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Interesting Engineering, Technology and Discoveries - beBee

Interesting Engineering, Technology and Discoveries

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This is the place when you can share information about interesting engineering projects, latest development in technology, new materials and other breakthrough discoveries and inventions. Welcome, all of you who love science and engineering!
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  1. Claire L Cardwell
    9 Stunning Buildings That Will Change the Way You Think of Wood.
    A beautiful new coffee-table book features 170 dramatic examples of great wooden architecture.
    When you think of wooden buildings, you likely think of log cabins or New England clapboard cottages. But thanks to new technologies like treatments for bamboo or cross-laminated "engineered" timber, wood is stronger, lighter, fireproof, and more practical than ever before—an alternative to environmentally problematic materials like steel and concrete. In London, for example, Murray Grove is a nine-story residential building built entirely of wood. Welcome to the era of wooden skyscrapers.
    (Evolver, Zermatt, Switzerland, Alice Studio/EPFL, 2009. Photo: Joel Tettamanti/ALICE Studio EPFL) http://www.gq.com/story/9-stunning-buildings-wood-architecture
    Claire L Cardwell
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    Joanne Gardocki
    10/04/2017 #1 Joanne Gardocki
    Wow
  2. Claire L Cardwell
    Solar-powered safari lodge offers sustainable luxury digs in Botswana.
    If visiting the rich wildlife at the Okavango Delta is on your bucket list, consider a stay at Sandibe Okavango, a sustainable safari lodge in Botsgo simultaneously blends in with the landscape and stands out from lowana that boasts a light environmental footprint. Designed by Michaelis Boyd and Nick Plewman, the recently reopened Sandibe Okavancal architectural typology with its curvaceous timber-clad form. The striking and sculptural 24-bed lodge overlooks the banks of the Sandibe River, a waterway rich with the sounds and sights of animals ranging from frogs to hippos.
    Elevated on stilts, the sustainable and cocoon-like lodge takes its inspiration from the pangolin, an endangered scaly animal native to the African bush. The architects clad the curvaceous facade with natural and locally sourced shingles and woven saplings in a bid to minimize the building’s environmental footprint. The building is entirely concrete-free and a solar panel farm powers the electricity.
    http://inhabitat.com/solar-powered-safari-lodge-offers-sustainable-luxury-digs-in-botswana/
    Claire L Cardwell
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    Claire L Cardwell
    09/04/2017 #2 Claire L Cardwell
    #1 I know exactly what you mean @Ken Boddie! It's absolutely stunning, I think my eyes would be glued to the roof as well.....
    Ken Boddie
    09/04/2017 #1 Ken Boddie
    I'm a sucker for glue lam, Claire. Those tapering arches would have my attention for hours if not days. Wildlife - what wildlife? I'd be riveted to the spot, stuck indoors, if I stayed here. 🙄
  3. DILMA BALBI -📃 Engenharia&gestão
    tesla deixando ford na poeira
    DILMA BALBI -📃 Engenharia&gestão
    Tesla is now worth more than Ford after delivering a record number of cars for the quarter
    www.recode.net Tesla delivered 25,000 cars in the first quarter while Ford’s sales dropped more than 7 percent in...
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  4. Claire L Cardwell
    Zaha Hadid Architects 3D prints an experimental structure with the help of robots.
    Robots are revolutionizing architecture and Zaha Hadid Architects is hopping on board to show what that technology can do for custom building design. The world-renowned architecture firm unveiled Thallus, a beautifully ornate experimental structure created with the help of robots for Milan Design Week’s White in the City. The sculpture was programmed and executed by the firm’s Computation Design (ZHA CoDe) research group.
    Located at Milan’s Brera Academy, Thallus joins a series of temporary installations all created for White in the City, a project that explores the color white as a symbol of health, sustainability, and serenity. Thallus is named after the Greek word for flora and features a tapered shape that opens up at the top like a flower or unfurled leaf.
    http://inhabitat.com/zaha-hadid-architects-3d-prints-an-experimental-structure-with-the-help-of-robots/
    Claire L Cardwell
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    Claire L Cardwell
    09/04/2017 #3 Claire L Cardwell
    Got no idea, facade units would be absolutely stunning! Glad you like it @Ken Boddie!
    Ken Boddie
    09/04/2017 #2 Ken Boddie
    Not sure where this concept is going, Claire. Have you any idea if this sculpture unit, or similar series of robotic curve creations, is to be used within a fundamental structure (hence presenting an obvious design challenge) or as facia units on external or internal walls?
    Yogesh Sukal
    08/04/2017 #1 Yogesh Sukal
    So cool
  5. Anđela Bogdan

    Anđela Bogdan

    07/04/2017
    Australian experts found a way to incorporate cigarette butt waste into brick making that not only gets that waste out of the environment, but it also makes cheaper and less energy-intensive bricks. When cigarette butts are added to clay bricks, the energy needed to fire them was cut by up to 58 percent. The bricks were lighter and were better insulators, too, meaning they could help cut household cooling and heating demands, all while keeping the same strong properties of traditional bricks.
    http://www.treehugger.com/clean-technology/cigarette-butts-make-better-bricks.html
    Anđela Bogdan
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    Ken Boddie
    07/04/2017 #5 Ken Boddie
    Can't say I've heard of this brick additive concept before. Sounds a great idea, Andela, although It probably needs one of the main brick companies to get on board, along with a means of readily gathering discarded butts, before it'll get wings. Thanks for the tag, @Lada 🏡 Prkic and @Praveen Raj Gullepalli.
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    07/04/2017 #4 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    @Ken Boddie, have you heard of the brilliant Aussie invention that could make cigarette butts valuable? :-)
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    07/04/2017 #3 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    Great share, @Anđela Bogdan! :-)
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    07/04/2017 #2 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    LOL...Talk of bricks n butts @Ken Boddie ;)
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    07/04/2017 #1 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    @Ken Boddie, @Gert Scholtz, have you heard of the brilliant Aussie invention that could make cigarette butts valuable. :-)
  6. ProducerBryan Tate

    Bryan Tate

    31/03/2017
    3 Most Innovative Building Designs
    3 Most Innovative Building DesignsIt was recently announced that architecture firm, Oiio Studio, wants to create a truly innovative building: The Big Bend. Essentially, the building is shaped in the form of a large, upside-down U. With an incredibly slender and unique design, the...
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    Franci🐝Eugenia Hoffman
    01/04/2017 #4 Franci🐝Eugenia Hoffman
    Interesting and creative designs. I can only imagine the fabulous views from the top floors of last 2 buildings.
    Ken Boddie
    01/04/2017 #3 Ken Boddie
    I remember passing by the CCTV building, Bryan, when visiting China, and thinking of the obvious design and construction problems it must have propagated. I am thankful that my roots are below ground, where only the size and direction of the loads to be resisted vary, and that I am not involved in the ongoing 'opportunities' that architects provide for structural engineers in such instances. 😀 Thanks for the tag, @Gert Scholtz
    Bryan Tate
    31/03/2017 #2 Bryan Tate
    Thank you!
    Gert Scholtz
    31/03/2017 #1 Gert Scholtz
    Imposing architecture Bryan - thanks. Copying @Claire L Cardwell @Lada 🏡 Prkic and @Ken Boddie
  7. Claire L Cardwell
    Plans Unveiled For Incredible Skyscraper That Hangs From An Asteroid
    Just when you thought skyscrapers couldn’t get any taller, a clever group of architects have designed one that reaches space.
    But the Analemma Tower isn’t grounded on terra firma, like other buildings.
    New concept art for the futuristic structure courtesy of a New York design firm illustrates how the structure would be built on a asteroid that circles the globe from outer space.
    The brainchild of Clouds Architecture Office, Analemma would be the tallest building ever created.
    The asteroid from which Analemma pierces through the clouds to Earth would travel thousands of miles each day between the northern and southern hemispheres in a figure-of-eight infinity loop.
    It’s perpetual journey would culminate in a daily pass over New York City.
    Clouds Architecture Office have proposed the tower will house residencies and offices, powered by space-based solar panels, constantly exposed to sunlight due to the curvature of the Earth.
    If the proposal ever comes to fruition, the only question remaining will be the matter of who clean the windows on this eco-tower.
    This is what the cities of the future will look like – and it’s literally ground-breaking.
    http://www.unilad.co.uk/best/plans-unveiled-for-incredible-skyscraper-that-hangs-from-an-asteroid/
    Claire L Cardwell
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    Ken Boddie
    30/03/2017 #6 Ken Boddie
    #4 Not wishing to disappoint, Claire, but let's chat over this one when it get's 'off the ground'. But it'll take more than an architect and an engineer to make this fairy story come true. 😂
    Ken Boddie
    30/03/2017 #5 Ken Boddie
    #2 Only 'groundbreaking', Lada, if it falls off the astronomically unbelievable asteroid concept and breaks the ground. 🤣
    Claire L Cardwell
    30/03/2017 #4 Claire L Cardwell
    #3 I know, I wish I could see Ken's face when he sees this! Engineers are always making comments about the architects over-using 'sky hooks' and now look.....
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    30/03/2017 #3 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    #2 It’s literally groundbreaking! But I can only repeat what one commenter said that an architect’s dream is an engineer’s nightmare. 😃
    Claire L Cardwell
    30/03/2017 #2 Claire L Cardwell
    @Ken Boddie @Lada 🏡 Prkic have you seen this?
  8. Anđela Bogdan

    Anđela Bogdan

    29/03/2017
    The Hyperloop One is ultra speed train made for 28 passengers, It ''floats'' on air pillow by using the magnetic accelerator. The transportation system is powered by solar panel. Preliminary analysis indicated that such a route might obtain an expected journey time of 35 minutes, meaning that passengers would traverse the 350-mile (560 km) route at an average speed of around 600 mph (970 km/h), with a top speed of 760 mph (1,200 km/h). In other words, Hyperloop train will travel from Dubai to Abu Dhabi in 12 minutes. Very impressive technology, isn't it?
    http://www.casopis-gradjevinar.hr/assets/Uploads/JCE-68-2016-8-7-zanimljivosti-II.pdf
    Anđela Bogdan
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  9. Marie Weaver

    Marie Weaver

    20/03/2017
    Hidden Brains UK Is a Mobile Application Development Company Developing and Designing IOS, Android and Windows mobile apps for startups and enterprise client. Hire our expert mobile apps developers now.
    Marie Weaver
    Mobile Application Development Services, App Development Companies london
    www.hiddenbrains.co.uk Hidden Brains UK Is a Mobile Application Development Company Developing and Designing IOS, Android and Windows mobile apps for startups and enterprise client. Hire our expert mobile apps developers...
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  10. Igor Perkovic

    Igor Perkovic

    10/03/2017
    Experience the Kondor AX - Advanced System Development Board at the Embedded World Conference and Fair in Nuremberg, Germany.
    The Kondor AX will be displayed inside Lattice Semiconductor’s booth, Hall 4-278 from March 14 to 16, 2017.
    Igor Perkovic
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  11. Claire L Cardwell
    The sun’s rays helped shape this Studio Gang-designed NYC tower.
    Solar Carve Tower advances Studio Gang’s ‘solar carving’ design strategy.
    When designing a new office building located between Manhattan’s High Line Park and the Hudson River, Studio Gang wanted to protect the views between the park and the river and block as little sunlight as possible. The firm’s solution to this problem was to take on the sun as a freelance designer.
    Expanding upon its “solar carving” design strategy, Studio Gang used incident angles of the sun’s rays to sculpt the Solar Carve Tower’s form. The result is a gem-like façade that allows light, fresh air, and river views to reach the park.
    At any point during the year, the sun’s rays will be able to pour around the building’s unique façade, which takes the shape of an hourglass made up of smaller diamond-shaped carvings, to reach the surrounding park and green space.
    On its website, Studio Gang says, “Solar Carve Tower explores how shaping a building in response to solar access and other site-specific criteria can expand its architectural potential.”
    Each of the building’s floors will provide office space ranging from 13,700 sf to 14,200 sf, the New York Post reports. 16-foot-high floor-to-ceiling windows will provide each floor with natural light, views, and connectivity to the natural environment. Solar Carve Tower will also include 17,000 sf of ground floor retail. In total, the new tower will provide 166,750 sf of space.
    The project is targeting LEED Gold.
    https://www.bdcnetwork.com/sun’s-rays-helped-shape-studio-gang-designed-nyc-tower?eid=343277176&bid=1684494
    Claire L Cardwell
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  12. Claire L Cardwell
    The Hanoi Lotus Centre will bloom from the middle of a lake.
    The proposed Hanoi Lotus Centre doesn't just pay homage to the national flower of Vietnam in name only; Decibel Architecture has designed the building to physically resemble a series of young lotus blossoms.
    The Centre will be positioned along one of the city’s main roads and, per the City of Hanoi’s request, will sit atop a lake that will act as part of the city’s stormwater control system. The building is being designed using a pentagonal grid system. This type of system was selected as a metaphor representing the five points of an outstretched person and because ratios of five are common in nature, especially in the organization of petal structures. Five smaller lotus blossoms will surround a large, main blossom that will become the central node.

    The building will house a variety of functions and spaces such as a restaurant, incubator and startup offices, 3D and 4D cinemas, multiple auditoriums, outdoor circulation, and an ice skating rink.

    It isn’t just the building’s exterior that will resemble the lotus flower, as the ceiling to the main interior circulation space is inspired by the colors and patterns found on the underside of a lotus leaf. The ceiling will blend into the central auditorium volume where colored skylights and light boxes will be added. The architects say the light that comes in through these fixtures will mimic the experience of being under lotus leaves.
    https://www.bdcnetwork.com/hanoi-lotus-centre-will-bloom-middle-lake?eid=343277176&bid=1684494
    Claire L Cardwell
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    Comments

    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    10/03/2017 #5 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    #1 I like buildings inspired by nature, such as the Lotus Building in China. This one will be truly spectacular. Thanks for sharing the video, Claire.
    Mamen 🐝 Delgado
    07/03/2017 #4 Mamen 🐝 Delgado
    #3 Yes, I did. The interiors are impressive.
    Claire L Cardwell
    07/03/2017 #3 Claire L Cardwell
    I think it's going to be a truly spectacular building - did you watch the video?
    Mamen 🐝 Delgado
    07/03/2017 #2 Mamen 🐝 Delgado
    #1 Impressive outside structure @Claire L Cardwell, with most impressive if possible inside functions.
    Love the idea of "the experience of being under lotus leaves". I would love to experience that. Thanks for the tag!! 😘
    Claire L Cardwell
    07/03/2017 #1 Claire L Cardwell
    @Dean Owen @Lada 🏡 Prkic @Ken Boddie @Mamen 🐝 Delgado @Javier Rojas García - check this link out and watch the video - it's going to be a stunning building, I can't wait!
  13. Claire L Cardwell
    Robots construct an art gallery in Shanghai from recycled gray bricks
    Archi-Union Architects have completed an unusual art exhibition space in Shanghai with the help of robots. Created for the Chi She artist group, the building in the city’s Xuhui district was built with recycled gray-green bricks salvaged from a former building. Designed with both traditional and contemporary elements, the Chi She exhibition space features an unusual protrusion made possible with advanced digital fabrication technology.
    The 200-square-meter Chi She exhibition space was built to replace a former historic building, the materials of which were salvaged and reused in the new construction. While the zigzagging roof has been raised and reconstructed from timber, the most eye-catching difference between the old and new buildings is the part of the wall above the entrance door that bulges out. The architects used a robotic masonry fabrication technique developed by Fab-Union to create the curved wall, which would have been difficult to precisely achieve with traditional means.
    “The precise positioning of the integrated equipment of robotic masonry fabrication technique and the construction elaborately to the mortar and bricks by the craftsmen makes this ancient material, brick, be able to meet the requirements in the new era, and realizes the presentation of the design model consummately,” wrote the architects. “The dilapidation of these old bricks coordinated with the stretch display of the curving walls are narrating a connection between people and bricks, machines and construction, design and culture, which will be spread permanently in the shadow of external walls under the setting sun.”
    http://inhabitat.com/robots-construct-an-art-gallery-in-shanghai-from-recycled-gray-bricks/
    Claire L Cardwell
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    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    10/03/2017 #1 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    Thanks for sharing this interesting article.
  14. Claire L Cardwell
    Researchers discover bacteria that produces pure Gold.

    The gold you see in the photo above was not found in a river or a mine. It was produced by a bacteria that, according to researchers at Michigan State University, can survive in extreme toxic environments and create 24-karat gold nuggets. Pure gold.
    Maybe this critter can save us all from the global economic crisis?
    Of course not—but at least it can make Kazem Kashefi—assistant professor of microbiology and molecular genetics—and Adam Brown—associate professor of electronic art and intermedia—a bit rich, if only for the show they have put together.

    Kashefi and Brown are the ones who have created this compact laboratory that uses the bacteria Cupriavidus metallidurans to turn gold chlroride—a toxic chemical liquid you can find in nature—into 99.9% pure gold.

    Accoding to Kashefi, they are doing "microbial alchemy" by "something that has no value into a solid [in fact, it the toxic material they use does cost money. Less than gold, but still plenty], precious metal that's valuable."
    The bacteria is incredibly resistant to this toxic element. In fact, it's 25 times stronger than previously thought. The researchers' compact factory—which they named The Great Work of the Metal Lover—holds the bacteria as they feed it the gold chloride. In about a week, the bacteria does its job, processing all that junk into the precious metal—a process they believe happens regularly in nature.

    So yes, basically, Cupriavidus metallidurans can eat toxins and poop out gold nuggets.

    It seems that medieval alchemists were looking for the Philosopher's Stone—the magic element that could turn lead to gold—in the wrong place. It's not a mineral. It's a bug.

    Read more at http://www.geologyin.com/2016/03/researchers-discover-bacteria-that.html#C5h2YM63F7Dc9sVL.99
    Claire L Cardwell
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    Claire L Cardwell
    05/03/2017 #4 Claire L Cardwell
    #3 Oh well, I thought it might be too good to be true.... Back to feeding the geese it is then (in the hopes that they start laying golden eggs...)
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    05/03/2017 #3 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #2 Claire I won't blame you for thinkin of diamonds ;) but mining for toxic gold chloride could prove more dangerous to them ol miners than diggin for gold in the dirt.
    Claire L Cardwell
    05/03/2017 #2 Claire L Cardwell
    #1 Well I won't be truly happy until there's a bug that makes platinum and diamonds.... no one can accuse me of being cheap today! I did think it might go someway to rehabilitating the huge mine dumps around Joburg though....
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    05/03/2017 #1 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Whattabug! And there goes the goose that lays golden eggs!
  15. Claire L Cardwell
    Parasitic wooden cubes slash Parisian building’s energy consumption by 75%.
    Stéphane Malka has designed a clever way of optimizing the energy efficiency of older urban structures while working within the restrictions of Parisian building codes. Malka’s Plug-in City 75 design envisions attaching parasitic wooden cubes to the facade of a 1970s-era building, extending the living space and significantly reducing the building’s annual energy consumption by approximately 75 percent.
    The innovative design is slated for a 1970s-era building in the French capital’s 16th arrondissement. Like similar buildings in the city, this one is burdened with low energy performance due to thermal bridges, poor insulation, and permeable windows. However, current building laws are quite restrictive and do not allow for the structures to be raised to make way for better, more efficient space.
    Malka’s solution is to incorporate a type of parasitic architecture to improve the building’s energy envelope. According to the design, a series of bio-sourced wooden cubes would be mounted onto the facade, extending the apartments horizontally through openings in the exterior.
    Extending the apartments outwards would divide the total energy consumption of the building by four. This would significantly reduce the rehabilitated building’s annual energy consumption from its current 190KWh per square meter to 45KWh per square meter.
    The modular boxes, made from wood particles and chips are quite lightweight, which allows for easy transport and on-site assembly. Once mounted onto the building, the cubed extensions would not only add more living space and light to the interior, but would also create an inner garden courtyard on the first floor. The new facade would be draped in hanging greenery, greatly improving the structure’s overall aesthetic.
    http://inhabitat.com/parasitic-wooden-cubes-slash-parisian-buildings-energy-consumption-by-75/
    Claire L Cardwell
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    Claire L Cardwell
    05/03/2017 #4 Claire L Cardwell
    #3 Absolutely @Praveen Raj Gullepalli! Let's get cubing!
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    05/03/2017 #3 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #2 Well then - let's just Heave-a-ho Geronimo! :)
    Claire L Cardwell
    05/03/2017 #2 Claire L Cardwell
    #1 Great point @Praveen Raj Gullepalli! In fact with the new solar energy generating glass you wouldn't have to replace anything.... You could still enjoy the view and have your house lit up like a Christmas Tree guilt free!
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    05/03/2017 #1 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Replace half that glass with solar panels and you could have electricity generated and stored as well.
  16. ProducerClaire L Cardwell
    Copycat Architecture is Booming in China
    Copycat Architecture is Booming in ChinaIt's difficult not to be intrigued by Chinese copycat architecture.... Throughout history China has been incredibly good at absorbing aspects of other countries and cultures and making them their own.  ...
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    David B. Grinberg
    04/03/2017 #20 David B. Grinberg
    #13 @Dean Owen Many 🙏for your informative reply. That's good to know. It appears there has been a lot of sensational China bashing in USA media. Thus, I appreciate hearing your firsthand account to help dispel some of the media hype that runs rampant. Thanks again and good luck with everything over there! 😇👏🌎
    Claire L Cardwell
    04/03/2017 #19 Claire L Cardwell
    #18 Thanks for the share @Lisa 🐝 Gallagher! We also have a bit of a problem with smog here in SA too. In the winter you can see quite a dirty haze over Johannesburg, this is mainly due to all the cooking fires that have been lit....
    Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    04/03/2017 #18 Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    Very interesting to view these and I had no idea China had so many replicas. Actually beautiful to view and of course I love photos! Ken mentioned Las Vegas, so true... multicultural buildings everywhere. We have reduced our smog in the US but still have a long way to go. I remember when we were kids and would drive to Cleveland Ohio with my parents, the closer we got, we were told to roll up our windows (yep before we had a car with electric windows). The smog was so bad you could taste it even with the windows rolled up. I believe there are still cities within the US that have smog issues, San Fransico being one. Thanks for sharing this @Claire L Cardwell!
    Claire L Cardwell
    04/03/2017 #17 Claire L Cardwell
    Thanks for the share @David B. Grinberg! Have a super weekend!
    Claire L Cardwell
    04/03/2017 #16 Claire L Cardwell
    #13 Thanks @Dean Owen - it's awesome that China has such a proactive environmental policy and I wish it was the same in England. Yes the 'pea souper' fogs are of the distant past, but when I worked in London for a while about 15 years ago I had to walk the long way around from Waterloo to work as if I walked over Waterloo Bridge I would be breathless and about to feel that I was going to have an asthma attack by about half way....
    Claire L Cardwell
    04/03/2017 #15 Claire L Cardwell
    #12 Thanks for the share @David B. Grinberg! Another thing to consider is the often poor quality of the cement, steel and engineering of a lot of Chinese buildings. I've seen many photos of buildings that have collapsed and we have a problem here in SA with cheap Chinese imports of cement etc. which have also caused buildings to fail. I also think it's appalling that people have to venture outside with masks on.......
    Devesh 🐝 Bhatt
    04/03/2017 #14 Devesh 🐝 Bhatt
    Loys of copycat architecture on india too. But most of it is not serving its prescribed purpose. Instead it is about disregarding the orignal so that some networked undeservig guy secures a Govt contract loaded with a lot of tax payers money.

    I would rather look at the scale at which China has done it to actually improve the Urban Infrastructure and how it improves the basic denominators of a good life for the people.
    Dean Owen
    04/03/2017 #13 Dean Owen
    #12 I look out my window and see a crystal blue sky. I live in the fastest developing city in the world. I read an article last week stating China is now the global leader in climate change reform. Combatting pollution is a priority in the current Five Year Plan. I look at what China has achieved, building cities to accommodate the urbanisation of 400 million, a road and rail network that is the envy of every nation, infrastructure that makes the West look positively archaic. There has been a heavy price to rapid and unprecedented growth, but that is true of every nation. Remember the perception of London as foggy? The Great Smog of London in 1952 killed upwards of 12,000 people, and Churchill responded as is Xi Jinping responding right now. Unlike many Western nations who tend to sweep things under a rug, the Chinese government is proactive and responsible, recently setting up an environmental police force and adopting a whole slew of other measures. Could they do more? Well certainly, every nation could possibly do more except perhaps for Bhutan, the Maldives, and some other smaller nations. But China is heading in the right direction whereas it appears the US has just done a major U-turn with the appointment of Pruitt as EPA Chief. China will remain committed to the Paris Accord even if the US drops out.
    David B. Grinberg
    03/03/2017 #12 David B. Grinberg
    Thanks for sharing this interesting buzz and great photos, Claire, which I've shard in three hives. I agree with you that "the scale of China's architectural copying is breathtaking." It appears that Chinese cities are building and developing so quickly that there are many unintended repercussions, perhaps the most dangerous being the health threat to the Chinese people -- some of whom literally can't breath outdoors without masks. Some Chinese cities don't even see the light of day some days due to terrible smog and pollution, which should be inexcusable. No citizen of any country should have to wear masks to protect themselves from toxic pollution levels whenever they venture outdoors. Thus, the Chinese government would be wise to strike an appropriate balance between massive construction and environmental degradation. The status quo is simply untenable and taking a huge toll on the health of the Chinese people -- which should be priority #1. @Dean Owen, any thoughts on these points?
    Claire L Cardwell
    03/03/2017 #11 Claire L Cardwell
    Thanks @Praveen Raj Gullepalli! I will check out the video later.... There is another big storm brewing so I have to unplug everything.....
    Claire L Cardwell
    03/03/2017 #10 Claire L Cardwell
    #8 @Ken Boddie you are so right, all you have to do is walk around most big cities in the world and you will find them choc full of colonial architecture. Architecture in London borrowed a lot from Greek and Roman Architecture. There are a lot of colonial buildings in Johannesburg and Cape Town that look very European in style. There is even a miniature Eiffel Tower and Arc de Triomfe in Parys in the Free State. A friend & I discovered it by accident when we got lost.... Will post pics later!
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    03/03/2017 #9 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Great share Claire! I guess it also reveals the appreciation that Chinese have for art and architecture worldwide if they go to such lengths at reproduction. (Of the civil and structural kind obviously ;) Imagine having such miniatures in every country as a celebration of global art and architecture! (With some Augmented Reality and VR headsets thrown in for the visitors to compare with the real thing while on a visit!) I was brwosing through some local architecture links recently and this one on the Kailash Temple had me going for a while (have yet to see it though)...there are enough mysteries already! Check this out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2Jl4HNDixc
    Ken Boddie
    03/03/2017 #8 Ken Boddie
    We westerners are, I suspect, too quick to ridicule the Chinese copy, Claire. Perhaps these architectural clones are evidence of an identity crisis, as a new middle class society emerges from the feudal system and associated magnificent architecture of China's past. China, with its indomitable focus on impressive development, will undoubtedly move through this localised clone phase and emerge into a new and even more magnificent order eventually. Before we scoff let us think of Las Vegas and the many copy cat buildings in the various former colonial countries, including Australia and the USA. Thanks for the thought provoking post, Claire.
    Claire L Cardwell
    03/03/2017 #7 Claire L Cardwell
    #6 @Dean Owen Huaxi is only one of the places I would visit in China.... the Hanging Temple is an amazing feat of architecture. I wouldn't spend more than 2-3 hours in Huaxi!
    Dean Owen
    03/03/2017 #6 Dean Owen
    #5 Take Huaxi off your bucket list and see the real marvels of China, Pingyao, The Summer Palace, the Hanging Temple at Cuiping Peak, Xian, Jiuzhaigou, Yunnan, Lijiang, oh too many to list.....
    Claire L Cardwell
    03/03/2017 #5 Claire L Cardwell
    #2 I thought you might have been to some of these places @Dean Owen! Huaxi is definitely on my bucket list of places to visit!
    Claire L Cardwell
    03/03/2017 #4 Claire L Cardwell
    It is fascinating I agree @Phil Friedman - it would be awesome to go somewhere like Huaxi, the village of knockoffs or Thames Town.... i found the fact that Chinese Emperors celebrated the defeat of their enemies by replicating their architecture very interesting.... I wonder if China is busy taking over the world by doing the same thing in the 21st century.....
    Phil Friedman
    03/03/2017 #3 Phil Friedman
    #1 Thanks, Claire, for the tag. It is fascinating that the Chinese, who have the Great Wall and other timeless masterpieces, are copying architectural notables from the West. Then again, not so strange, I suppose, as disassembling the 1831 London Bridge (not the Tower Bridge) and re-assembling it in the Lake Havasu, AZ area.
    Dean Owen
    03/03/2017 #2 Dean Owen
    I've been to some of these. Thames Town is actually a nice place to live and kind of reminded me of the Docklands. I would have bought a house there had the commute to Shanghai not been so harsh.
    Claire L Cardwell
    03/03/2017 #1 Claire L Cardwell
    @Ken Boddie @Dean Owen @Lada 🏡 Prkic @Phil Friedman @Praveen Raj Gullepalli - have you seen some of the imitation architecture in China? Thought you might find this interesting... Have an awesome day!
  17. Ken Boddie

    Ken Boddie

    02/03/2017
    And here was I believing that @Kevin Pashuk and @Don 🐝 Kerr were Canada's oldest fossils. 🤣
    Ken Boddie
    Scientists Uncover the Earth's Oldest Fossil; Could Hold Secrets to Life on Mars| Interesting Engineering
    interestingengineering.com Newly discovered bacteria fossils from Quebec, Canada now possibly hold the record for the world's oldest fossil at over 4 billion years...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Ken Boddie
    02/03/2017 #2 Ken Boddie
    #1 If you're feeling blue and 'number two',
    Is really way too hard for you,
    I'd say it's time you really ought'a,
    Take some prunes and coconut water. 😩
    Kevin Pashuk
    02/03/2017 #1 Kevin Pashuk
    When you are number two... You try harder. (at least that's what the old AVIS commercial used to say). Now that we've been supplanted by those 'new' old fossils... We'll just have to go with the claim that we are 'older than dirt'... But then, as a dirt doctor you could refute that claim.
  18. Claire L Cardwell
    Science meets architecture in robotically woven, solar-active structure.
    New York's MoMA PS1 will feature a shelter installation that uses robotically-knitted solar fabrics that absorb and release light. Winner of the art institution's Young Architects Program competition, the canopy from Jenny Sabin Studio is photo-luminescent by night and cooling by day, with a misting system that delivers a cooling spray when someone comes near.
    The installation includes long fabric tubes that hang from the canopy stalactite style, and make up part of the site's multi-sensory environment. During the day, visitors can take relief from the summer heat under the canopy, which allows in dapples of sunlight while occasionally spraying visitors with a misting system incorporated into the openings of those hanging tubes. The misting is activated by sensors that respond to movement.
    Three 30-ft (9-m) towers help anchor the tension canopy, and hold large water bladders that feed the network of tubes that connect to the misting system. "It's a simple detection network, so when you come close, the misters will slowly start to mist," Sabin says. With up to 3,000 visitors expected to the festival, a master control allows the misting to be put on pause if a big crowd enters the site, while some areas will be on a regular misting cycle.
    At night, visitors to the instillation have a different experience, with the solar active material in the canopy, stalactite tubes and stools giving off a phosphorescent glow that "inspires levity and enjoyment with the space," says Sabin. "The photo-luminescent fabric absorbs UV sunlight, and then they slowly emit light."
    http://newatlas.com/moma-solar-active-textile-structure/48109/
    Claire L Cardwell
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    Comments

    Claire L Cardwell
    02/03/2017 #3 Claire L Cardwell
    Thanks for the share @Lisa 🐝 Gallagher! Have an awesome day!
    Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    02/03/2017 #2 Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    Wow, very cool @Claire L Cardwell!
    Claire L Cardwell
    02/03/2017 #1 Claire L Cardwell
    @Lada 🏡 Prkic & @Ken Boddie - have you seen this? It's incredible!
  19. Claire L Cardwell
    A 10K tiny house 3D-printed in 24 hours.
    Building a house typically takes months, exacerbating the housing crisis so many people face worldwide. Apis Cor, a San Francisco-based company that specializes in 3D-printing, decided to tackle that crisis with a groundbreaking mobile 3D-printer that can print an entire 400-square-foot tiny home in just 24 hours. What’s more, doing so costs just over $10,000 – a steal compared to most modern homes.
    On their website, Apis Cor says the construction industry may be sluggish now, but they will persevere in disrupting that industry “until everyone is able to afford a place to live.” Their revolutionary mobile 3D-printer is small enough to be transported, so assembly and transportation costs can be slashed. Although their mobile printer only needs a day to print a home from a concrete mixture, the company says their buildings will last up to 175 years. Not only is their process speedy, but environmentally friendly and affordable too.
    White decorative plaster finished the tiny home’s exterior, allowing the team to paint it in bright colors. The interior is bright and furnished with modern appliances from Samsung. In total, the house cost $10,134, or around $275 per square meter.
    http://inhabitat.com/a-10k-tiny-house-3d-printed-in-24-hours/
    Claire L Cardwell
    Relevant

    Comments

    Warren Kellam
    04/03/2017 #8 Warren Kellam
    #7 I hope you're right Claire. They do really look cool, and I'm all for living well with less and decreasing our carbon footprint. Very relevant article. Thank you.
    Claire L Cardwell
    04/03/2017 #7 Claire L Cardwell
    #2 You are right Warren, there will no doubt be an issue in the future with people being replaced by technology, just as there was in the Industrial Revolution. People will adapt very quickly and new jobs will be created by for example building, operating and maintaining the machines needed to build this house. This house is designed for emergency shelters - not for everyday housing. It does however look a lot better than most RDP housing initiatives I have seen here in SA and elsewhere around the world....
    Claire L Cardwell
    04/03/2017 #6 Claire L Cardwell
    #3 @Phil Friedman - your plan sounds very interesting - any chance of a preview? Round floor plans are a bit of a pain when it comes to furnishing and yes if you were building with bricks or blocks would be more expensive to build.... However a round house is a lot stronger than a square house and I think that as a response to emergency housing this is a great system!
    Devesh 🐝 Bhatt
    04/03/2017 #5 Devesh 🐝 Bhatt
    Well they could send a proposal to India :)
    Phil Friedman
    04/03/2017 #3 Phil Friedman
    This is interesting, Claire, but I have to express a couple of reservations. 1) Using a round floor plan vastly complicates interior finishing and furnishing, and makes it more expensive that it would be if a box form were employed. 2) I think this may be a case of pre-commitment to a particular technology dictating methods that might not win out if evaluated without preconceptions. Years ago, when I lived for some time on a farm, I watched grain silos being built using movable concrete ring forms. You poured the base ring, then when it took its initial cure, the form was raised the height one ring, and another ring poured on top of the first. And again, and again, until the silo was completed. I designed a three-story house, that could be poured in a matter of a few days at very low labor and materials costs for the basic structure. Had an inherently high R-factor. And would easily last hundreds of years. I would have to search my files, but I bet construction costs for triple the floor area, would have been less than half of what this "printed" house costs, and with virtually nil capital investment for the equipment. And painted, the two houses would pretty much look the same. Cheers!
    Warren Kellam
    03/03/2017 #2 Warren Kellam
    Very cool. But what happens to the humans that are replaced by this technology? What will people do to feel valued by a society that replaces them with machines? These will be some of the questions that the next generation will have to confront. It's only for the betterment of mankind when it doesn't affect you.
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    03/03/2017 #1 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    Very interesting Claire. I watched the video also. There is no doubt that 3D printing is the technology of the future. The huge 3D printers on the construction site might soon replace construction workers and bricklayers. But, as far as I know, there is no regulatory framework for such type of construction, at least for now.
  20. Claire L Cardwell
    Duke University researchers use light to convert carbon dioxide to fuel. What if the carbon dioxide building up in our atmosphere could be put to good use as fuel? For years chemists have chased a catalyst that could aid the reaction converting carbon dioxide to methane, a building block for many fuels – and now Duke University scientists have found just such a catalyst in tiny rhodium nanoparticles.
    Duke University researchers converted carbon dioxide into methane with the help of rhodium nanoparticles, which harness ultraviolet light’s energy to catalyze carbon dioxide’s conversion into methane. Rhodium is one of Earth’s rarest elements, but according to Duke University it plays a key role in our daily lives by speeding up reactions in industrial processes like making detergent or drugs. Rhodium also helps break down toxic pollutants in our cars’ catalytic converters.
    The fact that the scientists employed light to power the reaction is important. When graduate student Xiao Zhang tried heating up the nanoparticles to 300 degrees Celsius, the reaction did produce methane but also produced an equal amount of poisonous carbon monoxide. But when he instead used a high-powered ultraviolet LED lamp, the reaction yielded almost entirely methane.
    Jie Liu, chemistry professor and paper co-author, said in a statement, “The fact that you can use light to influence a specific reaction pathway is very exciting. This discovery will really advance the understanding of catalysis.”
    The scientists now hope to find a way to employ natural sunlight in the reaction, which Duke University says would be “a potential boon to alternative energy.”
    http://inhabitat.com/duke-university-researchers-use-light-to-convert-carbon-dioxide-to-fuel/
    Claire L Cardwell
    Relevant
  21. Lada 🏡 Prkic

    Lada 🏡 Prkic

    28/02/2017
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
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    Comments

    Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    28/02/2017 #7 Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    I wonder how many birds and bees love this setting too? Really cool @Aurorasa Sima!
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    28/02/2017 #5 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    #4 It could be an issue with all tree-covered buildings, what is the current trend in architectural design.
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    28/02/2017 #3 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    Thank you Aurorasa. :-) I often say that great designs are those inspired by nature, such as Vincent Callebaut architecture. The honeycombs cells are an example of geometric efficiency, using the space without any gaps between cells and providing the strongest structure based on the hexagonal shape. I hope we’ll see the realization of this idea.
    CityVP 🐝 Manjit
    28/02/2017 #2 CityVP 🐝 Manjit
    Now that is what I call a hive !!!
    John White, MBA
    28/02/2017 #1 John White, MBA
    Cool buzz, @Aurorasa Sima
  22. Claire L Cardwell
    Modern Home by IDIN Architects in Chang Wat Pathum Thani, Thailand. To read more go to :- http://www.caandesign.com/modern-home-closed-beach-designed-party-dining-resting/ Claire L Cardwell
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    Comments

    Claire L Cardwell
    27/02/2017 #3 Claire L Cardwell
    Thanks for the share @Ken Boddie! Have an awesome day.
    Claire L Cardwell
    27/02/2017 #2 Claire L Cardwell
    #1 @Ken Boddie - cleaning those windows would be a nightmare you are right! I also had a laugh over the translation, but thought the house was stunning.
    Ken Boddie
    27/02/2017 #1 Ken Boddie
    Interesting house, Claire, but I'd hate to have to clean those windows, although probably not a problem for the owners in Thai high society. The unchecked English (translation?) provides a few chuckles, particularly the guaranteed longevity if you visit (10 lives), and the sad exclusion of 'Sandy' (Beach) from the party. 🤣
  23. Claire L Cardwell
    New silicon nanoparticles could finally make solar windows commercially viable.
    The trend toward integrating solar into homes and buildings seems to be taking off. First Tesla CEO Elon Musk unveiled his rooftop solar shingles that are invisible when viewed from the street. Now, researchers at the University of Minnesota and University of Milano-Bicocca have developed technology that could usher in a future with photovoltaic windows harvesting renewable energy from the sun. The research, published Tuesday in the journal Nature Photonics, demonstrates that high-tech silicon nanoparticles embedded into luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) can make the performance of solar windows more efficient, comparable to flat solar concentrators.
    Photovoltaic windows could be a game changer in the race to power cities with renewable energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions causing climate change. Modern glass office towers could be retrofitted with photovoltaic windows that wouldn’t change the aesthetics of the building and yet would be able to meet the structure’s electricity needs. According to the US Department of Energy, turning the windows at One World Trade Center into solar collectors could power more than 350 apartments.
    http://inhabitat.com/new-silicon-nanoparticles-could-finally-make-solar-windows-commercially-viable/
    Claire L Cardwell
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    Comments

    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    01/03/2017 #2 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    #1 You too, Claire! Keep it coming. I love learning about new technologies.
    Claire L Cardwell
    01/03/2017 #1 Claire L Cardwell
    Thanks for the share @Lada 🏡 Prkic have an awesome day!
  24. ProducerPaul Walters

    Paul Walters

    21/02/2017
    An Indonesian Catastrophe: A Man- Made Mud Bath.
    An Indonesian Catastrophe: A Man- Made Mud Bath.I am standing thirty five meters up, on top of a huge dyke, just a short, thirty minute drive from Indonesia’s second largest city Surabaya. This massive dyke stretches ten kilometers either side of me and I am looking out over one of the largest...
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    Comments

    Shelley Brown
    18/03/2017 #37 Shelley Brown
    So tragic!
    Ken Boddie
    10/03/2017 #36 Ken Boddie
    #34 Proper and adequately focussed intrusive investigation, Pam, would undoubtedly help in producing a working solution (or alternatives) to cap the flow, but this would require planning and payment and undoubtedly an admission of guilt from some party or other. Not having been involved in this project it is difficult for me to comment, except to suggest that there may already be subsurface information available, awaiting the appropriate authority to have it analysed by specialists.
    Pamela 🐝 Williams
    10/03/2017 #35 Pamela 🐝 Williams
    #31 being the victim of auto correct myself on many occasion I deciphered the message 😊
    Pamela 🐝 Williams
    10/03/2017 #34 Pamela 🐝 Williams
    And they have no way of knowing or even testing for the conditions since the mud continues to flow and cover the surface, Right? It's a wait and see scenario?? Would pre-drilling surveys be able to answer the questions? If the surveys were actually done and done correctly? #30
    Claire L Cardwell
    09/03/2017 #33 Claire L Cardwell
    #32 That's great! Thanks Paul, have a super day!
    Paul Walters
    09/03/2017 #32 Paul Walters
    #28 @Claire L Cardwell great schedule pretty busy while I am there but will make time however if we do miss each other I will be in London for the whole of July
    Ken Boddie
    09/03/2017 #31 Ken Boddie
    For 'recreated' read 'be created'. Out damned autocorrect!
    Ken Boddie
    09/03/2017 #30 Ken Boddie
    #29 The short answer, Pam, is yes, no, or maybe. Your scenario is possible if the fluid has enough soil particles ejected to leave voids behind in the subsurface strata, and if these voids are large enough and shallow enough to initiate and propagate subsidence so that bridging cannot be sustained. Alternatively, if the fluid is ejected from pressurised pores in the strata, then extensive voids may not recreated and hence subsidence will not occur.
    Pamela 🐝 Williams
    08/03/2017 #29 Pamela 🐝 Williams
    I just keep thinking about this post. @Ken Boddie , you're the geologist. What happens when that much mud is displaced underground and isn't the weight putting pressure on the surface? Sounds like the makings of a huge sink hole as the pressure causes the surface to collapse into the voids created underground. Is that possible? If that happens wouldn't the ocean of mud suddenly be sucked back into the earth?
    Claire L Cardwell
    08/03/2017 #28 Claire L Cardwell
    #27 That would be great @Paul Walters! It's good timing as I will be in the UK in July/August so will still be here when you come over. @Gert Scholtz has suggested that we get together with @Ian Weinberg for a South African Bees Braai. Hopefully we will be able to round up some more SA Bees to join us.
    Paul Walters
    08/03/2017 #27 Paul Walters
    #26 @Claire L Cardwell Tis a sobering place !! In fact many places in Indonesia can be sobering when one sees the man made destruction! Kalimantan, northern Sumatra to name just two. However there are some jaw droppingly beautiful places here...c'mon over . By the way I will be in Jhb mid June so lets meet up...what say you?
    Claire L Cardwell
    08/03/2017 #26 Claire L Cardwell
    The media silence on this disaster has been remarkable.... Am sharing this everywhere! Thanks for the article @Paul Walters the image of the drowning statues was haunting to say the least....
    Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    26/02/2017 #25 Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    #19 Couldn't agree more @Pamela 🐝 Williams. It's greedy men (and some women) who put money above everything, including human life. It sickens me.
    Paul Walters
    25/02/2017 #24 Paul Walters
    #23 @Ken Boddie Thanks for this Ken . Tis a tragedy !!!
    Ken Boddie
    25/02/2017 #23 Ken Boddie
    I must admit to having quite forgotten about this Indo disaster, Paul. No surprises that in big buck multi-national industrial activity, 'would've' and 'could've' are often buried in a similarly smothering sea of beaurocratic 'mud', along with the processes of environmental reparation and rightful compensation. Those seeking further info may benefit from the following links:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidoarjo_mud_flow
    http://www.abc.net.au/correspondents/content/2013/s3751758.htm
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/5408850.stm
    http://www.news.com.au/travel/world-travel/asia/the-bizarre-appeal-of-indonesias-devastated-mud-villages/news-story/b080758a2fcc1a969ca823ddd7d47e74

    The last link above has some interesting photos and a video.
    Paul Walters
    25/02/2017 #22 Paul Walters
    #21 so true @Aurorasa Sima I am trying to get this piece circulated to as big an audience as I can. 60,000 displaced people need the recognition they deserve ! Thanks for stopping by and commenting !
    Robert Cormack
    22/02/2017 #20 Robert Cormack
    Excellent post, @Paul Walters. The Lapindo family is directly responsible and, despite a decline in their fortunes, they should be held accountable (which I'm sure they won't be). Too often, ecological disasters are written off as just that, despite cases where it's obviously man-made. Great reporting.
    Pamela 🐝 Williams
    22/02/2017 #19 Pamela 🐝 Williams
    #17 Perfect Lisa, that was my thought exactly! Maybe I'll add it to mine as well. It would be awesome if it went viral. Maybe people would stop and think about oil drilling above and beyond the money. So sick of hearing about the money. I'd rather be poor!!!!
    Pamela 🐝 Williams
    22/02/2017 #18 Pamela 🐝 Williams
    Happy to!#16
    Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    22/02/2017 #17 Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    #15 Paul, I added this to Mytweetpack.com so it's tweeting every 6 hours or so. Are you on Twitter? I couldn't find you.
  25. Lada 🏡 Prkic

    Lada 🏡 Prkic

    22/02/2017
    LEAF-SHAPED SOLAR PANELS COAT BUILDING LIKE IVY ►The revolutionary Solar Ivy project, from SMIT (Sustainably Minded Interactive Technology) combines the piezoelectric effect with photovoltaic technology to generate energy.
    Using the sun and the wind to provide renewable energy for the building, the Solar Ivy system also becomes a shade screen that minimizes solar heat gain. Once again, nature serves as the perfect source of inspiration.
    I hope this concept would become widely accepted.
    http://inhabitat.com/solar-ivy-photovoltaic-leaves-climb-to-new-heights/
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
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    Comments

    Yogesh Sukal
    23/02/2017 #4 Yogesh Sukal
    #3 Nice Job... SMIT (y)
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    23/02/2017 #3 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    #1 Yes, it is, and these panels look very organic. As the artificial ivy leaves sway in the wind, they convert solar energy into electricity.
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    23/02/2017 #2 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    #1 Yes, it is, and panels look very organic. As the artificial ivy leaves sway in the wind, they convert solar energy into electricity.
    Yogesh Sukal
    22/02/2017 #1 Yogesh Sukal
    aesthetically pleasing
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