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Leadership Development - beBee

Leadership Development

+ 100 buzzes
Teaching of leadership qualities, including communication, ability to motivate others, and management, to an individual who may or may not use the learned skills in a leadership position.
Buzzes
  1. ProducerPreston Vander Ven
    How to Think Like A Leader
    How to Think Like A LeaderArticle from Blog FreedomFirst off, Leadership is not a position or a title. It is an action and an example.  Achieving high-level success requires the support and the cooperation of others. Success and the ability to lead others – that is getting...
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  2. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    13/01/2017
    Leadership Is Not What I Thought It Was
    Leadership Is Not What I Thought It Was"Leadership is not what I thought it was" – this was the comment from one of my students earlier this week as I sat in on one of the small group discussions into which the students break during class time. When I asked her to explain what she...
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  3. ProducerMark LeBusque Human Manager & Purposeful Provocateur
    Drop the "S" Word and Start Getting Real
    Drop the "S" Word and Start Getting Real Ever sat in a meeting and counted the amount of times when someone starts a sentence by apologising for what they are about to say?"I'm sorry to say this............................."Apologies in advance for what I'm about to...
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    Comments

    Harvey Lloyd
    13/01/2017 #1 Harvey Lloyd
    I agree here to a point. I find that many seem to need to excuse themselves for existing, while the other extreme is someone speaking their mind regardless of being relevant. I don't care for either extreme.

    I do think that sorry has become one of those words we use describe our own discomfort with the topic at hand. But sorry also opens up discussion about the "elephant", is that what you wanted? If i merely require discussion about the elephant then introduce it as a discussion topic. Instead of sorry i use the word uncomfortable as a way to open discussions.

    If you need the team to eat the elephant one bite at the time and time constraints exist........Then we must be direct, factual and lay out an eating plan. The word sorry will derail this effort by opening up discussions. In leading you get to decide when discussion is appropriate and when it is not. Choose wisely, but choose.

    I also think the apologetic style of leadership was born from a education and political system where we are gun shy to be but so direct, as we might offend someone. Also the number of folks waiting to be offended has grown.
  4. ProducerMax🐝 J. Carter
    Creating a daily strategy for long term leadership success
    Creating a daily strategy for long term leadership successIdentifying your personal energy cycle is key. If you do not take care of you, you cannot take care of them. When you go into a meeting that you know is going to be draining, would it not be better to schedule that meeting for a time of day when...
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    Comments

    Max🐝 J. Carter
    11/01/2017 #13 Max🐝 J. Carter
    #12 Totally @Franci🐝Eugenia Hoffman and thank you for sharing this out.
    Franci🐝Eugenia Hoffman
    11/01/2017 #12 Franci🐝Eugenia Hoffman
    Good information, @Max🐝 J. Carter. Being mentally prepared is key, IMO. I would get to work 30 or more minutes early to make sure I was mentally prepared. I am an organized person, however, there can be that ASAP project, or a client crying for help that will interrupt the day. I learned to expect the interruptions and not get stressed, by being mentally prepared. And then there's work/life balance!
    Max🐝 J. Carter
    10/01/2017 #11 Max🐝 J. Carter
    #6 You're welcome.
    Max🐝 J. Carter
    10/01/2017 #10 Max🐝 J. Carter
    #7 I like to think it's getting better.
    Max🐝 J. Carter
    10/01/2017 #9 Max🐝 J. Carter
    Thank you @Preston Vander Ven balancing urgent and important and knowing the difference is a fine line that can get blurred.
    Preston Vander Ven
    10/01/2017 #8 Preston Vander Ven
    Great article. I totally agree about being flexible with our time. Life happens even if we are great with time management, but we need to be prepared for when our schedule if derailed. This use to frustrate me so much, until I learn from others how to be for flexible. I did this by realizing urgent matters didn't always need to come first in my life, yet important matters did. The skill I am working on everyday is deciding on which of these categories a task on my list goes in. In may be either, or, both, or neither.
    I have noticed that when something derails my life, the task at hand is usually both important and urgent, thus needs my total attention. My emails can wait.
    Adam Weedy
    10/01/2017 #7 Adam Weedy
    Leadership, in business, is rare.
    Liesbeth 🐝 Leysen, MSc. beBee Ambassador
    10/01/2017 #6 Liesbeth 🐝 Leysen, MSc. beBee Ambassador
    #4 superb idea thanks for sharing @Max J. Carter
    Max🐝 J. Carter
    10/01/2017 #4 Max🐝 J. Carter
    #2 That we are @Liesbeth 🐝 Leysen, MSc. beBee Ambassador and knowing your energetic flow is a key to managing it and yourself better.

    One of the tools I got from a seminar on prioritizing and organization is to take 6 weeks an at 6 intervals during the day write down your level of energy, higher, lower, mid. This exercise gives you a better understanding of your flow and assists greatly in knowing when in the day to schedule those energy draining tasks.
    Julio Angel Lopez Lopez
    10/01/2017 #3 Julio Angel Lopez Lopez
    Good honey, ordering the hive.
    Thank you @Max🐝 J. Carter
    Liesbeth 🐝 Leysen, MSc. beBee Ambassador
    10/01/2017 #2 Liesbeth 🐝 Leysen, MSc. beBee Ambassador
    key to well-being yes, we are all beings of energy!
    Javier 🐝 beBee
    10/01/2017 #1 Javier 🐝 beBee
    thanks @Max🐝 J. Carter for sharing it !
  5. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    07/01/2017
    What’s That Knocking at the Door?
    What’s That Knocking at the Door?When I started writing this blog in 2014, my initial intent was to write about my journey as I started my own business as an Executive Coach. I had decided on the school I would attend for training, and had already completed some certifications...
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    Comments

    Jared 🐝 Wiese
    09/01/2017 #8 Jared 🐝 Wiese
    Great points. As you say, "step up".
    I've heard it added: Show up. Be authentic. That ties nicely with @Sara Jacobovici's comment. Prepare, then focus on the work, and the rest takes care of itself.
    Adam Weedy
    09/01/2017 #7 Adam Weedy
    Very encouraging!
    Sara Jacobovici
    09/01/2017 #6 Sara Jacobovici
    As always @Ali Anani "reads" me perfectly. Thanks Dr. ali for bringin my attention to this great buzz. @John Whitehead, you present an experience most of us can relate to and certainly identify with in a narrative that makes it easy to hear. As Dr. Ali pointed out, I appreciate when you write, ""One of the biggest lessons I've learned is to expect the unexpected: be open to opportunities as they arise and don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone". This can lead to what has worked for me to gratefully not have to experience the imposter syndrome anymore. First, I always find a way of asking as many questions beforehand regarding expectations; from the organizers or other team members. Then, in expecting the unexpected, my focus is on trying to imagine, where I will be, with who I will be and why I will be there; whether presenting, training, joining a new team , and so on. After all that, I go into the experience not focusing on me or others but on the work itself. With my focus on the work, I have shifted any attention from me or others to the content of the gathering. And since I wouldn't be doing what I was doing if I didn't have an interest or care enough about the work, immersing myself in the work beats any other place, comfort zone or not. Thanks for sharing your experiences and success story John.
    Laura Mikolaitis
    09/01/2017 #5 Laura Mikolaitis
    "So, be ready to step up and be uncomfortable at times because those are the opportunities for real growth. Be ready to open that door when it knocks." A great read by @John Whitehead.
    Laura Mikolaitis
    09/01/2017 #4 Laura Mikolaitis
    @John Whitehead, I love what you say here: "there is a reason you are here; someone thought you are the right person for this role. So do your best and be who you are. You know your stuff — be confident in that." Amen to that. It's something that we tend to forget and we do a disservice to ourselves when we do. Maybe it is due to outside forces or our own internal conflicts that can lead us down that road. But you are right. There is a reason. And likely, a steadfast one. So grab it by the reigns and go because you just never know. And if whatever it is doesn't work out, then perhaps it is leading you to the next thing that will. Growth doesn't come without challenges. We just have to be willing to accept them and learn from them - even if we don't understand the lesson at first. Thank you for sharing this. I really enjoyed reading it.
    Ali Anani
    09/01/2017 #3 Ali Anani
    @John Whitehead- I enjoyed immensely reading your buzz and experiencing the imposter syndrome. I know the feeling and your buzz triggered some memories. I like some doubts for short times because they make me try to do better. However; if should the syndrome stay for prolonged times it could be very harmful.
    I am sure @Sara Jacobovici shall enjoy reading this buzz as you wrote "One of the biggest lessons I've learned is to expect the unexpected: be open to opportunities as they arise and don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone". Only last week she wrote on the relationship of imagination and expecting the unexpected. Sharing
    Harvey Lloyd
    09/01/2017 #2 Harvey Lloyd
    This was a good discussion about the "imposter syndrome", i have never heard it labeled. This is a concept that when traveling in uncharted areas of growth can become a battlefield of the mind.

    I am not sure we can avoid it. There seems to be a competitive communications style that feels it must challenge people in their growth. This would establish a narrative of constant seeking understanding in the area of your growth. Early in my small business journey i was lucky and had a few mentors who recognized my blind exploration and provided complimentary guidance.

    Great thoughts here and certainly is a worthy topic.
    David B. Grinberg
    07/01/2017 #1 David B. Grinberg
    Nice post, John. I would emphasize the many employees need to improve their "soft skills" in today's mobile, digital and virtual Information Age. This is especially true for Millennials and Gen Z, the biggest age demographics who also represents the next generation of leadership. It's good to know you are training people on "soft skills" -- as mastering these skills enhance interpersonal communication and customer service, among other things. Keep buzing in 2017, John!
  6. Bert Purdy

    Bert Purdy

    06/01/2017
    Bert Purdy
    Practical Tips to Raise Up and Inspire Future Leaders
    switchandshift.com If you Google any derivative of “raising up leaders,” you will discover the first several pages of search results are from faith-based organizations, not business publications. If business rises and falls on the shoulders of its leaders, should...
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  7. Andrew Pulkowski
    Hey folks....just joined.....here are a few more things about me
    Andrew Pulkowski
    Andrew Pulkowski, Certified John C. Maxwell Coach, Speaker, and Trainer
    www.johncmaxwellgroup.com The John Maxwell Team is a group of Maxwell certified Coaches, Trainers, Speakers and Professionals, offering workshops, seminars, keynote speaking, and coaching to aid in personal and professional growth to individuals, organizations and companies...
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    Comments

    Milos Djukic
    06/01/2017 #6 Anonymous
    David B. Grinberg
    06/01/2017 #5 David B. Grinberg
    Thanks for spreading your wings with us, Andrew. I look forward to reading more of your buzz-worthy content.
    Max🐝 J. Carter
    06/01/2017 #4 Max🐝 J. Carter
    Welcome to the neighborhood.
    Joel Anderson
    06/01/2017 #3 Joel Anderson
    Welcome Andrew.
    Mike Rana
    06/01/2017 #2 Mike Rana
    Welcome aboard!
    John White, MBA
    06/01/2017 #1 John White, MBA
    Well then, @Andrew Pulkowski, I'm honored to welcome you to beBee and be your first follower. Please feel free to reach out to me personally regarding your experience here on the site. Buzz on!
  8. ProducerPreston Vander Ven
    John Maxwell The 5 Levels of Leadership
    John Maxwell The 5 Levels of LeadershipArticle from Blog Freedom This was a great video,  and I recommend reading this book.  First, if you haven’t watch this video. Stop Reading and Press play.Here is a quit overview of this video you just watched.One of the most established...
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  9. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    30/12/2016
    Networking – Growing Your Business in 2017 and Beyond
    Networking – Growing Your Business in 2017 and BeyondVince Lombardi, the well known and loved US football coach, is known, among other things, for his famous speech, “What It Takes to Be Number 1”. In a nutshell his central message is commitment; that to be a success in anything is to be committed...
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  10. Bert Purdy

    Bert Purdy

    26/12/2016
    Bert Purdy
    Just Because You’re in Charge Doesn’t Mean You Should Run Every Meeting
    hbr.org Three benefits of letting someone else...
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  11. Jim Taggart

    Jim Taggart

    26/12/2016
    Great insights on which to reflect. From Derek Sivers.
    Jim Taggart
    Year-End Leadership Message: It’s About Balance
    changingwinds.wordpress.com As we near the end of 2016, I’ve thought about what message I could share with my readers, something to encourage personal reflection and leadership for 2017. Fortunately, someone I admire...
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  12. John Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    24/12/2016
    John Whitehead
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  13. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    23/12/2016
    Leadership is a Continuous Journey
    Leadership is a Continuous JourneyLeadership is a continuous journey — we should never stop learning. One of the most effective ways of learning and growing, according to Kouzes and Posner (Learning Leadership, Willey, 2016), is to look for "stretch" assignments; areas for...
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    Comments

    Liesbeth 🐝 Leysen, MSc. beBee Ambassador
    07/01/2017 #3 Liesbeth 🐝 Leysen, MSc. beBee Ambassador
    leadership is about growth, yes and that should never stop.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    07/01/2017 #2 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @John Whitehead it really is continuous! Leadership is like learning to walk, even when you think you have mastered it, something can happen and you must relearn what you think you already know. You must always be ready to listen and desire to learn more. Great article.
    Kevin Baker
    23/12/2016 #1 Kevin Baker
    Awesome, love this sentence >>>> He states that he did it just for the sake of taking the course and learning something new and different.
  14. Bert Purdy

    Bert Purdy

    20/12/2016
    Bert Purdy
    4 Credibility Damaging Leadership Mistakes You Can Fix in 2017
    www.inc.com You work hard to build your credibility, but you might be making some common mistakes that can damage it. Here's how to fix...
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  15. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    16/12/2016
    Setting Targets for the New Year?
    Setting Targets for the New Year? It’s that time of year when we start to take a look ahead at what we want to achieve in the coming New Year and at the same time reflect on how far we have come since this time last year. It is fascinating to read the posts that start to appear on...
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    Comments

    John Rylance
    18/12/2016 #5 John Rylance
    The start of a New Year gives us the opportunity to set new goals, start with a blank canvas, plan and make changes in out lives, forget the negative aspects and celebrate the positives of the past year. In ditching the negatives ( they are so last year), I look to turn them where possible into positives. We are often looking for reasons/opportunities to change and a New Year can provide that impetus.
    Nic Fester
    16/12/2016 #4 Nic Fester
    I agree, it's just that the beginning of a year creates a natural reaction for anyone to want to reflect and hit the reset button. More often than not it's because you've found some rest and you are ready to fight on.
    Zacharias Voulgaris 🐝
    16/12/2016 #3 Zacharias Voulgaris 🐝
    I agree 100% on the learning part. For me a quite feasible and healthy goal for 2017 is to reduce my sugar intake and replace it with honey. Not just physically but on other levels too. For example I plan to abstain from LinkedIn as much as possible and focus on other, more nourishing social media.
    Mohammed Sultan
    16/12/2016 #2 Mohammed Sultan
    @John White.We begin the new year saying "Happy New Year" and very often end it up unhappy.If you look at deep-seated social change ,you realize that the slow,peaceful resolutions have never made a difference.Every time we dream of changing the world to become a global village,our march even didn't change a small village.Happy New Year,John.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    16/12/2016 #1 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Let's make a good beginning. Let's rejuvenate our spirits with new resolutions!
  16. ProducerJohn Eades

    John Eades

    12/12/2016
    How to Lead Someone Older Than You
    How to Lead Someone Older Than YouYou could cut the awkwardness in the air with a knife.  Everyone in the room almost had the exact same gasp when the words came out of his mouth,  “I have no clue why you go this job, not only are you younger than most everyone in this room, but...
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    Comments

    Aurorasa Sima
    16/12/2016 #10 Aurorasa Sima
    Interesting and explosive topic. I hear from a lot of older people that a lack of options forces them to accept job offers below their skill set.

    I can imagine that it´s a tough pill to swallow if you have to take orders from a less qualified youngster, so that your advice is double important for aspiring young managers.
    Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    16/12/2016 #9 Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    Mutual respect between the leader (manager) is vital. I think if others feel the manager isn't full of themselves and does have skills they lack along with being a person who's easy to interact with, they are already proving themselves as a great leader. I've always been of the thought that with age, wisdom doesn't always follow, it just depends on the person and then age isn't a factor if we see it this way.
    Leo Loison
    14/12/2016 #8 Leo Loison
    John Eades
    13/12/2016 #7 John Eades
    #5 Thanks Davis and Aleta, means a lot.
    Aleta Curry
    13/12/2016 #6 Aleta Curry
    A lot of this is pertinent to all managers, young or ol-- er - not-so-young. Nice read, John, you've got yourself another follower.
    David B. Grinberg
    13/12/2016 #5 David B. Grinberg
    Thanks for this good career leadership advice, John, you make several excellent points. I also like the quotes from Covey and Einstein. I'm sharing on several hives and now following you on beBee. Keep buzzing!
    John Eades
    12/12/2016 #4 John Eades
    #3 good question John Vaughan
    John Vaughan
    12/12/2016 #3 John Vaughan
    Decent leadership techniques, on general principle. Unique to leading someone older?
    Brian McKenzie
    12/12/2016 #2 Brian McKenzie
    Get deployed, go to war, get decorated and notoriously crash / hack an international war game. All before you are old enough to drink. Worked for me, your mileage may vary.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    12/12/2016 #1 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Show respect and make them feel that you are caring and responsible leader. :)
  17. Preston Vander Ven
    What was the last thing you said?
    Did it uplift, encourage, edify? Did it speak inspiration and vision?
    Did it speak belief into the person you were communicating with?
    What impact did your words have?
    Being a leader (a REAL leader) is far more than anyone really comprehends -- at least that's what I learned from this Daily Shortcut episode.
    Preston Vander Ven
    THE DAILY SHORTCUT #8
    www.empowernetwork.com THE DAILY SHORTCUT...
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  18. Marcel Wilson

    Marcel Wilson

    14/12/2016
    Are you prepared to challenges existing ideas?
    #frontiermindset
    Marcel Wilson
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  19. ProducerAli Anani

    Ali Anani

    13/12/2016
    Avoid Building Concrete Relationships
    Avoid Building Concrete RelationshipsThe societal 4-cycle theory was put forward by the Indian philosopher and spiritual leader‚ Prabhat Ranjan Sarkar in the 1950s and expanded by‚ Ravi Batra‚ since the 1970s,‚ Johan Galtung‚ and‚ Sohail Inayatullah‚ since the 1990s. ...
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    Comments

    Bill Stankiewicz, 🐝 Brand Ambassador
    04/01/2017 #195 Bill Stankiewicz, 🐝 Brand Ambassador
    Very interesting
    Lyon Brave
    31/12/2016 #194 Lyon Brave
    interesting
    Mohammed Sultan
    18/12/2016 #193 Mohammed Sultan
    #191 Thank you Phil for your welcomed thoughtful reply.If there's some logic in the the truth it's sometimes distorted by others interpretations.Sometimes we have an accurate market data(truth) which is distorted by the interpretations and the logic of an inexperienced researcher.
    Mohammed Sultan
    18/12/2016 #192 Mohammed Sultan
    #189 Analogies are also important in business.Nowadays,for effective communications companies are inspiring their employees by associating pictures to make their vision clearly understood.It's also happening here at beBee when they keep inspiring their mission and strategies.I remember once watching the former CEO of CAD Systems was moving with drawing featuring the company strategies on flip charts in offices and conference rooms.And when asked about this he said; I have those drawing around on purpose.It's really hard to get an entire org to understand where it's going ,so we have to keep hammering at the message.......I guess it's a kind of like subliminal suggestion.
    Phil Friedman
    18/12/2016 #191 Phil Friedman
    #187 Mohammed, I obviously agree about the excessive use, or rather the misuse of metaphor. However, logic does not "distort logic" mostly because logic has to do with patterns of reasoning, and never in itself can claim to determine truth. Logic is only concerned with assuring that if we start with true premises or assumptions, we reach similarly true conclusions. Logic does not, and cannot determine if our assumptions or premises are themselves true. Cheers!
    Ali Anani
    18/12/2016 #190 Ali Anani
    #189 Thank you for focusing the discussions @Robert Bacal. Analogies are there to help and at least in my case my imagination. Not all analogies are of the same power and the readers shall resonate with the ones that sounds good to them.
    Robert Bacal
    18/12/2016 #189 Robert Bacal
    There's one point about analogies that has seemed to get lost. Clearly they aren't meant to map onto something exactly, but the real value is in their ability to push us to see something "old and familiar" in a new, fresh way.

    That is why they are so important in poetry, and writing in general, and why they are so "everywhere".

    As I said before, people are smart enough to know the value and use of analogies, and don't mistake the analogy with the thing. We aren't stupid.
    Ali Anani
    18/12/2016 #188 Ali Anani
    #187 Too much of anything spoils and I agree with you @Mohammed Sultan on avoiding the excessive use of metaphors.
    Mohammed Sultan
    18/12/2016 #187 Mohammed Sultan
    #183 Some writers,as mentioned by D.Anani,think that the excessive use of metaphors will strengthen their communicated message,whereas,on the contrary, they distort it.Modernism used metaphors to call attention to their art while the naturalists ,with the excessive use of metaphors,have dissembled the medium and used art to conceal art.Don't we sometimes use logic to distort logic ?
    Ali Anani
    18/12/2016 #186 Ali Anani
    #185 Interesting- George Armani wold enjoy your humor as I did dear @Phil Friedman:))). I understand you are sure now of my pure respect to you.
    Phil Friedman
    18/12/2016 #185 Phil Friedman
    #184 yes, eventually fat fingers on small iPhone touch screens may even promote you to Dr, "Armani" -- which would certainly make the fabric of conversation even more valuable. :-)
    Ali Anani
    18/12/2016 #184 Ali Anani
    #183 Believe me that I understood and respected your views @Phil Friedman. In fact, I am extremely thankful to you for opening channels for extended discussions. I do appreciate your comments and I agree with you that we have to be aware of the shortcomings of metaphors. I don't know why you got this impression when in reality I am very grateful for your solid and honest comments. I fully understand that is topic is debatable and in no way I claim my point of view isn't distorted. I am learning from rich comments such as yours. I am glad you addressed your comment to Dr. Amani and not Anani because I appreciate greatly your contributions.
    Phil Friedman
    18/12/2016 #183 Phil Friedman
    #182 With all due respect, Dr. Amani, I trust you do not see my comments in the same category as the case you describe to Mohammed, for I am not in any way "attacking" the use of metaphors, similes, analogies or the like as tools of communication and elucidation. My point is that we all, myself included, have a tendency at times to become so enamored of the representing object in a metaphor that we forget it is not identical to the represented object, and we begin to draw conclusions about the represented object that are not warranted. Which, by the way, is one reason why literature and metaphysics are not science. My best to you. Cheers!
    Ali Anani
    18/12/2016 #182 Ali Anani
    #181 With all honesty dear @Mohammed Sultan even people who object to using metaphors they use them without being aware. I read once an article on the internet and the author attacked heavily our use of metaphors. I counted more than ten examples of metaphors that he used in his article. The response was the author deleted the post!
    Mohammed Sultan
    18/12/2016 #181 Mohammed Sultan
    I see metaphors and analogies as the simplicity on the other side of complexity.It has been used by political and business leaders as part of the message to convey their vision and to capture peoples imagination without a need to go into the complexity of the subject.
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    18/12/2016 #180 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    #178 Phil, I should apologize to you. Your explanation about models was at the academic level. I do love to hear a good lecture or presentation. In fact, I am involved in the program of lifelong learning/permanent education and professional development in the field of Civil Engineering, and constantly attend various seminars and lectures. I am looking forward to seeing more comments like yours, whatever the topic.
    Robert Bacal
    17/12/2016 #179 Robert Bacal
    #177 @Lada 🏡 Prkic Don't know if kids learn what metaphors are in grade school (we did), but I'd like to think that there is an understanding that a metaphor is never going to be "the thing". It's "like" the thing, and fits to a varying degree. The beauty of metaphors for creating understanding, and simply as a means of communicating is strong. People get it without being lectured.
    Phil Friedman
    17/12/2016 #178 Phil Friedman
    #177 Lada, I apologize if it appeared that I was seeking to lecture you (or for that matter, Dr. Anani), for I was not -- certainly not at a "high school" level. But, I believe that discussion in a forum such as this as requires keeping in mind that not everyone reading, although usually intelligent and educated, will be familiar with concepts and issues that are somewhat on the academic or esoteric side. And so may require a bit more explanation for clarity.

    That said, I understand and agree with your view that a "good analogy" aid in the communication of scientific knowledge and concepts. However, I have to point out that there is a significant difference between communicating a concept or making it clearer by means of an analogy, and seeking to "explore" the implications contained within the analogy before establishing, even informally that the analogy is sufficiently isomorphic in important respects to qualify as a "model" for further investigation or exploration.

    Nevertheless, I do not question for a moment the "Wisdom of Chung King" that one can tell a lot about people from the metaphors they employ. Cheers!
    Lada 🏡 Prkic
    17/12/2016 #177 Lada 🏡 Prkic
    #169 #170 Phil, I appreciate your detailed explanation (it reminded me of the high school lecture), although I understood what you said in the first comment. It seems to me that you, perhaps, overanalyzed the use of an analogy in this post. You clearly said that you're not a big fan of using metaphors in exploring a concept such as friendship, and I accept that fact as your opinion.
    On the contrary, I am a big fan of a good analogy, even in scientific writings. I always welcome when someone tries to communicate his/her knowledge or conveys an idea in such a way. Choosing a figure of speech may also be a matter of artistic licence. That is why a specific analogy, metaphor, or simile might work for me but won't work for someone else.
    I like what Ali Anani said: „They are mental model for a while.“ I would also add one more wisdom by Chung King: „You get to know people through their metaphors.“ :)
    Harvey Lloyd
    17/12/2016 #174 Harvey Lloyd
    #171 Be sure and leave some bread crumbs. Sometimes i need them to get back. Thanks for the dialogue and discussions they do require a level of thinking beyond our own understanding, you help me reflect.
  20. ProducerJohn Whitehead

    John Whitehead

    10/12/2016
    Leadership…. A Few Blisters
    Leadership…. A Few BlistersWe usually think of blisters in a negative way. They can hurt, if not looked after can cause infection, and depending where they are, have a frustrating tendency to get in the way. Another way of looking at blisters is that they are the result of...
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    Comments

    Tony 🐝 Rossi
    11/12/2016 #1 Tony 🐝 Rossi
    We get so caught up in the glamour and success of leaders, aiming to get to that next pedestal ourselves, that it's easy to forget that nothing comes to be without work. Often hard work, that without astonishingly good luck, always comes with a few lessons to be learnt - some more painful that others.
  21. Bert Purdy

    Bert Purdy

    09/12/2016
    Bert Purdy
    This Is What Truly Exceptional Leadership Is All About
    switchandshift.com The quest to define exceptional leadership obsesses many people, and the definitions vary not only in content, but in context. I have sipped many cups of coffee and ran countless miles pondering this complex topic. And like many, I have devoted...
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  22. ProducerAdam Weedy

    Adam Weedy

    08/12/2016
    What is Leadership?
    What is Leadership?Leadership is a rare thing. After 15 years in corporate America I look back at all of the speeches that I’ve sat through as a salesperson and very few of them stand out. In fact, there is only one that I remember with any great degree of clarity. I...
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    Adam Weedy
    05/01/2017 #6 Adam Weedy
    #5 thanks Dorothy!
    Dorothy Cooper
    05/01/2017 #5 Dorothy Cooper
    I am so glad that I read your mind and the article. Leadership is like that philosophical argument " if a tree falls in the woods and no one hears it does it exist."
    To me, I recognize leadership and then I listen. Thanks for your post! I will share on twitter.
    Adam Weedy
    09/12/2016 #3 Adam Weedy
    #1 Well John, I agree. In fact, that is an astute, succinct comment as any I've read on this piece. Thank you.
    Max🐝 J. Carter
    08/12/2016 #2 Max🐝 J. Carter
    I always found that leadership, true leadership has nothing to do with title or function it is a mode of life that is often self sacrificing for the benefit of the sum.

    Leadership in my mind has always been about identifying and filling needs that benefit the sum.

    Anyone making decisions based on the some is not a leader they are a manager or authoritative function with a title.
    John Prpich
    08/12/2016 #1 John Prpich
    What's interesting Adam, is that there is an unusual fine line here, between being a decent human being and being a leader. Tell people how important they are, speak plainly and give credit where credit is due, isn't that what decent people do, regardless of their status.
  23. ProducerMax🐝 J. Carter
    A brief overview of this Shaman's view on Leadership
    A brief overview of this Shaman's view on Leadership Here is an extract from a Nelson Mandela speech, written by Marianne Williamson: “Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light not our darkness that most frightens...
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    Max🐝 J. Carter
    09/12/2016 #2 Max🐝 J. Carter
    #1 "you will be a leader when the rest of the group will look at you as such leader"

    That right there is the essence of being a leader @David Navarro López and I thank you for the sweet honey of your comment on this buzz.
    David Navarro López
    09/12/2016 #1 Anonymous
    In addition to your words, to which I am completely in agreement, I would say that a characteristic of a real leader is to be humble, ready and willing to serve/help others. He/she would be particularly sensitive to the needs or weaknesses of a group, and thinking in advance how to complement them.
    By the time (1992)I was serving at Beiersdorf, after some time I felt I wanted to go somewhere else, as I did not see my career was going to have much progression there. I was service technician at the maintenance dep, and above me, they were two shift responsible, and above them, the head of dep. When I said the latest I wanted to leave, due not seeing any progressing future, he called my attention to the fact that all of my colleagues used to ask me for advice when facing a complex situation, or a difficult repair, rather than asking in the first place to the established leaders for it, their shift responsible.
    His words still resonate in my ears "you will be a leader when the rest of the group will look at you as such leader. You always take your time and give your best to help them with the questions they have, and think ahead about the next questions they will have, much before they even think about it". Some weeks after that, I was promoted to a position between the head of the dep and the two shift leaders. And all my colleagues celebrated it, asking me why it took so long to get the position, should have happened before. In my head, nothing changed, and the following years I acted the same way I was acting before. For that, I believe that to be a leader is to be a good professional with a special attitude. If someone is struggling himself to become a leader, and reading and applying the "10 tips to be a successful leader" crab, will hardly become a good leader. One needs to be born to that, to feel like it from the "helping" mindset, and is a natural evolvement product of your professional maturity.
  24. ProducerJohn Prpich

    John Prpich

    08/12/2016
    A CRITICAL COMPETENCY -ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS
    A CRITICAL COMPETENCY -ROOT CAUSE ANALYSISAuthor in Source TitleTwelve years ago I was sitting in a boardroom with the companies C suite, getting ready to review our customer service scores.  This conversation is very common in the hospitality industry, so this wasn't my first rodeo.  One...
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    Preston Vander Ven
    08/12/2016 #1 Preston Vander Ven
    This reminds me when one of my mentors asked me the question, "are YOU wanting or expecting success?" I was confused by his question. He wanted the know if I even knew the root source of my answer. I realized at that time, I DO NOT. i began to research what I wanted in my goals, such detailed cost of each goal of everything that made my heart sing. I then had to determine how to deliver what I identified with a plan of action. I was amazed at how much thought and detail I needed to put into this plan. But it was worth it, since today I have a daily plan of action.
  25. ProducerJohn Prpich

    John Prpich

    08/12/2016
    THE IMPORTANCE OF CONTEXT
    THE IMPORTANCE OF CONTEXTI believe that the lack of understanding around the concept of context is an Achilles heel for most organizations.  It's the leading cause of bad and poor judgment which inevitably manifests itself in negative consequences. Let's start with the...
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    Kevin Baker
    08/12/2016 #1 Kevin Baker
    Excellent point about knee jerk reactions. Why make a decision of today into repeating previous experiences. Time put in does not equate the most experience.
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