
    "that we could overturn the unjust political and economic relationships in our world as easily as we can flip the maps on our walls." A dream come true?
    Phil Friedman
    03/07/2017 #27 Phil Friedman
    #22 Louise, my wife and I traveled across Australia in the early nineties. I had been assigned by Power & Motoryacht magazine to test and write about a 70-foot power catamaran that was being manufactured in NZ, and we arranged to detour to Australia for a couple of weeks during the return trip. We spent time in Sidney, then Cairns, the outback in the Ayer's Rock area, and finally Brisbane. From Cairns, we visited the barrier reef and went up a couple of rivers, one was, I think, the Barron. That's where we saw crocs straight out of Crocodile Dundee. There had been a long drought and they were coming up (?) river to eat farmers' cows. It was before the Aboriginal people had made it well known that they disapproved of tourists stomping all over their sacred grounds, so we ended up climbing Ayer's Rock, then circumnavigated its base. Wow. Sidney zoo was delightful as was Sydney itself. I am a big fan of Australia and Aussies. Cheers!
    Louise Smith
    03/07/2017 #26 Louise Smith
    Thank you @Lada 🏡 Prkic for sharing this buzz in Fractals Forever !
    Louise Smith
    03/07/2017 #25 Louise Smith
    #23 NO BUT A MAN LIVES THERE !
    Phil Friedman
    02/07/2017 #24 Phil Friedman
    Pythagorean, not Oythagireans -- although no doubt both existed at some point in time before The Inqusition set the predominating world view back to the Stone Age. Cheers!
    Phil Friedman
    02/07/2017 #23 Phil Friedman
    #21 As I remember, most of the Ancient Greek philosophers were creations of Plato and surely Aristotle was a straw man created by Thomas Aquinas.I would not put much stock in Pythagoras since he and his merry band of Oythagireans also believed that some reincarnated souls returned as bean and so would not eat that species of vegetable. Next you will be telling us that the moon is not made of green cheese. You, Louise are quite a kidder. Thank you for the "history" lesson. Cheers!
    Louise Smith
    02/07/2017 #22 Louise Smith
    #20 When were you here ? How long ? Where did you go ?
    Louise Smith
    02/07/2017 #21 Louise Smith
    #20 I think that because " Pythagoras 6th-century BC and Parmenides 5th-century stated that the Earth is spherical, the spherical view spread rapidly in the Greek world. Around 330 BC, Aristotle maintained on the basis of physical theory and observational evidence that the Earth was spherical. Hermannus Contractus (1013–1054) was among the earliest Christian scholars to estimate the circumference of Earth. Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274), the most important and widely taught theologian of the Middle Ages, believed in a spherical Earth. Portuguese navigation down and around the coast of Africa in the latter half of the 1400s gave wide-scale observational evidence for Earth's sphericity. The ultimate demonstration came when Ferdinand Magellan's expedition completed the first global circumnavigation in 1521. " overall people did not believe in the FLAT Earth theory.
    Phil Friedman
    02/07/2017 #20 Phil Friedman
    I believe you may all be overthinking this "downunder" thing. My guess is that it began with Europeans fearing they would sail off the edge of the earth, and when they didn't, they're thinking retreated into picturing traveling over the edge and continuing onto the "bottom" face of the earth. This terminology persisted even when the "picture" was long given up (except among the members of the Flat Earth Society.) I gained great respect for Australians when I was there. Especially when I saw crocs as big as pick up trucks and heard farmers complaining that crocs were taking and eating their cows. Cheers!
    Louise Smith
    02/07/2017 #19 Louise Smith
    #3 @Pamela 🐝 Williams BTW Australian Indigenous people's dot paintings were often maps of where to find food, water and meeting places !
    Louise Smith
    02/07/2017 #18 Louise Smith
    #3 @Pamela 🐝 Williams As for "thoughts, images form in your mind when you interact with Americans? " that is a post in itself ! I will try to write it for you with pros & cons ! Please be patient,
    Louise Smith
    02/07/2017 #17 Louise Smith
    #3@Pamela 🐝 Williams
    Regarding
    "How is it that cultures can be so different, attitudes so diverse. Is it simply because of the hemisphere in which they exist or as you insinuate; is it because political an societal powers at work have instilled these differences? Do we only see the differences and not how similar we are?"

    This is a complex question ! Although cultures may seem different and attitudes diverse, I don't think they are. They look different due to geography and climate. However, most cultures value having their own country, identity, language, customs, religion, cuisine and values such as loyalty, freedom, self preservation of all at any cost, family, politics or governance. These are the same.

    We have been taught to see difference from the beginning of time as a means of survival of our own cultural group. But today this is mostly not the case except when greed or football are involved. Each person has a way of reacting to difference depending on their personality but there is also the "crowd" mentality where people perceive themselves to be threatened and react without thinking for themselves.
    Louise Smith
    02/07/2017 #16 Louise Smith
    #3 Hi @Pamela 🐝 Williams
    Thank you for your positive comments.
    Regarding
    "It amazes me how a map can possess so much significance in people's viewpoints, political or social."
    It's from the dawn of map making and maybe even before that, boundaries are important to people for survival, culture, resources & trade / making $.
    That's why so many explorers sailed to find new lands. And also people went to them for freedom from poverty, slavery, political, religious and cultural repression. Some were just plain adventurers - history's entrepreneurs if you like !

    But if you think about it for a minute, you will know about quite a few of these situations past and present.
    - Vikings raided & Romans conquered UK
    - Colonisation by Britain, France, Holland, Belgium, Portugal, Spain.......
    - The Mayflower transported the first English Separatists or Pilgrims from England to the New World/US in 1620.
    - Boundary issues in WWI & WW2 which still impact on nations today eg Former Yugoslavia
    - Israel becoming a country at the expense of Palestine
    - North & South Korea
    - Russia annexing the Baltic States and the Crimea
    - Indonesia annexing part of Papua and Timor
    - China annexing Tibet, Mongolia, Hong Kong and recently Spratly Islands in the South China Sea
    Louise Smith
    02/07/2017 #15 Louise Smith
    #14 Yes @Pamela 🐝 Williams I think it must be very painful to endure US politics at the moment. We had the same in both LP and LNP with leader changes. I am interested to know if President Trump has any advisers that vet his tweets? It seems very strange to me that the US President tweets. I know SM is widely used now but seems a bit below the Office to me. Or maybe it's the actual content. What do you think ?
    Pamela 🐝 Williams
    02/07/2017 #14 Pamela 🐝 Williams
    #10 throw stones Ken, through stones. I throw them often! We are in a mess right now and I'm the first to say; it's a three ring circus where a tiger attacks it's trainer. Not what you would call entertaining in the least. It's a tragedy and the blood is only beginning to be spilt. I called the attack on the GOP congressmen months ago (not that particular attack) but when you threaten people's lives and well-being, their baser instincts rise up, survival and protective instincts kick in. Conservative or Liberal, we all possess the instinct to survive and protect our mates and offspring.All the progress and technology does not prevent that. It's not over by a long shot and that makes me afraid for the future of this country, even the world because we are not the only ones threatened.
  7. Franklin Coetzee
    Franklin Coetzee
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    Comments

    Gerald Hecht
    30/11/2016 #1 Gerald Hecht
    It makes you wonder about all of the flags and banners and family crests and monogrammed billfolds with yet still more inked Woodrow Wilson images...futility...it's all futility; In throwing this stupid thing out...there's a receptacle just ahead! Thank you; this appeared exactly when it was what I most needed to hear!
  8. Emilio Rivero Collado
    Hola, aquí va una nueva entrada en mi Blog. Espero la encontréis interesante. ¨ Creación de topologías en ArcGIS ¨
    Emilio Rivero Collado
    GIS & Asset Management: Creación de topologías en ArcGIS
    gisassetmanagement.blogspot.qa
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  9. Teresa Gezze

    Teresa Gezze

    25/05/2016
    Take a look at how the world actually looks like.

    On any text book map - obviously designed by western society - India is five times smaller than Greenland, when truth is that India is the 7th largest country in the world vs Greenland, which is the 13th.
    Teresa Gezze
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    Comments

    Teresa Gezze
    26/05/2016 #6 Anonymous
    #5 Hahaha. OK that's just nuts. =)
    Brian McKenzie
    26/05/2016 #5 Brian McKenzie
    If you want some real fun with maps - head on over to the Flat Earther's Realm. They contend the globe is a lie and we live on a flat disk under a dome - like ants in a geranium.
    Teresa Gezze
    26/05/2016 #4 Anonymous
    #3 It's not about 'interests' - that could be a different debate -, but about proportions/fact and how the ones we know don't fit the actual ones. "Squished" is the perspective we get from the comparison we do with the maps we know, but if we would have seen the actual proportions from the beginning we would probably just see it and think, "yeah, that's the map we know".
    Steven Davies
    25/05/2016 #3 Steven Davies
    It was done this way simply because of the way the world is shaped, not because of some 'western' bias. The trouble with paper maps is that the world is round and paper isn't. When making things fit, from a globe to a 2D representation, images are skewed and squashed. The image in this post, for instance, suffers the same fate but in reverse. You wouldn't be able to overlay that image onto a globe and still retain its accuracy, the same is true from globe to paper.
    Brian McKenzie
    25/05/2016 #2 Brian McKenzie
    https://youtu.be/vVX-PrBRtTY
    Henrí Galvão
    25/05/2016 #1 Henrí Galvão
    seriously? scary
  10. Emilio Rivero Collado
    Nueva entrada en mi Blog profesional. En esta ocasión, creación de un MDT con ArcGIS.
    Emilio Rivero Collado
    GIS & Asset Management: Creación de un MDT con ArcGIS.
    gisassetmanagement.blogspot.qa
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  11. Federico 🐝 Álvarez San Martín
    Una app para ver los mapas topográficos de España.
    Federico 🐝 Álvarez San Martín
    Una app para acceder a los mapas topográficos de España
    www.ticbeat.com Desarrollada por el Instituto Geográfico Nacional, esta aplicación será de gran utilidad a la hora de planificar rutas al aire libre. #gps...
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    Comments

    Pedro🐝 Gómez
    20/03/2016 #1 Pedro🐝 Gómez
    Muy recomendable....!!! Gracias.