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Invisible Illnesses: Inspiration & Motivation - beBee

Invisible Illnesses: Inspiration & Motivation

~ 100 buzzes
Hey! We "lighten up" over here and get encouragement, inspiration, and .... Laughter!
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  1. Gloria Ochoa

    Gloria Ochoa

    10/08/2016
    Hold still, you have an eyelash riiiight there.... Gloria Ochoa
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    Gloria Ochoa
    04/09/2016 #2 Anonymous
    We were puppy sitting the little one and she LOVES our Shepherd..I got lucky with that photo!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/09/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    So Darling! They must take care of all the animals on the floor, too!
  2. Patricia Rosa

    Patricia Rosa

    01/09/2016
    Patricia Rosa
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  3. ProducerAndrew Porter

    Andrew Porter

    31/08/2016
    What is a Horticulturist? What does a Horticulturist actually do?
    What is a Horticulturist? What does a Horticulturist actually do? It seems that I maybe the only Horticulturist on beBee at the moment! so to give some bees a better understanding of what a Horticulturist is and does (unless some already know!) I have put this article together; which I have tried to keep...
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    Andrew Porter
    02/09/2016 #18 Andrew Porter
    #17 Thanks @Mohammad Azam Khan it is rewarding and beneficial for the planet....when you think about it without plants, trees and shrubs there would be no life on earth! I am also pleased that you enjoy your garden, keep it up!
    Mohammad Azam Khan
    01/09/2016 #17 Mohammad Azam Khan
    #15 Meaningful observation that so rewarding and most useful of activities for choice and like @Ali Anani helps to keep the flow pure. The good life @Andrew Porter. I love the day I get to enjoy the garden as well.
    Andrew Porter
    01/09/2016 #16 Andrew Porter
    #2 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD you asked about Hydrangeas as you were finding them difficult, I am sure this link to the RHS Hydrangea information pages will provide you with all the answers you should require, if not then please let me know, here is the link.....
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=122
    Andrew Porter
    01/09/2016 #15 Andrew Porter
    #14 @Donna-Luisa Eversley thanks, how could I possibly forget that...the beauty of nature on a daily basis!! planting is very therapeutic although if your doing it for a few hours it can have its toll on ones back! And I'll also let you in on a secret I do like to sit and watch the flowers and all the different insects that are attracted to them, its just so relaxing...well for me it is!
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    01/09/2016 #14 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @Andrew Porter and don't forget, you get to see the beauty in the environment daily! Thanks for breaking it down, now I won't think all you do is plant beautiful gardens and watch flowers daily!
    Andrew Porter
    31/08/2016 #13 Andrew Porter
    #12 Thank you @Jim Cody for commenting, I like your reference to the Giant Sequoia trees, earlier this year at The Eden Project in Cornwall over here in the UK 40 saplings were planted of coast Redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) they were cloned from some of the ancient plants in California, to help preserve this giant species for future generations, they were planted along the entrance road to Eden and will eventually form one amazing avenue!
    Jim Cody
    31/08/2016 #12 Jim Cody
    @Andrew Porter A Good interesting read about your field of work. I'm always amazed about plants and their history. Having lived in California for many years and seeing the great sequoia is truly amazing. The giant sequoia is among the tallest, widest and longest-lived of all organisms on Earth.
    Andrew Porter
    31/08/2016 #11 Andrew Porter
    #9 #10 Thank you @Franci Eugenia Hoffman for your appreciation I am also pleased to hear that you find plants and trees soothing, they are indeed therapeutic for we busy humans or should that be 'Bees' thanks also for the share.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    31/08/2016 #10 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Sharing in Bee Inspired
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    31/08/2016 #9 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Interesting read Andrew Porter and thank you for sharing your knowledge. I find plants and trees soothing. We live in an apartment and our back porch is full of plants. My husband works hard at keeping up with them.
    Andrew Porter
    31/08/2016 #8 Andrew Porter
    Well that's a new term for it @Kevin Pashuk! I also remember in my early days of horticulture getting told off for saying 'Weed'... as the general term is actually 'a plant out of place' but hay ho I still say weed, and funnily over here in Yorkshire we say swathes of colour! but yes horticulture or gardening if you like, can be very therapeutic besides many other benefits one can get from this activity!
    Kevin Pashuk
    31/08/2016 #7 Kevin Pashuk
    Ahhh. @Andrew Porter. I always thought it as "horrible culture" since I seemed to get all the weed pulling chores added to my list. Having said that, my wife has created a wonderful space using plants that provide beautiful swatches of colours all season long. A very necessary vocation in this busy world of ours.
    Andrew Porter
    31/08/2016 #6 Andrew Porter
    #3 Thanks for participating @Irene Hackett I am pleased you found the article of use, although I kept it slightly brief so as not to bore people, to be honest we can actually learn a lot about life from how we nurture and tend to plants, there are actually some similarities, great also to hear that you learned from your Dad....I reckon that would make a really interesting readable Buzz!
    Andrew Porter
    31/08/2016 #5 Andrew Porter
    #2 Thank you @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD great how you explain about how people are changing there landscapes due to the law on sprinklers, although grass can be quite remarkable at rejuvenating from droughts, longer periods without water will eventually kill it off, I didn't know that one could buy Lady Birds or Bugs as you call them, now this should be something that we could incorporate over here in the UK what a great idea!
    Thanks for your request about Hydrangeas yes I will write something about them and will let you know when this is done, I didn't really expect to receive any comments as horticulture is either a hit or a miss, it is a topic where you have to try and grab the attention not easy to do when there is only one of me...but I'll keep digging away so to speak!
    Andrew Porter
    31/08/2016 #4 Andrew Porter
    #1 Robert thank you for commenting, it never surprises me when I receive comments that there is or was a horticulturist in the family lovely to hear that you learned about plants from your Mother, and yes we can learn a lot from plants...some have a remarkable knack of been able to manage all on their own once they have been left to fend for themselves, and there are some plants and trees around the planet that are easily around 2 to 3 thousand years old, for example one of the oldest trees in Europe is said to be a 1,075 year old Bosnian Pine, plenty to right about I would say!
    Irene Hackett
    31/08/2016 #3 Anonymous
    Thank you @Andrew Porter - I enjoyed reading about the details of what a horticulturist does! I had a friend who was a landscape architect so it was interesting to learn the differences between the two. When you opened your hive I actually had to google 'horticulturist'!! Bottom line, I have always loved plants. Every year my Dad kept a pretty huge garden that we helped maintain. He taught us a lot about life by way of gardening - should write a buzz about that!!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    31/08/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 Excellent article, and I love all the biology! In So. California (Los Angeles) - we grew up in a drought (no brushing your teeth with the water on!) - and all of a sudden they passed a new law that no one can sprinkle lawns with water more than 2-3 times a week, and of course never from 10am-2pm (Oh! and no washing cars in your driveway!). So many people are buying succulent cactus and spreading it all over their landscape. They hold water, serving as 'double-duty
    to help retard fires during the hot Santa Ana winds. But all of a sudden when that new law passed, everyone was agasht to let their lawns saunter into a slow, dehydrated death. Totally changed how things are landscaped. - and just one note that I love about gardens: you can buy ladybugs in a paper cup at the local nursery (my Fav shopping place) so they eat all the aphids destroying the roses! Great article - keep writing more! Can you tell us about hydrangeas? I find them most difficult (and loving your Pic here, it is fantastic)!
    Robert Cormack
    31/08/2016 #1 Robert Cormack
    My mother was a horticulturalist, Andrew, and you've explained what they do very well. I learned a lot about plants. What I didn't learn was how not to be forgetful. My surviving plants all live with the knowledge that I'm forgetful (funnily enough, they've all be alive over fifteen years. We should take a lesson from plants, Andrew. They're far more forgiving than us鈥攁nd they live longer (in plant years).
  4. WILLIAM C. BALLARD II
    #211 THE AROMA OF GOD W.C.B.II
    Where is the Aroma of GOD today? Again ,, CHRIST now will give you another example,, "RIGHT HERE GODBLESS YOU ALL"
    WILLIAM C. BALLARD II
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  5. ProducerMichael D. Davis
    We've All Got One, So What's Yours?
    We've All Got One, So What's Yours?Nothing's more interesting than hearing a good story, unless, of course, it's a great or even fantastic story! #thedailychalkboard encourages you to think about yours today. Have a great week....
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    Michael D. Davis
    29/08/2016 #4 Michael D. Davis
    #2 Thank you for your comment @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD . Please feel free to join my hive, #thedailychalkboard , where I share similar observations and motivational inspirations with beBee and beyond!
    Michael D. Davis
    29/08/2016 #3 Michael D. Davis
    #1 Thank you for sharing #thedailychalkboard today @prabhakara rao rajarapu !
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/08/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Great for Positive Parenting, Inspiration for Career and Success. Just bee "You!"
  6. ProducerNicholas Fester

    Nicholas Fester

    21/07/2016
    YOU learn
    YOU learn My last post was very much centered on showing respect. In all the talk that went on after I published, I ended up doing the very thing I was 'preaching' we shouldn't do. My tone changed in one of my comments to a faithful reader, and I started...
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    Comments

    Nicholas Fester
    27/07/2016 #26 Nicholas Fester
    Kevin, thanks so much for weighing in. @Charles David Upchurch has certainly taught me a thing or two. I'm soooo willing to learn. I salute you sir, you deserve to be celebrated for what you are doing for your parents. Thank you, and please do give me a hint or two along the way! #25
    Kevin Pashuk
    27/07/2016 #25 Kevin Pashuk
    It sounds @Nicholas Fester, like you've experienced something beBee is getting really good at... constructive feedback (from @Charles David Upchurch) to help you be a better writer, and person.

    I also like how you've highlighted the plight of the aged in prosperous countries. It is a cruel thing to sentence them to insignificance in our society because we are too busy in our lives to deal with their issues. I'm in the stage of life where I'm parenting my parents, and have a very heightened sense of this issue.
    Nicholas Fester
    27/07/2016 #24 Nicholas Fester
    Thank you Dale. You have many valid thoughts. How is it that we leave those who should be most valuable to us in the hands of government? In South Africa we still have some cultures that would never dream of putting the aged in old age institutions. #23
    Dale Masters
    27/07/2016 #23 Dale Masters
    The problem as I see it is that before the educational system that came out of the 1890's planning of Carnegie, Rockefeller and Morgan ("What the parents do imperfectly, the children will do perfectly"), and with it, the institution of the "nuclear family" as the "preferred" family unit (from mothers, fathers, and children sharing a small, squalid space that factory owners set up for that grouping to live in), we lost the idea of a "family unit" being comprised of ALL members of the family, from great-grandparents and their relatives to aunts, uncles, mothers, fathers, children, etc., We have utterly lost a valuable piece of our heritage as human beings. Couple that with the "It's all MINE" mindset, and you have what passes for a "civilised" society today. No one wants to pay Social Security tax, for example...but no one wants to see their elders and those in their family unable to work living in poverty, either. The ultra-rich are an untouchable class in American society, but less than 60 years ago, the top 10% paid approximately 95% in taxes, and that was seen as the price of being wealthy in America.
    We have seen, from 1980 to the present, that "trickle-down" economics does NOT work...yet we continue to allow Congress to give away BILLIONS in corporate welfare, while slamming the poor for what is, at best, a subsistence amount of governmental assistance. The people won't do it...so the government has to.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    25/07/2016 #22 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @Charles David Upchurch, I keep losing my message...but in essence , keep trying!
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    25/07/2016 #20 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #18 @Charles David Upchurch ;-) wink... hahaha that's a manual one! and we
    Charles David Upchurch
    24/07/2016 #18 Charles David Upchurch
    #17 @Nicholas Fester, like I said to @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD and @Donna-Luisa Eversley (and then @Javier beBee liked it, so I know he read that comment, too)... I tried to insert a "wink" after my comment, using just the keyboard, and could not do it. No worries, this old dog still has plenty of fight, plenty of forgiveness, and plenty of kindness left to offer the world. (smile)
    Nicholas Fester
    24/07/2016 #17 Nicholas Fester
    @Charles David Upchurch I guess it's how I go from one place in my writing to another. You are far from old.
    Nicholas Fester
    24/07/2016 #16 Nicholas Fester
    Ahhh dear sir! Now I feel bad all over again
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    24/07/2016 #15 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #14 Ah @Charles David Upchurch, when I use my mobile I can do it .馃榾馃槝馃
    Charles David Upchurch
    24/07/2016 #14 Charles David Upchurch
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I was trying to put a smiley after my last comment (colon,less than symbol,end paren) but it got cut off. How is it that you and @Donna-Luisa Eversley are able to insert emojis into your comments? I don't see that option.
    Charles David Upchurch
    24/07/2016 #13 Charles David Upchurch
    @Nicholas Fester I am truly heartened to see that my well-meant feedback on your other post was not only taken well, but taken to heart. Writing that "[you weren't] hearing what the reader was actually saying and suddenly [your] defences went up" and "I immediately put things straight and posted an apology" tells me that you truly learned the lesson, and you were glad to make amends. Well done, young man. I'm sure your Dad would be proud that you so quickly put down your defensiveness and learned a better way.

    [I'll accept that I tend to make lengthy comments. That's MY learning to implement.]

    On another note, I couldn't help noticing the trend, here. You started with "wise," which was pretty nice to hear, and "fathers" (so far, so good). Then it went downhill. "Older people?" Okay, I do have some grey creeping into my mustache, and at my temples, with a few strands of hair here and there which appear to belong to someone older. But "mature voices" and "seasoned" and "the aged"? I'm feeling positively decrepit! :
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 Yes, as We Are the next 'older generation.' Don't want people forgetting about us!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 No worries on catching up on beBee, as the Hive is always here but there are real people out there that people like me can't reach. So do me a favor and when you see Youth or Elders, please give them a special touch from me馃憣馃徑. Just tap them on the knee if you're sitting with them, to make some random loving point you are making. And if it an Elder, please hug them too, for that's what I do and it would make me feel like I'm still in the 'real' world helping馃檶馃徑 . That would be just grand, my brother! We'll always be here 馃拋馃徑 .
    mohammed khalaf
    23/07/2016 #10 mohammed khalaf
    And treat those two impostors just the same;
    #4
    Nicholas Fester
    23/07/2016 #9 Nicholas Fester
    Hi @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD just got home from a busy day doing my part for our youth. What a heart you have. I really respect those who take time to look after the elderly. I have plenty of catching up to do on beBee :)#5
    Julie Hickman
    22/07/2016 #8 Julie Hickman
    "The world cannot afford for an older generation to go silent" - @Nicholas Fester. Amen to that!!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 #4 "Busy Beez are too busy making honey to really care about distractions, so let us hold on to the good in all of us. Because life is too short, and we need to keep on smiling while we still have teeth. We open ourselves to flowers of all shades, fragrances, shapes, and sentiments." And "..bees work themselves to death in just a few weeks producing stored honey for the future security of the hive." ( ~ both Dr Margaret Aranda Quotes, from a previous Buzz). I think what Mohammed was saying is that he agreed with my hypothesis that we need to work hard to keep others alive, and in the end, he so eloquently states, in full agreement with your piece, "...so we consider our fathers..." Ha. Masterpiece!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 Absolutely. Millions are serving as Caregivers, sandwiched between caring for both parents and children. The "Sandwiched Generation" of Baby Boomers has been alive for ?15 years at least. In my last book, I analyzed the statistics, effects, and sociology of Caregivers...but that would have to be another Buzz. Take-home point: Caregivers need Respite. They have to be healthy and wise, as their life-expectancy (and most are women) tends to be shorter than their counter-parts; this is in the families where the parent is not at home, but in a nursing home. I'd like to see all nursing homes either closed, or build next to an orphanage. Then there would be built-in respect, generational story-telling to avid ears, and an appreciation for these things that are unsaid.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 Oh my goodness! You quoted me! I'm so honored, this little buzz of a bee! And @NIcholas Fester (your name is not in green; did I Follow you?)...I learned from our Veterans my whole life through, dedicating my life to their service as a healer. I've seen their tears as we sang songs for them - my Leadership as President of the Pre-Med Club... I formed a group and we went room to room, bringing Christmas Carols to each Veteran's room. That was a gift for both them and us both, and I still struggle in wonder to know who was blessed the most.
  7. Miguel L贸pez de la Oliva
    Miguel L贸pez de la Oliva
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    21/07/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 It is worthy! Amen! Y Gracias!
    Miguel L贸pez de la Oliva
    20/07/2016 #4 Miguel L贸pez de la Oliva
    #3 !perfect! Thanks, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, I will translate it.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Una traducci贸n en English ( y no estas dif铆c铆l): "Therefore, open your mind and don't think about what we are, but what we can be with our ambitions. Instead of borders, think of new horizons." Awesome. Just awesome. Incre铆ble!
    Miguel L贸pez de la Oliva
    20/07/2016 #2 Miguel L贸pez de la Oliva
    #1 隆Gracias, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD! Me slegr
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Estoy de acuerdo mucho! Amen!
  8. ProducerFatima Williams

    Fatima Williams

    18/04/2016
    "You come Happiness comes ; You go Happiness goes"
    "You come Happiness comes ; You go Happiness goes" I don't know if this is my Aha moment聽yet. But, what happened today drove me to write this post before going to bed. A friend of mine this evening told me, that I bring happiness when聽we meet. Has anyone said that to you ? (if they聽did聽- Awesome).I...
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    Steve Brady
    29/08/2016 #48 Steve Brady
    #24 Thank you for your reply, Fatima...especially the blessing at the end: "Have an awesome life filled with Happiness Steve :)" That means so much to me in my current circumstances. It's a wonderful thing to write words that your readers need at the time. You're a blessing, Fatima.
    Lisa Gallagher
    29/08/2016 #47 Lisa Gallagher
    #46 Love it, I was singing this out loud as I read it :))
    Fatima Williams
    29/08/2016 #46 Fatima Williams
    #45 It's sure does sharing the best part the chorus for those who haven't heard this one by Pharrel Williams
    " Clap along if you feel like a room without a roof
    Because I'm happy
    Clap along if you feel like happiness is the truth
    Because I'm happy
    Clap along if you know what happiness is to you
    Because I'm happy
    Clap along if you feel like that's what you wanna do"

    Clap along if you feel you find happiness on beBee
    Because I'm Happy
    Lisa Gallagher
    29/08/2016 #45 Lisa Gallagher
    #42 I love that song too @Fatima Williams! Sometimes when I'm sad, I play that song and actually sing and dance to it. It helps to change the mood :))
    Fatima Williams
    29/08/2016 #44 Fatima Williams
    #43 Thank you @Nicholas Fester That is absolutely right , it's similar to a comment that lights up an article and gives it life :) #StayHappy
    Nicholas Fester
    29/08/2016 #43 Nicholas Fester
    Any person who has the ability to light up the room when they arrive are some of the best people you will ever know. Lovely article.
    Fatima Williams
    28/08/2016 #42 Fatima Williams
    #41 Very beautifully said dear @CityVP Manjit I know the answer and I just love the way you explain it. Thank you 鈽 I love the happiness song by Pharrel Williams.
    CityVP Manjit
    28/08/2016 #41 CityVP Manjit
    #40 Dear Fatima, where else does happiness start or end other than within ourselves. It is we who have made it a thing by trying to make it a having rather than a being. One day my mother will pass from this world and it will not be a happy day and on that day the gift of sadness will be more accessible than the gift of happiness. That I can access that within me means that it can either be a blessing (a gift) or a curse (a theft). Happiness as a curse is not at all the same thing as happiness as a blessing. Happiness is not a simple off and on switch and it is nothing without sadness, it is a flow that emerges from within, which is what makes the pursuit of happiness an endless chase of vanity. The greatest vanity of all is to explain happiness when we are happy. If we need to go look for happiness in other things or people, all we will find there are the symbols and expressions of their vanity, and not our bliss. Take the Woodkids remix [Unhappy Version) of Pharrel Williams song Happy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyBFx18E6O4 - whatever you feel, whatever it triggers, how it effects you begins with what it evokes in you. This is what Socrates meant by "Know Thyself" - so why use my language or experiences of happiness - when they are within you and yours to discover? This means your question is a rhetorical question, which means you already know the answer, but are you ready for the practice, a practice that is yours to discover.
    Fatima Williams
    28/08/2016 #40 Fatima Williams
    #37 Thanks @CityVP Manjit All our emotions are very important to each one of us. But do we really need to go looking for happiness in other things or people , can happiness not start with oneself ?
    Steve Brady
    27/08/2016 #39 Steve Brady
    #37 CityVP thank you for sharing the gift of your wisdom. We need elders!
    mohammed khalaf
    27/08/2016 #38 mohammed khalaf
    you not amateur ,you is professional and hope you more progress
    CityVP Manjit
    27/08/2016 #37 CityVP Manjit
    If I get asked if happiness is important to me, this is like asking me "which of your children do you love?", but I reply "I love all my emotions" and unless I can love all of them, how can one of them be more important? It is when we hate some or most of our emotions that we are most likely to be in a search for happiness but searching for happiness is like getting on a rocket ship and head out into the distant Universe so that we can find Earth.
    Fatima Williams
    27/08/2016 #36 Fatima Williams
    #35 Thank you @Deb Helfrich Your comment is like honey to my beBee ears 馃馃馃馃 Stay Happy always
    Deb Helfrich
    27/08/2016 #35 Deb Helfrich
    I also love it when someone says something unexpected that opens a vista to a new insight. From our 2-D interactions, I have to concur that you do bring happiness, @Fatima Williams and this is a super-power! Go forth and radiate happiness with your ability to ignite the smiles of everyone you interact with.
    Irene Hackett
    27/08/2016 #34 Anonymous
    #33 How cute, "virtual high fives" - again, you made me smile!!
    Fatima Williams
    27/08/2016 #33 Fatima Williams
    #31 Thank you @Irene Hackett for being so sweet in person and words :) A virtual high five 馃枑馃徎馃枑馃徎馃枑馃徎馃枑馃徎馃枑馃徎 to you and yes we are kindred spirits trying to live our lovely lives with Love in action :) Stay Happy and a big HUG to you .
    Ali Anani
    27/08/2016 #32 Ali Anani
    #31 to beBee is love in action. How sweet you are Irene @Irene Hackett!
    Irene Hackett
    27/08/2016 #31 Anonymous
    Dear @Fatima Williams, the more I am 'getting to know you' by your writing here on beBee, the more I am fascinated and delighted by the beauty of your words and your character! The message of this buzz resonates strongly with me, so much so that if you were here, I would give you a 'high 5' (followed with a hug!) This my friend, is what I call 'love in action', which is how I try to live out this one, precious life - so we are kindred spirits! To BEE 'love in action', to offer my attention, my smile, my heart to another. If not this, what then is the joy of being human? The twinkle in your writing is the essence of happiness - we are all blessed!
    Fatima Williams
    27/08/2016 #30 Fatima Williams
    I changed the image in the buzz to make it more lively, like the people reading it :)
    Fatima Williams
    27/08/2016 #29 Fatima Williams
    Thank you @debasish majumder I'm glad your Happy ! I guess this might inspire you to write a poem on happiness.

    Right now all I feel is " Happiness is to be on beBee "
  9. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Well, I've had 2 Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI), each with diabetes insipidus (DI) & you gotta get the best out of a bad situation. I did it with God's help, and visited the door to Heaven in a Near-Death Experience (NDE). I was in the hospital, unable to walk or talk....but I just started to write. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 If you'd like, I could use a Review on Amazon/Goodreads....and I'm happy to send you an e-book just for you being you!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    10/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 @Mohammed A. Jawad: you are absolutely right. Just like the gorilla who is holding his hand up to a butterfly just cleaning his ears while resting on that gigantic hand, everything takes on new meaning. Truth becomes more true, and lies become more nonsense. Outlook is 'micro,' but it's no longer 'soft.' It sees things for what they are. And that is a good thing. More room for the positive!
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    29/06/2016 #2 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Life, after painful recovery, is true blessing and boon that elevate simple joys to worthwhile jubilation.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    The goal of this book is to empower patients to seek a diagnosis, even if it is a "mystery" or a "rare" disease. Push on!
  10. Gary Sharpe

    Gary Sharpe

    26/06/2016
    The Heartwarming Story of the Unfolding of a Rigid Man (Out-Thinking Parkinson's)
    https://www.amazon.com/Heartwarming-Story-Unfolding-Out-Thinking-Parkinsons-ebook/dp/B01HIJ2JCC

    The loving kindness that Deb offered Gary not only began to mend his broken heart, but also ignited his desire to change and to seek a new life. She inspired him to write like he鈥檇 never written before. The subject of Change became the main theme of his essays and, through his writing, he began to allegorically reflect, in a very public way, the transformation he was himself undergoing with Deb in private.

    The articles written by Gary, as inspired by Deb鈥檚 love, during that time are recreated here in the order they were written, but annotated to reveal, for the first time, the unfolding True Love story which was being played out in the background. The backbone of the book is therefore the tale of how, with love, Deb inspired Gary to start living again and begin a profound journey of healing.

    As for the essays themselves, each contains the unique insights of a person who had lost all hope but was being given a second chance. These parables, on the common theme of change, reveal his search for a healthier, happier, and more fulfilled life. The book is therefore not only for anybody interested in the subjects of Change & Growth, whether in personal life, business or society, but also for anyone who celebrates true love as the most powerful healing force in the world.
    Gary Sharpe
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    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #18 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #17 And aren't we all the same on that philosophy...yes. We live to Serve.
    Gary Sharpe
    29/06/2016 #17 Gary Sharpe
    #7 Thankyou @Gert Scholtz - as @Deb Helfrich and I always said ... if this helps just one other person it will be worth it!
    Gary Sharpe
    29/06/2016 #16 Gary Sharpe
    #3 Thankyou so much @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD there is so much @Deb Helfrich and I still have to share about what we've learned about the truth of love an life - so if this book takes off ... much more to come!
    Lisa Gallagher
    29/06/2016 #15 Lisa Gallagher
    Love the prequel and I'm glad I've been a witness to this. So much love and amazing what real love can do for people.
    Leckey Harrison
    29/06/2016 #14 Leckey Harrison
    #12 I love that "couple" nature of it. My story didn't start in a garage either....
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 #9 So I did it, @Leckey Harrison and @Deb Helfrich...couldn't help it any more. I started: My Hive ~ "Stirring Authors Along" here: https://www.bebee.com/group/dr-margaret-aranda-stirring-authors-along
    Deb Helfrich
    29/06/2016 #12 Deb Helfrich
    #11 Some companies have garage stories, we have a prequel. :). I doubt Jobs and Woz got along so well....
    Leckey Harrison
    29/06/2016 #11 Leckey Harrison
    I love the title: "Prequel." That was a stroke of genius. Sounds like an amazing story.#2
    Deb Helfrich
    29/06/2016 #10 Deb Helfrich
    #7 Thank you for such kind-hearted encouragement, @Gert Scholtz. It means so very much.
    Deb Helfrich
    29/06/2016 #9 Deb Helfrich
    #8 Fabulous idea, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. I love to read, absolutely love it and I would be glad to offer support to anyone putting a book out into the world.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 Book Reviews for us Authors can be written here: Amazon, Goodreads, My Blog & Your Blog (we each do one for the other). @Gary Sharpe, @Deb Helfrich, @Leckey Harrison, @Sara Jacobovici, @Lisa Gallagher, @debasish majumder, @Dr. Allen Brown, @Jim Cody, @NO one, @Donald Grandy, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani. If you are listed here, I think you need to write a book. 馃尰 鉁嶐煆 馃尰.
    Gert Scholtz
    28/06/2016 #7 Gert Scholtz
    @Gary Sharpe @Deb Helfrich I read the extract on Amazon. Already I am deeply touched by your story. Thank you for your inspiring presence.
    Deb Helfrich
    28/06/2016 #6 Deb Helfrich
    #4 We are grateful for everything you do, @Sara Jacobovici
    Deb Helfrich
    28/06/2016 #5 Deb Helfrich
    Tremendous Thanks, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD.
    Sara Jacobovici
    28/06/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    #2 Will do Gary and will let you know as soon as it happens.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/06/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 I shall do the same. thank you, @Deb Helfrich and @Gary Sharpe for contributing so much as you lay yourself out on the line to save others.
    Gary Sharpe
    28/06/2016 #2 Gary Sharpe
    #1 Thankyou so much @Sara Jacobovici I do hope you will like it... perhaps you would give a review on amazon once you have read it - I understand this can help raise visibility. Thank you again!
    Sara Jacobovici
    28/06/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    Just purchased the ebook tonight. Looking forward to reading it! Wishing you both all the success @Deb Helfrich and @Gary Sharpe.
  11. Donald Grandy

    Donald Grandy

    28/06/2016
    This is Leadership..... Donald Grandy
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  12. ProducerCityVP Manjit

    CityVP Manjit

    26/06/2016
    The Love of Something
    The Love of Something10CC is the first band whose records I purchased back in the day when cassettes were the primary form of bootleg and they wrote what I still consider to be one of the finest love songs in "I'm not in Love" - because it continues to say something...
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    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #12 And isn't "to be present" "a present" in itself? It exists as a gift that is opened, has substance, and a use. It is as a movie that never ends. As you so rightfully stated, "it is a constant navigation of what is most valuable about life." Enticing.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 "....Right now!" You got it, @Randy Keho!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 Perhaps that is because they are all immeasurably indescribable. But we sure do love to try!
    CityVP Manjit
    26/06/2016 #13 CityVP Manjit
    #9 Oh but I can see your face Sara, because I can see your heart.
    CityVP Manjit
    26/06/2016 #12 CityVP Manjit
    #10 It is wonderful how our compass is reset with presence - to be present is something I value also Margaret, it is not a given but it is a constant adjustment in the navigation of what is most valuable about life.
    Randy Keho
    26/06/2016 #11 Randy Keho
    "Love is but a song we sing ... If you hear the song I sing, you will understand, listen. You hold the key to love and fear, all in your trembling hands. Just one key unlocks them both. It's here at your command," sentiments from the "Summer of Love," from "The Youngbloods. "Come on, people now. Smile on your brother. Everybody get together , try to love one another right now." I think we need a remake, right now.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    26/06/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 @CityVP Manjit, it is all about love. Exactly. Just a blend of serenity, and an absolute epiphany... Few people really, truly see it until laying on their deathbeds in a hospital: "Where is my son? I want to see him before I die." And the patient mingles on for the two-day stretch. As soon as the son arrives, "completeness" is .... so.... pervasive that it fills the room. One immediately feels that it is a sacred time, not for the sharing of outsiders. Then, I go home and hug my son.
    Sara Jacobovici
    26/06/2016 #9 Sara Jacobovici
    "...it is the fundamental nature that runs through all living things that are conscious enough to know that they are indeed living and in that, this is the best way I know of saying to all those conscious enough to see this, I love you." No words to express the gratitude for this statement @CityVP Manjit and that specifically reflects the nature of love; we express it predominately in a non-verbal way and when we attempt to put it into words we produce art like your statement. Then we have the picture of your 2nd grandson Roshan - no words - but if you could only see my face......
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    26/06/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    What Really matters in this life?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    26/06/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    What really matters in this life?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    26/06/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 @Ali Anani: Well, of course I couldn't stop myself from stopping by, and WoW. The Bee-Gees, Beatles, Beauty, and a new Baby to top it all off! Hi Roshan, little love! Muaaahhh!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    26/06/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 Greatly said. Congratulations on the birth of your new generation of love, hope, and optimism. It's all good.
    Laurent Boscherini
    26/06/2016 #4 Anonymous
    Thank you ityVP Manjit for sharing your beautiful post with slices of life so well penned.
    "Conserve in your heart,
    without fearing anything,
    If you should cry and suffer,
    The flame that cannot be extinguished." - Victor Hugo
    Mohamed Amroussi
    26/06/2016 #3 Mohamed Amroussi
    Love is like Soul , it exists but you don t have to prove or define,
    Ali Anani
    26/06/2016 #2 Ali Anani
    #1 You kindle fires, but who shall extinguish them? Your comments fired great discussions dear @CityVP Manjit. I am going to read the link and will comment again. Dear @Anees Zaidi and dear @Mohamed Amroussi- your input shall be most welcome here as well.
    CityVP Manjit
    26/06/2016 #1 CityVP Manjit
    Dear @Ali Anani I thought hard about capturing my thoughts about the different types of love but I can't publish love, I can only discover it every single minute of the day, and in your buzz I LOVE YOU? What does it mean? Every comment in that buzz here in this link https://www.bebee.com/content/626207/611145 is sufficient to keep us busy for the entire life to put into practice that which flows in our mind - so it is I will maintain LOVE as the Open Book that it is and will always be.
  13. ProducerCityVP Manjit

    CityVP Manjit

    22/06/2016
    My Way
    My WayI actually think that following is a chronic way of living that simply leads me to making a living, and making a living is not sufficient for me.聽 The alternative to following is observing and observation is not an emulation or an imitation, it sits...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #27 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #26 Awwweeee! My father had 6 girls, and just like you, he made me feel like I was his "only daughter." I grew up thinking that all men were like him, but learned the hard way that they're not. But I know I have arrived at that "Take No Shit from Anyone" destination that women don't all know about...and for that, I am blessed. MAN! You pierce me with a stunning laser beam of such pride and love for your daughters....I wish this upon all of our daughters. I just want to cry.
    CityVP Manjit
    29/06/2016 #26 CityVP Manjit
    #25 It is more important that Ann Hawkins was there for me, in the four years I worked with her, they are treasured years. This Friday, my third daughter gets married. All three will now have wedding anniversaries in the last week of June, with the latest getting married on 1st July. Ultimately that they are succeeding in life and take absolutely no shit from anyone is something I am proud of. In their respective cases I value my family's privacy and within that privacy the best decision I made was to focus on family rather than work. I worked with Ann between 1984 and 1988. My daughters were born between 1987 and 1991. They are human beings, that is what matters to me. As father-of-the-bride this Friday, I have watched my third daughter take full control of her wedding, if anything I more like Steve Martin - watching them lead, but without Steve Martin's tantrum. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oYIHLUxzRr8
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #25 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #24 "Laser Backup. How wonderful that you were there to provide "Laser Backup" for Ann Hawkins, with pure support and the strength that a woman derives from a man that empowers her. It is clear that the depths and reverberations remain within you today, yes. Moreso, you embrace it as a pivotal physical and emotional assault that needs to be met head-on. The man's way. And how blessed she was to have you, her mentor, encouraging her to fight back. It is a fight, a deeply psychological one that empties one's bowels in great fear of imminent danger. Such a vivid scene (I am sorely temped to know how long ago this happened, to wonder what more you have done for women in leadership (or in subservient positions ~ I only mention it because the thought is there ~ but I do not want to distract from the moments at hand for they are too worthy). Your perseverance and tenacity to devote reflection and mindful investment in contemplating this matter to its higher levels, choices, and consequences, is truly honorable....most don't give it but a passing glance. It is too 'taboo' to wonder if a woman had to sleep with a superior to 'get that account,' to 'make that sale,' or to 'rise up the ladder' in academia. I know @Rebel Brown faced this issue and fought it 'her own way,' without 'backup.' While this situation definitely 'breaks' many young women, it also serves to 'make' others find the 'real me' that will fight alone. So many thoughts, reflections, and more experiences...yet this is a good place to stop for now. Beautiful that you were there for Ann Hawkins. It has the makings of a dedicated Buzz. I'd like to know more...
    CityVP Manjit
    29/06/2016 #24 CityVP Manjit
    #23 Margaret I don't think of the feminine in terms of Jack Ma, I think of it both the feminine within me but also in terms of Ann Hawkins. Who is Ann Hawkins? Ann is the first girl I hired when I was a 23 year old manager, yes she was pretty but she was amazing as a person and not because her good looks. A year into working for me, I was over the moon with her professionalism and work contribution but then one day she was not her usual self. I could see that she had been crying and so I wanted to know if I could help. As it happens, she confided in me that she had been sexually harassed by another manager. So I faced Ann and new this was a pivotal moment in her career and asked her if she trusted me. The answer was affirmative, so I asked her to go to that manager and let him assertively know that she did not like his language, that it was inappropriate and that it was unacceptable to her. She was brave enough to do that and when she came back, she had asserted herself, found that she had the strength to assert her feminine power and she was never bothered again - but more she blossomed from that - and on that day I touched upon feminine leadership, not only did I witness a young girls power but I was intensely proud of this for I too had grown.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #23 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #17 @CityVP Manjit: Beautiful and empowering to thousands and throngs. Please allow me to so aptly refer you to a similar-stringed manifesto on the role of the feminine touch on this video. I do hope that it speaks to you. It features Jack Ma, the CEO of Alibaba Group, who was rejected by Harvard 10 times, and more... https://www.facebook.com/igbondioma/?pnref=story
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #22 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #16 Poignant and revealing. Just love peeling back the layers.
    Sara Jacobovici
    23/06/2016 #21 Sara Jacobovici
    #17 What an honour to have my name in any way connected to your deeply uplifting (and the use of the push and pull of the opposites @Ali Anani is intentional) writing; your thoughts and insights always leave me in wonder @CityVP Manjit. When you write, "what we are born into", there is no way that the feminine can be neglected or minimized. Our journey or process of becoming whole human beings in this world started from the union of genders and then we were given time to form and then pushed out into the world through the feminine only to integrate once more the feminine and masculine. Lots of hard work but definitely worth it.
    CityVP Manjit
    23/06/2016 #20 CityVP Manjit
    #19 Dale, add that to my classic history of putting my foot in it :-) Glad you made that clear, that would have been an awkward assumption :-)
    Dale Masters
    23/06/2016 #19 Dale Masters
    #18 @CityVP Manjit Actually, I was addressing my old foreman, Dean...but that's OK. :)
    CityVP Manjit
    23/06/2016 #18 CityVP Manjit
    #16 Dale I am sure that @Dean Owen will read what you have written. The jobs I enjoyed most are the one's where I worked with truly great people and if that paid me minimum wage the value is in those relationships. Minimum wage work is a part of my black intelligence - not because it is something that must be hidden or dark or dirty but because it is an area of life that people do not shine their light upon - if only they did, they will see the true value in people like you and me. Originally in our society before the industrial revolution, meaning was created by our home, today due to the industrial revolution meaning is created by our work - as in "Dale what do you do for a living". To me such a question is not important, the important question that was the one where meaning when it used to be attached to our home is "Dale how are you making a life". My life remains private but this I can say, my meaning comes from home and not my work - without the home, the work is just an act of passing one's time.
    CityVP Manjit
    23/06/2016 #17 CityVP Manjit
    #15 My dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, you and @Sara Jacobovici in mentioning caring and color for life have made me deeply aware that I have left out a vital piece of my focus on Blue Intelligence - and that is the Maternal. Not the paternal because we already reside in a paternal society and that is what we are born into. As I meditate on the Blue I see that which connects the great leader with the great doctor and the great mother, and this is the act of tending. My Way will now proceed with a 21st Edition where I will look at all aspects of my Spectraneuron (My Way) and fit in the missing feminine that serves to make my leadership more whole. As the 21st Century proceeds, the feminine strengths will serve to make me a wiser leader also - feminine here does not mean the woman, but the at of tending that can be done by those who care regardless of their gender. The paternal society will push back at this notion but what is push back but a society stuck in the past not ready to embrace the future. This is the essential aspect of "My Way" it is in within, the inner reflective spirit which as a society we have not been taught to access. Who you are as a leader is within you, not as a King but as the mother we all came from that remains always umbilical within us.
    Dale Masters
    23/06/2016 #16 Dale Masters
    I have never understood the consumer-driven way of life in the US. I had to be taught at a young age that if you give money to people they can use your friendship as a means of obtaining the money, or (worse yet) they might rob you.
    I chose the jobs I did because I enjoyed them, and it gave me an opportunity to help people. I remember a conversation I had with an MIT physics professor. We were talking about the latest developments in physics (this was the 1970's...and I know we said something else that drove the rest of it out of my head: "We'll see where you're working in 5 years...then we'll see how intelligent you are."
    I always thought that finding a job you enjoyed was a measure of intelligence. I got jobs a manager of gas/service stations because I enjoyed fixing cars (much like I enjoyed building models when I was younger), and I enjoyed the people. I also got a job at a materials handling company delivering steel and tools to different worksites. When I got back to the shop, I would either fix tools or construct parts. It was my favourite job...and at times I still dream that I'm working there, and that the waking world is just some psychotic fantasy world I've come out of. It was about the people there as well---we were like family.
    I really miss Viatech...and the people there. Dean, if by some chance you ever see this, I love you.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/06/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Being yourself means being a Leader. And most leaders have to get used to be alone to see themselves through, without exception. Only one King sits on the throne, and he is not there to please every individual. When we stop caring about what others think of us, only then do we have the freedom to be our raw selves, and find the special gifts that each one of us has as a God-given right. "I did it my way." Great application of this song! Fantastic! I knew this song, but I never realized its depths until this moment. What an epiphany! I can't thank you enough.
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/06/2016 #14 Sara Jacobovici
    #11 What you say about colors @ptharso astro reminded me of this quote: "You know creators, composers, need a palette for life, a color for life." - Mstislav Rostropovich
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/06/2016 #13 Sara Jacobovici
    #12 Your response literally brings me joy @CityVP Manjit. couldn't be happier and thanks for the link. Love listening to it!
    CityVP Manjit
    22/06/2016 #12 CityVP Manjit
    #9 Perfect Sara. I am listening to the Berlin song now. The version that most resonated with me is by Bryan Davis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oX5qZoCOxfo It is so beautiful and I will add this song to my Physical Intelligence log at LinkedIn - this is so appropriate to that journey. My struggles with achieving the simplest thing as sleep now has an amazing reference point - love this and it is the first time I have heard this song. Thank you - you talk about time sense, this is time sense.
    ptharso castro
    22/06/2016 #11 ptharso castro
    The colors speak everything in this life! Through them it is possible to decipher all Millenary Sciences. Many scientists talk bad or do theater. They did not understand where the Millenary Sciences extracted so much knowledge. It is a global challenge to prove they are not true! https://www.bebee.com/producer/@ptharso/ciencias-milenares-sao-uteis-e-verdadeiras
    CityVP Manjit
    22/06/2016 #10 CityVP Manjit
    #8 When I finally develop a slow appreciation as I addressed in a "yellow intelligence" it will allow thoughts to percolate and settle a while and that goes back to your thoughts on habits. The difference here is appreciation for fine wine rather than a focus on what alcohol does to the brain, in the former we discover patience and value, in the latter all the myths that are not actually facts http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/23/health/the-claim-alcohol-kills-brain-cells.html?_r=0
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/06/2016 #9 Sara Jacobovici
    Powerful Buzz @CityVP Manjit. Each paragraph, each line so rich in insight and meaning. "My Way" (written by Paul Anka, a Canuck) is definitely a song that communicates your message Manjit in a strong way and underscores your Call To Action; "Observe all that you can observe but do not follow my way, observe your own way."

    TOP 5:
    1. The alternative to following is observing...2. One must not throw away their crutches, or their labels or their attachments if that is what it takes for people to survive...3. ...we grab hold of the nearest arm or mind because creativity is too taxing and thinking is too hard...4. ...who wants to live in a Universe where the Earth is mortal and we are immortal. Immortality is watching everything die around us until we are floating in the blackness of space forever. 5. A metaphorical representation to observe this metaphor.

    You reminded me Manjit when you write, "We hardly count our blessings and cannot see what it is we have." of Berlin's song, "When I'm worried and I can't sleep, I count my blessings instead of sheep, And I fall asleep, Counting my blessings."
    Ali Anani
    22/06/2016 #8 Ali Anani
    #7 You remind me of my own words dear @CityVP Manjit. But how could I clean my mind cache after reading your powerful comments? It takes little time at least my friend.
  14. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Breakout Women
    Breakout Women
    Breakout Women We women know the truth, Everyday we face situations that test our confidence and our patience. We're smart and we know our stuff. Yet they still question our skills. While we're dealing with conflict, diversity, resistance to change and less than
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  15. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    The website of @Selim Yeni莽eri is:
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    SELIM YENICERI ~ "I AM THE STORM"
    www.selimyeniceri.com Self-motivation, Expression of All Your...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    21/06/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Don't be shocked at the creativity and novel dimensions of artistry here! Get ready to be surprised!
  16. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Finding the Positive, After Multiple Trauma
    Finding the Positive, After Multiple TraumaNow, what positive 'anything' can come out of trauma?Great question, and it deserves a great answer. In short, the answer can be summarized. Others with experience and/or expertise can only add to the list. Make it better than what is here, and that...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 Oh, you are so funnY! I'm rolling my eyes and smiling, with dimples, too! Thanks for making my day special! Waiting for you to write, too! Hmmmm.....
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 Yes! I think it best to just stay healthy, eat foods with immunonutrition in mind, and stay away from the doctors and hospitals. Unless you are there on a weekend, to visit the sick and bring flowers for the patient, and a huge box of chocolates for the room. This way, the nurses are eager to visit the patient, the patient actually has happier people around her/him, and WoW!...the patient gets better care ;-)!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 @Leckey Harrison, Nice. I liken your phrase "learning to keep your head up while your feet seems to be sliding this way and that and keeping up and balanced" to one that I kept telling myself: "I am a swan. An elegant, classy swan. I float on top of the water gracefully (for all to see), and I paddle like heck under the water (keeping my cool). So many times a professional, we are not "allowed" to be seen in any other way. Or people feel sorry for us, and none of us needs 'sorrow,' only simple, everyday human compassion. Great comments! Thank you!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 Why thank you, @Donald Grandy, so sweet. I'm otherwise just at a loss for words. And you won't see that happening again any time soon lol!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 Well, what a grand "taking" for me! Thank you! I'll keep that on my top shelf ~ nice! And I do like "Maggie" just fine because it is endearing, coming from you. But only you lol!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    P#2 Oopsies! (brain injury, lol) Here's the link to Invisible Illnesses: Miracles! Gotta love it! God is still in charge, and Jesus is the best healer of all! Please join: https://www.bebee.com/group/invisible-illnesses-miracles
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 Absolutely! I should have died 5 times over; my daughter was supposed to "never have been born," and I'm such an avid believer in miracles, that I started the Hive ~ Invisible Illnesses: Miracles!
    Dale Masters
    21/06/2016 #9 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I always, always, always love to read your articles!
    Dale Masters
    21/06/2016 #8 Dale Masters
    #2 Facts aren't facts until they are proven by observation. I have made it a hobby to prove doctors wrong. Medicine is mostly an art, not a science, and like all art, some are born to it---but most aren't.
    Leckey Harrison
    20/06/2016 #7 Leckey Harrison
    It was a trick to learn how to be positive in the midst of raging PTSD. There is an advantage to learning about it, because it puts into focus the scope of work. Daunting, eh? In my recovery, I started to notice small changes that began to snowball, and then I was able to look the positive aspects, the end game as it were of the work I was doing, and now I do the same for clients. It's easy to see the mire and muck, until you realize your head is down. Then there's learning to keep your head up while your feet seems to be sliding this way and that and keeping up and balanced is the challenge. It is however, a good tool to have, to be able to see a positive, and to believe in yourself, because sometimes I look back at where I was and see how far I've come. That's a boost in self-confidence.
    Donald Grandy
    20/06/2016 #6 Donald Grandy
    I just made a promise to myself never to complain again about my insignificant discomfort, aches and pains. Most of which are self inflicted. Margaret, you are a warrior and role model for others to mirror when tragedy strikes. And the odds are that it will. You have used your God given gifts to fight for yourself and passed on that strength to anyone who reads this post. God Bless
    Dr. Allen Brown
    20/06/2016 #5 Anonymous
    #2 great comments
    Ken Boddie
    20/06/2016 #4 Ken Boddie
    Must admit, Maggie (hope you don't mind me calling you that), that I am always unsure why my local GP keeps asking me how I am, when I first meet him at his practice. It always prompts me to think (but not say) "Why don't you tell me, doc? That's what I'm here for."

    As for asking in general, "Hello, how are you?" what we really mean is "Nice to see you. I will now go through a polite routine of asking how you are, but please don't tell me, as I really don't have the time and don't want to know. Just say 'fine' then we can both move on".

    When I really want to know how somebody is or has been and know there is a history of illness, accident, etc I find it better to be more specific with my greeting, such as, "How are you / How have you been / since your illness / accident, etc". Although I only use this approach when I really know the person well and that they won't feel uncomfortable opening up and really telling me 'how they are'.

    Agreed that everyone needs to stay positive and you must know this better than most. So I wish you and yours an old Scots wish for the best with "Lang may yer lummie reek wi' other folks' coal". 馃
    David Brown
    20/06/2016 #2 David Brown
    Believing in yourself is the first thing that anyone should have, sometimes science and doctors will (not intentionally) limit the patient by stating the facts. We have to keep in mind that there are miracles or explainable happenings in life that will prove those facts wrong everyday.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/06/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Trauma, Traumatic Brain Injury, PTSD, Lost of Child Custody, sadness and triumph during it all. Heart goes out to fellow traumatized and 'left behind' patients who never seem to get the right medical care. Remember that every surgeon expects a 2nd Opinion before doing it, so talk to the original surgeon first. ;-)
  17. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Age 1: A Baby in the Sky for Father's Day
    Age 1: A Baby in the Sky for Father's Day/ by Dr Margaret Aranda /聽 (Third Edition of previous post on my Author blog,聽www.drmargaretaranda.blogspot.com聽; "Perseverance.")It was my Father. 聽I knew him. I had no fear.My Father held me, the scent of his cologne permeating my brain such that...
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    Salma Rodriguez
    24/07/2016 #30 Salma Rodriguez
    Wonderful! Parents keep us from flying at an early age. I also wanted to fly :-D I still want to fly! I enjoy the idea of lifting "[h]igh...above the clouds". Yet, they keep us honest to ourselves, helping us learn WHY we are and WHAT--- purpose? reason? A truth-seeker's quest! I had no father, only a cherished mother who helped me learn WHO--- it is not about "me" because there are other "me"s out there, including you :-) Thank you, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD!
    Dale Masters
    22/07/2016 #29 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I LOVE how your words paint a picture in my mind! It's a buzz...but it's a portrait, too!
    Now I really miss my Dad...
    NO one
    21/07/2016 #28 NO one
    This is beautiful Mags you took me also to my beautiful past with my family, which I miss so much. Thank you for bringing up such warm memories of yours so I could relive mine. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Lisa Gallagher
    21/07/2016 #27 Lisa Gallagher
    If you missed this, a great read by @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/07/2016 #26 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #25 You are too poetic and you must become the writer that is inside you. To put words on a piece of paper, and to make some one like me cry....that is something that @Ali Anani, @debasish majumder, @Selim Yeni莽eri, and only a few have done. So please I beg you to join my MEMOIR MADNESS Project and let us get your writing skills perked up for the rest of the world to see! For you have a gift that God gave you, and you must touch it with us all, not just me! Here is the link to get you started, kind sir. Please. Start here: https://www.bebee.com/producer/@margaret-aranda/memoir-madness-update-july-20
    mohammed khalaf
    20/07/2016 #25 mohammed khalaf
    God is rewarding the best reward and I salute you#24
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/07/2016 #24 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #23 YEs, thank you. I cry at your words, as I didn't realize how good he was when I was a child. I only appreciated it later, and I did my best to honor him when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. I stayed by his side until a tragic car accident took me away from my spot there. He died 6 months later, but not without my daughter knowing exactly who "Grandpa" was, and watching her walk the halls with him. He still held out 2 fingers at his side, and the little girl in all 6 of his own girls...she, now my own daughter, walked and subconsciously just reached up and grabbed those two fingers, as if it was the most natural thing in the world to do. This is the vision of him that I love the most: the man inside.
    mohammed khalaf
    20/07/2016 #23 mohammed khalaf
    I think the effort of your father not loss because he is born Dr Margaret #22
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/07/2016 #22 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #21 Yes, I hold on to what he taught me by doing what he would have loved the most: spreading the message on to other girls, and teenagers. I love telling them inspiring stories, and being able to impress upon them the smallest gift of self-confidence. It honors my father all over again, in all the lives that he still touches.
    mohammed khalaf
    18/07/2016 #21 mohammed khalaf
    please hold on to that matter,and pray to him #20
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    18/07/2016 #20 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #18 Like so many others, my family has broken my heart so many times that there is much isolation and condemnation. 馃挃 But...This unconditional love of my father is within me. and no one will ever take it away. I carry it in me, always and forever. 馃挏
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    18/07/2016 #19 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #17 I thought that every man was like my father. He gave me so much unconditional love, laughed at my foils, and allowed me to be "me." I don't think that most fathers appreciate just how much their little girls will always adore them, no matter how old the girl is. She is always, "Daddy's little girl." 馃挒
    mohammed khalaf
    17/07/2016 #18 mohammed khalaf
    may God blessed to you family
    Vincent Andrew
    17/07/2016 #17 Vincent Andrew
    "I knew it was him, and therefore, I had no fear." This will give me a good platform to have a conversation with my daughters. Thanks for sharing this @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD.
    Mamen Delgado
    17/07/2016 #16 Mamen Delgado
    Beautiful @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD!! You are very lucky...
    Lisa Gallagher
    17/07/2016 #15 Lisa Gallagher
    Such a relatable story for so many gals who adored (or adore) their fathers. What a cute picture of you as a child! Thanks for sharing this, it put a smile on my face @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #13 no worries....there'll be 31 when you're done! Invite in your Inbox...goes out to all!
    Irene Hackett
    17/07/2016 #13 Anonymous
    #12 so many stories, so little words...hmmmm - I'm still thinking!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #10 @Irene Hackett: I hope you join in sharing your stories, too! I kmow you have a story to tell!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman: ...and thank you for your encouragement in support of all who would like to join in, too!
  18. William Rakow

    William Rakow

    12/06/2016
    The world's most valuable barn find rare Cars untouched for 50 years
    The world's most valuable barn find rare Cars untouched for 50 years Today these old cars are worth a lot of money. We are talking about american muscle cars produced before and now found in different places of the world....
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/06/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Just goes to show that sometimes, there's a goldmine sitting in our brains or buried in our back yards. So we should never give up on any of our goals, even if our only goal is to make it through another day! Keep ON GOING! Dig! Dig! Dig! Look up...and see the helping hand waiting for you, because you are not alone. Just look up!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/06/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Oh! VROOoooooOOMMMM!
    Juan Imaz
    13/06/2016 #1 Juan Imaz
    I love those cars!
  19. Brigette Hyacinth
    El d铆a que cambie su actitud es el d铆a que cambie su vida. Brigette Hyacinth
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/06/2016 #9 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 @Federico 脕lvarez San Mart铆n: 隆Tan verdadero! Jajaja!
    Federico 脕lvarez San Mart铆n
    16/06/2016 #8 Federico 脕lvarez San Mart铆n
    Claro, tu actitud es tu motor, para todo!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/06/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5
    Por obrigado! Ser谩 que o pequeno c茫o tem um Poncha primeiro? :-)
    S茅rgio Ferreira
    15/06/2016 #5 S茅rgio Ferreira
    Kkk bem legal isso
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    14/06/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Love it! And love your philosophy that we all need to keep our eyes on benefitting society! Just the same as my heart! I started a new Hive with this inspiring quote ~ Invisible Illnesses: Inspiration & Motivation! Muchas gracias, mi hermana!
    Zack Thorn
    10/06/2016 #3 Zack Thorn
    Isn't that the truth ! The difference between a smile or a frown on your face as you walk through any door in life is a deal maker or breaker.........you choose.
    Pamela L. Williams
    10/06/2016 #2 Pamela L. Williams
    Just have to love the photo! Even if the words weren't present it would provide a powerful message about courage!
    Brigette Hyacinth
    10/06/2016 #1 Brigette Hyacinth
    'It's not who you are that holds you back, it's who you think you are not.' 鈥擠enis Waitley