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Interesting Engineering, Technology and Discoveries - beBee

Interesting Engineering, Technology and Discoveries

+ 100 buzzes
This is the place when you can share information about interesting engineering projects, latest development in technology, new materials and other breakthrough discoveries and inventions. Welcome, all of you who love science and engineering!
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  1. Pamela L. Williams
    Pamela L. Williams
    8 inexpensive earth homes almost anyone can afford
    inhabitat.com Let these earth houses inspire you to build your own affordable home from sustainable...
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    Claire Cardwell
    01/12/2016 #4 Claire Cardwell
    I've seen some stunning rammed earth homes and I love the Green Magic homes! Thanks for the share @Pamela L. Williams
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    19/11/2016 #3 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    I like this idea. We need to respect our natural resources and think more into the future.
    Pamela L. Williams
    19/11/2016 #2 Pamela L. Williams
    #1 Absolutely Deb time to step out of the box and think uniquely.
    Deb Helfrich
    19/11/2016 #1 Deb Helfrich
    Interesting! It is really time to stop using trees as building materials. Let them do their job in the environment and begin to use more sustainable materials. Lots to explore....
  2. ProducerClaire Cardwell

    Claire Cardwell

    28/11/2016
    What you need to know before installing a rainwater harvest system
    What you need to know before installing a rainwater harvest systemWater is vital to life and is such a precious natural resource that it makes sense to collect every drop of rain and re-cycle grey water and back-washed pool water. In fact you can reduce your water bill by as much as 90% by harvesting rain...
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    Comments

    Claire Cardwell
    01/12/2016 #13 Claire Cardwell
    #11 Unfortunately the water infrastructure has not been maintained or planned very well here either @Kirsten Horner - as the city gets more and more overpopulated and dense we are about to see some major problems with water supply, this has of course been exacerbated by the drought....
    Claire Cardwell
    30/11/2016 #12 Claire Cardwell
    Thanks for the share Mohammad!
    Kirsten Horner
    29/11/2016 #11 Kirsten Horner
    Thanks Claire. We live with water saving and water restrictions here in Queensland, Australia - in between the floods! The larger water management infrastructure is under pressure and hasn't been planned or managed well for future supply, so everyone has to do their part on their own property.
    Claire Cardwell
    29/11/2016 #10 Claire Cardwell
    Thanks for the share Elizabeth - we can all live for a while without electricity, but now the water cuts here in Joburg are a reality - you simply can't take clean drinking water for granted anymore.
    Elizabeth Bailey
    29/11/2016 #9 Elizabeth Bailey
    Something all property owners should think about.
    Claire Cardwell
    29/11/2016 #8 Claire Cardwell
    Thanks for the share @David B. Grinberg!
    Claire Cardwell
    29/11/2016 #7 Claire Cardwell
    #4 Thanks Rod, you are certainly right about being a lot more aware of water usage when you rely on stored water.
    Claire Cardwell
    29/11/2016 #6 Claire Cardwell
    #5 Thanks @David B. Grinberg! I am certainly a lot more careful with water these days..... Part of the problem here in Joburg is a badly maintained old infrastructure, apparently about 40% of all our potable water is wasted through leaks....
    David B. Grinberg
    29/11/2016 #5 David B. Grinberg
    Thanks for an awesome post, Claire, which is informative and educational. Water conservation is certainly a high priority public policy issue in California and the Middle East, among other places around the world. Keep buzzing!
    Rod Loader
    29/11/2016 #4 Rod Loader
    A good post Clair. Here is Australia, virtually all rural homes have rain water tanks. I have four 20,000 litre tanks, which supplies all my household water (drinking, showers, etc) and water for my gardens, pool etc. I also have a bore, which is not as nice, but still drinkable, as a backup. When you rely on stored water, you are a lot more aware of water usage.
    Claire Cardwell
    28/11/2016 #3 Claire Cardwell
    #2 After a severe drought in SA last summer followed by the usual 6 months of dry season water restrictions and cut offs are a way of life here. It's certainly made me wake up and use water a lot more carefully. I recycle water where-ever I can.....
    Lada Prkic
    28/11/2016 #2 Lada Prkic
    "Water conservation needs to be a way of life.“ I second that Claire. Your article is a very good reminder of the importance of water. My homeland, Croatia, is water-rich country and also one of the countries where you can safely drink tap water. But despite this, many people in rural and suburban areas, and especially people who live on islands are collecting rainwater to reduce their bills when using water for agriculture.
    In addition, several scientific studies propose to refurbish numerous abandoned traditional rain collectors (impluviums) in the Dalmatian area of Croatia to collect rain and dew water, which could provide a significant amount of water, especially during the dry season.
    Claire Cardwell
    28/11/2016 #1 Claire Cardwell
    Thanks for the share @Lada Prkic
  3. Lada Prkic

    Lada Prkic

    28/11/2016
    ZERO-BLADE TECHNOLOGY ► Tunisian start-up Saphon Energy developed a radical new way of harnessing the wind. The related wind converter, called "The Saphonian", is bladeless and non-rotating with a design inspired by antient sailboats, as well as the movements of birds and fish → https://youtu.be/b3aBPDTDtx8Lada Prkic
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    Comments

    Claire Cardwell
    29/11/2016 #8 Claire Cardwell
    #7 Thanks for the share Chas - I've reposted it!
    Chas Wyatt
    29/11/2016 #7 Chas Wyatt
    @Lada Prkic, @Claire Cardwell, you may also be interested in this~ the clear difference, is that it is for individual users at location, rather than relying on a power grid and distribution.~
    http://sauerenergy.com
    Lada Prkic
    28/11/2016 #6 Lada Prkic
    #5 I haven’t experienced the noise of rotating blades first-hand, but I’ve read testimonies of the people who live near conventional wind turbines.
    Claire Cardwell
    28/11/2016 #5 Claire Cardwell
    #4 A couple of things that I found a plus was the lack of noise and the small size of the turbine. It's unbelievable how much noise is generated from a conventional wind farm.
    Lada Prkic
    28/11/2016 #4 Lada Prkic
    #3 I think so @Claire Cardwell. Wind energy technology moves forward to the bladeless turbines to prevent negative sides of the turbine technology with rotating blades. There are several other prototypes of bladeless turbines which are in testing phase.
    Claire Cardwell
    28/11/2016 #3 Claire Cardwell
    What an awesome development - thanks for the buzz @Lada Prkic
    Lada Prkic
    28/11/2016 #2 Lada Prkic
    #1 Thanks Chas. Glad you found this buzz worth sharing,
    Chas Wyatt
    28/11/2016 #1 Chas Wyatt
    originally shared by @Lada Prkic
  4. ProducerKen Boddie

    Ken Boddie

    19/11/2016
    Gut Feeling Heralds New Generation Lithium Batteries
    Gut Feeling Heralds New Generation Lithium BatteriesCambridge Uni and Beijing Institute of Technology researchers have reportedly collaborated to develop a denser and potentially much longer lasting lithium battery. The concept is seemingly intestine-inspired. More details, for the bioengineering...
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    Comments

    Lada Prkic
    26/11/2016 #11 Lada Prkic
    #4 Meanwhile, I will look carefully in all directions. :)
    Ken Boddie
    24/11/2016 #10 Ken Boddie
    #7 so what you're saying, Dean-san, is that bright sparks won't 'stop' until they have a flaming good idea? 😂
    Ken Boddie
    24/11/2016 #9 Ken Boddie
    #8 historically, Kev, those with the best renewable energy ideas have been bought out by the industry magnates who do rule the world, then the ideas shelved.
    Kevin Pashuk
    24/11/2016 #8 Kevin Pashuk
    Back in 2001 NYT Journalist Tom Friedman (author of The World is Flat and no relation to @Phil Friedman) stated that the first one to come up with a cheap, reliable, renewable power source will be the one to rule the world, regardless of politics. (My paraphrase).

    Looks like we are still working to rule the world. Interesting concept, and better than putting a mini nuclear reactor in your pocket.
    Dean Owen
    24/11/2016 #7 Dean Owen
    #6 it wasn't that long ago when Teslas were spontaneously combusting and Toyotas were not braking... Happens to the best of them.
    Ken Boddie
    24/11/2016 #6 Ken Boddie
    #5 ..... and the best spontaneous combusting phones? 😄
    Dean Owen
    24/11/2016 #5 Dean Owen
    #3 it wasn't that long ago when we said that about Korean quality control and now the Koreans make the best TVs in the world.
    Ken Boddie
    24/11/2016 #4 Ken Boddie
    #1 You can take a technocrat to water but you can't make him drink. He's too busy trying to redesign the tap to enjoy the magnificent fluid coming out of it, Lada. There's a world of readers out there, Lada, queuing up to read our buzzes. Sometimes engagement comes from the least expected direction.
    Ken Boddie
    24/11/2016 #3 Ken Boddie
    #2 You may be correct Dean-san but decades of very poor quality control will prevent me from jumping on that bandwagon with my hard earned cash. 🙁
    Dean Owen
    24/11/2016 #2 Dean Owen
    This is very interesting. Back in 2008 i concluded that there was no doubt in my mind China would have car companies to rival Toyota and Ford. Chinese cars back then were shoddy rip offs. They have improved tremendously. There are a few contenders like Great Wall, but I saw promise with BYD who were producing electric cars. Legend has it the Chairman of BYD bought a Mercedes S Class then told his workers to disassemble it to see how it was built. They refused to take apart such a beautiful new car, so he got out his key and scraped all along the side of the car and said, "now do it!". BYD has since been at the forefront of lithium battery, and electric car production. Their cars are still pretty bad, but getting better. Warren Buffet has had a stake in them for a while now. I believe he bought at around RMB 20, it went up to 90, and is now around 46. With the development you mention above, I would suggest BYD is a good buy right now. Seeing how Japanese, and now Korean cars have improved, I have no doubt Chinese car makers will produce high quality cars within the next decade.
    Lada Prkic
    24/11/2016 #1 Lada Prkic
    Another interesting article regarding new technologies that remained unnoticed by engineering community on beBee.
  5. ProducerKen Boddie

    Ken Boddie

    19/11/2016
    Noah's House?
    Noah's House?This house is built to facilitate rising river levels.  It is claimed that building this floating house was cheaper (and certainly more aesthetically appealing) than building ugly flood defence barriers.  Beats me how high the neighbours will keep...
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    Comments

    Ken Boddie
    27/11/2016 #9 Ken Boddie
    #8 Yes, Claire. Sure beats keeping a little Dutch boy on hand, just in case the dyke starts to leak? 😊
    Claire Cardwell
    27/11/2016 #8 Claire Cardwell
    I saw this house featured on Grand Designs - the engineering involved was amazing!
    Ken Boddie
    24/11/2016 #7 Ken Boddie
    #4 A canny thought, Kev. Perhaps mooring fees are cheaper than Council rates?
    Ken Boddie
    24/11/2016 #6 Ken Boddie
    #3 Ah Don, you are a man who economises on his words. 😊
    Ken Boddie
    24/11/2016 #5 Ken Boddie
    #1 I suspect, however, that this solution is too complex and expensive, Lada, for the extensive flood prone regions around the world that need help. It's still a clever idea non the less.
    Kevin Pashuk
    23/11/2016 #4 Kevin Pashuk
    I'm wondering if its a Scot who designed this (being married to one, I think of these things). I do remember seeing a small house built on a bridge for the very reason that in some jurisdictions that you weren't required to pay property tax if the home wasn't actually sitting on land.
    Don Kerr
    23/11/2016 #3 Don Kerr
    Brill!
    Lada Prkic
    23/11/2016 #1 Lada Prkic
    Thank you for this interesting article, Ken. The design is so clever and based on the Archimedes' principle. The house will ‘travel up’ to two and a half meters during a flood event. It's worth sharing.
  6. Claire Cardwell

    Claire Cardwell

    17/11/2016
    Are there alternatives to foam when it comes to packaging and insulation? Yes says Ecovative Design, a NY company engaged in the design, development & testing of biomaterial applications. The company has launched 2 extremely green mushroom-based products. This high-performance alternative to molded or fabricated is renewable, compostable & cost-competitive. Ecovative’s Mushroom packaging, is a “Cradle to Cradle Gold Certified alternative” to plastic packaging. http://greenbuildingelements.com/2014/07/22/green-materials-report-ecovative-designs-non-foam-insulation/ Claire Cardwell
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    Claire Cardwell
    19/11/2016 #6 Claire Cardwell
    Thanks for the share @Lada Prkic
    Claire Cardwell
    19/11/2016 #5 Claire Cardwell
    #2 I also hope it doesn't grow in the dark! Thanks for the share @Ken Boddie !
    Claire Cardwell
    19/11/2016 #4 Claire Cardwell
    #3 That's awesome @Pamela L. Williams - I've seen applications where styrofoam is added to concrete for insulation - it also makes it considerably lighter.
    Pamela L. Williams
    19/11/2016 #3 Pamela L. Williams
    Very interesting Claire, thank you for sharing. Styrofoam is one of my pet-peeves. Our recycling program does not include styrofoam so we collect it at our Sierra Club meetings and one of the members takes it to a business that will recycle it for use in other products.
    Ken Boddie
    19/11/2016 #2 Ken Boddie
    This is one to keep an eye on, as it's not yet commercially available. Hope it doesn't come with the old mushroom syndrome, Claire, as in "kept in the dark and fed sh_t"? 😂
  7. Claire Cardwell

    Claire Cardwell

    16/11/2016
    Canada Tops Out World’s Tallest Wood-Frame Building. Celebrating the tallest wood-frame building of its kind anywhere in the world, Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources Jim Carr recently attended the “topping out” ceremony of the Brock Commons Residence.
    The new University of British Columbia student housing tower rises 18 stories to reach a stunning 178.8 feet (53 meters) tall. To read more go to :- http://greenbuildingelements.com/2016/10/05/canada-tops-out-worlds-tallest-wood-frame-building/
    Claire Cardwell
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    Claire Cardwell
    18/11/2016 #3 Claire Cardwell
    #2 Hi @Jan Barbosa it is an amazing structure, I think that wood would have more sound absorbing qualities than Concrete - especially with noise overhead and below. As to external noise the building does not look like it is an incredibly busy area, I guess it all depends on whether they used double glazing in the windows....
    Jan Barbosa
    18/11/2016 #2 Jan Barbosa
    Guess the building would need pretty good sound insulation... I live in an apartment made with concrete but guess sound insulation was NOT one of their PRIME directives !!! Believe me.. stopping noise coming thru an aluminum louvered window is almost impossible... nevertheless im amzed at such a construction using wood..
    Lada Prkic
    16/11/2016 #1 Lada Prkic
    Thanks for the share. I'm a big "fan" of wooden high-rises.
    It started with Shigeru Ban’s seven storey wood office building in Zurich, which was modelled on traditional Japanese timber buildings.
  8. Migdalia Burgos

    Migdalia Burgos

    15/11/2016
    This is pretty cool!: "The PowerWatch uses thermoelectrics, a material which converts temperature differences into electricity."
    Migdalia Burgos
    The PowerWatch, developed by startup Matrix Industries, is the first wearable powered by body heat.
    money.cnn.com The Matrix smartwatch is powered by body...
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  9. Claire Cardwell

    Claire Cardwell

    15/11/2016
    New Construction Materials… That Self-Repair?
    Opening up a new field of design for construction technology, the US Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is envisioning futuristic materials that repair themselves.
    After recently launching the Engineered Living Materials (ELM) program, DARPA’s goal is to create a whole new class of construction materials. Imagine engineering living cellular systems into the structural features of traditional construction materials. The results might offer, for example, a driveway that eats oil spills; a chimney that cleans itself or heals after heat damage; surface materials that never fade or flake; or even a roof that “breathes” and controls airflow.
    To read more go to:-
    Claire Cardwell
    New Construction Materials... That Self-Repair? - Green Building Elements
    greenbuildingelements.com Opening up a new field of construction technology, DARPA is envisioning futuristic self-repairing construction materials grown from...
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    Comments

    Lada Prkic
    16/11/2016 #5 Lada Prkic
    #1 Claire, thanks for the tag. I’m familiar with the self-healing concrete and bio-bricks and read a lot about that. This amazing concept of genetically engineered 3D structures from seeds looks a pretty bizarre but I'm also excited about its possible development. As the author of the article said, the internet was a pretty bizarre concept back in 1969, too. What is now unrealistic might become possible within 2 or 3 decades and I'm looking forward to it.
    Lada Prkic
    16/11/2016 #4 Lada Prkic
    #1 Claire, thanks for the tag. I’m familiar with the self-healing concrete and bio-bricks and read a lot about that. This amazing concept of genetically engineered 3D structures from seeds looks a pretty bizarre but I'm also exciting to watch its possible development. As the author of the article said, the internet was a pretty bizarre concept back in 1969, too. What is now unrealistic might become possible within 2 or 3 decades and I'm looking forward to it.
    Claire Cardwell
    15/11/2016 #3 Claire Cardwell
    #2 It's all a bit futuristic for me too! Still it's exciting to watch this develop.
    Ken Boddie
    15/11/2016 #2 Ken Boddie
    All sound a bit futuristic for my simple engineer's brain, Claire, but, there again, as the link suggests, who'd have figured out satellite imaging and the GPS a few years ago? And then there's our smart phones and now the bio-brick?
    Claire Cardwell
    15/11/2016 #1 Claire Cardwell
    @Lada Prkic @Ken Boddie - don't know if you've seen this ?
  10. Tony Rossi

    Tony Rossi

    09/11/2016
    3D printing meets affordable, scalable housing construction. This has my geek-meter pegged high on sustainable innovation!
    This castle was printed in concrete
    This castle was printed in concrete This printer can print...
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    Claire Cardwell
    15/11/2016 #1 Claire Cardwell
    Love this!
  11. ProducerClaire Cardwell

    Claire Cardwell

    07/11/2016
    Building your house out of Straw?  How about Rice Straw?
    Building your house out of Straw? How about Rice Straw? I've just discovered that the best straw to use for building is rice straw.  Pine Needle Straw and Coconut Straw also work really well, but due to the high silica content in Rice Straw it's far better than wheat straw.  Rice is a staple food for...
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    Comments

    Ken Boddie
    07/11/2016 #9 Ken Boddie
    #8 Break a leg!
    Claire Cardwell
    07/11/2016 #8 Claire Cardwell
    #7 I've actually got some plans afoot to start an NGO to try and address the housing shortage here in SA using renewable resources that would be energy efficient as well. I've been incubating it since July, thanks for the reminder!
    Ken Boddie
    07/11/2016 #7 Ken Boddie
    #3 Seems to me, Claire, you may be in the right place, and have the right background, to do something effective about this. But the big question arises, is it the right time for you?
    Claire Cardwell
    07/11/2016 #6 Claire Cardwell
    #5 I live in Boskruin (near the Rhema Church and Crescent Clinic (was the Old White Horse Inn). It only takes me about 20 minutes to get to Parkview on the back roads. Parkview is lovely, did you stay in one of those stunning old houses with the pressed iron ceilings? Please send me the link to your article when you write it @Paul Walters! I love the idea of a 'truth window' too.
    Paul Walters
    07/11/2016 #5 Paul Walters
    @Claire Cardwell Wow, this is amazing. Today I was working on a piece on building straw houses for a Magazine here in Indonesia . Met an architect here in Bali who is on a quest. Rice straw is all burnt here which seems a bit ridiculous. Her first structure has been turned into a coconut oil processing centre which is proving to be successful . I like the 'truth window' she puts into the structure showing the straw under the plaster. I have to have the piece finished by thursday and will eventually post iy on beBEE . However thanks for the article ( I might reference your work in SA) By the way where do you live in Gauteng ? I used to live in Parkview !!
    Claire Cardwell
    07/11/2016 #4 Claire Cardwell
    Thanks for the share @Ken Boddie
    Claire Cardwell
    07/11/2016 #3 Claire Cardwell
    #2 Absolutely - I like the lego bricks too - it will make straw building so much faster and easier. Whilst I was writing the article I wondered if a little sand and some Sporosarcina pasteurii bacteria (used for the bio bricks) would eliminate the need for the glue.
    Ken Boddie
    07/11/2016 #2 Ken Boddie
    I see 'padi' straw being burnt regularly all over South-East Asia, Claire. These 'lego' bricks look really interesting and may be a viable consideration in countries like Indonesia! Potential to greatly increase lateral resistance, particularly to the 'big bad wolf' who 'huffs and puffs'? 🌪
  12. Claire Cardwell

    Claire Cardwell

    07/11/2016
    How about a backyard garden office? The owners wanted a backyard office and the shed was renovated into an art studio. - Scott Lewis Landscape Architecture, San Francisico, USA - to read more go to :- http://inhabitat.com/this-lush-green-cube-is-a-dream-artists-studio-hidden-in-a-san-francisco-garden/Claire Cardwell
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    Claire Cardwell
    07/11/2016 #5 Claire Cardwell
    #4 Thanks for reminding me @Ken Boddie - I love the idea of an office like this, but am not a fan of ivy anyway as it strangles trees. Perhaps an office with a green roof would be better....
    Ken Boddie
    07/11/2016 #4 Ken Boddie
    I just can't stop the geotechnical engineer in me getting in the way of my aesthetic appreciation, Claire. Ivy on walls can be so destructive due to root jacking in existing cracks in the bricks and mortar, and can also damage the fabric of timber, not to mention housing unwanted pesky inspects. As for garden beds close to foundations, the intensive watering required and/or the root suction can cause structural damage, particularly when the house is built on reactive clays prone to seasonal shrink-swell movement. Looks great but looks can deceive. 😟
    Claire Cardwell
    07/11/2016 #3 Claire Cardwell
    #1 Thanks for the share Julie!
    Claire Cardwell
    07/11/2016 #2 Claire Cardwell
    #1 Me too!
    Julie Hickman
    07/11/2016 #1 Julie Hickman
    I would consider this a dream office! Gorgeous :-)
  13. ProducerClaire Cardwell

    Claire Cardwell

    06/11/2016
    @Soulfulsundays - Thorncrown Chapel by E. Fay Jones
    @Soulfulsundays - Thorncrown Chapel by E. Fay JonesThorncrown Chapel was designed by world renowned architect E. Fay Jones. Fay was born in Pine Bluff, Arkansas in 1921. He studied at the University of Arkansas, Rice University, the University of Oklahoma, and finally under his mentor Frank Lloyd...
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    07/11/2016 #14 Sara Jacobovici
    #7 I've been told @CityVP Manjit that "intense" is my favorite word and "it's all connected" is my favorite expression.
    CityVP Manjit
    06/11/2016 #13 CityVP Manjit
    #11 There is another discipline that is akin to "school by doing" which is "action learning" - the important thing here is that doing is not a past tense, it is in the here and now, and Claire Cardwell can engage this right here or anywhere.

    For sure getting to know how the Lloyds translated this to architecture is something you won't know unless we engaged in that school, but even me just discovering this as a reality has somewhat imperceptibly changed me. It is the appreciation of this awareness that matters.

    Whether it is this discovery I had today about Taliesen philosophy courtesy of your buzz or visiting those who think about "action learning" http://www.wial.org/action-learning - the actual reality of this discovery is that both you and I can then operating in the school which we to belong even when it is a self-created school of our own online learning journeys.

    This is why I especially really loved the affinity that I dug out of your buzz because it is kindred with how I personally want to relate to the WWW a.k.a. http://myhero.com/hero.asp?hero=T_BernersLee_MMUN_CA_07 and so I frame it as a "learning journey".
    Claire Cardwell
    06/11/2016 #12 Claire Cardwell
    Thanks for the share @David B. Grinberg!
    Claire Cardwell
    06/11/2016 #11 Claire Cardwell
    #7 Thanks for the links @CityVP Manjit - very interesting reading - I am particularly intrigued by the 'school by doing' approach taken by Frank Lloyd Wright and his aunts. I would have loved to have gone to a school that followed the Taliesen philosophy.
    Claire Cardwell
    06/11/2016 #10 Claire Cardwell
    #9 Thanks @CityVP Manjit - I am glad you enjoyed it! It is one of the most beautiful buildings I have ever come across and it must be an amazing place to meditate by. The history, synchronicity and respect for the forest really resonated with me too.
    CityVP Manjit
    06/11/2016 #9 CityVP Manjit
    What was personally relevant to me in this buzz was that I encountered the intellect of E.Fay Jones which informs my yellow hive, it contained the emergent and design aspects of architecture which informs my violet hive and it told the story of an educational institution for the Lloyd-Wright's vision of an architectural fellowship which informs my gray hive. When it comes to my own learning journey this buzz actually contained far more elements than simply directly appreciating the design thinking of the Thorncrown Chapel. Thank You for this buzz.
    Lada Prkic
    06/11/2016 #8 Lada Prkic
    Wonderful! I am also amazed by the fact that no structural element was heavier than two men could carry through the woods. Repeating patterns are stunning.
    CityVP Manjit
    06/11/2016 #7 CityVP Manjit
    Did not about Fay Jones. The one thing obituaries create is a doorway into a life, so I first accessed the NY Times page for his obit http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/01/arts/design/fay-jones-83-architect-influenced-by-wright-dies.html?_r=0 There I also learned about http://taliesinfellows.org/i/taliesin-fellows/ so again something new for me but now I see the connection even more with Lloyd-Wright as an educator. That in itself is worth buzzing to my Gray HIve https://www.bebee.com/group/gray noting here that my hives are for my own learning journey, rather than a singular interest in the field of architecture. An obit of an accomplished person describes the key moments of a life and a person's work, .In Fay Jones it's describes a "chance encounter with Lloyd-Wright". Again another evidence point what @Sara Jacobovici and Reena Saxena on LinkedIn have been talking about regards the subject of synchronicity. I also note Olgivanna Lloyd Wright's contribution in enlightening Frank Lloyd Wright towards this vision that I learned today was Taliesian. What we attribute to greatness is a web of relationships that I am beginning more and more to recognize in my own learning journey.
    Claire Cardwell
    06/11/2016 #6 Claire Cardwell
    It's on my bucket list of places to go along with Falling Waters by Frank Lloyd Wright who was E Fay Jones's Mentor. I particularly love the fact about how E Fay Jones insisted that the chapel only be built with materials that could be carried by two men through the forest.
    Dean Owen
    06/11/2016 #5 Dean Owen
    Not to be confused with F.A. Jones, the great American who founded one of Switzerland's most famous watch companies, IWC. This chapel is gorgeous!
    Ken Boddie
    06/11/2016 #4 Ken Boddie
    This is absolutely amazing, Claire. Furthermore, this is one chapel they'll never be able to replicate in Vegas! I can't stop looking in awe at the photos of this building on various websites. 🙄
    Mamen Delgado
    06/11/2016 #3 Mamen Delgado
    Woww...
    Claire Cardwell
    06/11/2016 #2 Claire Cardwell
    @Ken Boddie - thought you would like this one - it's quite the engineering feat!
    Claire Cardwell
    06/11/2016 #1 Claire Cardwell
    #Soulfulsundays
  14. Lada Prkic

    Lada Prkic

    05/11/2016
    Solar Roof is designed to replace traditional shingles.
    Elon Musk unveils Solar Roof by SolarCity
    Elon Musk unveils Solar Roof by SolarCity Tesla CEO and SolarCity chairman Elon Musk just announced a new way to power your home with solar power. The product is called Solar Roof, and it’s designed...
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    Comments

    Claire Cardwell
    05/11/2016 #6 Claire Cardwell
    I've just read about this on Tech Crunch and here's the movie ! Thanks for the share @Lada Prkic - I think this is awesome.
    Jacproject Comercial
    05/11/2016 #5 Jacproject Comercial
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/227039664331748/
    Jacproject Comercial
    05/11/2016 #4 Jacproject Comercial
    https;//www.facebook.com/jacproject
    Lada Prkic
    05/11/2016 #3 Lada Prkic
    #1 #2 Here is the article about the cost of the Tesla Solar Roof tiles: http://www.teslarati.com/consumer-reports-estimates-tesla-solar-roof-cost/
    Ken Boddie
    05/11/2016 #2 Ken Boddie
    Great find, Lada. Have you any links explaining details or should I Google 'Tesla' and 'Solar City'?
    Lisa Gallagher
    05/11/2016 #1 Lisa Gallagher
    Really cool designs. I wonder how much it will cost to replace traditional roof shingles with solar?
  15. Lada Prkic

    Lada Prkic

    03/11/2016
    NAIL HOUSE PHENOMENON ► Nail house is a building whose owner refuses to accept compensation from a property developer for its demolition, either for the love of the home, or because they want to 'hold out' for increased compensation.
    Below is the famous nail house in China where the road was built around the house, leaving it as an island in a river of new asphalt. The house was finally demolished after its elderly owners agreed to accept compensation.
    Lada Prkic
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    Ken Boddie
    05/11/2016 #5 Ken Boddie
    Amending John Donne's famous quote, "No house is an island"? The eventual stated solution makes us think how, and even whether, the owners 'agreed'?

    Perhaps @Dean Owen may agree that, in this former feudal state, where impressive infrastructure is built with incredible speed, the state still comes first ..... and the individual? ...... a long way down the chain. But, yet again, how can you cloth and feed a nation of almost 1.4 billion and satisfy the appetite of a huge merging middle class, without treading on a few toes? 🤔
    Lada Prkic
    03/11/2016 #4 Lada Prkic
    #1 Most nail houses can be found in China and most of them are eventually removed. Apparently, this farm in the UK was saved because there is a geological fault beneath the house so the lanes could not be joined together and the highway was built around the house. Not a pleasant place to live, but the owners have their reasons to stay.
    Thanks for the share Don.
    David Gamella Pérez
    03/11/2016 #3 David Gamella Pérez
    WoW!!!
    Aurorasa Sima
    03/11/2016 #2 Aurorasa Sima
    I bet that was a tourist spot. Cool finding!
    Don Kerr
    03/11/2016 #1 Don Kerr
    If memory serves, I think there is something like this on the highway between Leeds and Manchester in the UK. http://www.cntraveler.com/stories/2014-04-21/stott-hall-farm-britain-ken-jennings
  16. Lada Prkic

    Lada Prkic

    31/10/2016
    BLADELESS WIND TURBINE GENERATES ELECTRICITY BY OSCILLATING ► It will need less material, provide electricity to more people at a lower cost while leaving a smaller environmental footprint. It won’t kill birds and it won’t make noise. The turbine captures the energy of vorticity, an aerodynamic effect that creates a pattern of spinning vortices or whirlwinds. Here is the explaining video: https://youtu.be/WqcNc9bKlNY Lada Prkic
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    Comments

    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    01/11/2016 #8 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Looks like a friendlier ''Alternative'' Lada! :)
    Lada Prkic
    01/11/2016 #7 Lada Prkic
    #6 Indeed! Well put, Mohammed.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    01/11/2016 #6 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Aha..technology on the move, with more benefits and ease!
    Lada Prkic
    01/11/2016 #5 Lada Prkic
    The smallest version is a 3-meter high pilot study planed for India. It will produce 100 W.
    https://twitter.com/vortexbladeless/status/608023669013495809
    They also plan a 12-meter high version of 4 kW.
    Vasco Gonçalves
    31/10/2016 #3 Vasco Gonçalves
    I contacted them some months ago. They told me that they would start to raise money for the smallest version. I asked the CEO about the biggest version, they didn't think about when they would start - actually I hoped for 2022.
    Javier Rojas García
    31/10/2016 #2 Javier Rojas García
    I am looking for something similar but this is too big. In the future, everyone is going to have one in his house... at least in my dreams
    Lada Prkic
    31/10/2016 #1 Lada Prkic
    Vortex Bladeless is a Spanish tech startup that developed this radical new way to generate wind energy..
  17. ProducerClaire Cardwell

    Claire Cardwell

    29/10/2016
    The Rise of Urban Mining
    The Rise of Urban Mining"There's gold in them thar' hills" - but not nearly as much as in all the cell phones, computers and electronic equipment we make and discard every year. According to the organizers of the first e-Waste Acedemy held recently in Accra,...
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    Lada Prkic
    31/10/2016 #7 Lada Prkic
    This important topic points to a devastating fact that industrialized nations export their toxic e-waste to developing countries, rather than processing it themselves, because environmentally recycling in industrialized countries is up to ten times more expensive than the primitive recycling in developing countries.
    But, ultimately, urban mining in such a way poisons us all. "What comes around goes around, no matter where you are."
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    31/10/2016 #6 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #2 Not really sure how things stand in India Ken..gotta look into that for my info. But one thing I do know is that there is a large workforce of organised garbage collectors out on the streets. Mostly the homeless and destitutes. Just like the begging mafia network. Am sure there is some method and purpose to this relentless scavenging that happens around the clock. Most corporate bodies have ewaste disposal teams that engage local NGOs to do the last mile dumping.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    31/10/2016 #5 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    That is a lot to think about in terms of recycling. We don't really have to dig too deep now to unearth treasure Claire ;) It must already be a BIG underground industry is what I suspect.
    Claire Cardwell
    31/10/2016 #4 Claire Cardwell
    #2 There is also an informal re-cycling industry here in SA. Rubbish pickers go through bins before they are collected and collect metal, glass and plastic and drag them by hand on trolleys to re-cycling centres. There are rubbish pickers on the dumps too. I am not sure whether heavy metals and e-waste are recycled by these people as well.
    Ben Pinto
    31/10/2016 #3 Ben Pinto
    Love that URBAN MINING logo.
    Ken Boddie
    31/10/2016 #2 Ken Boddie
    Excellent illustration, Claire, of our need to carefully recycle our heavy metals instead of losing them in landfill. I don't know about the situation in Guiyu, China, but I do understand that there is a large recycling industry in Mumbai, India. Perhaps @Dean Owen has some knowledge on Guiyu?
  18. ProducerClaire Cardwell

    Claire Cardwell

    25/10/2016
    Bio-Bricks - The Future of Construction
    Bio-Bricks - The Future of ConstructionTraditional construction materials such as brick, concrete and steel rely heavily on limited natural resources and use a lot of energy and water to produce.  Concrete is one of the most energy intensive materials and uses limestone shale converted...
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    Comments

    Claire Cardwell
    27/10/2016 #5 Claire Cardwell
    #1 Thanks @Ken Boddie - I am excited about this technology, traditional clay and cement bricks manufacture is way too costly for the environment.
    Claire Cardwell
    27/10/2016 #4 Claire Cardwell
    #2 Hi @Phil Friedman, @Albert Gibel - Bio-Bricks typically have a compressive strength of 1-2MPa, Clay fired bricks around 17MPa and Concrete Bricks - 15-25MPa, blocks are 3.5-7MPa and Mud Bricks are 1.6-1.9MPa. According to bioMason their bricks are just as strong if not stronger than clay fired bricks.
    Phil Friedman
    27/10/2016 #2 Phil Friedman
    Fascinating information, Claire, how do the mechanical properties compare to concrete block?
    Ken Boddie
    27/10/2016 #1 Ken Boddie
    Missed this one first time round, Claire. Bio-bricks using nature's cementation. Can't be bad. Thanks for the tag and the link. Sharing on the ETD hive as usual: https://www.bebee.com/group/interesting-engineering-technology-and-discoveries
  19. ProducerClaire Cardwell

    Claire Cardwell

    26/10/2016
    3D-printed Aquaponic Homes grow their own veggies and fish - Inhabitat.com
    3D-printed Aquaponic Homes grow their own veggies and fish - Inhabitat.comAs natural resources dwindle and rising temperatures threaten to alter entire ecosystems in unknowable ways, architects and designers are creating innovative ways to shore up humanity's resilience. Aquaponic Future Housing, a conceptual design by...
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    Comments

    Ken Boddie
    28/10/2016 #4 Ken Boddie
    #3 Thanks for the links, Claire. I'll look at them this weekend.
    Claire Cardwell
    27/10/2016 #3 Claire Cardwell
    #2 I love the idea of living in a house that produces it's own food - however I don't feel that the 'habitats' shown in this article would work on a practical day to day basis. A while back I came across a concept called ReGen Villages which also used hydroponics, permaculture and aquaculture. Apparently the only item they had to buy in (in bulk that is) is coffee. http://inhabitat.com/utopian-off-grid-village-grows-own-food-in-shared-local-eco-system/ I also found an article about a house in Sweden the Naturhus - I am a fan! http://www.ecowatch.com/couple-builds-greenhouse-around-home-to-grow-food-and-keep-warm-1882128131.html
    Ken Boddie
    27/10/2016 #2 Ken Boddie
    Thanks for the tag, Claire. I'm sharing this on the ETD hive as follows, to see if there is any response from the engineering fraternity:
    https://www.bebee.com/group/interesting-engineering-technology-and-discoveries View more
    Thanks for the tag, Claire. I'm sharing this on the ETD hive as follows, to see if there is any response from the engineering fraternity:
    https://www.bebee.com/group/interesting-engineering-technology-and-discoveries
    I'm not sure who wrote the original wording above, as replicated in the Mihai Chiriak link, but I found a lot of jargon being used which, for me personally, was confusing. My initial reaction was that the concept is sound but the illustrations appear to relate to a parallel universe. I'd be interested to know your reaction to this article, Claire and whether you see the concept being practically applied. As you probably know, I tend to be an unimaginative and relatively conservative thinker on these issues. Close
  20. ProducerJavier Rojas García
    La casa columpio/ Balancing barn (Español & English)
    La casa columpio/ Balancing barn (Español & English)La casa columpio/ Balancing barnEsta casa muestra lo que debe ser la arquitectura y me encanta cómo lo define Winy Maas del grupo de arquitectos MVRDV. Creo que es la primera vez que he entendido la arquitectura como una película con un guión muy...
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    Comments

    Javier Rojas García
    27/10/2016 #13 Javier Rojas García
    #11 Thanks for reading
    Javier Rojas García
    27/10/2016 #12 Javier Rojas García
    #11 my pleusure @Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    27/10/2016 #11 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Thanks for the inline translation! :)
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    27/10/2016 #10 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Can't understand the text, but the visual is WOW!
    Hugo Chinchilla
    26/10/2016 #9 Hugo Chinchilla
    #8 Lo de la Supercopa catalana es más gaje del oficio que afición, jeje. Mira que es cierto, en todas las películas de terror hay un columpio colgado moviéndose solo.
    Javier Rojas García
    26/10/2016 #8 Javier Rojas García
    #7 la Supercopa?? Qué afición!!! A mi el columpio siempre me ha recordado al de la niña de Frankenstein...jajaja
    Hugo Chinchilla
    25/10/2016 #7 Hugo Chinchilla
    La casa está interesante, no he escuchado el vídeo porque estoy viendo la final de la Supercopa Catalana, pero yo le agregaría paneles solares a todo el techo. Lo del columpio... ¡Uuufff! Impresiona y da una extraña mezcla de seguridad y miedo.
    Mamen Delgado
    25/10/2016 #6 Mamen Delgado
    #3 @Claire Cardwell, I am completely sure I wouldn't feel comfortable with the transparent floor, or sleeping in the house, or cooking in the kitchen... Or even swinging in that wonderful swing. But it could be a great way to "fight" with my own fears about vertigo. There's something too attractive about the house and the script inside it...
    Lada Prkic
    25/10/2016 #5 Lada Prkic
    Excellent video! I've read about this structure but I did't see the video. Just like you said, I've experienced architecture as a movie with a good script.
    Javier Rojas García
    25/10/2016 #4 Javier Rojas García
    Jumping in the middle of the living room has to be a great experience...
    Claire Cardwell
    25/10/2016 #3 Claire Cardwell
    Wow! That's a cantilever of note! Not sure whether I would be entirely comfortable with a transparent floor.... Mamen is right Vertigo does spring to mind..... I love the swing too!
    Mamen Delgado
    25/10/2016 #2 Mamen Delgado
    Simply wonderful. A house full of emotions. The first one in my mind is "vertigo"...
  21. ProducerPaul Netscher

    Paul Netscher

    16/10/2016
    Construction demands good communication
    Construction demands good communicationAs a child we played a game which I’m sure many of you played. We sat in a circle and one person whispered a message in to their neighbour’s ear who then passed the message to their neighbour by whispering in their ear, who passed the message on,...
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    Comments

    Paul Netscher
    23/10/2016 #2 Paul Netscher
    #1 Thanks Lisa for adding your experience to the conversation. A lesson for all of us - make sure you read and understand the contracts you sign and ask questions if you aren't sure of anything. Don't make assumptions.
    Lisa Gallagher
    16/10/2016 #1 Lisa Gallagher
    Very thorough article @Paul Netscher. I agree, good communication is vital. This not construction work related but contractor work- we once hired a company to remove all of our shrubs and replace them with new shrubs. The man was in his late 70's (the owner) of this large landscaping business. We had a contract but it was explicit enough to cover us. We placed too much faith in this man because of his age and he appeared to be a man of his word. They never came back to take care of the new shrubs the next summer as promised (it wasn't in the contract) and he also planted shrubs we did not agree on- again the contract was too vague. We learned a lesson with that one. He charged us A LOT of money, so it was a major disappointment that his word was not sincere. That was our fault in the end.
  22. ProducerVasco Gonçalves
    Invitation - Will a completely new Smart City be built?
    Invitation - Will a completely new Smart City be built?http://bit.ly/2c263kv...
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    Comments

    Vasco Gonçalves
    25/10/2016 #5 Vasco Gonçalves
    OK, when I come back from Russia, I'll try to do it - if I have the time.
    Lada Prkic
    25/10/2016 #4 Lada Prkic
    #2 I appreciate your proposal but I barely manage to find a half an hour a day for social media. Sometimes I need a couple of weeks for writing a post. :)
    Vasco Gonçalves
    25/10/2016 #3 Vasco Gonçalves
    You may also add the comments, because some of them complement the articles.
    Vasco Gonçalves
    25/10/2016 #2 Vasco Gonçalves
    #1 Lada, you may do so. Sorry don't have the time to do it.
    When it's done, I'll have a check.
    Thanks.
    Lada Prkic
    25/10/2016 #1 Lada Prkic
    Vasco, I would like you to republish all these interesting articles about smart cities in their entirety rather than just link. It would be much easier to comment on beBee.
    I like this topic very much. :)
  23. ProducerVasco Gonçalves
    Smart Cities and Trust, is it compatible?
    Smart Cities and Trust, is it compatible?http://bit.ly/2dH7W7N...
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  24. ProducerVasco Gonçalves
    Will our Smart Cities be Sustainable?
    Will our Smart Cities be Sustainable?http://bit.ly/2eyTstf...
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  25. ProducerVasco Gonçalves
    Are our cities becoming “smart”?
    Are our cities becoming “smart”?http://bit.ly/2csDhMh...
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