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Materials Science Engineer - beBee

Materials Science Engineer

~ 100 buzzes
Materials Science Engineer aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific understanding of materials science of engineering materials and their co-evolution with industry and society, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.
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  1. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    09/12/2016
    Milos Djukic
    What will Science Communication Look Like a Decade from Now?
    axial.acs.org Why do most scientists still record their daily work in a hardcopy lab notebook? How will science communication evolve in years to...
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  2. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    09/12/2016
    "Developing a new area is a high-risk, high-return field. The deeper your frustration is, the more fruitful your success will be." - Kimoon Kim, Professor, Chemistry, POSTECH, South Korea
    Milos Djukic
    Highly Cited Researchers Spotlight Series: Kimoon Kim
    stateofinnovation.thomsonreuters.com Do you know a molecule called ‘cucurbituril’? Kimoon Kim is a researcher who pioneered this amazing...
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  3. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    04/12/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Better Science Communication Is Critical, The New Yorker’s Michael Specter Argues | Scope Blog
    scopeblog.stanford.edu As part of Stanford's Bio-X Seminar Series, Michael Specter, staff writer at The New Yorker, spoke to an audience of over 70 researchers and students...
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    Comments

    Max J. Carter
    06/12/2016 #13 Max J. Carter
    #12 Wasn't Einstein who said "that all physical theories, their mathematical expressions apart ought to lend themselves to so simple a description 'that even a child could understand them.' "
    Robert Bacal
    06/12/2016 #12 Robert Bacal
    @Milos Djukic There's another way of looking at this, and that is that we need to up the general public's understanding of science, what it does, and what it can't do, along with basic understandings of probability and statistics. So, for me it's about education.

    People who "do" science very well are not always the best at breaking down their specialties, so I don't know if it's practical, or a good use of scientists' time to develop the skills of communicating their science.

    There's really a risk of dumbing things down even further in a world where data literacy should be an essential skill in a world of data centric decision making.
    Max J. Carter
    06/12/2016 #11 Max J. Carter
    #10 While you are entitles to that opinion Phil it doesn't make it true. And could be the very bull chips you speak of.
    Phil Friedman
    05/12/2016 #10 Phil Friedman
    Thank you, Milos, for inviting me to read and comment. I agree that science should not be considered a world unto its own and scientists the priests of that world. Instead, scientists should reach out to communicate with an educated, intelligent, but lay audience, the summary elements of their knowledge and findings.

    A fellow academic (and scientist) once told me that if you can't explain your concepts, at least in terms of their basic principles, to such an audience, then you are not clear enough yourself on those concepts.

    This is not, of course, to say that anyone with a couple of books (or access to the internet on a laptop) can do valid scientific research, without serious training and education in a given field. To my mind, those who claim to be self-taught physicists or physicians or behavioral phsychologists are invariable full of bull chips. IMO.
    Lisa Gallagher
    05/12/2016 #9 Lisa Gallagher
    Thank you for tagging me @Milos Djukic. This summed it up very well for me: "He argued that scientists have the obligation to not only discover new knowledge and challenge our understanding of the world, but also to present “facts” and “truth” in a way that is accessible understandable for all. “Every young scientist in this room should be talking to people about what they do, why it matters, and why they should care,” he said, urging researchers to:

    Reach out. Talk to people. And maybe listen to people." Could not AGREE more!! What a difference this can make worldwide. They need to speak in layman's terms to drive the facts home.
    Irene Hackett
    04/12/2016 #8 Anonymous
    Thanks for the tag Milos. Interesting to introduce the idea of "obligation" to make scientific results more accessible: "scientists have the obligation to not only discover new knowledge and challenge our understanding of the world, but also to present “facts” and “truth” in a way that is accessible understandable for all." I appreciate this approach. 👍
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    04/12/2016 #7 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Without science communication and scientific discoveries, the world would be flat.
    CityVP Manjit
    04/12/2016 #6 CityVP Manjit
    Canada lived through its post-truth era with the Harper government. Love him or hate him, Justin Trudeau has lifted many restrictions that bound scientific practice in Canada This was how it was back then http://www.academicmatters.ca/2013/05/harpers-attack-on-science-no-science-no-evidence-no-truth-no-democracy/ The next article is Justin Trudeau's response to scientific practice in Canada http://www.nature.com/news/canada-creates-science-minister-post-1.18739 Rather than use words like Post-Truth, the realities of science communication are writ deep when we look at how political leaders relate to science. At the same time grassroots scientific communication does have a role to play in communicating science to a broader cross section, rather than remain in their individual Islands of Excellence.
    Max J. Carter
    04/12/2016 #4 Max J. Carter
    #2 Thank you @Milos Djukic for living that intent and that comes from all of us that will benefit from your work.
    Milos Djukic
    04/12/2016 #2 Anonymous
    #1 Thanks @Max J. Carter, That's my intention.
    Max J. Carter
    04/12/2016 #1 Max J. Carter
    From the article.

    "He argued that scientists have the obligation to not only discover new knowledge and challenge our understanding of the world, but also to present “facts” and “truth” in a way that is accessible understandable for all."

    One of the most hope inspiring things I have read.
  4. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    30/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Shadow of ignorance veiling society despite more science communication
    conservationbytes.com I’ve been thinking about this post for a while, but it wasn’t until having some long, deep chats today with staff and students at Simon Fraser University’s Department of...
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  5. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    24/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Quit Social Media. But If You Want to Spread Science, Use Social Media.
    www.fromthelabbench.com Two days ago, Cal Newport, an associate professor in the department of computer science at Georgetown University, published an op-ed in the New York Times titled "Quit Social Media. Your Career May Depend on It." I think it could have been...
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    Comments

    Randy Keho
    25/11/2016 #2 Randy Keho
    What are you thoughts on this @Milos Djukic?
    Mohammed Sultan
    25/11/2016 #1 Mohammed Sultan
    @Milos Djukic.Great summary of a needed book..Scientists and young are not working in ivory tower to isolate themselves from the current of events demonstrated by social media.In their research process whether they are seeking to generate a new idea or trying to validate their hypothesis they often need constant,instant and real time information.During the development stage of their case study they should also have focus and self-monitoring to detect any new related trends,then analyse it very quickly and accurately in order to forecast the changes that may occur with dizzying speed.The more the researcher keeps a balance of his or her engagement with social media the more they will be able to create,communicate and deliver the output of his or her research.
  6. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    23/11/2016
    9 Tips For Communicating Science To People Who Are Not Scientists
    Forbes Welcome
    www.forbes.com Science issues are at the forefront of society. Here are nine tips to help communicate complex science to non-science...
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    Comments

    Aurorasa Sima
    23/11/2016 #1 Aurorasa Sima
    You´re good at making complex content approachable. I have to give a shoutout to @Phillip Hubbell too
  7. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    23/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Peer-review 'heroes' do lion's share of the work
    www.nature.com Imbalance exists even though supply of reviewers outstrips demand, study...
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  8. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    22/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Publishing innovations aim to highlight hidden research efforts
    www.timeshighereducation.com Open publishing platforms that bring grey literature out of the dark promise to save money, reduce duplication and speed...
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  9. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    20/11/2016
    "Stop treating scientists like they’re geniuses and start treating them like people"
    Milos Djukic
    Getting science out in the open
    daily-iowan.com By Jacob Senstad Jacob-senstad@uiowa.edu Joe Palca took the stage at Phillips Hall on Nov. 16 and gave an ardent message about the future of scientific journalism. “Change the way we tell...
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    Comments

    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    23/11/2016 #9 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #8 Ditto, Randy Keho
    Randy Keho
    23/11/2016 #8 Randy Keho
    #7 As far as I'm concerned, you've already done a great deal for the advancement of science through social networks..Your contributions to beBee and other networks could be considered groundbreaking in my book.
    Otherwise, I would have never been introduced to any of the subjects you champion. I may not have a clear understanding or a genuine interest in them, but they set the wheels spinning. I applaud you're undying efforts to spread the word, even though I can't spell it.
    Milos Djukic
    22/11/2016 #7 Anonymous
    #4 #5 Thanks @Randy Keho and @Robert Bacal. Scientific communication is a special - delicate kind of art. This is something that I am learning. I am one of the few who also trying here.
    Randy Keho
    22/11/2016 #6 Randy Keho
    #5 If they're talking about "scientific journalism" -- spreading the word to the masses -- they've already established what they are, it's just a matter of price.
    Robert Bacal
    22/11/2016 #5 Robert Bacal
    #4 Interesting. The premise behind virtually all formal science publications is to remove the voice and characteristics of the researchers, as they are seen as irrelevant to the pursuit of the research. Some might perceive your suggestions as whoring science (for what?)
    Randy Keho
    22/11/2016 #4 Randy Keho
    #3 When did scientists become people?
    I must have missed it, Milos.
    I've always found it best to focus on the person rather than the "thingie."
    Personalize the story. That's how you treat them like real people. It doesn't matter what you're writing about.
    Putting a face to the "thingie" draws interest into the "thingie."
    The "thingie" by itself is boring to most readers.
    People prefer to read about people.
    Who's responsible for creating the "thingie?"
    How and why did they created the "thingie.?"
    How does the "thingie" impact our lives?
    And, definitely include a photo of the person. They can be captured with or without the "thingie."
    But, you'll still need a photo or illustration of the ":thingie"
    Milos Djukic
    22/11/2016 #2 Anonymous
    #1 Thanks @Jan Barbosa and congrats :)
    Jan Barbosa
    21/11/2016 #1 Jan Barbosa
    Good One !!!
  10. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    20/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Improved integration of communications and scholarly roles can help academics become successful digital influencers
    blogs.lse.ac.uk It has become increasingly incumbent upon higher education institutions to improve the visibility of their academic research. Heather Crookes has examined the role of university departments in...
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  11. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    19/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    How to turn your research findings into a video that people actually want to watch
    www.mayaproject.org It seems that everyone is making videos about their research these days, but if you look at the number of views, not many of these films are actually getting their message across to large audiences. So how to you make a video about your...
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  12. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    19/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Bringing science to audiences; what do they take away?
    www.fizzicseducation.com.au
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  13. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    19/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Top Twitter Tips for Research Impact
    www.mayaproject.org Our Top Twitter Tips are 4 years old today, and to celebrate, we've completely re-written and revised them for 2015. The previous tips were viewed over 30,000 times before we took them down. We hope that many more will find the new version...
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  14. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    17/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Clarivate Analytics Presents Highly Cited Researchers, 2016
    stateofinnovation.thomsonreuters.com Using citation analysis to identify authors whose scientific and scholarly papers wield outsized...
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  15. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    16/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    The Top 10 Websites for Science in 2016 | RealClearScience
    www.realclearscience.com Let's be honest, the Internet is chock-full of garbage information, and this messy situation is only getting worse. At RealClearScience, our job is to separate the wheat from the chaff in the...
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  16. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    16/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Scientific writing: A very short cheat sheet : Naturejobs Blog
    blogs.nature.com
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    Comments

    Randy Keho
    16/11/2016 #1 Randy Keho
    I believe this confirms my post on tips to improve your writing that I used to distribute to all my students. He must have read it. Lol
  17. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    15/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Altmetrics, ‘Altmetric,’ and Science Communication
    sciencecommunicationbreakdown.wordpress.com Editor’s Note: This is a guest post from Iara Vidal, a Ph.D. student based in Brazil whose work focuses on altmetrics and scholarly communication. If you’re curious about altmetrics, or how they...
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  18. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    15/11/2016
    Milos Djukic profile @GrowKudos A free platform for explaining your #research and #science papers #mobilizeresearch
    www.growkudos.com A free platform for explaining your research in plain language, and managing how you communicate around it – so you can understand how best to increase its...
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  19. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    15/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Cooperation on Research and Higher Education - Why Does it Matter? | The Huffington Post
    www.huffingtonpost.com International Education Week is an excellent opportunity to highlight the importance and benefits of global education and the value international...
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    Comments

  20. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    15/11/2016
    Milos Djukic
    Beyond citations: Why scientists need to engage with public | Spectrum
    spectrumnews.org Scientists should regularly relate their work to a broad audience, and universities should support these...
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  21. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    11/11/2016
    Hard work, little reward: Science!
    Milos Djukic
    Hard work, little reward: Nature readers reveal working hours and research challenges
    www.nature.com In an online poll, almost two-thirds of readers say they have considered quitting...
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    Comments

    kevin south
    11/11/2016 #3 kevin south
    Some people just cant accept change, or maybe cant understand it,#1
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    11/11/2016 #2 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Sometimes more than rewards you attain prized recognition. And that's worthwhile!
    Lisa Gallagher
    11/11/2016 #1 Lisa Gallagher
    It has to be frustrating when you face so many obstacles @Milos Djukic, do you put in 60 hr weeks too? Keep up the good work, you've got this!!!
  22. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    11/11/2016
    Science and people

    Article - www.herald.co.zw
    Milos Djukic
    Science must speak people’s everyday lives | The Herald
    www.herald.co.zw
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    Comments

    Ali Anani
    18/11/2016 #3 Ali Anani
    Yes, I agree @Milos Djukic. Phd in any field is degree of philosophy. Science is for people and must be communicated transparently and in language people may understand. I feel sometimes the lack of communication abilities that make the gap between science and people I noticed that your buzz on fractals attracted more than 11,000 views simply because you communicated the idea so that people may comprehend it. You walk the talk my friend.
    Milos Djukic
    11/11/2016 #2 Anonymous
    #1 Thanks @Deb Lange, I agree with you. The apparent separation and relocation of scientists from philosophy is a fatal mistake. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to forgive them - great minds. That's why they are great. An optimal amount of fiction and imagination are always welcome.. : I would like to read your book.
    Deb Lange
    11/11/2016 #1 Deb Lange
    What I think @Milos Djukic, is that we do need to make visible other ways of knowing & learning. Over hundreds of years our prevailing view has been impregnated with reductionist, objective, logical views. Whilst this has resulted in the development of technology, it has also resulted in us not seeing, sensing, appreciating diverse ways of knowing, seeing, learning. These other ways relate to ways of learning with nature, aesthetics, spirituality, our senses etc These other ways are more to do with "enabling" the potential of animate beings and life forms, rather, than predicting and controlling things as animate objects. My book, 'Trust Your Senses" makes a contribution to this old and new way of knowing.
  23. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    06/11/2016
    Lots of new information about hydrogen & fuel cells
    Milos Djukic
    H2-international Newsletter November 2016 › H2-international
    www.h2-international.com German Government Launches FC Subsidy Program - On Aug. 1, 2016, the heating industry got the certainty they wanted with regard to the future policy framework for state-of-the-art fuel cell heating...
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  24. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    06/11/2016
    Science channels.
    Milos Djukic
    Top 10 YouTube science channels to enlighten and entertain - EuroScientist journal
    www.euroscientist.com Thanks to YouTube it’s never been easier - or more entertaining - to learn about science. Find out about our 10 favourite Youtube science...
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  25. Milos Djukic

    Milos Djukic

    02/11/2016
    The science matters by Elsevier
    Milos Djukic
    How old is too old? No matter the age, the science matters
    blog.sciencedirect.com [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"1003","attributes":{"alt":"Courtesy of the Elsevier Heritage Collection","class":"media-image","height":"226","style":"width: 300px; height:...
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