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Invisible illness mental health - beBee

Invisible illness mental health

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  1. ProducerLeckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    04/09/2016
    Distraction isn't curiosity
    Distraction isn't curiosity"Squirrel" Many of us are familiar and have quoted this line from the movie Up, which Dug was predisposed to say. We call it distraction. Is it really dissociation?Let me share a story with you. A few years ago when I was still a carpenter, we had a...
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  2. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    05/08/2016
    PTSD effects more than just us responders. This video with TRE creator David Berceli was shot with responders in mind. Feel free to pass it on to any police, firefighters, dispatchers, paramedics, and EMTs you know or their organizations. The percentages of those with PTSD is high, and people are taking their lives because of it.
    Leckey Harrison Firefighter & EMT teaches TRE to EMT Professionals
    Leckey Harrison Firefighter & EMT teaches TRE to EMT Professionals Leckey is a firefighter and EMT. He talks about his experience with TRE and why he thinks it would be helpful to introduce it to Emergency Medical...
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    07/08/2016 #9 Leckey Harrison
    #8 I was 58+ in that video.
    Lisa Gallagher
    06/08/2016 #8 Lisa Gallagher
    #7 Interesting to say the least. And wow, you do NOT look close to 60. I would have guessed you're 40 something, seriously.
    Leckey Harrison
    05/08/2016 #7 Leckey Harrison
    #6 krav maga is Hebrew for contact combat, essentially hand to hand. In our school a great workout aside from learning the manual and psychological techniques. I know it seems juxtaposed to what I do. It's not too unlike shaolin Kung fu for Buhhist monks to me. Excellent awareness training, great workout (especially for me at 60 years), and the instilled skills to know if I can't run or avoid, then I have a better chance of surviving. Our fatigue drills prepared me for the climb up Pilchuk.
    Lisa Gallagher
    05/08/2016 #6 Lisa Gallagher
    #5 This helps me to understand better @Leckey Harrison. What you described with regards to your response(s) you've experienced are the same or similar to mine. I too, hide it well. You mentioned butterflies.... oh wow, can I relate. I wake up with them and go to bed with them. I describe it as if I'm shaking from the inside out, muscles are tense all day, I get dizzy off and on, yes- anger increased (internally) rare I show it and finally, feel so drained before the day is over. This gives me hope knowing you have experienced much of what people do with anxiety disease or PTSD, knowing that TRE has helped tremendously. What is Krav maga? I haven't heard that one before? Thanks for sharing Leckey!
    Leckey Harrison
    05/08/2016 #5 Leckey Harrison
    #1 If by "an event is triggered" you mean a stressful event in real time, I feel my SNS activate. These days that allows me the choice to determine if it's a valid response. It is somewhat the same if I "get" triggered by an external event that touches on something still unreleased in the body. The response time is longer usually because it's in the healing process. What I feel in my body is the heightened level of adrenaline which is easy to feel, and the anxiety that goes with it, which is similar to "butterflies" in the stomach type of feeling. There is a spike of glucose which I feel in the body as readiness and wanting to move. The emotional response is different though since I've started doing TRE. I am more present to awareness, and so notice the nature of the event: is this translated as "fight," and the attendant type of emotions along the spectrum of anger. If I feel trapped at all (good indicator of past superstructures), I might feel fear spectrum emotions. Mostly though if the situation doesn't warrant "danger" per se, I can take a deep breath, and then my curiosity comes on line and it's to to engage and learn. NEW PARAGRAPH Yes, I experienced anxiety FAR more pre-TRE and at much higher levels. regularly. I hid it really well, but it was there. I also still use TRE after my krav maga classes to shake out physical tension, and to promote healing.
    Leckey Harrison
    05/08/2016 #4 Leckey Harrison
    #1 Thanks, Lisa!
    Dr. Allen Brown
    05/08/2016 #3 Anonymous
    Great article. very important!
    Lisa Gallagher
    05/08/2016 #2 Lisa Gallagher
    Great explanation on why TRE works so well for PTSD by someone's who's been there @Leckey Harrison
    Lisa Gallagher
    05/08/2016 #1 Lisa Gallagher
    Thank you for sharing this @Leckey Harrison. It's always great to see a person and hear their voice after we get to know them. Now, on to your message- Can I ask what happens to your body when an event is triggered? Also, before you began using TRE did you experience anxiety more than not? I love the idea that your muscles feel more relaxed too after doing a work out and TRE! This is very promising and sharing this. Thank you for your service too. You are one of the hero's @Dr. Allen Brown mentioned on his post last eve.
  3. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    29/07/2016
    Come join as as we look at the relationship between stress and illness. Better yet, we'll teach you the body's natural tool to release it. Learn the revolutionary method that's a couple hundred thousand years old!
    Leckey Harrison
    Release stress and heal with TRE®
    www.eventbrite.com Sixty to eighty percent of visits to physicians are for ailments whose root cause is stress, but three out of four physicians feel unqualified to advise their patients about how to relieve it. Even if they knew how, doctors couldn't relieve your...
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    Comments

    Deb Helfrich
    29/07/2016 #2 Deb Helfrich
    I can highly recommend checking out @Leckey Harrison's TRE workshop. Just visiting his website has had a profound effect on me.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    29/07/2016 #1 Mohammed A. Jawad
    When we learn to persevere and be content, then it becomes easier to dispel stress through diverse, simple exercises.
  4. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    21/07/2016
    I used TRE on my PTSD. Here's another story from a colleague in Madison, WI.
    Leckey Harrison
    Rise Above Adversity and Stress by Learning a New Tool
    unleashyourpractice.com
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  5. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    20/07/2016
    A good little primer on the tool I teach by the man who taught me, and created it.
    Leckey Harrison
    Trauma Release Exercises
    whattherapy.com Interview with founder of Trauma Release Exercises, a revolutionary way to let go of tension from known and unknown stresses and...
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  6. ProducerLeckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    18/07/2016
    A man that matched the mountain
    A man that matched the mountainThis is me and my sons hamming on the peak of Mt. Pilchuk yesterday. The trip was all about making a plan, then starting on it. Taking corrective actions as needed, and adapting. The goal was to get to, ascend and descend Mt. Pilchuk, and come home....
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    26/07/2016 #12 Leckey Harrison
    #10 You're welcome, and most assuredly we can talk.
    Lisa Gallagher
    26/07/2016 #11 Lisa Gallagher
    #9 Thanks @Deb Helfrich, would love to chat with you again!
    Lisa Gallagher
    26/07/2016 #10 Lisa Gallagher
    #8 Thanks so much @Leckey Harrison, I will look at the website first and if I have questions maybe we can talk? Appreciate!!
    Deb Helfrich
    26/07/2016 #9 Deb Helfrich
    #7 There is a ton of great stuff on their website., @Lisa Gallagher I have been captivated the last couple days with the implications of re-installing the 'tremor' mechanisms that we were meant to employ to deal with aftermath of a flood of hormones and neurotransmitters when a stressful situation dissipates.
    Leckey Harrison
    26/07/2016 #8 Leckey Harrison
    Hi Lisa,

    I would steer you to our website at https://RaiseYourResilience.com, and take your time learning and possibly developing other questions. Then we can talk via the phone or Zoom, and you can decide from there what you'd like to do. If you prefer, you can skip the website and we can talk directly. I allow you the choice, just let me know.

    Leckey
    Lisa Gallagher
    26/07/2016 #7 Lisa Gallagher
    #6 @Leckey Harrison, would love to hear more about your treatment. I remember reading about it on Linkedin but my memory is not that great after reading so much. I think we can all learn from each other and some modalities of treatment work better for others as well!
    Leckey Harrison
    26/07/2016 #6 Leckey Harrison
    #1 Thanks, Lisa! Yea, I got that shaking, but I know what that is, as I teach people how to self-induce it without having to climb a mountain, and, relative to a different reason. Now my one son is all eager to do it again, and my knees are still recuperating!
    Leckey Harrison
    26/07/2016 #5 Leckey Harrison
    #3 Thank you, Sarah!
    Deb Helfrich
    26/07/2016 #4 Deb Helfrich
    It is the same contradiction, @Sarah Elkins, that means that I found this post a week too late and at just the right time. Shoot, I am confronting a set of different but equivalent patterns just thinking about a drive across the water to meet-up with @Leckey Harrison.

    I have a bit of a helper pattern, but thinking it through it is my control patterning that is causing me aches and pains galore. I also notice that perhaps my career as a payroll software consultant further ingrained this feeling that something cannot be a "go" unless it has been rigorously planned, tested, contingencies outlined, backups secured, and hundreds of taxing localities voluminous regulations satisfied.

    I have hit this place were everything seems monumental, necessitating a byzantinely complex set of maneuvers. Even the way I approached writing that sentence is showing me the gyrations that I have let become my default operating procedure over these last few months.

    And yet, I know the 'summit' of England is exactly where my next chapter requires me to be. I decided. We decided. I am going to have to surrender to a simpler way of doing. Step, stop, step.

    OK, @Gary Sharpe?
    Sarah Elkins
    26/07/2016 #3 Sarah Elkins
    Awesome, @Leckey Harrison. Really a huge leap for you to take, and you took it one step at a time. I know that sounds like a contradiction, and it would be if we were talking about the physical challenge you faced. But in this case, it's exactly right, one step at a time gets you there. Great story with great lessons.
    mohammed khalaf
    18/07/2016 #2 mohammed khalaf
    We are inundated daily with a myriad of "news worthy" stories that pull us in this direction and that direction. Often it is almost impossible to get to the essence of any particular subject as we see challenges, specially when challenge the mountains.
    Lisa Gallagher
    18/07/2016 #1 Lisa Gallagher
    Wow @Leckey Harrison, I'm so happy for you! As someone who experiences are similar I was able to feel what you so visually described. My husband and I did a climb up a mountain in Maine and .5 miles up I sat down, I was shaking and had tears while saying I didnt think I could complete the other half of our climb to the top. After self talk, encouragement from my husband, I did it! I'm so glad you were able to ask for help and had this special time with your sons!
  7. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    04/07/2016
    I share this because I think as a society, if we want to really start changing the health of this planet's inhabitants, we start looking at trauma first. Congrats to my colleague Dr. Melanie Salmon.
    Leckey Harrison
    TRE® CASE STUDY: HOW OFTEN IS BIPOLAR MISDIAGNOSED? – TRE® FOR AFRICA
    treforafrica.com
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  8. ProducerLeckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    01/07/2016
    They call it being in the trenches
    They call it being in the trenchesI'm sure the title conjures up an image in your mind. Lets relate that image to stress. We all know what it feels like to be stressed. We might even be able to say what stressed us, but we may not be able to say exactly when our neurobiological...
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    04/07/2016 #12 Leckey Harrison
    @Michele Williams More than happy to train you how to do that.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 @Dr. Allen Brown: This has great potential in helping teens deal with PTSD and stress in a new way....love that @Leckey Harrison and @Michele Williams are totally with us on that!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 @Michele Williams: Kids are at the heart of my heart, and anything we can do to help them is honorable and worthy. I'm in on this aspect, too ~ all the way!
    Michele Williams
    04/07/2016 #9 Michele Williams
    @Leckey Harrison very helpful article. I need to reduce my use of stress relief and increase my stress release. I can't wait to explore your links. It is so important that kids and teens learn this too.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    03/07/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Definitely a new and novel technique worthy of more exploration. And if it worked for you as a fireman helping firemen who see and smell human flesh differently than the rest of us, I believe it will help here. Thank you, @Leckey Harrison View more
    Definitely a new and novel technique worthy of more exploration. And if it worked for you as a fireman helping firemen who see and smell human flesh differently than the rest of us, I believe it will help here. Thank you, @Leckey Harrison! cc to: @Sara Jacobovici, @Gerald Hecht, @Lisa Gallagher, @Brian McKenzie, @Randy Keho! Close
    Leckey Harrison
    03/07/2016 #6 Leckey Harrison
    #5 Yea, I've used Ditch Witches too. They dig a nice thin ditch as I recall, though they may have different tools now. They also cut through gas lines quite cleanly!
    Brian McKenzie
    02/07/2016 #5 Brian McKenzie
    Of course they have a machine that does that now - known as the Ditch Witch - but I did spend many an hour on the working end of a shovel. If it wasn't shoveling shit, it was digging a ditch to nowhere.
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/07/2016 #4 Lisa Gallagher
    Awesome analogy you used with digging trenches @Leckey Harrison. I can relate to the lemonade even though I've never dug a trench. The website looks as though it has very useful tools. I will go back later when I have more time to take a deeper look. Thank you for sharing this!
    Leckey Harrison
    02/07/2016 #3 Leckey Harrison
    #2 Thank you, and you're very welcome.
    Randy Keho
    02/07/2016 #2 Randy Keho
    Indispensable and insightful information, Leckey. Thank you for sharing and the good work that you do.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    I get the analogy, and the periods of respite that also apply not only to the wounded, but to the weary Caregivers, too. I need to be spoon-fed just like you did here. Each step of the way, one step at a time. This beginning of understanding "Stress Relief" ~ like taking a coffee break that only makes you jittery on an empty stomach, then makes you need to use the restroom when it's a total and complete, archaic imposition....vs...."Stress Release" ~ like taking a vacation away from your 'Vacation' by just staying home and relaxing....did I get it right? We have to go for the "Release." Then we get regenerated, refreshed, and rejuvenated to go back and put out more fires (I know you're a firefighter, a First Responder like MDs). And that 'human factor' of socializing with those around us, whether at work or at home...that is so important because when we're trying and trying but everything around us...it's in black-and-white is a mistake, and ...and we'll never get ahead...and ... rEgrETs LInGEr... we live in a cOMa, neve r ... being QuItE aWAkE...we just beg to escape! Thank you for offering hope as we dig in and keep learning more. Stay with us, can you? @Randy Keho, @Brian McKenzie, @Rebel Brown, @Sara Jacobovici, @Lisa Gallagher, @Gerald Hecht, @Gary Sharpe, @Deb Helfrich, @debasish majumder, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani.
  9. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    29/06/2016
    If you don't release your stress, this can happen. TRE® release stress from the body naturally. Leckey Harrison
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    01/07/2016 #2 Leckey Harrison
    #1 Sounds like a decent idea...
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Please expound on this, as it is so interesting! Can you Produce honey here? I think you found a great niche that's multidimensional for all beezzz.
  10. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    28/06/2016
    Even though PTSD Awareness month draws to a close, for me it doesn't. Fair warning. I lived with it, healed it, and now help others learn how to heal their own. Leckey Harrison
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    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 Well, Sweet! I'm throwing in a doctor/rapper video and I'll be waiting for your response with baited breath! Looking forward to all!
    Leckey Harrison
    29/06/2016 #2 Leckey Harrison
    #1 Oh baby! Just getting started...
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/06/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Leckey Harrison: You and I don't need an official "National Awareness Month" deadline from which to confine us to talking about PTSD! Not at all. We keep talking, we keep moving, Upward & Onward! We've lived it, we've helped others overcome its debilitation, and we re-invest ourselves, thriving in 'giving back.'
  11. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    25/06/2016
    I love teaching TRE®. Every body I encounter is different, and so working with all these variables to simply unlock the innate stress release/trauma healing mechanism is such a joy. I love watching people feel relaxed like never before. I love watching the light go on as they realize this is THEIR tool now.

    https://RaiseYourResilience.com
    Leckey Harrison
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  12. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    25/06/2016
    Even professional athletes make mistakes. They are hurting people. And they get stupid, and destroy their own lives. Here's a pro athlete, on a high profile team, who got drunk, aimed a loaded gun at his wife, and threatened to kill her. Good bye career, It isn't just "gang bangers," or punks, or the mentally ill doing this kind of thing. Justice likely won't be the same, but the point is, we need to be trauma informed in our world, because hurt people, hurt people. We need to start focusing on healing hurt people. The homeless. The mentally ill. The traumatized, the stigmatized. And the pro athletes.
    Leckey Harrison
    Tarvaris Jackson arrested on charges of pulling gun on wife
    www.sportingnews.com After having a gun pulled on her, Tarvaris Jackson’s wife replied that the QB “better be accurate because you ain’t accurate on the...
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  13. ProducerLeckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    21/06/2016
    The Juniper Root
    The Juniper RootIn light of some questions people have had regarding healing trauma, I wanted to share a story, as a metaphor to what healing trauma may be like. Even when using a tool like TRE®, which doesn't require a diagnosis or talking about it.I used to live...
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    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 Great intro to open up the floor to the door on the Path to Wellness. No blind deception, no turning away. I can speak for myself that I'm going to be myself ~ an open book of transparency. Because there's 1 million people that feel the same way that I do...but they just don't say it. Losing your mind because you've lost your body..in finding out what you can...here AnD THeRe TrYiNg and TrYiNg and....TrYiNg and.....TrYiNg and.........keeping ON!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 Just love the double-meanings everywhere. They really leave an impression.
    Leckey Harrison
    23/06/2016 #2 Leckey Harrison
    #1 That was the implication, Elizabeth! Awesome that you caught it!
    Elizabeth Harris
    23/06/2016 #1 Elizabeth Harris
    Another metaphor at the end with the juniper, dead and negative things in our life are sometimes more difficult to leave behind or take out. They take over important parts of ourselves and it is a harder work. At the end the result is a better and cleaner space for new and beautiful things. Lovely metaphor @Leckey Harrison
  14. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    05/06/2016
    ACE test suggests that bottom line is 2/3 of the population. Freud discovered the same. They are adults now. Look around you. June is PTSD Awareness month. Leckey Harrison
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    22/07/2016 #18 Leckey Harrison
    #17 I would say that's a freeze that occurs, of the fight/flight/freeze continuum. The overwhe,m is so much that in severe cases, the body shuts off: "plays possum" as it were. There is also the understanding that in quickly escalating events, there is a default pathway in the brain and that pathway means PFC and associated regions shut down, the speech center being one. In a chronic stress condition which traumatizes, the disconnect happens over time, and the neural networks between limbic and PFC regions atrophy, so the silence is an inward turning of looking for safety at all times, not exposing oneself via noise. This can also create the split of the personality that then begins to talk to themselves in psychotic and dissociated manners..
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #17 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #15 I was just having a discussion with @Selim Yeniçeri about how some children witness a traumatizing event and try to scream, but nothing comes out. It is well known that some of these children can become mute for a time. And thinking that what you offer can be applied in this scenario. Please advise....it is so interesting to think of applying it to this patient population of our children. Just can't wait to see what you think! And thank you for being here....you're a wonderful help! We are blessed to have you, @Leckey Harrison!
    Leckey Harrison
    15/07/2016 #16 Leckey Harrison
    #14 Regardless of the type of stress, our body has the tremoring mechanism as the release valve.
    Leckey Harrison
    15/07/2016 #15 Leckey Harrison
    #14 Yes, there are different classifications of stress as it were, but the same nervous system. Intensity, and duration play roles as well. Stress of low to medium intensity ocver a long period will traumatize an organism as much as a single overwhelming event. Singlar events that create helplessness and terror rapidly often create freeze, and thosememories then got lost, though they are still in the body and brain.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    15/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #13 You make so many great points with this article...and the follow-up comments may be tongue-in-cheek as for me hiding my own pains, and thank you. You are always so positive and reassuring, quite a breath of fresh air. So I think I'm hearing that there are two main categories of stress... one being more the daily 'stresses' of making a living and turning on the lights...and the other being the more catastrophic, traumatic stress. It is so interesting, as they both overlap at different times and places. For example, when @Randy Keho told of his daughter's being held up at gunpoint to the head, it took me literally a full week to remember and realize that I had been through the same thing. I'm still intrigued that I could forget that trauma. And even now, talking and thinking about it doesn't really bother me. I never thought I'd 'get' to this place. I'm just grateful. And I'm sure that you specialize in making this so for others, on a more accelerated pace (my incident was in 1991) and professional basis. I'm glad people have you.
    Leckey Harrison
    12/07/2016 #13 Leckey Harrison
    #11 Stress can be accumulative, and then turn into PTSD. It's the distinction I make with the terms "traumatic stress," meaning, chronic stress eventually creates a traumatized organism. Stress directly related to trauma will do the same, and both together are crippling. I have such clients.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 That would also put me at 90%, but I still turned out ok, ya?
    Brian McKenzie
    12/07/2016 #11 Brian McKenzie
    if it is an accumulative event - then I have an 80% stat for a bar graph. For what ever Big Data that is worth.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 Well, we do have our mission, indeed. And we shall pursue the human galaxies that no man dares to go. ;-). We're just used it it.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #9 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 @Brian McKenzie: I'd love to know more about the Venn Diagram. Reading about it myself would be one thing, but getting it from your standpoint is much more significant to me. Pray tell more.
    Leckey Harrison
    20/06/2016 #8 Leckey Harrison
    #1 I am accustomed to that on SM, Margaret. It's not a "comfortable" topic.
    Leckey Harrison
    20/06/2016 #7 Leckey Harrison
    #4 Excellent idea! The big one would be abused children which would encompass to some degree the rest of them. The signifant percentages would be worth knowing.
    Leckey Harrison
    20/06/2016 #6 Leckey Harrison
    #5 You're welcome, Lisa. This is my life work, teaching folks how to heal their trauma.
    Lisa Gallagher
    20/06/2016 #5 Lisa Gallagher
    Extremely important and relevant topic! Thank you for sharing this @Lecky Harrison
    Brian McKenzie
    20/06/2016 #4 Brian McKenzie
    A Venn Diagram might be enlightening too. I know that many of my military crew that I served with were law enforcement and fire depts.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/06/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    I would like someone to kindly buzz this over to my Hive ~ "Invisible Illnesses: Mental Health." I've maxed out on the buzzing. But I'm not giving up.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/06/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    "All it takes for evil to reign in the world is for one good man to say nothing." ~ Albert Einstein
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/06/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Bombshell: the highest incidence is in the most innocent of all, our children. I'm so sorry. I can't express how hard this hits me, and my initial reaction is to be infuriated that out of 100 views, no one commented before me. WE are all about SOLUTIONS, and I'm glad that someone can give a voice to the voiceless.