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Japan - beBee

Japan

~ 100 buzzes
This hive was created to share and inform about Japan.
Buzzes
  1. Nelson Rogério

    Nelson Rogério

    13/09/2016
    TÉCNICA VOCAL/AULAS VIA SKYPE
    OLÁ FINALMENTE ALGO NO NÃO É Você afiliado pode apresentar para seus clientes que o curso TÉCNICA VOCAL ALGORA TEM AULA VIA SKYPE…
    PAGES.HOTMART.COM
    Nelson Rogério
    TÉCNICA VOCAL/AULAS VIA SKYPE
    hotmart.net.br OLÁ FINALMENTE ALGO NO NÃO É Você afiliado pode apresentar para seus clientes que o curso TÉCNICA VOCAL ALGORA TEM AULA VIA SKYPE ISSO MESMO NO ATO DO PAGAMENTO TERÁ DIREITO A A 1 MÊS DE AULA E O MAIS IMPORTANTE VOCÊ PODE DISTRIBUIR ESSE CÓDIGO...
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  2. Vincenzo De Florio
    I've just finished watching
    #Planetarian: The Reverie of a Little Planet (#ちいさなほしのゆめ).
    A story that moved me to tears.
    #planetarian_anime
    Vincenzo De Florio
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  3. Dean Owen

    Dean Owen

    22/08/2016
    Yes we have plenty of MacDonald's, Burger King's, even Carls Jr here in Asia, but we also have MOS Burger, a Japanese chain that, in 1987, launched the Rice Burger with patties made of Rice, much like hash browns, crispy on the outside, soft in the middle. Try one next time you visit Asia! Dean Owen
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    Comments

    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    22/08/2016 #15 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    #13 Well, the bun is a patty so I guess either term is correct.
    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    22/08/2016 #14 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    #13 Let the experimenting commence!!! I have a few thoughts, I'll let you know Dean-san. I'll try a dry skillet first, or maybe a pannini press with flat panels. If that doesn't work I'll move on to a broiler.
    Dean Owen
    22/08/2016 #13 Dean Owen
    #11 sorry, mistaken use of word above. Rice buns, not patties (not too familiar with American lingo) 🇯🇵🤓
    Dean Owen
    22/08/2016 #12 Dean Owen
    Yep, a completely rice bun glazed with a sauce (maybe a light teriyaki like sauce) and I guess it is toasted, not fried as it is not oily at all. Crispy on the outside, fluffy inside.. The one pictured is a Yakiniku rice burger (Korean BBQ'd meat). Really tasty!
    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    22/08/2016 #11 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    Hmmm, I think I'll make some for my supper. Do they deep fry or pan fry, @Dean Owen?

    From the picture, it looks more like a bun made of rice or is that filling rice too?
    Dean Owen
    22/08/2016 #9 Dean Owen
    Chill guys and girls, have a rice burger!
    Dean Owen
    22/08/2016 #8 Dean Owen
    #6 You would absolutely love Singapore (provided you don't mind tropical weather year round). Good luck!
    Brian McKenzie
    22/08/2016 #6 Brian McKenzie
    #5 I just pushed a project proposal into Singapore....so maybe it is soon.
    Dean Owen
    22/08/2016 #5 Dean Owen
    #3 No bacon cheese rice burgers, but the Spicy Mos Cheeseburger is pretty cool. It won't be long before you'll see Mos on your continent. http://www.mosburger.com.sg/mos_menu.php
    Dean Owen
    22/08/2016 #4 Dean Owen
    #2 I'm sure it won't be too long before you'll have one near you. 1700 stores across APAC already.
    Brian McKenzie
    22/08/2016 #3 Brian McKenzie
    What does it taste like......and can I get bacon and cheese on it?
    Vincent Andrew
    22/08/2016 #2 Vincent Andrew
    Hmmmm interesting. You get so much food choices there @Dean Owen. We haven't got MOS here yet.
    Javier beBee
    22/08/2016 #1 Javier beBee
    thanks @Dean Owen !
  4. Vincenzo De Florio
    Premiata Forneria Marconi: La Carrozza di Hans
    Live in #Japan

    #Mussida #Premoli #DiCioccio #Djivas #Fabbri
    #PFM
    #日本
    PFM - La Carrozza di Hans
    PFM - La Carrozza di Hans Premiata Forneria Marconi Live in Japan,...
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    Nick Mlatchkov
    10/08/2016 #2 Anonymous
    PFM have definitely put Italy on the Prog Rock map!
    Nick Mlatchkov
    10/08/2016 #1 Anonymous
    How long have PFM been active?
  5. Isidro Nieves G.
    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10207072955798399&id=1115960760 Isidro Nieves G.
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  6. ProducerAndrew Porter

    Andrew Porter

    26/07/2016
    Jigokudani Park
    Jigokudani ParkWell I bet you’d never guess that there is a monkey spa right in the middle of Hell's Valley…. ​Let me introduce you to Jigokudani Park…So named because of the area’s eerie bubbling hot springs, harsh landscape, and snowy frigid climate,...
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    donald agbaje
    01/08/2016 #4 donald agbaje
    Beautiful
    Andrew Porter
    26/07/2016 #3 Andrew Porter
    #1 Thank you @Dean Owen....although I am in awe of your article, a little more practice required on my part!
    Mathias Jung
    26/07/2016 #2 Mathias Jung
    Primates are truly our closest cousins!
    Dean Owen
    26/07/2016 #1 Dean Owen
    Onsen - One of my favourite pastimes! Great buzz! - https://www.bebee.com/producer/@dean-owen/naked-japan-an-onsen-experience
  7. ProducerDean Owen

    Dean Owen

    23/07/2016
    Letters from Manila
    Letters from Manila25th October, 1944, Philippines “Dear Father, It is with deep regret that I write to say this will be my last letter. Just this morning, we were given a simple slip of paper with mission details and three choices. To eagerly...
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    Comments

    Dean Owen
    24/07/2016 #24 Dean Owen
    #23 Brilliant comment!
    Phil Friedman
    24/07/2016 #23 Phil Friedman
    #22 @Dean Owen - I think it is a mistake to generalize. (That is not a pun, BTW) Eisenhower was to my mind a great U.S. president, in part because he knew and warned of the growing danger being posed by the military-industrial complex (of special interests). Colin Powell might have made a solid president, if he had a better grounding in constitutional history. William Westmoreland was an apparatchik. And many of the "great generals" in the U.S. (which is what I know best), like MacArthur, Patton, and Schwarzkopf probably had egos too big to make them good presidents. I think military brass have a place at the highest levels of decision making, but that the U.S. is founded on the concept of civilian rule. Unfortunately, we've allowed out political system to be bought by moneyed and foreign interests.
    Dean Owen
    24/07/2016 #22 Dean Owen
    #21 Yes I got you @Phil Friedman. Do you think military brass would make better politicians? I am thinking back to Colin Powell...
    Phil Friedman
    24/07/2016 #21 Phil Friedman
    @ @Dean Owen and John Valledor - Please do not misunderstand. First, I said in the modern world. And second I am talking primarily about rulers (politicians and other doyens of government, not the warriors who carry out their orders. I understand fully that not all generals are from the Armchair Brigade.
    John Valledor
    24/07/2016 #20 John Valledor
    Gentlemen, in today's Army we don't have arm chair generals. In 2014, I served in Afghanistan with Major General Harold Greene (US Army two-star general). He was a remarkable leader. Sadly, he was killed by an Afghan soldier while performing his mission. Past wars aside, today's conflicts are far different-everyone fights and death does not discriminate by rank.
    Dean Owen
    24/07/2016 #18 Dean Owen
    #15 @John Valledor, your comment should be a buzz in itself. The waterbottle story is absolutely priceless. Our perception of the American soldier, right or wrong, is largely from Hollywood's portrayal in movies like Casualties of War. I suspect "Generation Kill" was a pretty accurate portrayal, but you would clearly know first hand. Respect.
    Dean Owen
    24/07/2016 #17 Dean Owen
    #13 Indeed @Phil Friedman, as illustrated by the armchair generals of WW1. This was actually not the case with the Kamikaze, when in fact the Admirals and Commanders often led the squadrons to their death. Call it Samurai spirit, I think perhaps they were obsessed with devotion to a divine Emperor. It is perhaps rare to see Kings or Queens on the battlefield these days. It does happen, but is usually staged. But throughout history there have been a huge number of monarchs/emperors killed in battle.
    mohammed khalaf
    23/07/2016 #16 mohammed khalaf
    from your right to honor with your sacrifices
    John Valledor
    23/07/2016 #15 John Valledor
    Dean, I truly enjoyed reading your article. As a combat veteran it resonated. I thank you for adding the comment about how American sailors buried kamikaze pilots with honors. Reminded me of my first taste of combat--Desert Storm. As a young captain in the 101st Airborne Division and hours into our air assault into Southern Iraq on the first day of the ground war, I was sent by helicopter to capture and round up roving bands of demoralized Iraqi soldiers we previously bombed mercilessly. I recall approaching several Iraqi soldiers in the open desert, capturing them and to their great surprise I handed them bottles of water. I will never forget the look in one soldier's eyes, when he saw me reach back over him he expected to be shot dead by me, deep fear was in his eyes. To his surprise it was a bottle of water, not a gun, that I pulled out and handed to him. You see, not all American soldiers are blood thirsty killers.
    Phil Friedman
    23/07/2016 #14 Phil Friedman
    In the modern world, wars are waged by old men who rarely, if ever take to the battlefield themselves. If politicians and high government officials were required to lead troops into battle, there would be far fewer, if any wars. This post by @Dean Owen View more
    In the modern world, wars are waged by old men who rarely, if ever take to the battlefield themselves. If politicians and high government officials were required to lead troops into battle, there would be far fewer, if any wars. This post by @Dean Owen is a must read, for it is rich with history and a keen sense of humanity. Close
    Phil Friedman
    23/07/2016 #13 Phil Friedman
    In the modern world, wars are waged by old men who rarely, if ever take to the battlefield themselves. If politicians and high government officials were required to lead troops into battle, there would be far fewer, if any wars. Very nice piece, @Dean Owen View more
    In the modern world, wars are waged by old men who rarely, if ever take to the battlefield themselves. If politicians and high government officials were required to lead troops into battle, there would be far fewer, if any wars. Very nice piece, @Dean Owen, rich with history and humanity. Close
    Randy Keho
    23/07/2016 #12 Randy Keho
    #2 Another example that we are more alike than different.
    Irene Hackett
    23/07/2016 #11 Anonymous
    @Dean Owen - I just gotta have that book!!!
    Mamen Delgado
    23/07/2016 #10 Mamen Delgado
    #7 Sounds very interesting!!!
    Michael Hillebrand
    23/07/2016 #9 Michael Hillebrand
    #7 props!!! Now I REALLY wanna read it..
    Dean Owen
    23/07/2016 #8 Dean Owen
    #5 Thanks Pamela. I am sure there are parallels to be drawn if you dig deep enough. I have no idea where to start really. My intention was not to glorify these horrific acts, but more to highlight that these were typical college kids much like the ones I went to university with.
    Dean Owen
    23/07/2016 #7 Dean Owen
    #4 Thanks Michael. I do have a book waiting to be written, and incredible story that needs to be told, and in a way these are dress rehearsals, but the book will have to wait as it is politically sensitive and may well get me evicted from my current country of residence.
    Dean Owen
    23/07/2016 #6 Dean Owen
    #3 Thanks Irene. Yes I think there are lessons to be learnt here and I am kind of on a journey to discover what the lessons are. Much appreciate the kind words.
    Pamela L. Williams
    23/07/2016 #5 Pamela L. Williams
    Dean, what a wonderful depiction of a time when honor and loyalty were the code by which many of the world lived. To me that is how the situation differs from todays events. The kamikaze pilots followed through because to not do so would not only bring dishonor upon themselves but their families. The suicide bombings today are not the same; they do not result from a sense of honor but feelings of hate and the belief of what awaits them in the afterlife. They are selfish acts that kill innocent people. In my eyes, the two situations cannot be compared.
    Michael Hillebrand
    23/07/2016 #4 Michael Hillebrand
    Very good post @Dean Owen. I really like the way you write, and tell stories. Sitting down for coffee with you, hitting record on a voice recorder, and just having you tell stories, would make an incredible book.. Just jump around through all of your various stories, personal memories, etc.. Should look into doing that sometime, and find something like Blurb.com (or something) and make something for your daughters..
  8. Flavio 🇯🇵 Souza
    Just another weekend in Japan , nothing to see here move along folks .... Flavio 🇯🇵 Souza
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    Brian McKenzie
    09/07/2016 #2 Brian McKenzie
    Mon chi chi coz-play
    Dean Owen
    09/07/2016 #1 Dean Owen
    These two gunguro just back from Papua New Guinea?
  9. Flavio 🇯🇵 Souza
    basic but nice article
    Flavio 🇯🇵 Souza
    Top Things to Do in Tokyo
    taiken.co With virtually unlimited sights to choose from, we have picked out the top 15 things to do that you must experience in...
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    Dean Owen
    05/07/2016 #1 Dean Owen
    Disappointing list! I mean, who would want to get lost in Shinjuku and Tokyo stations? They should add Shimo-Kitazawa, Jyugaoka, and Monzen-Nakacho. Plus visiting a sumo stable and eating chanko.
  10. Isidro Nieves G.
    Después de México, PuertoRico...este verano se unirá a la familia ACN : Japón...el 3er mercado más grande del mundo de VentaDirecta, será el 26avo país.

    ACN será la primera empresa de VentaDirecta de servicios de Japón y lo haremos a lo grande ...con servicios Inalámbricos y Energía. Conoces a algún Japonés con ganas de crear algo grandioso ...?

    IM-PA-RA-BLE...
    Isidro Nieves G.
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  11. Marta Carretero Garcia
    Restaurante Kikunoi- kyoto Marta Carretero Garcia
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    Dean Owen
    23/06/2016 #1 Dean Owen
    とても美味しそうだね! Looks delicious!
  12. ProducerDean Owen

    Dean Owen

    22/06/2016
    Pachinko - Uniquely Japanese
    Pachinko - Uniquely Japanese Take a walk near any major train station in Tokyo and you’ll likely stumble upon a colourful façade with flashing signs and a million tiny lightbulbs. As you approach, the sliding doors open and the noise hits you like a ton of bricks. This is...
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    Dean Owen
    02/07/2016 #4 Dean Owen
    #3 How cool to have had one in your home. The modern ones make a right racket. I think everything you come across is worth doing once. Thanks @Loribeth Pierson
    Loribeth Pierson
    02/07/2016 #3 Loribeth Pierson
    Sounds like fun @Dean Owen, we had a small Pachinko machine growing up, it was a blast to play. We could play for hours but no money involved. Lol to young at the time. I think a room full of them would give me a big headache, but it might be worth it once. Thanks for sharing part of your journey.
    Dean Owen
    22/06/2016 #2 Dean Owen
    Weird and wonderful @Catalina Serrano, it is like no other country (well except Taiwan and South Korea!). Pachinko, yes a few times when I felt like throwing money away. I had an uncle that owned a parlour (and became very rich doing so).Thanks for sharing (as always)!
    Catalina Serrano
    22/06/2016 #1 Catalina Serrano
    Have you been there trading? Did you win something or loose? Japanese people are incredible, they won't stop amazing us with all kind of things like the Pachinko parlour, I hope I can go soon to discover and taste and see and... everything!!
  13. ProducerDean Owen

    Dean Owen

    20/05/2016
    Culinary Sadists
    Culinary SadistsRemember as kids when we used to have those conversations about the weirdest things we ever ate? Without a doubt, there would always be someone who mentions snake blood or monkey brains. The weirdest thing I have ever eaten, aside from...
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    Comments

    Ken Boddie
    06/11/2016 #44 Ken Boddie
    #43 #40 Think I'll stick with the Big Rat burgers or the KFR. 🐭
    Claire Cardwell
    06/11/2016 #43 Claire Cardwell
    #42 It makes more sense to me that peanuts which are normally sold salted are mixed with a savoury spread like marmite rather than sweet jam. In the UK they have an awesome snack called Twiglets - baked maize 'twigs' dipped in marmite. I wish you could get them here in SA!
    Ken Boddie
    06/11/2016 #42 Ken Boddie
    #39 I remember the supermarkets in Oz used to sell peanut butter with stripes of jam through it. Maybe you're onto the next 'thing' - peanut butter with stripes if marmite?
    Claire Cardwell
    06/11/2016 #41 Claire Cardwell
    #40 @Dean Owen they are both yeast extracts, but Marmite has a cleaner, meatier flavour.
    Dean Owen
    06/11/2016 #40 Dean Owen
    #39 Huh? Are they not one and the same?
    Claire Cardwell
    06/11/2016 #39 Claire Cardwell
    #38 Me too, it's revolting. I am however a lover of Marmite! I sometimes eat it with peanut butter.
    Ken Boddie
    06/11/2016 #38 Ken Boddie
    #36 and survived to tell the tale, Claire. It remains a complete mystery to me why Vegemite is so popular.
    Claire Cardwell
    06/11/2016 #37 Claire Cardwell
    @Dean Owen the weirdest thing I have ever eaten is pickled snake skin that some friends from Hong Kong brought when I was at school (+/- 100 years ago) . They couldn't believe that I a) ate it and b) liked it. Now I would rather leave the snake alone and eat pickled plums.
    Claire Cardwell
    06/11/2016 #36 Claire Cardwell
    #29 I tried vegemite and egg sandwiches once....
    Pamela L. Williams
    28/07/2016 #35 Pamela L. Williams
    #27 OMG Cat I love mole! Haven't had any decent since leaving California! With the large Latin community in North Carolina you would think some of them would have their grandmother's recipes! :-). There was a little dive restaurant attached to a gas station that did really authentic Mexican food but the wimpy people from this area apparently didn't appreciate it because it was closed the next time I went. It actually had hand-made corn tortillas...scrumptious.
    Wayne Yoshida
    04/07/2016 #34 Wayne Yoshida
    #33 Yes. It even looks dangerous
    Dean Owen
    04/07/2016 #33 Dean Owen
    #32 Ahh the King of Fruit. I am seeing it in supermarkets further afield these days, in London, Paris, NY. Durian is slowly taking over the world. We just need to ensure this potential WMD stays out of the hands of terrorists.
    Wayne Yoshida
    03/07/2016 #32 Wayne Yoshida
    How about Durian fruit? I had some when I went to Singapore and Malaysia. I believe it is your lead picture. Stinky. It is illegal to have them in hotels and buses. But, other than the smell, it was - OK. I had it in a salad. . . But the strangest thing of all is this thought -- who decided to eat any of these things for the very first time? Like the first durian feast. The first person eating one of these had to have been thinking - Hmm. This smells like poop or a sewer or a dead animal. I wonder what it tastes like?
    NO one
    22/05/2016 #31 NO one
    #29 I would love to go back and visit you @Ken Boddie it's my favorite country in the world, my best friend is from Canberra.
    Dean Owen
    22/05/2016 #30 Dean Owen
    #29 Blame the Germans! I just learnt that a German invented Marmite in the late 19th Century.
    Ken Boddie
    22/05/2016 #29 Ken Boddie
    Regarding your inexplicable passion for vegemite, @NO one, perhaps you need to come on an exploratory visit to Australia in order to find out? #26 🇦🇺
    NO one
    21/05/2016 #28 NO one
    #14 @Phillip Hubbell I'm glad you liked them! You probably have some insect super powers in your blood now 😏
    NO one
    21/05/2016 #27 NO one
    #11 No no!! you have to try them they're delicious! but we also have other weird things to eat that are not that creepy, maybe try "mole", a sauce made with chocolate and chile, it's not that spicy and it's amazing!
    NO one
    21/05/2016 #26 NO one
    #25 Yes, @Ken Boddie maybe I have to try kangaroo meat cooked in a different way, I only had it in a type of barbecue so maybe I would need to try it with sauce. As for the vegemite I still have some here in Madrid, I don't know why but I love it!
    Ken Boddie
    21/05/2016 #25 Ken Boddie
    Sorry to hear you had a bad experience with kangaroo meat, @NO one. 😞 I wouldn't write it off as bitter. It is a delicious lean meat, but, like all lean meat with little or no fat, it has to be cooked carefully or it can be chewy or bitter. As for the Vegemite, most Australians would agree with you, but they have probably grown up with it and it is a taste I have never acquired. 😝 #9
  14. Marta Carretero Garcia
    beBee is relevant in Kyoto! Marta Carretero Garcia
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    Javier beBee
    21/05/2016 #1 Javier beBee
    We want also japanese professionals in beBee :)
  15. ProducerDean Owen

    Dean Owen

    19/05/2016
    Sushi Secrets
    Sushi SecretsWhen people think of Japanese food, Sushi is usually the first thing that comes to mind. Much of Sushi’s worldwide popularity can be attributed to people like my mother who, back in the Swinging Sixties, opened the first Japanese restaurant in...
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    Dean Owen
    22/06/2016 #22 Dean Owen
    #21 Glad to see you on beBee bro! I remember we went to a couple of Chinese restaurants with Dad, the crispy duck at Vilamoura was good. Don't think we ever had Japanese, but there was a good one in Quinto de Lago years back.
    Sinclair Owen
    22/06/2016 #21 Sinclair Owen
    @Dean Owen what a great read, thank you for your precious insight into the world of Sushi. Sushi has become very popular here in Portugal recently with an explosion of restaurants offering all manner of Sushi, mostly buffet style or you order from a menu and they bring you all you can eat for a fixed price. Many are actually converted Chinese restaurants run by Chinese patrons who probably discovered that by serving Japanese food they could be more successful! Some are actually very good but none offer the service or attention to detail you describe. As far as I know there are only a few Japanese restaurants here in Portugal that would offer the experience you describe, one of my favourites and probably the oldest was called Aya but sadly it closed down. I believe that one of the best now is called Tomo, the chef used to work at Aya and also the Japanese embassy. Next time I am in Lisbon I will go there and follow you great advice, savour the experience and even try the Kamayaki you recommended!
    Dean Owen
    20/05/2016 #20 Dean Owen
    Only once. The bath right? Yes, when I was very young I went to stay at an old house in Shizuoka and they had one. I had the bath, and then let the water out only to get scolded by the grandmother - That was their bathwater for the whole week. I do love the modern baths that can heat the water while you are in the bath.
    Louise Smith
    20/05/2016 #19 Louise Smith
    Hi Dean @Dean Owen, I don't think of myself as a Japaholic. When I was studying at uni the first time as a young adult, I met some Japanese exchange students. It was my first contact with a Japanese person, food and culture. We became friends and they invited me to visit them. So I did! Then later on I studied Japanese my second time at Uni and needed a job at the end so became a Japanese teacher. As since the first time at uni, I've always had Japanese friends, I've just kept in touch and visited them. I have had many experiences in Japan that even Japanese nationals have not. Have you ever seem or had Goemonburu?
    Dean Owen
    19/05/2016 #18 Dean Owen
    #16 Do give it a go @Christopher Taylor. And you can vary it up on the temaki sushi. The best temaki are Negi Toro (fatty tuna with Japanese chives), Anakkyuu (Eel with cucumber), and Umekkyuu the one I mentioned. Only Japanese chefs will know the last two. Thanks for stopping by!
    Dean Owen
    19/05/2016 #17 Dean Owen
    #15 Sounds like LinkedIn @Brian McKenzie! I actually hate spam, but liked the deep fried spam in Hawaii.
    Christopher Taylor
    19/05/2016 #16 Christopher Taylor
    This is really interesting. I love sushi so I'm sure to try all of the things I had no idea existed too!
    Brian McKenzie
    19/05/2016 #15 Brian McKenzie
    Battered and deep fried SPAM 'sushi' makes me fond of the old war back in Hawaii - spam was EVERYWHERE
    Dean Owen
    19/05/2016 #14 Dean Owen
    #13 Cool @Louise Smith, a real Japaholic. It is such a cool country. I went there for university and ended up staying 9 years. Did you ever acquire a taste for Natto?
    Louise Smith
    19/05/2016 #13 Louise Smith
    #4 Hi @Dean Owen, Yes I did guess that. So a Japanese childhood ? I have been to Japan 9 times. I lived there for 3 months and then 1 year at different times. I love Japanese food and learnt to adapt Australian ingredients long before Japanese ones were available here!
    Dean Owen
    19/05/2016 #12 Dean Owen
    #10 Sure @Jennifer. You can usually find both types of paste in any international supermarket, usually sold in square plastic tubs. The white miso paste usually has a large percentage of rice, and the red has other grains like soybeans. The resulting taste is very different with the white miso slightly sweeter and the red slightly salty and with umami (Japan's 5th taste in addition to sweet, sour, salty, bitter). Many Japanese mix the two. White works well with fatty port, radish etc, and red works well with clams, maitake or bunashimeji mushrooms.
    NO one
    19/05/2016 #11 NO one
    #7 Will be delighted to learn from the master!
    Jennifer Martin
    19/05/2016 #10 Jennifer Martin
    #9 Another thing that I didn't know, I've only tried the white version. Will have to add it to the list! Could you tell me the difference between both?
    Dean Owen
    19/05/2016 #9 Dean Owen
    #5 @Jennifer Martin, yes Omisoshiru (miso soup) is really hit or miss at most places, but good sushi restaurants will always serve good miso soup. Which do you prefer, red or white miso soup (or a mixture of both?)
    Ken Boddie
    19/05/2016 #8 Ken Boddie
    Lots of Kens, eh, @Dean Owen? Didn't realise theJapanese were so clever 😊#6
    Dean Owen
    19/05/2016 #7 Dean Owen
    Well certainly Catalina, one day I will make the trip to Madrid and take out team beBee for some sushi if you all have time!
    Dean Owen
    19/05/2016 #6 Dean Owen
    Thank you @Ken Boddie-sama (did you know Ken is a very popular name in Japan, usually short for Kenji or Kentaro). Enjoy your trip!
    Jennifer Martin
    19/05/2016 #5 Jennifer Martin
    My favorite apart from a typicall sushi, customized for american I guess, is the miso soup although sometimes in some places I found it too salty. I think that these tips are incredibly insightful and helpful. Thank you @Dean Owen View more
    My favorite apart from a typicall sushi, customized for american I guess, is the miso soup although sometimes in some places I found it too salty. I think that these tips are incredibly insightful and helpful. Thank you @Dean Owen. The part of saying Omakase Shimasu is the best! Close
    Dean Owen
    19/05/2016 #4 Dean Owen
    Yes @Louise Smith, I lived in Japan for 9 years and as you can probably guess, my mother is Japanese. But it was long nights at sushi counters talking to the Master that form the basis of this article. Thanks for stopping by!
    NO one
    19/05/2016 #3 NO one
    @Dean Owen I love to learn from other cultures, I would love to be one of those clients and having you order for me so I can have the real and great experience! With this buzz I can have some of that, thank you!
  16. Marta Carretero Garcia
    Brutal experiencia callejera en Tokyo! Marta Carretero Garcia
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    Catalina Serrano
    25/05/2016 #3 Catalina Serrano
    qué pintaza, no? :P
    Marta Pardo Morales
    17/05/2016 #2 Marta Pardo Morales
    @Marta Carretero Garcia Ikazaya no? que envidia!! pásalo bien :)
    Pedro Gómez
    16/05/2016 #1 Pedro Gómez
    Debe ser un shock cultural.....es otro mundo, no...?
  17. ProducerDean Owen

    Dean Owen

    13/05/2016
    Naked Japan - An Onsen Experience
    Naked Japan - An Onsen ExperienceJapan’s Mount Fuji is certainly one of the most beautiful mountains of the planet. This sacred giant is a picture perfect backdrop to the five surrounding lakes. It’s almost perfect symmetric shape and snow covered peak has been inspiration for...
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    Comments

    Louise Smith
    05/06/2016 #14 Louise Smith
    #13 My Japanese friends have seen tsuru. They are birdwatchers so know where to go http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e6792.html
    Dean Owen
    05/06/2016 #13 Dean Owen
    #12 Funny I lived in Japan for 9 years, went to Hokkaido numerous times, and never saw tsuru, but I guess they avoid the big cities like Hakodate and Sapporo. Only time I have seen the dance of the tsuru was in Bhutan, a place I least expected it. I do love the skiing in Hokkaido. It is so uniquely Japanese, hitting the slopes followed by katsu kare and Ichiban Shibori.
    Louise Smith
    05/06/2016 #12 Louise Smith
    #11 Hi @Dean Owen I haven't been to Hokkaido only the other main Islands. I'd like to go there in Spring or to Ski in Winter. I'd like to see tsuru in the wild.
    Dean Owen
    04/06/2016 #11 Dean Owen
    #10 Wow a bit of an Onsenaholic @Louisa Smith. I am glad you didn't mention Atami and Hakone. They are quite run down.
    Louise Smith
    04/06/2016 #10 Louise Smith
    The best Onsen I have been to are near Nikko the size of an olympic swimming pool; one about 2 hours car drive from Tokyo with a view of Mt Fuji from the outside pool; a few in Gunma and Chichibu; Beppu; near Asosan and Shirarahama"Shirasuna" (Open air bath) http://www.shiraraso.co.jp/english/sightseeing/ It's one thing I really miss !
    Dean Owen
    13/05/2016 #9 Dean Owen
    Ohh the monkeys love the onsen, I wouldn't worry about them. They are not considered a food group by the Japanese and that picture is not a big boiling pot! Thanks for stopping by @Roland VanDenBerg.
    Ken Boddie
    13/05/2016 #8 Ken Boddie
    Will do, @Dean Owen-san #6
    Dean Owen
    13/05/2016 #7 Dean Owen
    Hope you get the chance to visit one day @Jessica Robinson. Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment!
    Dean Owen
    13/05/2016 #6 Dean Owen
    Douitashimashite Ken-sama! Let me know if you need any recommendations for anything!
    Dean Owen
    13/05/2016 #5 Dean Owen
    You would totally love Japan @NO one. It is such a hotspot for creativity with the cultural element added in. Thanks for reading and sharing as always!
    Roland VanDenBerg
    13/05/2016 #4 Roland VanDenBerg
    Their goodness!!! Look at those monkeys! They have lost hope and now are in bitter disappointment. I have been there before. A better climate would do them good. Any suggestions? Put those monkeys in a zoo if nothing else!!!
    Jessica Robinson
    13/05/2016 #3 Jessica Robinson
    Seems like an amazing place! Its wise of you to put a word on Onsen etiquette as i had no idea. Great post @Dean Owen, ill definitely put this on my wish list.
    Ken Boddie
    13/05/2016 #2 Ken Boddie
    Domo arigato, Dean-san. I've filed away your 'hot' list of resorts as we're planning to visit japan next year, Fujiplosion permitting, of course. 🌋
    NO one
    13/05/2016 #1 NO one
    Omg this is totally amazing! It is on my wishlist to go to Japan. I want to experience the most ancient traditions if it is posible.
  18. Aileen Adalid

    Aileen Adalid

    07/03/2016
    Japan can be quite an eccentric country, so with the help of ‘locals’, here are some 10 interesting facts about Japan to help make us understand it better!

    http://iamaileen.com/10-things-foreigners-should-know-about-japan/ #travel #japan #tokyo
    Aileen Adalid
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