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Interfaith Dialogue - beBee

Interfaith Dialogue

~ 100 buzzes
A place to deepen our understanding of other's beliefs. All are welcome. Representatives of all religions wanted as Administrators.
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  1. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    30/11/2016
    Minnesota Metaphysical Boutiques Targeted with Harassment (link)
    Minnesota Metaphysical Boutiques Targeted with Harassment (link)by Cara Schulz - The Wild HuntWHITE BEAR LAKE, Minn. — Pagan-owned businesses face all the usual challenges of any small business: overhead costs, long hours by the owner, and maintaining a customer base. Yet they also face the additional...
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  2. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    30/11/2016
    Indigenous Expel Evangelical Churches for Attacks on Their Culture (link)
    Indigenous Expel Evangelical Churches for Attacks on Their Culture (link)by Rick Kearns - Indian Country Today Indigenous leaders in northern Colombia expelled a group of evangelical Christians from their community recently, saying the missionaries were contributing to the “physical, cultural and spiritual...
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  3. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    24/11/2016
    Paganism Growing in The U.S. Army: Choose Your Own Gods (link - video)
    Paganism Growing in The U.S. Army: Choose Your Own Gods (link - video)by Heat Street staffIt’s a Sunday. Private Horvath makes his way across the Fort Jackson Army Base to attend his weekly religious service. Instead of filing into a church pew, he joins the other soldiers forming a big circle outside, under a...
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  4. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    06/11/2016
    The history of Satanic Panic in the US — and why it's not over yet (link)
    The history of Satanic Panic in the US — and why it's not over yet (link)Updated by Aja Romano Some of the victims of mass hysteria over satanic ritual...
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    Comments

    Paul Kemner
    09/11/2016 #6 Paul Kemner
    The people running the scare campaigns, especially Jack Chick, have had quite a bit to say about the Catholic Church too:
    http://www.chick.com/reading/tracts/0071/0071_01.asp

    ... and here's an article about the phenomenon:
    http://www.catholic.com/documents/the-nightmare-world-of-jack-t-chick
    Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes
    07/11/2016 #5 Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes
    Ok Mr Williams
    blessed
    WILLIAM C. BALLARD II
    07/11/2016 #4 WILLIAM C. BALLARD II
    #1 Only ONE man, could follow the LAW ever, JESUS, You should know that, To think any person is still under the Commandments, given to Hebrews who had many false gods, Is truly not a follower of JESUS CHRIST, And being alive today is all because of the WORK OF THE CROSS. A gift of GRACE, A gift without sin, A future for children to know given to them by GOD. To live without LAWS of Faith, Peace of mind knowing no man is over GOD. GODBLESS
    Paul Kemner
    06/11/2016 #3 Paul Kemner
    #2 So all the above would fall under the 9th commandment, then.
    WILLIAM C. BALLARD II
    06/11/2016 #2 WILLIAM C. BALLARD II
    REMEMBER The god on earth is real. Ask the POPE, "WHAT IS THE TOTAL AMOUNT OF MONEY USE, TO PAY OFF LAWYERS, AND FAMILIES WHERE A CHILD WAS MOLESTED, BY A CATHOLIC PRIEST OF GOD?" The world, would be speechless ,, JESUS knows only a few will enter into Heaven, Because we are sinners. It is up to the individual to love fire or eternity. GODBLESS
    Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes
    06/11/2016 #1 Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes
    We're are Satan?
    Blessing
  5. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    01/11/2016
    Many Gods, One Logic (link)
    Many Gods, One Logic (link)from Epified.A succinct explanation of Hindu (and probably other polytheist)...
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  6. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    31/10/2016
    What it’s like being a witch in New York City (link)
    What it’s like being a witch in New York City (link)By Jane Ridley and Liz Pressman - New York Post A news librarian at The Post, Liz Pressman has been a practicing witch for 42 years — and has recently noticed that pop culture has taken a more open view of her religion, Wicca. This is her story...
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  7. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    19/10/2016
    Gods in Buddhism- Are There Gods, or Aren't There? (link)
    Gods in Buddhism- Are There Gods, or Aren't There? (link)By Barbara O'BrienIt is often asked if there are gods in Buddhism. The short answer is no, but also yes, depending on what you mean by "gods."It also is often asked if it is all right for a Buddhist to believe in God, meaning the creator God of...
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    Comments

  8. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    19/10/2016
    Resurrecting gods: Where discarded deities wait for shelter (link)
    Resurrecting gods: Where discarded deities wait for shelter (link)(India Samvad) Hong Kong, October 14: Tucked away on a coastal Hong Kong hillside is a different type of recycling point -- here, thousands of unwanted statues of deities look out to sea, gathered and repaired after their owners discard...
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  9. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    09/10/2016
     Americans fuzzy on religious details, study finds--- A heresy for some can be a tenet for others (link)
    Americans fuzzy on religious details, study finds--- A heresy for some can be a tenet for others (link)by TK Barger (Toledo Blade)The headline that LifeWay Research gave its 2016 State of American Theology Study is “Americans Love God and the Bible, Are Fuzzy on Details.” The findings from a survey conducted in April had some very...
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  10. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    06/10/2016
    Inside Santa Muerte, Mexico’s Fast-Growing Death Cult (link)
    Inside Santa Muerte, Mexico’s Fast-Growing Death Cult (link)Roman Catholicism is still by far the dominant religion in Mexico, but the Santa Muerte is quickly gaining followers. And not everyone is happy about itby Jan-Albert Hootsen - vocativ.comMEXICO CITY—The woman and her daughter approach the...
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  11. ProducerNicole Chardenet
    In Defence Of Funny Muslims & Other Hilarious People
    In Defence Of Funny Muslims & Other Hilarious PeopleIs there anything funny about Muslims? Can you say anything about them and not have them, you know, burn down the city in violent protest?Apparently so, on both counts, because Canadians laughed through five seasons of the old CBC show Little Mosque...
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    Comments

    Charles David Upchurch
    06/10/2016 #17 Charles David Upchurch
    I had no idea it ran for so long. Like I said, I only saw about 5 episodes, probably in the first or second season (starting with the recruitment of the "modern" young imam).
    Nicole Chardenet
    04/10/2016 #16 Nicole Chardenet
    #15 I stopped watching after the fourth season because it was losing its edge, but I have those four seasons on DVD.
    Charles David Upchurch
    04/10/2016 #15 Charles David Upchurch
    #4 I was lucky enough to watch about 5 episodes of 'Little Mosque on the Prairie' and I LOVED it. The show also did a great job of showing multiple points of view.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    03/10/2016 #14 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #9 You are so hotdiggity right on the keys there Nicole! It is always the powers that be that divide so that they can rule sadly.
    Nicole Chardenet
    03/10/2016 #13 Nicole Chardenet
    #3 Hi Donna-Luisa, over the weekend I was reading articles about misogyny and white male reaction to Hillary Clinton and how we're going to hear the word 'bitch' used far more often in the coming years (let's be real, she's gonna win...) And one article suggested that it's time for forward-thinking women to reclaim the word 'bitch'...particularly after Tina Fey's sketch on Saturday Night Live re Clinton where she said, "Bitches get stuff done." We're in for as much misogyny in the next four years as we've gotten for racism in the last eight...it's time to meet the easily-emasculated with a grin and a smirk rather than a raised fist ;)
    Nicole Chardenet
    03/10/2016 #12 Nicole Chardenet
    #4 Thank you Dean, your support is much appreciated! As someone already pointed out - and as I realized myself as I uploaded the post a few weeks ago - it's not the timeliest story on beBee. I'd actually intended for it to cover more than Little Mosque, which ended production a few years ago, but it just kind of took over. I have been thinking lately of political correctness and how the right is correct (to a certain degree) when it claims PC is ruining political discourse. I've felt that way for years, and I think it's time for some pushback.
    Nicole Chardenet
    03/10/2016 #11 Nicole Chardenet
    #6 Some people use "humour" as a cover to just be nasty, and then accuse the victims of being thin-skinned. It does vary in the eyes of the beholders (or the targets), and some folks for sure are too sensitive, and I think we've catered enough to the thin-skinned, who sometimes really do need to grow up a little. There may be some future honey from me on this...
    Nicole Chardenet
    03/10/2016 #10 Nicole Chardenet
    #7 Hey Lisa, if you can't find it on Netflix it may be available elsewhere. We need to start challenging the easily-offended, though. Humour is a great way to mend fences and make ourselves and others seem less scary. If some thin-skinned Muslims had had their way, Little Mosque would have never made it to air - yet I thought it humanized them and made them less scary. I didn't laugh *at* them, I laughed *with* them.
    Nicole Chardenet
    03/10/2016 #9 Nicole Chardenet
    #8 Praveen, when I first moved to Canada & into my friend's home he met me out in the driveway. He gestured to the neighbours on one side - "Muslims to the left" and to the other side - "Hindus to the right." "We're not going to get caught in the crossfire, are we?" I joked. Turns out we were in a heavily immigrant neighbourhood with lots of Indians and Middle Easterners. Everyone got along with everyone else. It's not as hard as people think.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    01/10/2016 #8 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    I saw a few episodes of Citizen Khan and loved the "protagonist" for his ability to poke fun at himself and others in equally good humour! He too did rile some folks I hear. That said, human nature is the same everywhere, though there are groupings with some characteristic peculiarities. So more than likely it is the same drama in all homes...kids vs parents, daughter-in-law vs Mother-in-law...sibling rivalries...some of my best buddies are muslims and i love their company, their welcoming homes and affection. I blame power politics, religion driven politics, and the resultant mob mentality for creating and sustaining the divides. You will be floored and dumbfounded to see how much Hindu and Muslim friends and families do for each other in this country of mine. It is not easy to co-exist at such close proximity but we have been managing for ages. Because many do believe in the same-blood, same race paradigm.
    Lisa Gallagher
    01/10/2016 #7 Lisa Gallagher
    @Nicole Chardenet, awesome read. I never heard of this show but I wonder if I can find it on Netflix? I agree, there's a lot to be said about humor and those who can laugh at themselves are people I adore. I admit, I've had a few stories I wanted to share but was afraid of offending. Good advice about not being afraid to put it out there.
    Phil Friedman
    01/10/2016 #6 Phil Friedman
    @Nicole Chardenet, to my mind, you are correct in the main about humor... er, humour. I tend, however, to disagree when you say that some humor can be viscous and eviscerating. It's simple the case that not everything that represents itself as humor is funny. Cheers... and ribbet, ribbet, ribbet. :-)
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    01/10/2016 #5 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    No matter who, what, where or why we are, it does hurt to laugh. It's why we laugh that matters.
    Dean Owen
    01/10/2016 #4 Dean Owen
    I am surprised that not many picked up on this article as it is the best and most relevant article I have read all year. I read it the day it was published and wanted to see how the community reacted while making a mental note to come back to it and comment/share if it was overlooked. I certainly hope it was just an oversight and not anything to do with the title and title picture. Well done Nicole. I am a big fan.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    22/09/2016 #3 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @Nicole Chardenet thank you very much for sharing the other side...everyone has a funny bone, and in the silly season of politics everyone has become quite serious. It is good to laugh every now and then...more now than then...the world will hopefully laugh again after the USA elections, coming soon to a live stream near us all 😀
    Nicole Chardenet
    14/09/2016 #2 Nicole Chardenet
    #1 Yeah...I know the show's been over for awhile but godz, the world has gotten so humourless and politically correct I just *had* to say something. And Muslims are very much under the microscope these days.
    Pascal Derrien
    13/09/2016 #1 Pascal Derrien
    Timely article :-)
  12. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    25/09/2016
    300 Hindu families unable to perform Durga puja in Bengal's Kanglapahari village after opposition by 25 Muslim families (link)
    300 Hindu families unable to perform Durga puja in Bengal's Kanglapahari village after opposition by 25 Muslim families (link)Soudhriti Bhabani  | Posted by Anand Jayaram It's been the fourth consecutive year when 300-odd households in a village in West Bengal's Birbhum district are running from pillar to post seeking permission from the district administration just...
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    Paul Kemner
    26/09/2016 #1 Paul Kemner
    Additional news- the situation is apparently more complex- the Muslims in the area were also denied permission to do an Eid sacrifice.
    http://scroll.in/article/766597/ground-report-was-durga-pujo-really-banned-in-a-west-bengal-village
  13. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    24/09/2016
    Bhutan's dark secret to happiness (link)
    Bhutan's dark secret to happiness (link)by Eric Weiner - BBC TravelOn a visit to Thimphu, the capital of Bhutan, I found myself sitting across from a man named Karma Ura, spilling my guts. Maybe it was the fact that he was named Karma, or the thin air, or the way travel melts my...
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  14. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    17/09/2016
    Reconsidering the Witch’s Uniform (link)
    Reconsidering the Witch’s Uniform (link)(by Devo)It's normal for marginalized groups to try and reclaim things that have been used against them. You see this in countless cultures and subcultures such as the LGBTQ+ community reclaiming the word “queer” or pink triangles as a sign of...
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  15. ProducerJavier beBee

    Javier beBee

    17/09/2016
    Virginia
    VirginiaVirginia is a one of my closest friends. She has had one intimate relationship which began when she was 20. She is now 45. Virginia is a witch. It is quite interesting to listen to her talk about her experiences with her coven. I have not met...
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    Comments

    Aurorasa Sima
    18/09/2016 #11 Aurorasa Sima
    #4 You´re most welcome. @CityVP Manjit is someone one can learn a lot from and I was thinking he also would love your stories.
    Irene Hackett
    18/09/2016 #10 Anonymous
    #9 very cool indeed dear @Karen Anne Kramer ~ CNN Women Leaders 2015
    Irene Hackett
    17/09/2016 #7 Anonymous
    I liked this Karen! It is wonderful to engage with and earn the friendship of those who hold different worldviews; our territory expands, our vision extends, our minds open up to new possibilities. We are freed from the shackles of dogma and can observe our similarities as human beings, traveling together- perhaps from different vehicles and on different roads, but each of us together- drawn towards our own pilgrimage. Labels force separateness and may cause unnecessary suffering. Anyone who loves nature, trees and lives peacefully is 'practicing' well and personally, I shall like to learn from such practices!
    Chas Wyatt
    17/09/2016 #6 Chas Wyatt
    The term 'Witch' has a lot of baggage and a cultural history of negative connotation. Often, the image of the wicked witch of the East melting in the movie "The Wizard of Oz" comes to mind, even though Wanda, the good witch of the West also has a prominent role in the movie. The terms, 'wizard', 'sorcerer', 'shaman', or 'brujo', don't seem to carry the same negative connotations as the term 'witch' does in our culture. Part of it is sexist, part of it is religious bigotry and part of it is the negative imprint from history. Often people in a Judeo-Christian mind-set believe that other cultures are worshiping nature, when in fact they are worshiping the creator through the creation- a totally different perception. Back in the 70's I had a friend that had a strepped throat and as she was walking downtown she ran across a woman and was having a hard time talking to her and explained her condition to her; the woman said she was a witch and placed her hand on her throat and the sore throat and swelling immediately dissappeared. Perhaps if the term 'healer' were used, the negative connotations of a 'witch' putting her hand on my friend's throat wouldn't come to mind. But, the woman she ran across was the real deal, not someone just wearing the label, like many people who claim to be 'psychic' but, are just using it as a ploy to make a buck.
    Dean Owen
    17/09/2016 #5 Dean Owen
    Fascinating. I have never met a witch before (or maybe I have but just don't know it). Virginia sounds like the real deal in that she most likely believes as opposed to an expression of individualism and following an eclectic and perhaps trending theme.
    CityVP Manjit
    17/09/2016 #2 CityVP Manjit
    First of all I would like to thank @Aurorasa Sima for bringing me your way. This is a brilliant account of a way of life that would otherwise pass me by. What is most important in this account is Virginia. You spent time with the uniqueness of one being but also offered the meaning of diversity and I welcome both. You have so honoured your friend that your relationship with her is not found in friendship, it is as natural as the universe.

    No matter what faith system we examine, we can find beautiful people within them all. We are not expansive enough or may have sufficient mental bandwidth to capture the full diversity. What you have expressed here is the true meaning of diversity and you have expressed this at a supernal level. I will never know who Virginia is, but you get me racing towards her for such is the power of your expression and storytelling.

    I walk away with an appreciation for Virginia, an expansion of my insight that brought Wicca into view and you touched the soul of essence, whereas what usually makes faith problematic is where the symbol has been lost and replaced by hardened arteries. Virginia is original source, these people are rare and unique. A single life can be studied for itself and not be fully comprehended in a lifetime of study and yet in this world diversity is about going beyond that life and the ways that emanate from diversity. You have taken me fully into this world as if I had always been there and that is why cite this as brilliant. Absolutely brilliant !
    Paul Kemner
    17/09/2016 #1 Paul Kemner
    There are apparently many types of witchcraft, and many don't have anything to do with Wicca. Kitchen Witchery, Stregheria (Italian) , Celtic, ancient Greek- I think I've seen at least 20. There is even a Christian Witchcraft tradition (possibly connecting with Braucherei tradition in America. Most don't seem to involve a coven structure.
  16. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    17/09/2016
    'Jesus Hasn't Saved Us': The Young Black Women Returning to Ancestral Religions (link)
    'Jesus Hasn't Saved Us': The Young Black Women Returning to Ancestral Religions (link)(by Yomi Adegoke)Christianity still exerts a powerful force in many black communities, but some young women are turning their back on the faith and returning to the older, traditional religions of their ancestors. Michelle Yaa does not feel she...
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  17. ProducerSushmita Thakare Jain
    Celebration of Ganesha!
    Celebration of Ganesha!The most visited Large Community Celebration in Mumbai known as Lalbaugh cha Raja i.e. the King of Lalbaugh (Lalbaugh is a locality in Mumbai)Ganesh Chaturthi is the Hindu festival celebrated in honour of the elephant-headed god, Ganesha.But before...
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    Comments

    Sushmita Thakare Jain
    06/09/2016 #6 Sushmita Thakare Jain
    #5 @Augusto Santos glad you liked it! Thanks for sharing your views.
    Augusto Santos
    06/09/2016 #5 Augusto Santos
    It's very good learn about Ganesh Chaturthi and know about your experience on his celebration. Thanks for sharing @Sushmita Thakare Jain
    Sushmita Thakare Jain
    05/09/2016 #4 Sushmita Thakare Jain
    #2 @Dean Owen glad you like the post!
    Sushmita Thakare Jain
    05/09/2016 #3 Sushmita Thakare Jain
    #1 @CityVP Manjit thanks for sharing!
    Dean Owen
    05/09/2016 #2 Dean Owen
    Thanks for sharing Ganesh Chaturthi. Now I am more at rest with increasingly large belly! Lovely buzz.
    CityVP Manjit
    05/09/2016 #1 CityVP Manjit
    I once communicated through my Emeri Gent account with an Indian who impressed me very much, this gentleman's name was Devdutt Pattanaik. He communicated aspects of hinduism in a way that I found absorbing and thoughtful and his chief interest was a practical understanding of mythology.

    A Youtube account by Epified covers Devdutt's 7 Secrets from Hindu Calendar Art, which they have split into 10 video's. It is a fascinating account. When I marry how Devdutt presents this information with how Joseph Campbell talks about the power of myth http://billmoyers.com/content/ep-1-joseph-campbell-and-the-power-of-myth-the-hero%e2%80%99s-adventure-audio/ it takes me understanding from belief to meaning.

    There are powerful meanings to these symbols, just as Adi Shankara has pointed to the different symbolic facets of Ganesha. I then couple all this meaning with what hinduism was when it was many streams of spiritual belief before the impact of the British on making order out of the rich diversity that emanated from the Veda's and other ancient Sanskrit writings.

    It is the work of British archeologists that rediscovered the lost history of Ashoka Maurya - but I prefer the lack of coherence before the British started to first categorize religious belief and secondly start drawing artificial boundaries to separate nations. When I look back before the British involvement in India, there is a rich spirituality that is far greater and much more diverse than what we know of hinduism today. http://www.e-ir.info/2012/11/26/the-impact-of-european-colonialism-on-the-indian-caste-system/

    Through the interference of the British who still cannot deal in larger abstractions, symbols became more concrete in interpretation, rather than a wellspring of deep meanings, and as we move into the knowledge age and beyond, British sense of order is not what we require - instead we need to rediscover what was lost before the British cast their Industrial age design on all.
  18. ProducerSarah Elkins

    Sarah Elkins

    31/08/2016
    Tolerance Isn't Nearly Enough
    Tolerance Isn't Nearly EnoughThis post was originally published on LinkedIn in March, 2015. It's being re-posted here on beBee as a complementary post to Kevin Pashuk's thought-provoking piece, Ponderings on Tolerance.In December of 2013 I broke my record. I gave my annual...
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    Comments

    Sarah Elkins
    02/09/2016 #14 Sarah Elkins
    #11 @Dean Owen, that is so interesting! I had no idea there is a Jewish quarter in Shanghai. Now I really want to visit there, even more. My family isn't religious, we're more secular in our celebrations. Each boy had a Bar Mitzvah because I love the tradition and find incredible value in the process itself. Both of our boys sang beautifully from the Torah, read their portion, and wrote and presented a speech about it. Because we live in a small Montana town, there's no synagogue, so I taught our boys to read Hebrew and sing the prayers they would need to know for the event. It was an amazing year spent bonding with each of them. I think that story needs to be told, too...
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    01/09/2016 #13 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    A beautiful message sent regarding awareness and acceptance. Tolerance, IMHO is a "maybe" word.
    Aurorasa Sima
    01/09/2016 #12 Aurorasa Sima
    A beautiful call for more openness and acceptance. I´ll share this to my empowerment hive.
    Dean Owen
    01/09/2016 #11 Dean Owen
    I love the message you outlay here. I remember my parents discussing my Bar Mitzvah. My brother had been on a Kibbutz and had his Bar Mitzvah, but I think it was all done out of respect for my grandmother (A Polish Jew) who was still living at the time. My parents were not religious. My grandmother passing was the last Jewish event I experienced, with the Shiva. I never had a Bar Mitzvah. Now in Asia we tend to celebrate all religious holidays. I guess you could call it hedging our bets? In Shanghai I often visit what was known as the Jewish Quarter and it feels like a walk through my heritage. Your article also reminded me of Friends, The One with the Holiday Armadillo!
    Sarah Elkins
    01/09/2016 #10 Sarah Elkins
    #8 I re-read your comment here a couple of times, Phil, it was that good. I know you're right about the numbers (or lack of numbers) contributing greatly to a perceived sense of challenge or threat. At some point I hope that our global economy and community will understand that to build one person up doesn't mean someone else has to fall. I love your daughter without ever having met her. Our older son has similar "color blindness" in that he doesn't seem to associate any kind of value judgment with any physical characteristic. He was about 4 when we were walking down Clement Street in San Francisco. He saw a kid walking on the other side of the street and said "that kid looks just like Ewan!" I was so puzzled, Phil. Ewan was tall, and is as fair as can be, with blond hair, of Scottish & English descent. The kid Jacob pointed to was smaller in stature -- and very dark brown skin. I asked him why he thought the kid looked like Ewan, and without hesitation he said: "I don't know, just the way he walks and his face, I guess."

    Thanks so much for this great comment. Really thoughtful and insightful.
    Phil Friedman
    01/09/2016 #9 Phil Friedman
    I agree with you, Sarah, that tolerance is not, in itself, sufficient. But believe, as well, it important to understand that "tolerance", even where and when it exists, is fragile. Tolerance way too often depends on numbers and the feeling of security, or lack thereof that numbers engender. For example, you can take a small predominantly white town and introduce a couple of black families, who will be tolerated and even accepted fully into white circles of the town. And without any sub rosa current of racial discrimination. But bring more black families into that same town, to the point that the black minority becomes a significant minority with the ability (repeat ability) to challenge the white majority for political and economic power -- and you will almost always, I submit, see the racial prejudice generate almost spontaneously. Tolerance is easy when we are not threatened. Much harder when we perceive a threat, social, economic, or religious -- whether that threat is real or imagined. cont. Pt II...
    Phil Friedman
    01/09/2016 #8 Phil Friedman
    @Sarah Elkins - pt.II

    I'd also point out that in my experience religious differences are always much more easily tolerated when those differences are reduced to ethnic gastronomy. There are plenty non-Jews, for example, who love a good hot corned beef on seeded Jewish rye or lox on a bagel, and so tolerate (and patronize) the restaurants and the owners of those restaurants. But who show genuine consternation if groups of in-your-face Hasidic Jews move into their neighborhood. And vice versa.

    I don't know if you and @Kevin Pashuk will agree, but I personally believe that we will not achieve genuine tolerance until the need for tolerance disappears. Not because we have all been melted into one pot, but because we have come actually to not notice the racial, ethnic, and religious differences between us. I like to think of the evening I sat with my family, and my older daughter was telling us about something that happened among her group of friends. She spoke of one of the boys doing something particular noteworthy, but I could not pick out in my mind who he was. My daughter tried several times to describe to me who he was, to no avail. Then finally it dawned and I said, "Oh, you mean the black kid who hangs with you guys?" And she said yes. I asked her why she didn't just say that in the first place. Her answer was not that she thought it inappropriate, but that she just never thought to. Thanks for a good read.
    Sarah Elkins
    01/09/2016 #7 Sarah Elkins
    #3 Thanks, @Kevin Pashuk, I really appreciate this comment. Sensing & feeling words can be interpreted in so many ways, who really knows which is the right one to use when it comes to perception and feeling? I guess that's why we write, to clarify our thoughts so we understand them and in the hope that others will as well.
    debasish majumder
    31/08/2016 #6 debasish majumder
    men born with ignorance. it the human knowledge which make them numb, disastrous, and vindictive by willful ignorance being crafted with the coating of distorted knowledge, resulting them to become intolerant. nice Sarah @Sarah Elkins View more
    men born with ignorance. it the human knowledge which make them numb, disastrous, and vindictive by willful ignorance being crafted with the coating of distorted knowledge, resulting them to become intolerant. nice Sarah @Sarah Elkins. enjoyed read. thank you for sharing the post. Close
    Kevin Pashuk
    31/08/2016 #5 Kevin Pashuk
    #4 Not quite sure how this is relevant to this post Gordon. While important, I'm sure there's a better place for it.
    Gordon Pye
    31/08/2016 #4 Gordon Pye
    I got electronically excommunicated from LinkedIn by a Wiseman Daries executive for attempting to reveal the truth on a fatal heavy goods vehicle accident. Explore my https://nollyprott.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/norman-bettinson-of-the-hillsborough-then-sowerby-bridge-disaster-cover-up/
    Kevin Pashuk
    31/08/2016 #3 Kevin Pashuk
    What a nice companion piece @Sarah Elkins... It shows that 'tolerance' shouldn't be our end goal if we want to be part of a healthy community. I really like how you (and your mom) took the initiative to create curiosity about the differences. If I knew how to include applause in my comment, I would do so. 👍👍
    Sarah Elkins
    31/08/2016 #2 Sarah Elkins
    #1 Thanks, @Don Kerr, I appreciate your comment & sharing.
    Don Kerr
    31/08/2016 #1 Don Kerr
    @Sarah Elkins "I share with them that tolerance is a good place to start, but it's not enough. Tolerance means you're okay with others, as long as they keep their differences out of your sight. What we need is to appreciate those differences and recognize the beauty and strength those differences bring to our world." Something we need to be mindful of as adults too! Lovely piece. Thanks for sharing and I will now share it too.
  19. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    23/08/2016
    Don’t Forget These 10 Rules When Placing Your Ganesha At Home Or Work (link)
    Don’t Forget These 10 Rules When Placing Your Ganesha At Home Or Work (link)By Matt CaronGanesh the Mighty Ganesha is one of the most important deities in Hinduism. His likeness is all over the east; many countries- not just India- have adopted his appearance and incorporated his motifs into their culture. After all,...
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  20. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    19/08/2016
    Pagan School Clubs? The Teacher Perspective (link)
    Pagan School Clubs? The Teacher Perspective (link)(by Terence P Ward) TWH –The Satanic Temple (TST) is once again in the news. This time they are working to establish After School Satan Clubs in schools that already have student groups which are organized by Christian ministries. TST’s mission is...
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  21. ProducerKevin Pashuk

    Kevin Pashuk

    15/08/2016
    I think about God too Jim Murray.
    I think about God too Jim Murray.This started out as a reply to Jim Murray's post I Think About God.  The comment ended up being way too long... so I'll post it in this format.It’s been said that to have a great conversation one must avoid 3 topics – sex, politics, and religion....
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    Comments

    Lisa Gallagher
    31/08/2016 #55 Lisa Gallagher
    @Kevin Pashuk, love the way you approached this topic. I don't care if someone is religious, believes in Aliens or is an Atheist. What matters is how they treat others. (Not sure why I added Aliens lol), just sounded fun for the sake of making a point. As I wrote on Dean's post, I'm agnostic, I question a LOT and I want to believe there is a heaven when we die. I want to believe there is a higher power that created our universe. It's just so hard to wrap my mind around something we've never seen or had proof of. But, I have to because it gives me hope that we have somewhere else waiting for our souls - some would call it our energy after we pass. I make a lot of mistakes but I want to think when I do I learn and grow from them. I hope my mistakes make me a better person because I really do try to be self-aware. We have a beautiful world right at our doorstep to enjoy. Many people to love and care for, that's an honor. Enjoyed your post.
    Aurorasa Sima
    16/08/2016 #54 Aurorasa Sima
    #49 You have a point there.
    Irene Hackett
    16/08/2016 #53 Anonymous
    #52 And I am also Christian.
    Kevin Pashuk
    16/08/2016 #52 Kevin Pashuk
    #51 Thanks for sharing that @Irene Hackett. You are now firmly entrenched on my list of beBee friends who are passionately curious. You would have to be to read the authors you have mentioned. :)
    Irene Hackett
    16/08/2016 #51 Anonymous
    #50 I honor your faith and am in deep respect. I've read the books you've mentioned and many more! C.S. Lewis writings in 'The problem of Evil' is superb. I have enjoyed Ravi Zacharias, even Lee Strobel offers much in support of faith.
    Kevin Pashuk
    16/08/2016 #50 Kevin Pashuk
    #48 Thanks @Irene Hackett. I meet many spiritual people who have faith and believe like you and @Jim Murray, that one should live with great values, seek peace, and that God is in our essence.

    Where we differ is that I have no trouble believing that there is a personal God who wants a relationship through his son Jesus. Many (even on this thread) may call that a fairy tale. I've approached this as one who seeks truth without prejudging what I might find. For me, my research and observations led me to where I am now. I am confident and content in my faith, and I honestly hope you are confident and content in yours. Really. (No sarcasm even hinted at)

    Books that were influential in my journey were Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis, and Orthodoxy, by G.K. Chesterton (who used to publicly debate the renowned atheists of the day including H.G. Wells and Bertrand Russel)
    Kevin Pashuk
    16/08/2016 #49 Kevin Pashuk
    #46 Thanks @Aurorasa Sima. For the sake of debate... Do you know tons of Christians, or Muslims, or Sihks, or Buddists who don't kill? There are many. There are a radical few from all faiths that get the headlines. There are also a lot of people who kill others. Ask my wife who is a parole/probation officer. It's hard to kill in the name of a god when you don't believe in one, which is why you don't hear of shooting in the name of atheism.

    From my limited perspective, atheism has the potential to become a religion too... This is evidenced by the vitriol against 'simple minded' people who choose to believe in a god by the likes of Mr. Richard Dawkins, or Bill Nye, formerly the 'Science Guy'.

    In order to have the freedom for each person to follow their faith, you have to give people the freedom to choose not to follow any faith... As I understand it, is a big part of 'free will' theology. (Another misunderstood concept)

    We all though, have to live in community.... Local, national and internationally. Our faith should enhance our contribution to the world, not destroy it.
    Irene Hackett
    16/08/2016 #48 Anonymous
    @Kevin Pashuk - I like how you organized this buzz - topical and yet to the heart of the matter. Clearly your life's purpose is founded in faith, and I can 'see' that in your writings. I have studied the Bible for years and love Jesus and his teachings. I have also studied Buddhism and dabbled in many other spiritual teachings. So far, what I've learned is that religion is man-made; God is our essence. I've just always been of the belief that there is something much larger going on here and I want to be connected to that 'something' for it takes me to "the mountain that is higher than I". Peace.
    Aurorasa Sima
    16/08/2016 #46 Aurorasa Sima
    Did Gandhi say that? Well, that´s pretty cool. I agree that there is a vast difference between god and religion. Or better: believing and religion. One thing is for sure: IF someone awaits you at the end of days you will be measured on your deeds and crimes - not how often you went to church. I´m nearly amused by people who believe they call themselves "Christian" or "Muslim", commit hate crimes and will be received with applause. One observation: I know tons of atheists. None of them are violent or have radical beliefs.
    Kevin Pashuk
    16/08/2016 #45 Kevin Pashuk
    #39 Interestingly enough @Jim Murray, we are in agreement on that. I'm not a big fan of religion, and as I read the bible, it would appear Jesus wasn't either. There is a lot I know we will agree to disagree with each other, but die defending the right of each other to have those beliefs. If you've done nothing else with your initial post, you've shown that people on beBee can actually have a dialogue about a potentially volatile issue.
    Kevin Pashuk
    16/08/2016 #44 Kevin Pashuk
    #38 Thanks @Donna-Luisa Eversley. This post is indeed showing off how people of vastly different beliefs can have an intelligent conversation. Your faith in Jesus is part of who you are, and obviously influences your worldview, and that's a good thing. Thanks for adding your comments.
    Kevin Pashuk
    16/08/2016 #43 Kevin Pashuk
    #35 Thanks @Pamela L. Williams. That's the story that highlights the teaching that wealth itself is not bad, but hoarding it without helping others doesn't fit in with what Jesus taught. I did chuckle at your joke however.
    Kevin Pashuk
    16/08/2016 #42 Kevin Pashuk
    #34 Thanks for weighing in @Jim Cody. That is indeed an interesting thought to ponder. What would the world look like if there was no one who had faith in a higher being. There are a large number of good things that happen in the world currently because people (of all faiths) are motivated by their faith to help others. I will state that one doesn't have to have a faith background to do good things, but I certainly meet a number of people who do.
    Kevin Pashuk
    16/08/2016 #41 Kevin Pashuk
    #33 There may not be a correct answer for you @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, but I certainly want to hold out hope that if I'm genuinely curious, then my curiosity will be rewarded. To me, there is no downside for my current belief system. (see Pascal's wager above). Thanks for commenting.
    Kevin Pashuk
    16/08/2016 #40 Kevin Pashuk
    #32 Thanks for adding to the discussion Rick
    Jim Murray
    16/08/2016 #39 Jim Murray
    The net net for me here is that there is a fundamental difference between being religious and having faith. I have oodles of faith. Religion, not so much.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    16/08/2016 #38 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    Wow @Kevin Pashuk, I've got a totally off the wall observation to start with... I saw a teenie weenie weenie on your header, and then went stratight to the comments and wow, this post is amazing. I'd like a beer on @Phil Friedman's tab, even though I'm nor crazy upset over this post - just the opposite! The United Nations could take a page off these responses from all corners of the earth with a hearty respectful conversation ongoing! @Jim Murray sure has a way with opening a dance floor!
    So getting serious, loved your points and in agreement Kevin. I wear my love for my Jesus on my sleeve, but religion gives me a headache if I think about it. Though I wish everyone would know Jesus Christ our savior as I do, I think this is personal, how we choose our beliefs. What I do know is if we can love our fellow man and even follow the commandments, we would probably have a very happy world. Just my two cents, and I'm hoping to sip a beer sometime! Don't waste it on haters, share with those who appreciate good dark beer!
    Pamela L. Williams
    16/08/2016 #37 Pamela L. Williams
    I just want to say: This is a wonderful dialog and an example on how such a discussion should occur. Respectfully.
    Pamela L. Williams
    16/08/2016 #36 Pamela L. Williams
    #26 LMBO Phil! That's too perfect!
    Pamela L. Williams
    16/08/2016 #35 Pamela L. Williams
    Bravo! Kevin! You spoke for both of us. My favorite Jesus story is this; A man came to him asking how he could enter heaven. Jesus said; Go and give all you have to the poor. The man having great means walked away. (this is paraphrased of course). I guess he was a Conservative :-) Just a joke, had to say it.
  22. ProducerJim Murray

    Jim Murray

    14/08/2016
    I Think About God
    I Think About GodOne of my favourite fictional characters is a guy named Virgil Flowers who is an agent for the Criminal Apprehension Bureau of Minnesota. He is the main character in a series of novels by John Sandford, one of the authors I have been reading...
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    Comments

    Dale Masters
    09/09/2016 #40 Dale Masters
    I find it fascinating that physicists have come to the conclusion (kicking and screaming, but reached the conclusion, nonetheless) that the Universe itself possesses Consciousness (with a capital C , because the Universe is HUGE). Maxwell's equations show it. Quantum entanglement shows it. The study of subatomic particles is even influenced by the act of observing, leading me to the conclusion that the Universe itself must be alive after a fashion.

    Though I am a Christian, I would NEVER bully someone to "accept Christ" (what an oxymoron that idea is!). In today's world, especially in Western society, there are few people who have not heard the Gospel, and we are to share it, not use it as a club to beat people with.
    I had a VERY unusual experience, which I will write about, as soon as I can find the words for it. Because of it (and because the answers to my questions have now been proven to be correct), I am FORCED to acknowledge that there is indeed a God---not that I need to be forced. To me, it is just one of those inescapable facts, like the Sun rising every morning.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    31/08/2016 #38 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #37 Glad you didn't say ''trippin'' My Lord! :) And equally glad you dinna suffix a "nowhere" to your wishes! ;)
    Kevin Pashuk
    31/08/2016 #37 Kevin Pashuk
    #36 Wishing you the best @Praveen Raj Gullepalli on your 'road trip'.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    31/08/2016 #36 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Not too many years ago I heard a song by Joan Osborne called - One of us - (What if God was one of us...). I thought to myself Nice thought indeed! But what if God was actually every one of us (and everything) as has been said by many over the ages? If that were true and if I believed in it, then I would love you as much as I would love anyone else, without exception! Then that beautiful definition of God by one of the greatest messiahs - God is Love, would be so spot on! The logical chapters in any book of Love would then have to be: Compassion, Non-attachment, Tolerance, Forgiveness, Mercy, Selflessness, Kindness, Sacrifice...? So telling myself we are all the same, but at different levels of / degrees of separation and preparation, I started focusing on the G word less and ''understanding'' more. The paths to attainment are many they say: Total Devotion (to a Faith, but with tolerance for other belief systems), Selfless Action, Scholarly Study (Knowledge & Learning), Calisthenics/Yoga & Meditation. Am still deploying a bit of each of these four ;) Still on the Road...
    Lisa Gallagher
    31/08/2016 #35 Lisa Gallagher
    Enjoyed the "Think about God series from you @Jim Murray, @Dean Owen and @Kevin Pashuk. I love how you referred to your mom as a 'cutie.' My husband was raised a Roman Catholic too, and I thought he would have no problem attending church with me and the kids. I felt it was my duty to take them to church as a 'good mom,' at some point they protested big time and questioned God's existence. I remember asking my husband why he wouldn't go to Church with us. He told me he ate, slept and drank religion for years and couldn't stomach it in his adult life. He said, God is always with me in my heart, it's personal and I don't need to go to church to have a relationship with God. I live my life in accordance- meaning, to be a good person, not a religious person. I told my kids I gave them the tools but would never push beliefs on them. My kids realized it was up to them if they chose to go to Church or not. I wanted them to be free thinkers. I love what you wrote here, "If we could only learn to see clearly how much alike we are. If we could only learn to ignore the meaningless differences and get on with living this miracle as part of one God, which is all we really are, who knows how far that could take us." I couldn't agree more! Good convo guys! Well written, Jim.
    Jim Murray
    16/08/2016 #34 Jim Murray
    #31 Anything is possible Jesse Kaelis...there are a lot of people in the world who are pretty damn evil and yet claim to be gods.
    jesse kaellis
    16/08/2016 #32 jesse kaellis
    Addendum, I think about God every day many times a day. To what avail, I don't know. But it's there for rumination. Jews write this:​ G-d out of respect. I don't on a board like this because people won't understand.
    Christianity didn't emerge out of nowhere. Jesus was a Jew, a Jew, and an observant Jew. Not the anti-Jew that many Christians postulate.
    jesse kaellis
    16/08/2016 #31 jesse kaellis
    God + politics = religion. 'Sapiens' is an excellent book and the author says that the only reasonable explanation for the state of the world is that God is evil. But nobody ever had the stomach for that. Or something like that. I laughed out loud, ​and I kept laughing.
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23692271-sapiens
    Jim Murray
    15/08/2016 #30 Jim Murray
    #24 @Kevin Pashuk I did, and I commented. Since I am obviously more disciplined than you I manged to not have my comment turn into a post. :)
    Jim Murray
    15/08/2016 #29 Jim Murray
    #28 @Phil Friedman Yes, you have seen this, Maybe linked from my WordPress site to LI. I'm in the process of bringing all my relevant posts over here. It will take a couple of years, because I like writing new stuff too. Thanks for the compliment.
    Phil Friedman
    15/08/2016 #28 Phil Friedman
    @Jim Murray, I think I've seen this piece of yours before, perhaps on LinkedIn. It is by far and away one of the best of yours that I've read. Indeed, it is one of the best blog posts I've ever read, replete with authentic angst, humor, whimsy, and, yes, even a kernel of wisdom. Of course, part of my reaction is that I agree with you about "that f#@king Flowers" -- as he is known to his bosses and buddies in the BCI -- being perhaps the greatest character in police fiction. Much more three-dimensional than his boss and predecessor, Lucas Davenport, in the line of novels by John Sandford. But I have to point out that you omitted an important fact about Virgil Flowers, which is that he is a minister's son, and is perpetually roasting on the spit of his own fall from grace. Who says popular literature is bereft of nuance and depth?
    Brian McKenzie
    15/08/2016 #27 Brian McKenzie
    I in no way claim to have the answers, nor do I believe "finding" them would change the origin nor end of the world.
    Kevin Pashuk
    15/08/2016 #26 Kevin Pashuk
    #25 This would also be a good comment on my comment that became a post (see below) @Brian McKenzie.. and why I can believe differently than you and we can still be friends.
    Brian McKenzie
    15/08/2016 #25 Brian McKenzie
    I dont like nor agree with church, don't get all SWJ offended - my aversion crosses all denominations. As for God, meh - my thoughts would neither validate nor negate - so I don't bother, because if I do; then I have to wrestle with the notions that the all present, all powerful, all knowing Creator ~ wants, enables, encourages and perpetuates war, genocide, murder, illnesses and of course 'accidents' are now out the window. so if He/She/It knows the outcome, why bother with the distraction of playing it out? I honestly think mankind created God because they cant cope with there is not grand design for all the mayhem & chaos; life is all buggared so you buy into (or are frightened / goaded / trained) into an after-life of "Just" rewards & punishments. brought to you by an Anarchist, Athiest ~ cheers.
    Kevin Pashuk
    15/08/2016 #24 Kevin Pashuk
    I tried to write a short comment @Jim Murray, I really did! ... but it ended up turning into a post. Check it out at https://www.bebee.com/producer/@kevin-pashuk/i-think-about-god-too-jim-murray
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    15/08/2016 #23 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    I think about God a lot, and pray and believe that he is not religious as the world says, but real and true as only he can be. My faith has developed over time, and I know he made me in the substance of his image. He is my light and my salvation...
    Thank you for this awe inspiring post @Jim Murray..like that you keep it real
    Gerald Hecht
    15/08/2016 #22 Gerald Hecht
    #20 @Jim Murray The wonder of this Blackhawk helicopter trying to maneuver into the courtyard is unworldly, I think it's on tv; you could check wbrz.com I think there gonna go with a boat...did you ever hear of the fisherman who asked if he was impressed with Jesus walking on the sea to get the oar, and the disciple said: "I don't understand why he just didn't swim"
    Gerald Hecht
    15/08/2016 #21 Gerald Hecht
    #20 @Jim Murray yes, that is true; you are very gracious to remind us of the wonder of nature
    Jim Murray
    15/08/2016 #20 Jim Murray
    #1 @Gerald Hecht ...I don't presume to explain disasters, because this planet is subject to a million powerful forces. There is chaos. There is harmony. And there is everything in between.
    Jim Murray
    15/08/2016 #19 Jim Murray
    #6 Thanks Kevin. I'm hoping that all our discussion will remain that way...for the duration.
  23. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    31/07/2016
    Asherah, Part II: The serpent’s bride (link)
    Asherah, Part II: The serpent’s bride (link)(from the Queen of Heaven blog) "Is the world good, or bad? Who made us, and why? These are some of the questions ancient myths and religions attempt to answer.  And the answers matter. A belief in a goddess who is Mother Nature personified is...
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    Comments

    Paul Kemner
    01/08/2016 #6 Paul Kemner
    #4 I'm interested in what your project turns out to be, too. Ugarit isn't exactly a household name. ;)
    Pamela L. Williams
    31/07/2016 #5 Pamela L. Williams
    #4 Aha! So I was not the only one 'captured' by this essay! Looking forward to you sharing your research Chas.
    Chas Wyatt
    31/07/2016 #4 Chas Wyatt
    @Paul Kemner, fascinating- I was totally unaware of this figure, or her story. I went on to read the entire story in your link and delved into other sources, as well. I prefer the sound of the spelling of her name, Asherah, to the Akkadian of "Ashratum/Ashratu", the Hittite, "Asherdu or Ashertu or Aserdu or Asertu", or the Ugaritic goddess "Atirat". I clicked on your article because of the picture and the first few sentences correlated with a project I had started that was in its embryonic stage and you have given me the incentive to continue it. Thank you.
    Pamela L. Williams
    31/07/2016 #3 Pamela L. Williams
    #2 I definitely agree with the garbage-to-gold ratio. I've bookmarked that page so I can go back. Come to think of it; @Adam Read might be interested in this site. We've discussed similar topics. @Dean Owen, you might like this; fascinating stuff, and quite frankly it lends to some heated debates I and my brother had with my grandfather years ago.
    Paul Kemner
    31/07/2016 #2 Paul Kemner
    One of my historian friends is an expert on Ancient Near East religions, so occasionally I pick up some details. They tend to be very complex, and the different cultures interacted and influenced each other. It's hard to find quality information on ANE religions on the internet- there's a very high garbage-to-gold ratio.
    Pamela L. Williams
    31/07/2016 #1 Pamela L. Williams
    Fascinating!
  24. ProducerPaul Kemner

    Paul Kemner

    30/07/2016
    Orthodox Church warns that youth neo-paganism is a challenge for the future (link)
    Orthodox Church warns that youth neo-paganism is a challenge for the future (link)"Last winter, Vladimir Legoyda, head of the Department for Church relations with society and the media, complained about the rising popularity of neo-paganism in Russia. "We are witnessing the growth of neo-pagan sentiments among young...
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  25. ProducerSue Chien Lee

    Sue Chien Lee

    15/07/2016
    An open letter to Sara Jacobovici. “Be water, my friend!”
    An open letter to Sara Jacobovici. “Be water, my friend!”https://unsplash.com/@perottoDO YOU REMEMBER Bruce Lee's words? “Empty your mind! Be formless, shapeless, like water. If you put water into a cup, it becomes the cup. Put it into a bottle, it becomes the bottle. If you put into a teapot, it...
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    Comments

    Sue Chien Lee
    27/07/2016 #20 Sue Chien Lee
    #17 @Pamela L. Williams @Deb Helfrich and all true beBees, i would love to eat with you some day. Thank you for your kind words and support.
    Sue Chien Lee
    27/07/2016 #19 Sue Chien Lee
    #18 Dear @Mohammed A. Jawad, our lives are all the richer with you as our friend. Thank you once again for your sparkling poetry and generosity.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    27/07/2016 #18 Mohammed A. Jawad
    @Sue Chien Lee How well you have disclosed about yourself and your perceptions. We are what we are, and ain't all human beings citizens of this little world in the vastness of this voluminous Universe. May the Almighty Lord bless you for your subtle thoughts and expressions.
    Pamela L. Williams
    27/07/2016 #17 Pamela L. Williams
    Beautifully written, beautiful thoughts, like water, de. I saved this into my favorites until I had the opportunity to read and I am so glad I chose to set aside today to go back and read all that I had saved.
    Deb Helfrich
    15/07/2016 #16 Deb Helfrich
    What a fabulous introduction to the marvelous river you are @Sue Chien Lee. I hope a lot of bee's find this buzz!
    Sue Chien Lee
    15/07/2016 #15 Sue Chien Lee
    #13 so sweet @Erroll -EL- Warner. Happy Friday!
    Sue Chien Lee
    15/07/2016 #14 Sue Chien Lee
    #12 and my deepest respect to you my friend @Amour Setter 😃
    Erroll -EL- Warner
    15/07/2016 #13 Erroll -EL- Warner
    Ha!, Ha!. Sue so great. A real good presentation.
    Amour Setter
    15/07/2016 #12 Amour Setter
    @Sue Chien Lee I am deeply touched and honored to have been mentioned in your beautiful blog! It is such a well-written piece that speaks straight to the heart and soul. It is like a dance and a wonderful meal all rolled into one. I look forward to meeting you in the flesh next time I am in BCN, which is hopefully very, very soon. Deep respect and gratitude to you my friend. X
    Sue Chien Lee
    15/07/2016 #11 Sue Chien Lee
    I meant to include @Amour Setter @Kim Wheeler (as mentioned herein) and all beBees a lovely Friday. #LWAP #LLAP
    Sue Chien Lee
    15/07/2016 #10 Sue Chien Lee
    #3 Dear @Sara Jacobovici, time waits for all who truly want to savor life ; )
    Mamen Delgado
    15/07/2016 #9 Mamen Delgado
    #8 A tapear!!! Yes please!! 😂
    Sue Chien Lee
    15/07/2016 #8 Sue Chien Lee
    #5 Dear @Mamen Delgado -- I am so happy to have met you on beBee, and would be far happier meeting you in person one day! A tapear ; )
    Sue Chien Lee
    15/07/2016 #7 Sue Chien Lee
    #4 @Laurent BOSCHERINI thank you for your kind words. Brilliant, no. Curious, yes!
    Sue Chien Lee
    15/07/2016 #6 Sue Chien Lee
    #1 @marcelo leiva, es cierto lo que has dicho. También esa practica no lleva a sitios fuera de nuestro "comfort zone", y así llegamos a conocer y apreciar las cualidades de mucha más gente fuera de nuestro entorno.
    Mamen Delgado
    15/07/2016 #5 Mamen Delgado
    Such a beautiful and powerful post @Sue Chien Lee... Love the way you wrote it, and love the Wu-wei filosophy I didn't know. Thanks so much for all this information, beautiful Sue.
    Laurent Boscherini
    15/07/2016 #4 Anonymous
    Think you @Sue Chien Lee for sharing your consistent and beautiful post, so deeply rooted by and in your personality. I met out social plateform and I confirm your mind is exactly as your writing so brilliant.
    Sara Jacobovici
    15/07/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    Dear @Sue Chien Lee, your letter is a gift which I treasure. I would love to go through it and give it the time your insightful and inspiring words, thoughts and concepts deserve. I can't promise I will be able to produce as quickly as you, but I will enjoy responding. Thank you Sue.
    Sara Jacobovici
    15/07/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 True, but worth the effort.
    marcelo leiva
    15/07/2016 #1 marcelo leiva
    igual no todos pueden andar asi ..se requiere prctica y conocimiento
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