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Immunonutrition: Heart Disease - beBee

Immunonutrition: Heart Disease

~ 100 buzzes
Let's get it together! Heart Disease is the #1 cause of death for Americans. Not acceptable.
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  1. ProducerFernando Santa Isabel Llanos
    ¡Alerta! Estos son signos de un infarto
    ¡Alerta! Estos son signos de un infarto En la medida en que las personas fumen, consuman alcohol de forma excesiva, experimenten estrés laboral y no practiquen ninguna actividad física, están más expuestas a sufrir un infarto. En cualquier momento el corazón puede dejar de funcionar y...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    31/08/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    "...en la ciudad de Los Ángeles." Sí. Por mas que siete años, estudio a las "University of Southern California (USC) Medical School." Tienemos muchos cuantos personas con enferma de corazón y las mujeres tambien. Gracias por todo esté informacion. "Share" to Hives: Heart Disease, HealthCare, Invisible Illnesses. Muy bueno!
  2. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    My Home Remedy: Staring at an Aquarium
    My Home Remedy: Staring at an Aquarium/ by Dr Margaret Aranda /  Introduction: The sights and sounds of nature can be soothing to mind, body, and soul, reaping benefits that abound to many tangents, off-shooting to the world (See Image 1). We have waterfall sounds, falling rain on the...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    31/08/2016 #21 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #18 I believe that you are All Over the UK.. So what's the deal with the UK? Bwaa..
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    31/08/2016 #20 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #18 Of all the ...people..@Randy Keho- okay, don't get mad I may have spelled your name wrong in a coupla places. Perhaps you should check it out, friend: just Google your name at #RANDYKEHO... MWaaaUUHahaha~ 🎀mags
    Randy Keho
    29/08/2016 #18 Randy Keho
    Nemo's old hat. Dora's all the rage now.@Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD They released a sequel. Nothing like making it official, but what's the deal with Australia? #15
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/08/2016 #17 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #10 Yes, and so many urban cities just have honking of the cars, along with the occasional siren! Love the invention of the multi-sound clock-radio - sounds of crickets, the ocean, the rain, the crashing waves, and a waterfall. We all need that. When people don't have green trees or grass, I don't think they realize how much they miss out on....nature is indeed so very beautiful.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/08/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 Sorry I don't see a Comment on this Article. Hmmm...
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/08/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 Oh, Randy @Randy Keho! I can just see your smile! GeeZ ~ get some fish! You have to live long with all the stress ~ oh my! Hope to bring you some good cheer in Hive: Veterans: To Serve. I'm a little behind on my once/wk promise, so forgive me on that. I was busy writing about fish when I shoulda been staring atem. lol And Just so Ya Know, this article is hitting Twitter in Australia, and I'm officially on the Australia Twitter Follow List! (Is that where Nemo lives?). @Matt Sweetwood, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani, PhD, @John White, MBA, @Juan Imaz
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/08/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 "There is nothing more soothing to me than being near a body of water, watching the ​fish, the birds, listening to the sounds of nature which includes the waves on the ocean when the tide returns back in towards the shore." What a visual, as the river I thought was fresh-water, then you end up at the tide with the ocean rather smoothly but abruptly if you read close. You and @Deb Helfrich both have a way with words, and I'm sure that @Ali Anani would agree that you should write poetry with me!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/08/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 Love that, @Deb Helfrich, "...the ways us humans can really not live up to the responsibility of our big pre-frontal cortices." Poetic science. You should try poetry in Hive: Poetry - Mathematics and Science. :)
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/08/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 Super interesting information, and WoW your experience must have landed you with a really good heart! I can't help but wonder if you'll live longer than the rest of us! Thank you, seriously for all the information - truly worthy of its own Buzz but so so love that it is here in the Comment Stream instead! In many cities throughout California, most people that can afford a salt water tank actually don't manage it themselves - they have "the fish man" come over 1-2x a week. Just like "the pool man" and "the water man." And in some places, you can still get fresh organic milk delivered in glass bottles, just like back-in-the-day. Cherish your additional information, and I'd like to keep writing articles on fish. I hope you can contribute - just add 2 pics & iBAM! you've got Honey!
    Alan Geller
    29/08/2016 #11 Alan Geller
    #7 You ARE Baywatch!
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    27/08/2016 #10 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Watching fish in an aquarium can be very relaxing plus aquariums can be quite beautiful I'm of the same opinion as @Lisa Gallagher, I like to enjoy the relaxation of being outside with nature.

    When I was a child, I used to live at Daytona Beach during the summer months. I found nothing more relaxing then hearing the sound of the ocean when trying to sleep.
    mohammed khalaf
    27/08/2016 #9 mohammed khalaf
    HI dear I waiting you why not any responce? #3
    Randy Keho
    26/08/2016 #8 Randy Keho
    Now that it's legal to possess small amounts of marijuana in Illinois, I'll bet there's a lot of people staring into space or at the wall instead of nature. Goldfish will be swimming to the unemployment line and the sale of fish bowls will plummet.
    Lisa Gallagher
    26/08/2016 #7 Lisa Gallagher
    We have many areas near us where we can watch the fish swimming in the open river. There is nothing more soothing to me than being near a body of water, watching the ​fish, the birds, listening to the sounds of nature which includes the waves on the ocean when the tide returns back in towards the shore.
    Deb Helfrich
    25/08/2016 #6 Deb Helfrich
    #5 You know what, Paul this comment of yours deserves a full buzz..... I'd never thought about the message of these small bowls and my only real life experience is a vague memory of getting some in a baggie during a grade school carnival. Geez, the ways us humans can really not live up to the responsibility of our big pre-frontal cortices.
    Paul Kemner
    25/08/2016 #5 Paul Kemner
    Hi Margaret-

    As someone who has kept fish since the 60's, I've got to say keeping goldfish or bettas in such tiny bowls is very poor practice, even though stores encourage you to do this. It's like keeping a small dog or cat in a 20-gallon tote- they might live, but in horrible conditions.

    Here are some quick references:
    Goldfish:
    (A 20-gallon tank -24" x 12" x 16") has enough room for one slow-moving fancy goldfish, but not a short-finned one.
    http://thegoldfishtank.com/tank-size-calculator/
    goldfish myths
    http://www.tfhmagazine.com/details/articles/goldfish-myths-debunked.htm
    more:
    http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=0&aid=2650
    http://www.puregoldfish.com/what-size-tank-do-goldfish-need/

    Bettas aren't as bad in a small-ish container, but are still susceptible to rapid waste build-up. They live in very shallow water in very tropical Asia, so they need higher temperatures than most people set their thermostat for. They really need a heater.
    http://www.bettatalk.com/housing.htm
    http://www.firsttankguide.net/betta.php
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KcFWKfHHKus
    https://bettafish.org/care/

    It's easier to care for a larger tank than a small one because you have a much larger margin for error. If you overcrowd a tank with too many fish, that margin gets razor-thin. The margin on a saltwater tank is even smaller!

    OTOH, if you do your homework and do things right you can have a beautiful tank with long-lived fish. Some species are a lot more interactive than others. And you can actually teach your goldfish!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0PEs_qvU-n4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GxCVMWqW4-k
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    25/08/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 #1 You are quite on the par, and ahead of the game with a pet dog. For those that have an Invisible Illness or Mental Health concerns over being disabled, serving as Primary Caregiver to our parents, or just melancholy, many medical studies have shown the value of a Companion Pet solely to add the last 'missing' sensation here, "touch" and affection, a relationship, and positive reinforcement. Just as a mother rocks her newborn on her shoulder, that skin:skin (or skin:fur) contact releases endogenous hormones (e.g., encephalons) from the brain to the rest of the body. These have a morphine-like effect. So yes! Your pet is healthy for you, and for the geriatric population in nursing homes, you will regularly find dogs and cats residing. Furthermore, this is why horses on patrol are used for crowd control - animals just soothe most people. Thank you, Deb for bringing up such salient points. You are great with the dog:landscape combo and blessed you have it accessible!
    Deb Helfrich
    24/08/2016 #1 Deb Helfrich
    I simply have to have the sound of moving water splashing throughout my day, but I tend to prefer the contemplative stimulation of a vast landscape. I will keep the aquarium concept stashed away for when I get settled. Luckily, I do have my dog to ensure my strolls are a daily fact.
  3. Donald Grandy

    Donald Grandy

    08/07/2016
    “Those who can’t find time for exercise will have to make time for illness.”
    Donald Grandy
    Healthy Body
    yourdream.smartlivingtoday.com
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    Dale Masters
    31/07/2016 #5 Dale Masters
    What if...1) the connective tissue holding your abs together is weak, and you have a herniation in the front...AND 2) Your spine is crumbling, your disks are a mess, and your spine is being held up by bone spurs? I used to lift weights. I worked in physical jobs all my life. At one point I was on one end of a 300 lb bundle of steel...and helped to unload the entire truck. What do I do?? My legs are getting progressively weaken, and have a birth defect in my left shoulder that I'm told will regrow bone spurs over and over again as fast as they're removed! I am terrified.
    Donald Grandy
    23/07/2016 #3 Donald Grandy
    #1 So many people take their health for granted. Take time for fitness or you will be taking time for your sickness..
    Donald Grandy
    15/07/2016 #2 Donald Grandy
    #1 Amen!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    15/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    This should be on a Billboard so those who can use their bodies, do use their bodies.
  4. Donald Grandy

    Donald Grandy

    12/07/2016
    Dogs, like humans, need physical exercise to keep their body healthy. Running with a dog helps keep both you and the dog in shape and also helps diminish negative canine behaviour such as barking, digging, and excessive chewing.
    Donald Grandy
    Tips For Running With A Dog
    yourdream.smartlivingtoday.com
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    15/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Now this is certainly pertinent and super-useful for today. Thank you for the great share!
  5. Donald Grandy

    Donald Grandy

    09/06/2016
    Donald Grandy
    Weight Loss Decisions: Which Cardiovascular Exercise Is For You
    yourdream.smartlivingtoday.com
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    15/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Pure and simple.
  6. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    23/06/2016
    Childhood Obesity = Precocious Puberty
    Childhood Obesity = Precocious PubertyThe high obesity rate among very young children is worrisome for many reasons, and one is that obesity causes children to go through puberty earlier. According to a recent article in Medical Daily on the issue of childhood obesity and early...
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    Lori Boxer
    02/07/2016 #3 Lori Boxer
    #2 I have on more than one occasion said to a mother, You do realize that you're slowly killing your kid, right? True medical issues or extraordinary circumstances aside, childhood obesity is the result of adult behavior, pure and simple.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Childhood obesity is so multifactorial, and Hat's Off to You for tackling it in such a short Buzz. Concise, professional, and references provided. Excellent. I would also add that obesity leads to not only heart disease in adults (as your article on arterial clogging so nicely pictures), but to "chronic metabolic syndrome," diabetes, low self-esteem, bullying, bad grades in school, no childhood friends, being 'the black sheep,' and more. Diabetes alone leads to kidney failure, blindness, leg amputations from gangrene, gastroparesis with the stomach not emptying food, painful neuropathy of the lower legs, and all the side effects of hyper- and hypo-glycemia. If parents would stop buying chips and junk food, their children would eat better, too. The wrong foods are bad medicine to a death sentence at an early age. Obesity is Obscene. Obesity is Gluttony. Obesity is Self-Help Comfort Food. Obesity is a murderer. Let's be raw. Unleashed. Just say it like it is, because I've seen it ALL. And I'm tired of the general public thinking that, "Oh...yeah...my grandmother has diabetes and all she does is take insulin." W-h-aaa-t? We need to reinvent obesity and diabetes and let people know that just like lung cancer and cigarettes, it's an addictive disorder that leaves one dead, instead of retiring and enjoying grandchildren. That, that is obesity. Parents, open your eyes and put that food DOWN! Your kids will learn by example. Oh. And. It's not a joke. (And it's all in my book, https://www.tatepublishing.com/bookstore/book.php?w=978-1-62854-116-8 . Women's Health.
  7. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Hey! Let's Eat Watermelon!
    Hey! Let's Eat Watermelon!/ by Dr Margaret Aranda /  This tongue-in-cheek article is on the very serious subject of Immunonutrition. Little known by the general public, it is an international concept used by millions of medical professionals for at least the past 8 years. Do...
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    Lisa Gallagher
    22/08/2016 #22 Lisa Gallagher
    #20 Thats amazing @Cyndi wilkins! I love to hear stories like the one you just shared!
    Lisa Gallagher
    22/08/2016 #21 Lisa Gallagher
    Worth a repost since so many people love reading about alternative medicine. by @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Cyndi wilkins
    21/08/2016 #20 Cyndi wilkins
    Yep...I'm a true believer in the health benefits of watermelon! Several years ago I was volunteering with Hospice visiting dying patients. One of them told me her favorite food was watermelon, but they wouldn't give it to her because she was diabetic. I thought...WHAT! This poor woman is dying, given a few weeks..maybe a month left of life...and she can't have watermelon? So, rebel that I am, I began sneaking it past the nurse so this poor woman could somewhat enjoy her last days. Well, guess what...She lived another seven months! I swear it was the watermelon;-)
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/06/2016 #19 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #18 My pleasure! I always love to make science fun, and as you get to know my writings, you'll see how easily I can switch from writing a solo MD manuscript in Pharmacy & Pharmacology International (I submitted it to a Hive that I can't remember)...to writing like a child. Or a mixture. And you'll notice that I like to be different. :-). Was always the black sheep growing up, and have embraced it in my old age! Lovin' your Buzzes, too! It's all good!
    James McElearney
    14/06/2016 #18 James McElearney
    #16 The pleasure is all mine @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. So happy we connected on here. I look forward to reading some more of your buzzes. Keep these little gems coming
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/06/2016 #17 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #15 It's quite the sculpture, isn't it, @Lisa Gallagher? Super unique! Inviting you to my Immunonutrition Hive, too, as I'll be focusing on Women's Health, naturally. :-). Love your comment but you can also eat cantalope or honeydew for your skin/hair...and too much of a good thing is bad so make sure to eat plenty of variety with veges/fruits! Take care!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/06/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #14 Coming from you, @James McElearney, I take that as a compliment indeed! I'll be writing lots on Immunonutrition, so feel free to join the Hive...or I can tag you if you'd like. You have a great day!
    Lisa Gallagher
    13/06/2016 #15 Lisa Gallagher
    I guess I need to eat a lot more watermelon @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. Love the sculpture!
    James McElearney
    12/06/2016 #14 James McElearney
    I never knew melon was that nutritious. what a brilliant buzz
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/06/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #12 Oh that is SUPER Cool! Sweet! Make sure it's organic if you can! :-)!
    Michele Williams
    12/06/2016 #12 Michele Williams
    Thanks @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. I'm going to pick up some watermelon on my way home! I guess Bebee is a source of good health: intellectually, socially and physically!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/06/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Javier beBee: Thank you for sharing so much! Mucho gusto! ?Tal vez yo escribo en espanol tambien?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/06/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 Well, if you blow the fresh-cut watermelon with ozone and wrap it with either polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or polyethylene (right away, before the water evaporates), and keep it at 4 deg Centigrade, the shelf-life can be up to 7 days. But what honeybee would want plastic coating on it these days? So....yeah.....the better part of valor is to have a multi-ethnic mix of fruits & veges that are all different colors, and don't eat too much of anything every day. We wouldn't want to see Vitamin A overdose and yellow hands, now would we? Uhmmmm...no, or people would think you were jaundiced and maybe you'd end up with a liver transplant...by mistake!
    Ken Boddie
    12/06/2016 #9 Ken Boddie
    Hey @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, if an apple a day keeps the doctor away, does a melon a day keep the body OK? 🤕
    Kirstie-Sweetie Louise
    12/06/2016 #8 Kirstie-Sweetie Louise
    You're welcome!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/06/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 If it's Banff Vodka, then it's going to bite!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/06/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 Oh thank you so much, angel!
    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    12/06/2016 #5 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    Hmmm, my neighbour is a doctor. He serves up the best watermelon I ever had. He injects it with vodka. Does that affect its nutritional value? After a few pieces, no one cares.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/06/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 All in the name of Quality of Life! En el nombre de La Vida!