logoSign upLog in
Mental Health - beBee

Mental Health

~ 100 buzzes
The purpose of this Hive is to provide an outlet to speak and network with each other on matters concerned with various types and degrees of mental health issues.
Buzzes
  1. Donald Grandy

    Donald Grandy

    28/11/2016
    Donald Grandy
    Overview - Resilience
    kpjrfilms.co Resilience is a new documentary that delves into the science of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and a new movement to treat and prevent toxic...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Donald Grandy
    28/11/2016 #1 Donald Grandy
    .
    Brilliant new documentary on the physiological and mental health impact of abuse on children, and on adults who endured abuse (physical/sexual / emotional) in childhood. https://vimeo.com/137282528
  2. ProducerEmily Forget (Newbee!)
    Find Your Calm. Achieving Mindfulness in a Demanding World
    Find Your Calm. Achieving Mindfulness in a Demanding WorldYou are on a beach at sunset, walking along the water's edge. The air is crisp and warm, smelling a little salty. The sky is clear with a few clouds. You feel a slight breeze on your face and see the waves coming in from the ocean. You sit down...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Max Carter
    24/11/2016 #12 Max Carter
    #11 I teach a little bit of everything that goes into assisting people to live unified in mind, body and spirit and that encompasses a great variety of topics for mapping ones life to be something one can be unified in mind body and spirit in living.

    Enjoy the meditation many have said it has aided in making great leaps in personal realization and self discovery. I myself have been using this particular one for several years after studying many other forms.
    Emily Forget (Newbee!)
    24/11/2016 #11 Emily Forget (Newbee!)
    #9 Oh! So you teach meditation I take it. That's awesome. I will add your mantras to my sessions!
    Emily Forget (Newbee!)
    24/11/2016 #10 Emily Forget (Newbee!)
    #4 Hi Jared! Thanks for your comment! I am too curious about this Miracle Morning, it sounds wonderful. You should most definitely try to use the App more... at least daily I would suggest, even for 5-10 minutes to start.. I know it sounds like a lot, but you will most likely start to enjoy it so it becomes a pleasure. Like going in and out of a Jacuzzi on a cold day.... soooooooo amazzzzzing. I find that now, I get the urge to meditate more than once a day, but time and daily duties restricts me. In a perfect world, I suppose! ;-)
    Max Carter
    24/11/2016 #9 Max Carter
    #6 I mean the one in my comment.

    The app is my professional competition.

    Being able to find and maintain ones inner peace is the goal and takes much growth in the form of finding peace in the places you think you would be certain not to find it.
    Emily Forget (Newbee!)
    24/11/2016 #7 Emily Forget (Newbee!)
    #3 Oh yes, it is most certain @Franci Eugenia Hoffman. If you do give it a go, let me know what you think!
    Emily Forget (Newbee!)
    24/11/2016 #6 Emily Forget (Newbee!)
    #2 Hey Max! Those are awesome mantras, love it! When you say "I use this meditation", do you mean the Calm App specifically? Allowing space for everything that comes up during meditation is so important. Pema Chodron once said, "Sticking with uncertainty, getting the knack of relaxing in the midst of chaos, learning not to panic - this is the spiritual path." Thank you for commenting!!! :-)
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    24/11/2016 #5 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #2 Very interesting, Max. I'll try this.
    Jared Wiese
    24/11/2016 #4 Jared Wiese
    Hi Emily,
    What an awesome summary and enticement to meditation and all you can do with the app!

    I have used it some with my Miracle Morning routine (so sharing there). But I need to do this more! So, also sharing in Eckhart Tolle :)
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    24/11/2016 #3 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Good advice. Most likely, everyone has some level of stress in their lives. I'll check out the app.
    Max Carter
    24/11/2016 #2 Max Carter
    I use this meditation and have given it to thousands I have worked with.

    Say "I let got of everything"

    Repeat these words until your body takes over the breathing and then tel yourself.

    "I go into the void of my mind to learn what I need to know right now."

    This creates a calm space for you to be shown things that will aid you in dealing with life better and in less stressful ways getting the guidance form within.
    Emily Forget (Newbee!)
    24/11/2016 #1 Emily Forget (Newbee!)
    New Honey for you Bees! This one can change your life. I strongly suggest you give it a read and please share it around. ;-)
  3. ProducerGerald Hecht

    Gerald Hecht

    19/11/2016
    But Why Quibble?
    But Why Quibble?Insane:There is only one kind of person, Phaedrus said, who freely chooses to accept or reject the mythos in which he lives. And the definition of that person, when he has rejected the mythos, Phaedrus said, is “insane”. To go outside the mythos is...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Gerald Hecht
    27/11/2016 #39 Gerald Hecht
    #38 @Brian McKenzie good call
    Brian McKenzie
    27/11/2016 #38 Brian McKenzie
    Enlighten me as to where any of my comments were comedy. And as for Jesus and murder - yeah his name does appear quite a bit when the killing starts.
    Gerald Hecht
    27/11/2016 #37 Gerald Hecht
    @Lisa Gallagher as per your request
    Gerald Hecht
    27/11/2016 #36 Gerald Hecht
    @Brian McKenzie so you think that gives you a right to be a bitter, semi-coherent smartass? Sorry dude --you gotta be born with that gift...watching people you love die...doesn't make you suck any less as a comedian...Nobody told you that before? Jesus!
    Gerald Hecht
    27/11/2016 #35 Gerald Hecht
    #32 @Brian McKenzie I've witnessed friends, relatives, and heroes murdered. I don't think there was even cash involved --just murdered
    Gerald Hecht
    26/11/2016 #34 Gerald Hecht
    @Brian McKenzie yo...that's cultureclicktv.com
    Gerald Hecht
    26/11/2016 #33 Gerald Hecht
    So...what have we learned? "Cold Hard Cash IS Propaganda"...I gotta take another "Dammital" because the unadulterated reality of that is so insane...ok, anyway back to "Culture Click"
    Brian McKenzie
    24/11/2016 #32 Brian McKenzie
    I had friends in Ukraine getting murdered. Comrades over Cash
    Phil Friedman
    24/11/2016 #31 Phil Friedman
    #30 Well then, Brian, why did you abandon such a profitable revenue stream? What changed? Or was it just so profitable and easy, it got boring? Sorry, doesn't track for me. I still have friends and family in Canada, some of whom work professionally in the healthcare system. If there is any propaganda floating around, it is on this side of the border and put out by MediBusiness here. Cheers!
    Brian McKenzie
    24/11/2016 #30 Brian McKenzie
    Propoganda is rarely factual. Cold hard cash is always factual. I specialized in working the loop holes and exploiting the system to my benefit, and Canadian medi-tourism was one of my most successful revenue chanels for 7 years, the other was security evaluations / fraud investigations for HIPPA compliance. There was not a month go by that I did not have Canadians coming down for treatment. That precedence and experience is what led me to unternational health care. Travel Med / Medical Tourism OUT of America has only grown since the imposition of Obamacare: as well as the number of ex-pats and people that have surrendered their citizenship. ObamaCare is so unpopular that I help clients get to the Philippines, India, South Korea and before the war - Ukraine for services and coverage. And they are going to commercial, pay for cure specialists and locations- not the shining path of Soviet Socialist State medical malaise. I am hoping with Trump in office I can turn on my Russian market models and retire to the Black Sea. (There is surprisingly more capitalism in Moscow Ru than Washington D.C. )
    Phil Friedman
    23/11/2016 #29 Phil Friedman
    #25 Brian, speaking bluntly, that is the bullshit propaganda of those who made a dollar off the activities that you outline. I know of hordes of U.S. citizens who beg to be able to buy drugs in Canada, where the pricing is tightly controlled in a single-payer system. I lived and worked in Canada for more than 15 years, and I can tell you that neither I nor anyone I knew in that time went without or waited for critical medical treatment. Nor do I know anyone now in that position. Elective procedures might involve a scheduling wait, but I gotta tell you, buddy, that the same thing is true here in the U.S. when you're trying to deal in-network on your insurance coverage.

    The big difference is that to cover my family with a decent plan currently costs nearly $1,200 per month, and does not include me (as I am medicare substitute covered) for another $250 per month. Versus the less than $300 per month, I would be paying to OHIP if I lived in Ontario for equivalent coverage. It's not just government subsidies from general tax revenues involved, but the advantages that accrue to a single-payer system that puts price negotiating power back on the side of the consumer, and works to mitigate the rapacious greed of MediBusiness.
    Gerald Hecht
    22/11/2016 #28 Gerald Hecht
    #10 @Brian McKenzie take two of these and call me in the morning https://www.bebee.com/content/988151/937990
    Gerald Hecht
    22/11/2016 #27 Gerald Hecht
    #21 @Phil Friedman what gets into these folks huh? https://www.bebee.com/content/988151/937987
    Gerald Hecht
    22/11/2016 #26 Gerald Hecht
    #25 @Brian McKenzie right now I've seen them force @Jim Murray to take the word pussy off of his butterfly thingie; if we let that stand; they'll shut your mouth too and all the bluster on earth won't stop it...there was nothing wrong with his post...they've already shut my mouth...but I've not said anything wrong either and people who may can't stand a comment an opinion of mine have fought to give me the right to say it...my downstairs neighbor is half my age, just finished 3 tours as a ranger...he doesn't agree with some of my political views --we've become best friends anyway; I'm just up here getting more beer --I don't take kindly to "oh, I don't mean to be the PC Police...nobody yelled fire in a crowded theater and everyone knows it
    Brian McKenzie
    22/11/2016 #25 Brian McKenzie
    #21 Universal health care is so great ..... Cuba still has it; and yet even with open relations - I see no wave of US citizens flocking to their shores for the glorious shining path of Single Payer and Universal Health Care. PS as a patient advocate - I used to make a quite tidy sum helping Canadians that would fly down to America, and pay cash to Seattle Regional Clinics because they could not get past long ques and Rx requirements of the Canadian system, while their main trips were for elective and cosmetic surgeries - there were quite a few early stage cancer diagnostics too. I prefer the Power of the market - personal choice over Federalist / Nationalist goons - every time.
    Gerald Hecht
    22/11/2016 #24 Gerald Hecht
    #14 @Brian McKenzie there are strange forces afoot https://www.bebee.com/content/987919/937901?bblang=en_US&utm_source=bebee&utm_medium=post&utm_campaign=internal
    Gerald Hecht
    22/11/2016 #23 Gerald Hecht
    #14 @Brian McKenzie we were not voices so that others should silence them https://www.bebee.com/producer/@gerald-hecht/the-obsessively-ambitious-canadian-and-the-american-academic-philosopher-turned-marinecraft-expert-and-yachtsman
    Gerald Hecht
    22/11/2016 #22 Gerald Hecht
    #20 @Brian McKenzie I can dig that; I especially will not stand for the removal of your right to speak your mind
    Phil Friedman
    21/11/2016 #21 Phil Friedman
    #20 Brian, that explains a lot about your irrational rage. Irrational because because universal healthcare, especially combined with a single-payer system is anathema to the class of greedy physicians and hospitals. Do not go to Canada, where people who have affordable coverage will indeed think you insane and lock you up. LOL.
    Brian McKenzie
    21/11/2016 #20 Brian McKenzie
    #17 I had a car accident and head trauma in 1990 - idiots put me in a psych ward for 'recovery' - it took me 5 years to get my life back. In the process, I learned medical billing, patient advocacy, CMS filing, VA rebuttals and I laid waste to EVERY doctor and bureaucrat that was involved. None of them kept their job. I don't trust doctors - I don't like government - and I don't play nice. I can hardly wait to kill ObamaCare.
  4. John White, MBA

    John White, MBA

    17/11/2016
    Today's column 11-17-16.
    John White, MBA
    How To Cope With a Panic Attack At Work According To Science
    www.inc.com Anxiety disorders affect 40-million Americans and many of them have no idea what to do to get...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Lisa Gallagher
    17/11/2016 #3 Lisa Gallagher
    First let me thank you for writing this article which is an important topic for so many @John White, MBA. Your dad had to be fairly young when he passed. I found out something interesting just last night. Those who lose parents when they are younger tend to worry about dying earlier in age too along with the pain of loss which never leaves us, it just changes with time.

    You also brought up another important topic, fleeing a place to be alone when a panic attack comes on. When I first developed anxiety disease and had no clue what a panic attack was and had a fear of passing out in front of people not to mention, a fear of what the hell is happening to me?! I remember being in a store once writing a check and my sister was with me. I signed it then quickly said, you need to finish this and ran out of the store. I sat in the car crying, not sure what was going on and she came out asking, what just happened? It was so embarrassing.

    Thanks for writing what you do to cope and reiterating how important it is to get help. People should not have to be embarrassed because they have an illness they have no control over. Excellent article John and I thank you for tagging me!!
    Lisa Gallagher
    17/11/2016 #2 Lisa Gallagher
    #1 I just typed an entire comment and it disappeared when I hit reply, let me try again.
  5. ProducerPhillip Hubbell

    Phillip Hubbell

    25/10/2016
    Working in the Asylum
    Working in the Asylum“You can't really be strong until you see a funny side to things.” Ken Kesey At the tender age of 23, I really needed a job. I had been on my own since 18 and had moved home briefly after leaving college when my Daddy had a stroke. I got a job...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    26/10/2016 #5 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #2 #4 I am glad you are both here to write about your experiences. Thank you for sharing.
    Phillip Hubbell
    25/10/2016 #4 Phillip Hubbell
    #3 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman I was until I worked there.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    25/10/2016 #3 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Well written post about your experiences, Phillip. I can't imagine what it would be like to work there. You must be a very patient person.
    Randy Keho
    25/10/2016 #2 Randy Keho
    A beautifully written recollection @Phillip Hubbell. I taught English to student-inmates at a state prison while attending graduate school. The prison was originally a state mental hospital. The prison was segregated, with the general population being housed separately from those in the special treatment center, except while attending school. The special treatment center was filled with inmates requiring medications for various mental disorders.
    If one had faked taking his meds, classroom discussions would become more than interesting. I decided I'd had enough when they knocked holes in the cafeteria walls to insert machine guns. The security level had been increased from medium to maximum and they were introducing women into the mix.
    Pascal Derrien
    25/10/2016 #1 Pascal Derrien
    well crafted article as usual Phillip but more importantly what an experience if might have been, ''The qualifications for working there was having a pulse''
  6. Agata Osowska

    Agata Osowska

    19/10/2016
    A new plan for anxious feelings: escape the custard! | Neil Hughes | TEDxLeamingtonSpa
    A new plan for anxious feelings: escape the custard! | Neil Hughes | TEDxLeamingtonSpa Comedian, author, and physicist Neil Hughes lived with anxiety for years before he had a strange realisation: anxiety is just like custard! This surprising...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Deb Helfrich
    19/10/2016 #2 Deb Helfrich
    Thanks for sharing @Agata Osowska - the custard trap metaphor is a really stellar way to rethink about our mental cycles.
    Deb Helfrich
    19/10/2016 #1 Deb Helfrich
    @Lisa Gallagher - this is enjoyable....
  7. ProducerChristine Stevens
    Riding for a Reason: One Entrepreneur's Mission to Raise Awareness for Suicide Prevention
    Riding for a Reason: One Entrepreneur's Mission to Raise Awareness for Suicide Prevention About six years ago, I was sitting at my computer doing something unimportant when my daughter walked in in tears and told me one of her dearest friends killed himself. He was only 18 and he jumped from a building in downtown Fairfax, ending his...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Lisa Gallagher
    12/10/2016 #15 Lisa Gallagher
    What a great story. I'm so happy Josh survived and how admirable that he is riding his bike to raise awareness!! Go JOSH, You've got this, after all you beat suicide so you can now kick butt with your riding!!! Thanks for posting this @Christine Stevens
    Mamen Delgado
    10/10/2016 #14 Mamen Delgado
    Woww @Christine Stevens, thanks for bringing this story to beBee!
    Following Josh on all his networks!
    Jared Wiese
    10/10/2016 #13 Jared Wiese
    Sharing in Veterans: Mental Health
    Jared Wiese
    10/10/2016 #12 Jared Wiese
    Sharing to Suicide Prevention
    James McElearney
    10/10/2016 #11 James McElearney
    Unfortunately for me, I do know the figures worldwide as I have been looking into this for a short film I am writing, and staggering they are! This is a very important issue that needs addressing and in everyway possible. I knew two of my childhood aquantances who took their own lives and I saw frst hand the devistation it causes the families that remain. More needs to be done to raise awareness
    Jared Wiese
    10/10/2016 #10 Jared Wiese
    #8 I would too. I think of all the talented people who are suffering, yet have so much to give. Robin Williams comes to mind. Perhaps because he appeared on the outside to be just the opposite of depressed. A true issue that NEEDS awareness.
    Deb Helfrich
    10/10/2016 #9 Deb Helfrich
    Josh Quigley's journey is one I have been following for about six weeks. It is the very essence of understanding what life is all about. Thank you, @Christine Stevens for so eloquently sharing his mission and the fact that we all need to reach out to the people in our lives who may be having a tough time. It may be more serious than we can imagine and the gift we can give with our time and concern may be priceless.
    Christine Stevens
    10/10/2016 #8 Christine Stevens
    #5 Jared, I get choked up still when I think about that young man who ended his life. It had a profound impact on my daughter's life as well - she now works as a case manager helping people with mental illnesses navigate day-to-day life.
    Jared Wiese
    10/10/2016 #7 Jared Wiese
    Raising Awareness for Suicide Prevention - on October 10, World Mental Health Day
    Ashley Marie Taylor
    10/10/2016 #6 Ashley Marie Taylor
    This is great. Mental illness and depression tend to be stigmatized. It's good to see a push for acceptance of our flaws as human beings and rather than punishing ourselves for them, strive for healing.
    Jared Wiese
    10/10/2016 #5 Jared Wiese
    Absolutely brilliant post, @Christine Stevens. You've turned on a light for hopefully so many!
    You engaged us. Hell, you got me all choked up.
    You've pointed out resources and ways we can all help. There is always hope.

    Sharing on all my networks.
    Christine Stevens
    10/10/2016 #4 Christine Stevens
    #3 Thank you, Frolián!
    Froilán Pérez
    10/10/2016 #3 Froilán Pérez
    Thanks for this, @Christine Stevens!
    following him on social media, will contribute on his web!
    Christine Stevens
    10/10/2016 #2 Christine Stevens
    #1 Thank you, @Don Kerr.
    Don Kerr
    10/10/2016 #1 Don Kerr
    Many thanks for bringing this to my attention @Christine Stevens. I am going to track him. Every bit helps in this type of endeavour. Will also share in Healthcare hive.
  8. Michelle Amerman
    A conversation about treatment could help save your loved one’s life and help them start a journey towards recovery.
    Michelle Amerman
    How to Help an Addict Seek Treatment - Pathways Real Life Recovery
    pathwaysreallife.com Addiction is a deceptive by nature and addicts as well as their loved ones often fail to recognize it as the debilitating disease that it is...
    Relevant
  9. ProducerLance Scoular

    Lance Scoular

    07/09/2016
    Zemblanity + Family and the Word We Fear To Speak
    Zemblanity + Family and the Word We Fear To Speak Today is Thursday 8th September 2016, as I post this on beBee and it is R U OK? Day (R U OK? - Are You OK? Day) in Australia. "R U OK? Day is an annual day in September (the second Thursday in Australia) dedicated to remind people to ask...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Lisa Gallagher
    10/09/2016 #26 Lisa Gallagher
    #22 A topic very close to my heart @Lance Scoular. As I read your buzz I have to admit I cried and it took me about 3-4 minutes to compose myself before I could type. I didn't cry for myself, I cried reading about your daughter's friends, your wife's student and thinking of so many that are afflicted with severe depression and feel the only way out is to commit suicide. This is a vital topic and I'm glad you wrote so deeply about this. I'm keeping that term in my brain, "RU-OK" Wishing you a wonderful weekend Lance!
    Lance Scoular
    10/09/2016 #25 Lance Scoular
    Glad you hear UROK @Aaron Skogen. Appreciate too, your sharing the concerning increases in the suicide statistics.
    Lance Scoular
    10/09/2016 #24 Lance Scoular
    #11 Thank you @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian for sharing those that have checked out before time. Also for the incredible sharing you have been doing on Twitter.
    Lance Scoular
    10/09/2016 #23 Lance Scoular
    #10 No need @Mamen Delgado you already have! More than adequately.
    Lance Scoular
    10/09/2016 #22 Lance Scoular
    #9 Thanks Lisa @Lisa Gallagher for your kind words and sentiments. Also for your shares on Twitter.
    I need to reread this myself more often, as painful as it is to do so, to remind me to ask RUOK? more often, so that less people are impacted by Zemblanity. Hopefully.
    Lance Scoular
    10/09/2016 #21 Lance Scoular
    #8 No @Jena Ball I did not know about project semicolon. but now I do. Link: http://www.projectsemicolon.org
    Lance Scoular
    10/09/2016 #20 Lance Scoular
    #7 So true @Donna-Luisa Eversley we should no assume all is well by a persons outward appearence.
    Lance Scoular
    10/09/2016 #19 Lance Scoular
    #6 Once again @Sarah Elkins thanks. It is a reminder to me again to ask ask RUOK? more often.
    I did a Snapchat story Thursday evening (Sydney time) more about the concept of asking RUOK? and how to do so in different circumstances and a few snappers passed it on to their networks.
    Lance Scoular
    10/09/2016 #18 Lance Scoular
    #1 Thanks @David B. Grinberg for your kind comments and also for the link to the New York Times article Researchers Confront an Epidemic of Loneliness. It was interesting to see the reference to Men's Sheds which originated in Australia. We have a number in our area and are a great way for men (often lonely or at a loose end) to get together a make things in a community workshop.
    Lisa Gallagher
    08/09/2016 #17 Lisa Gallagher
    This needs to be read and re-read. Excellent, and moving (to tears) article by @Lance Scoular
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    08/09/2016 #16 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Sharing in Invisible Ilnesses
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    08/09/2016 #15 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Sharing in Invisible Illnesses
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    08/09/2016 #14 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    This is heartbreaking. I too had a loved one commit suicide. This is a fantastic idea and should be a worldwide effort. U R OK? - I hope this catches on quickly. Thank you for sharing your story with us.
    Aaron Skogen
    08/09/2016 #13 Aaron Skogen
    #1 Thanks for the tag @David B. Grinberg, I appreciate it.
    Aaron Skogen
    08/09/2016 #12 Aaron Skogen
    Wonderful story @Lance Scoular, a very poignant reminder of our need to stay connected. As a medic, I had a handful of call's to respond to successful suicides and far too many calls to respond to an attempt. The horror of some of those calls, the families devastation has, like you, stuck with me. The suicide rate has increased 6% here in MN in the last year, driven primarily by men of a certain age (mine). More disconcerting is the rate of veteran suicides being 40% higher higher than that of the general population here int he US. Only through increased awareness, actively engaging with people, and staying connected can we battle this permanent solution to a temporary problem. "R U OK" is a great theme, and one that should be adopted worldwide. I am OK Lance, thanks for asking!
    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    08/09/2016 #11 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    RU OK? Should be pushed worldwide. Thank you for this post, @Lance Scoular. I've had four friends commit suicide, five if you count one who was diagnosed with a terminal, painful illness and decided to check out on her terms. All but the last were indeed permanent solutions to temporary problems.
    Mamen Delgado
    08/09/2016 #10 Mamen Delgado
    Uffff, this story and everything you have shared here is deeply touching for me @Lance Scoular.
    I'll try to write something more than THANK YOU when I recover and let my feelings slow down. THANKS TO YOU as well @David B. Grinberg, as I told you yesterday it is an incredible gift for me to be in touch with all of you. 💕
    Lisa Gallagher
    08/09/2016 #9 Lisa Gallagher
    I removed a few comments, they were long and I felt too much info after I re-read what I wrote. I can't thank you enough for writing this. I'm sorry for what you and your family experienced over the years. This is such an important topic and I thank you so much for sharing this. RU-OK? Shared on beBee and twitter! My heart goes out to anyone that has lost a friend or loved one to suicide. Thanks @Lance Scoular for sharing your personal story.
    Jena Ball
    08/09/2016 #8 Jena Ball
    Powerful, gut wrenching and so important. Thank you for having the courage to share. I really believe that it is by breaking the silence, caring enough to ask and taking steps to ensure help is available we can start to make a difference. Do you know about project semicolon? Several of my friends who have struggled with depression have found its message and the community helpful. Sharing and making a conscious effort to ask not just today but every day.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    08/09/2016 #7 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    R u ok? This is a question I ask when I sense something is wrong, but maybe should be asked when everything appears right. Thanks for this sobering and inspiring article @Lance Scoular... Thank you @David B. Grinberg for pointing me towards this post. Will share.
  10. ProducerVincent King

    Vincent King

    09/08/2016
    Is the world to much? Part I
    Is the world to much? Part IASK YOURSELF THE QUESTIONI think every good experience from life usually comes from an unanswered question we have deep inside. Something that has been in my mind for a bit, is the question asked in the title. Really though, is it too much? Most of...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    28/08/2016 #8 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Yes, the world can be too much depending on your perspective. “Inch by inch, life's a cinch. Yard by yard, life's hard.” - John Bytheway
    Pamela L. Williams
    28/08/2016 #7 Pamela L. Williams
    Making your weaknesses your strengths.
    Pamela L. Williams
    28/08/2016 #6 Pamela L. Williams
    You ended this perfectly Vincent; "The only thing "too much" about the world is that there is too dang much of it. We are in a world sized labyrinth of choices and decisions, and sometimes if we are in it alone, we could be lost forever. We can't do it alone everyone, even if that is our biggest struggle.." Enjoyed this post very much. You make some excellent points. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    28/08/2016 #5 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    @Vincent King...Margaret @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD...yes, the world is enough, our typical individual situation in life is enough, to teach us and to learn from i presume. Nobody owes us answers. We vote the people who make our laws into power. We allow our smiles to be mistaken for signs of weakness so that we are taken advantage of, and then we put on a poker face for greater control! ;) We shut ourselves up, we keep secrets from the ones who love us truly, we neglect priorities, indulge inconsiderately, we are afraid to raise our voices, to express clearly, we do not treat others the way we would like to be treated, we exploit people, the planet, we have forgotten to give back, even in the face of blow after blow to our ego, right from childhood days, we cling to the vanity, the pride, the bling and every little inconsequential thing...and call it our freedom to choose, a nice excuse. Many have found answers, showed us the way, in the hoary old past, through the ages, even in this day. If we listen to the voice inside, I believe we can still succeed in hearing the sound of that one hand clapping ;) Great indeed is the love of God who gives without receiving, of this Earth constantly sacrificing itself, of our near and dear who care regardless of our responsiveness...and that will keep us alive long enough to learn the truth, even if it means coming back again and again into this Matrix. It is nice indeed, in fact irresistible, to delve into the origins, the evolution, into space, into time, into the root cause...but not at the cost of losing grip on the present, the here and now that has all the answers embedded in it. This post reminded me of CSNY... http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/crosbystillsnash/wastedontheway.html
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/08/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    beBee Shares: Shared to 3 Hives: "Mental Health: Anxiety" and "Invisible Illnesses" and "Invisible Illnesses and God." @Lisa Gallagher, @Dean Owen, @Matt Sweetwood, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani, PhD, @Matt Sweetwood, @John White, MBA, @Juan Imaz.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/08/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    "if our greatest weaknesses can become our greatest strengths, then surely our greatest strengths can become our greatest weakness." Awesome! BRILLIANT message of positivity, motivation, and goal direction to Evolve upwards & not spiral awry from genetic mutations! Keep Creation a Creation with ethical standards throughout. @Dale Masters, @Randy Smith, @Mandi Loren, @Praveen Raj Gullepalli, @CityVP Manjit, @Randy Keho, @Michele Williams, @Charlene Burke, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani, PhD, @John White, MBA, @Juan Imaz.
    David B. Grinberg
    09/08/2016 #2 David B. Grinberg
    Nice buzz, Vincent, many good points.
    Brian McKenzie
    09/08/2016 #1 Brian McKenzie
    We must make great pets.
  11. ProducerVincent King

    Vincent King

    06/08/2016
    Six Things We Would Like You To Understand About Mental Illness
    Six Things We Would Like You To Understand About Mental IllnessFrom inside our mindsI would like to share with you a few things that someone suffering with mental illness would like you to know. Thank's to the wonders of social media, its incredible to me the wealth of people who are willing to share given the...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/08/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    'That old self is the same person, with the same struggles, just letting you in more than usual, or something is making the struggle worse than usual. ' 1 in 10 USA suicides are linked with Invisible Illnesses. People need to understand that it is #2 #4 "Definitely not a Choice."~@Leckey Harrison. And on the 'higher' level of self-awareness, we are reminded to be productive. Positive. Nurturing. Fluttering our wings to keep the water from contaminating the Hive. Let's do that.
    Brian McKenzie
    16/08/2016 #10 Brian McKenzie
    #9 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I was a licensed PI for the state of Washington. I don't play nice. When I "run" a clinic, a HIPAA violation is the usual appetizer; the billing fraud hammer comes later, usually after I have forced/ threatened a State Compliance Audit.....and the drug ring cases I usually dumped at the FDA, DEA doorstep - they have a heavier hammer than I.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/08/2016 #9 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 @Brian McKenzie, my dear friend who I hold in great hugs, MaN ~ you did it again! Got to the heart of the worst things in sight - plain as day. Can you be my PI? Man, you've got instinct. You always send me reeling. Never change.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/08/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 @Dale Masters: you are so so kind. You always come from a place of love. That's why I love you back.
    Brian McKenzie
    16/08/2016 #7 Brian McKenzie
    You will never get to be "Uncrazy" - there is no test for normal personality, every clinical interaction will reaffirm the current Dx or assign a new Dx that perpetuates the treatment, counseling, maintenance, meditcation carousel. The system does not want you cured but on an ever revolving cycle of meds and side effects that keep feeding their machine. Try it sometime - go to a provider and tell them you feel fine.....you will leave with at least one "illness" and a med script.......PS this is how I used to bust providers that were suspected of over prescribing opiods because of a nice pharma kickback incentive.
    Dale Masters
    16/08/2016 #6 Dale Masters
    @Vincent King You have my support, my understanding...and my love.
    Leckey Harrison
    08/08/2016 #4 Leckey Harrison
    I loved the structure! Definitely not a choice. I had no idea myself until a couple years ago. I was just busy trying to hide it and figure it out.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/08/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 #2 So many thoughts are extremely well stated, and I love your personal twist: to dedicate each component into separate entities for which you attribute a particular person(s) as having a special insight. Just love that ~ building relationships is what beBee is all about....and we'll "be there" for you, too. We are now beginning that road alongside you. Others will jump on...and we'll keep pushing on to support, love, accept, and have no regrets. 🐝beeZ working together. Love your valuable contributions ~ keep it up!
    Lisa Gallagher
    07/08/2016 #2 Lisa Gallagher
    Well articulated @vincent king! Thank you for sharing something so personal and becoming another voice to help end the stigma. I loved the analogy you used about someone with chronic pain
    Ella de Jong
    07/08/2016 #1 Ella de Jong
    "please please please support us the entire way,..." hoping you will have those people around you! Thank you @Vincent King
  12. ProducerVincent King

    Vincent King

    01/08/2016
    Responsibilities
    ResponsibilitiesSometimesAs much as we would all love to have an infinite amount of time to focus on ourselves and try and figure out all of our own little issues, sometimes its just not an option. Day to day we all go through it, even if its just taking care of...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/08/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 I agree, right? @Vincent King, I've tagged your Pinterest Board with several articles that you have written ~ you are compiling a fantastic writing. I'm serious when I say "You should write a book" because your prose is sane and inviting. Keep writing! Join Pinterest and find your Board: https://www.pinterest.com/Dmargaretaranda/real-person-vincent-king/ 🌺 🌻
    Ali Anani
    08/08/2016 #3 Ali Anani
    #2 You are spot on @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. I love his post and its emotional content. It moved my heart. Vincent King- you know how to steal the hearts of your readers.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/08/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    So wonderful to bring you along here to beBee, VIncent ~ your issues represent 1 million or more, who have anxiety and need support & resources. Besides loving the image and all it encaptures along the path toward self-awareness and our Journey in Life....your writing style is succinct and daggers straight to the heart. Won't you please consider doing your Memoirs? Dr Margaret Aranda: Stirring Authors Along Hive. "You Need to Write a Book" ~ your personal journey is the best start. Love and hugs! ~🐝mags @Lisa Gallagher, @Gary Sharpe, @Deb Helfrich and @Ali Anani, PhD, all supportive and loving, too.
    Javier beBee
    06/08/2016 #1 Javier beBee
    @Vincent King welcome!
  13. ProducerVincent King

    Vincent King

    01/08/2016
    I can't handle today
    I can't handle todayIt Started Off Like Every OtherWho, what, when, where, why, dunno, dunno, dunno, dunno, dunno. All I know is today was looking to be great. Had an awesome day yesterday with the family. Went out and had a great little adventure. I was looking...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/08/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 So glad to know that your anxiety panic attacks are sparse, my friend. Your writings here are beautiful, and I started your own Pinterest Board: Please follow me on Pinterest & click your pins off your posts~ we'll get the most out of your wonderful messages: (1) You're invited to Share my Board: For NewBeeZ: https://www.pinterest.com/Dmargaretaranda/bebeez-dr-arandas-newbeez/ and (2) here is your own Pinterest Board: https://www.pinterest.com/Dmargaretaranda/real-person-vincent-king/ ! @Vincent King.
    Lisa Gallagher
    07/08/2016 #6 Lisa Gallagher
    #5 I understand, sadly I've been there. I find they may disappear for a long time and come back out of the blue. But, there's usually an event that triggers them or a series of events. Then they seem to come on after stress let down for me, if that makes sense? Do you have a counselor?
    Vincent King
    06/08/2016 #5 Vincent King
    #3 Thank you for your comments. This isn't PTSD related. Anxiety has been a life long companion of mine. This past Sunday just so happened to be my first unprovoked panic attack which held more severe than usual physical implications. I'm doing better now. It took until Tuesday to get fully back to normal.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/08/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 In total agreement and sincere appreciation of your contribution to actually have a solution! So much of life is 'lip service' to ailments, and that's a disservice overlooked by many health care 'unprofessionals' who just dare to write an Rx. You ROCK! @Vincent King, let us take this to the next level and get you better ~ that's how bees thrive!
    Lisa Gallagher
    06/08/2016 #3 Lisa Gallagher
    @vincent King, I'm so sorry you were experiencing panic and anxiety. It's not fun. I see this was written 5 days ago, how are you now? Do you suffer from PTSD or Anxiety/Panic disorder without PTSD? There are others on here who have been where you are and can offer suggestions/help. One person that comes to mind is @Leckey Harrison. Keep us updated!! Sending good thoughts your way.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/08/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    P.S. @Vincent King, I'm also Sharing this on my Twitter (@medibasket ), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/margaret.aranda.1), Pinterest (https://www.pinterest.com/Dmargaretaranda/ ), Google (https://plus.google.com/u/0/111846950139615364972 ), and more! Follow me & let me know! Oh.....P.S. Perhaps @Lisa Gallagher and others can help me put together a Talk Radio Show on Anxiety...it would be my pleasure to feature you both & your contact info on "I'M ALIVE AND LIVE" ~ (1st Broadcast here; Join 1000Mikes.com First: http://en.1000mikes.com/user/manageArchive.xhtml ) ~ Let's Jive on this Hive & Get This Show on the Road! Anyone else with a Passion? Let's DO IT!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/08/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    A Warm beBee Welcome, our friend @Vincent King! So many of us...patients with chronic illness, entrepreneurs, mental health advocacy, veterans, teens....the list goes on...need this! Love how you go through stages of paragraphs that could really be pages...so much unsaid, yet you write with rising bread, yeast coalescing with molecules of un-power to transform from flat to tower! Keep on writing, dear kind sir-bee....stirring you on to keep singing your song, as wee neeed it! @Randy Keho, @Lisa Gallagher, @Sara Jacobovici, @Anees Zaidi, @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian, @Paul Walters, @Brian McKenzie, @debasish majumder, @Ali Anani, @Javier beBee....as I bring others on to Buzz personal memories along, we appreciate your candor and courage, dear Vincent. We do.
  14. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    26/07/2016
    Another insightful and practical, straight from the wise heart post by @Sarah Elkins.
    Sara Jacobovici
    We All Need a Foundation to Step Out of Our Comfort Zone
    elkinsconsulting.com It's a mattress! It's not practical to keep a mattress when I've managed to give away and throw away the majority of my "stuff" so we can travel,...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Sarah Elkins
    27/07/2016 #2 Sarah Elkins
    #1 Thanks again for sharing this, @Sara Jacobovici! @Rebel Brown & @Lisa Gallagher, I'm guessing you'll both appreciate this one.
    Sara Jacobovici
    26/07/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    Another insightful and practical, straight from the wise heart post @Sarah Elkins.
    Yes! “We all need something to help us feel grounded when we're about to take a leap out of our comfort zone…we need a close bond with someone (or something) in order to become independent.” I invite your readers to this particular link re attachment. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/born-under-wings-other-paradoxes-sara-jacobovici?trk=mp-reader-card
    That is what it’s all about; we have been attaching or not attaching from the moment of conception. There are biological, physical, emotional and social attachments happening or not happening on a daily basis. Part of the choice we take to attach, or not, is conscious, part more unconscious. And then there is what is referred to as “transitional objects”. These objects represent that which you describe in your post Sarah. They are connected or “attached” to something, someplace (internal or external), or someone. As long as we are aware of what we need and are able to continue to engage with others in our lives and move forward in life, don’t judge or put a negative spin on it. As you say, “Don't get rid of it. You have a storage area [read as a metaphor] that can hold it for you for a while. Keep it until you don't feel like you need it any more. We all need something to help us feel grounded when we're about to take a leap out of our comfort zone.”
  15. John White, MBA

    John White, MBA

    07/07/2016
    A powerful read from @Christian Farber on The Good Men Project.
    John White, MBA
    My Secret Is Out: I Have OCD! -
    goodmenproject.com Chris Farber shares his story of living with...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    19/07/2016 #6 Sara Jacobovici
    Great share @Aaron Skogen. Definitely a strong and important message. @Christian Farber your story needs to be heard and I am glad it was posted on a site working to fight stigma. "The more people who share their stories, the more light is shone on these invisible illnesses, and the more the stigma of living with mental illness is reduced."
    Aaron Skogen
    07/07/2016 #2 Aaron Skogen
    This is a powerful story indeed @Christian Farber, well done. I wholeheartedly agree with your perspective on treatment and your strong advocacy for early intervention. For those who suffer from mental health diseases, intervention is life altering. You talk for a while about regrets. I am certain you would not be the man, husband, father, et. al., that you are, had you not battled this demon. You would certainly be a different person. I only mention the regret portion as I believe regret to be a fruitless and ultimately, negative emotion. Your experience has granted you many gifts, of this I am sure, and your writing is a gift to the rest of us. No regrets! Thank you for a great article. And thank you @John White, MBA for sharing!
    Mickael Angelo Yusufidis
    07/07/2016 #1 Mickael Angelo Yusufidis
    Important piece of writing. Courage is everything and I can definitely relate to this. Thank You for sharing.
  16. Flavio 🇯🇵 Souza
    Flavio 🇯🇵 Souza
    Ouch! A bug in fMRI software could invalidate 15 years of brain research.
    grendz.com There could be a very serious problem with the past 15 years of research into human brain activity, with a new study suggesting that a bug in fMRI software could invalidate the results of some 40,000 papers. That’s massive, because functional...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Flavio 🇯🇵 Souza
    06/07/2016 #3 Flavio 🇯🇵 Souza
    Right on @Sara #2
    Sara Jacobovici
    06/07/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    SCORE ONE FOR MAN AND ZERO FOR TECHNOLOGICAL DEVICES - An important perspective to read: “…the fact is that when scientists are interpreting data from an fMRI machine, they’re not looking at the actual brain. As Richard Chirgwin reports for The Register, what they’re looking at is an image of the brain divided into tiny ‘voxels’, then interpreted by a computer program…because software is the thing that’s actually interpreting the data from the fMRI scans, your results are only as good as your computer.”
    Sara Jacobovici
    06/07/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    Thank you @Flavio 🇯🇵 Souza. An important article with a clear perspective that technology provides tools, not substitutes for human capacities.
  17. ProducerPascal Derrien

    Pascal Derrien

    01/07/2016
    Are You A Coached Potato?
    Are You A Coached Potato?Are you the king of the couch? Are you worshipping take aways to a point that even your own mind is fried? Are you making half-baked decisions? Are you a coached potato?We have a popular TV program on National TV every January here in Ireland called...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    19/07/2016 #15 Sara Jacobovici
    Great share @Jennifer Martin. @Pascal Derrien, there is nothing you write about that can be argued against. The only thing I would underscore is that each generation has faced and continues to face the "battle of the bulge" and that in and of itself is one aspect of the problem; the generation that grew up making the wrong choices carries that over to the next generation. Making people aware will not be enough unless there are practical supports in place for families and institutions like schools and hospitals.
    Pascal Derrien
    04/07/2016 #14 Pascal Derrien
    #13 social media diet thats a good one :-)
    Dean Owen
    04/07/2016 #13 Dean Owen
    Author's June submission for Bees' Best Picks Hive. I am not too sure as it is suggestive we spend less time on beBee and more time outdoors! Nice one Pascal!
    Pascal Derrien
    01/07/2016 #12 Pascal Derrien
    #11 thanks Laura for sharing this in modern life it takes a lot of efforts to make the decision let alone what it takes to implement changes we should not victimised individuals who are struggling....
    Laura Mikolaitis
    01/07/2016 #11 Laura Mikolaitis
    @Pascal Derrien this is well written but then again that goes for all of your posts. Thank you for writing about such an important topic and for starting the discussion. It can be difficult to make that first step toward leading a healthier lifestyle. I was there not so long ago. For me, I had always been a "skinny" girl so when I started gaining weight it was a huge shock. And for a long time, I ignored it. I wasn't happy in my skin, but I kept making excuses - and I'm sure that complacency and where I was at in life had a hand in it too. But eventually I got off of the couch and I made a choice to change. However, it is more than just choosing to diet, it's choosing to implement a life style change because really that's what it is. And it's worked for me. I am a healthier, happier, and more grounded person because of the changes. Now, when I look back at where I was 4 years ago I sit in awe because so much has changed - and it's all good. In fact, I published a post last night that spoke to how taking to the open road has helped me find my well being (and shed the weight). It can be done and we shouldn't be ashamed to talk about it.
    Pascal Derrien
    01/07/2016 #10 Pascal Derrien
    #7 indeed @Julie Hickman depending where you are in life it is sometimes difficult to make that first....step and there are some other incentives for not doing it ........
    Pascal Derrien
    01/07/2016 #9 Pascal Derrien
    #8 we are very similar in our household too and then I can see of my neighbours giving crisps to young kids in the morning ..... :-(
    Aaron Skogen
    01/07/2016 #8 Aaron Skogen
    I had this open on LI and was planning to comment, then I clicked over here and it was at the top of my feed @Pascal Derrien. Maybe I'll go back there and comment too. . . It's certainly a serious dilemma and a huge issue here in the US as well. I don't believe there is a silver bullet, but it starts with each individual making a choice. There is no "junk" food or soda in our home. We still sit down for family meals. Yet most importantly, I think, is that my bride and I model an active lifestyle for our kids. And thankfully its rubbing off. They are very active in sports, eat well and love their time outdoors. Very relevant post my friend!
    Julie Hickman
    01/07/2016 #7 Julie Hickman
    Such an important topic @Pascal Derrien. I believe we all know what we "should" do to achieve a healthy weight and lifestyle but many are overwhelmed by the "how" and "when". Just start! Step by step you will get there. Exercise is good for the mind and body :)
    Pascal Derrien
    01/07/2016 #6 Pascal Derrien
    #5 potatoes are pretty photogenic aren't they, my kingdom for a potato !!!! Thanks for dropping by
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    01/07/2016 #5 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    By the way, @Pascal Derrien, I didn't mention in my LI comment that I like the potato image.
    Pascal Derrien
    01/07/2016 #4 Pascal Derrien
    #2 my son received an award for Sport Person of The Year yesterday he has an ipod which sometimes goes uncharged for weeks I can take it away form him he does not care but I threat not to being to training he is making a fuss and begging not to I cannot ake the credit for his mindset but I have encouraged him to get off the couch and do something sport or else his sister for example likes to draw and make stories in her room
    Pascal Derrien
    01/07/2016 #3 Pascal Derrien
    #1 :-) thanks Alan @Alan Geller
    Ken Boddie
    01/07/2016 #2 Ken Boddie
    Where am I, @Pascal Derrien? Sitting on the couch of course.

    You see I was a cruel father. No iPhones when my kids were young, so I had them watching a black line for 2 hours every day with their faces submerged in water. No, not because I was too Scottish to fix the TV, and insisted they have long showers, but I had them attend swimming squad, along with other sports. Swimming in particular provided them with good exercise, taught them discipline, helped them focus on their studies, and, along with the education that was associated with squad life, ensured they followed an exercise routine and appreciated a balanced food diet; attributes which lingered well into adulthood and to this day. It also helped that I married a lady who was not only a good but an excellent cook. Times were different then. The challenge today is to prise kids away from screens and get them moving their limbs in a group of their peers, be it swimming squad, little athletics, school orchestra, or whatever.

    Love the "Potatoe King" image, Pascal. 👍
  18. ProducerGary Sharpe

    Gary Sharpe

    15/04/2016
    My Experience with Counselling and Parkinson's Disease
    My Experience with Counselling and Parkinson's DiseaseWhy Cry?For me, it began when my own mind was changed and with it the opening up of my ability to be emotive. My Mind Change is quite literal. New pathways, new mental capacities, new thought horizons. Not just thinking different thoughts,...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Deb Helfrich
    01/07/2016 #22 Deb Helfrich
    #21 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD We actually have some research supporting a circadian aspect to PD. Haven't quite nailed the treatment protocol. But it is certain that sleep cycles really do make a Seattle / England partnership way more challenging than one that isn't 8 hours out of phase.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #21 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #13 Oopsies. I forgot to mention how important the day/night cycle is for mental health and the treatment of depression or sadness. "Lights on" & stay awake during the day. "Lights off" and sleep at night, no TV, and don't fall asleep at your laptop (of course I've never done that lol). Wait....I have to see what this ridge is that's on my forehead...oh. Oh! My head fell asleep on the laptop... (but I didn't just actually say that). Now I have 'keyboard' imprints....oh well. It makes me smile just at this moment. So it's all ok... and Oh! Without the circadian day/night cycle, a patient will get sad, depressed (Seasonal Affective Anxiety Disorder, SAAD), or get ICU psychosis complete with hallucinations. The Solution? Light by day, dark at night. Sit/lay by a window. That's it!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #20 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #15 The additional thought that @Gary Sharpe ignited in me was that as patients, we have to take care of ourselves. If we don't sleep at night, or eat watermelon instead of potato chips, then our physical bodies cannot maintain the mental capacity to stay focused. We need to take care of ourselves first. In order to do that, we need to listen to our bodies....and do what they say. Stop working if needed ~ Take a nap instead!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #19 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #12 You would like the book I wrote while in the hospital. I'll write a blurb soon. The PTSD still kicks in when I write or talk about the car accident my daughter and I were in, but I don't cry anymore when relating that or the subsequent (and current) bed-ridden state I am in. My faith in God has allowed me to get through all, and ministering to others is still a part of my being able to be a doctor that heals.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #18 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 I am happy that @Deb Helfrich has been and is there for you. We only need one person to really care. We can hold on to that.
    Lisa Gallagher
    01/07/2016 #17 Lisa Gallagher
    I have to add, I could feel the emotions with your writing @Gary Sharpe! So deep, thank you for sharing.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    30/06/2016 #16 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Wow! I am also speechless. Very moving and and informative. Shedding tears can be the first step towards seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.
    Lisa Gallagher
    30/06/2016 #15 Lisa Gallagher
    What a moving and informative post @Gary Sharpe! This really stood out, "“And what about compassion for yourself?”
    I will remember those words for the rest of my life and, yes, the remembering brings deep emotions even as I write this. Because they cut through the defences I had erected like a knife." If we don't have compassion for ourselves we are failing ourselves and It's hard for others to have compassion. I think it's hard because they aren't sure if their compassion will be accepted.
    Gerald Hecht
    29/06/2016 #14 Gerald Hecht
    #3 @Gary Sharpe hey...just not today, lol
    Gary Sharpe
    28/06/2016 #13 Gary Sharpe
    #5 You have just left me speechless @Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.. I feel your words at the visceral level.
    Gary Sharpe
    28/06/2016 #12 Gary Sharpe
    #7 While things are difficult right now, at least I know what I want and what future I am working for. I am sure the tears will then be joyous thereafter @Sara Jacobovici
    Gary Sharpe
    28/06/2016 #11 Gary Sharpe
    #8 To tie both ends of your deeply felt comment, @Deb Helfrich has been the one present for a lot of my tears lately, @Cyndi wilkins
    Gary Sharpe
    28/06/2016 #10 Gary Sharpe
    #9 Thankyou for this thoughtful words @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD - yes I like the last lines a lot. These speak to me about some of my current troubles (I have been doing a lot of Crying lately).
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/06/2016 #9 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 Completely overwhelming scenario, that mimics where each one of us has been at one time or another, for different reasons. What really resonates is our need, yes...and our own "letting go" of the facade of happy faces that are crying invisible tears. We have to get those tears out. We just must be able, one day, to talk about our tragedy without crying. It is then, that we know we have indeed dealt with it.
    Cyndi wilkins
    28/06/2016 #8 Cyndi wilkins
    The shedding of tears is a show of great strength...especially when done in the presence of another...it is a show of love and empathy for oneself or another...A most profound healer...Thank you for sharing your tears with us Gary...and to you @Deb Helfrich View more
    The shedding of tears is a show of great strength...especially when done in the presence of another...it is a show of love and empathy for oneself or another...A most profound healer...Thank you for sharing your tears with us Gary...and to you @Deb Helfrich, for the mention in this powerful expression of a man's heart and soul...It is an honor to have connected with you both. Close
    Sara Jacobovici
    28/06/2016 #7 Sara Jacobovici
    Dear @Gary Sharpe, I am very grateful I got to meet you through your courageous work and inspirational commitment to keep on growing and thriving as a human being. You are passing the baton with your story and you are having a tremendous impact on the quality of life of so many you connect with. You trusted Elle and you trusted the process of therapeutic counselling, but finally and most importantly you trusted yourself. You need all three to make it work and Gary, you are making it work! Wishing you continued strength and may you cry and shed many tears of joy!
    Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    28/06/2016 #6 Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    #2 Thank you so much for your kind words, @Deb Helfrich.
    Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    28/06/2016 #5 Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    This is beautiful and compelling and insightful, @Gary Sharpe. But perhaps more importantly, it is inspiring! To embrace your situation on an emotional level is to meet the challenge at its heart. The mind and body operate in crystalline transmission of vibrational frequencies, and it is our emotional state that tunes the antenna. The crystalline nature of our mind and body functionally stores the negative energy of conflict, tension, and trauma, and the positive energy of passion, joy and enthusiasm. The critical relationship of positive intention is learning to mindfully control this transmission of energy to manifest positive changes in our emotional state, which translates to charging our consciousness into actualization and self-possession. Weeping clears the slate. We let go of bitterness, disappointment, anger, rage . . . FEAR . . . which serve as a mental, emotional and physiological disconnect! Once we do this, we begin fine tuning the connectivity we are seeking within ourselves and open up to the abundance of love that surrounds us--the love upon which the human organism thrives--love which is the organic sentience and unity consciousness of our living, breathing universe. Holistic health and emotional presence are one in the same. And yes, sometimes it takes a little therapy to shine a light into the diamond mine.
    Sara Jacobovici
    28/06/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    #2 Your kind and generous words mean alot @Deb Helfrich. Thank you.
    Gary Sharpe
    28/06/2016 #3 Gary Sharpe
    #2 Also we must thank @Gerald Hecht for all his free giving of scientific expertise - the REAL inquiring science not the dogmatic
  19. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Invisible Illnesses: We are "Paralyzed"
    Invisible Illnesses: We are "Paralyzed"by Dr Margaret Arandaby Dr Margaret ArandaThe "Invisible Illness" world is full of young women and men who lay in bed all day, living solitary lives due to sickness. There is a huge need for awareness, research, donations, non-profit Activism,...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 @Pamela L. Williams: WoW. I'm so sorry to hear your report that the ER doc did such a traumatic thing to you. Has happened to me 1000 times and I had no choice BUT to go to the ER...purple lips on the floor...wearing just my panties and a tank top...spotted images of handsome EMT bodybuilders ....too embarrassed to be embarrassed....to sick to see anything but those big muscles, not out of adoration, but out of desperation that they actually could carry me downstairs....dOn'T LEt mE FaLl! .... Stay with us as we tell all to help others. Knowledge is power. Women Helping Women, and Men Helping Women. Men Helping Men, and Women Helping Men. It's a small world, after all.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 @Leckey Harrison: I figured out how to start a new paragraph! Whoa, Baby! You just write the Comment on another avenue, like "Word.doc" or "Notes"...and then Cut & Paste. Ha!! Baby steps, man...gotta love the Baby steps 💪!
    Pamela L. Williams
    24/06/2016 #9 Pamela L. Williams
    What a nightmare it is to contend with the limited scope of a closed minded medical staff. Thanks for sharing Margaret. I'll never forget going to the ER for severe ear pain and being treated like someone in search of drugs. I was given ear drops with an acid base. This was on a Saturday and I couldn't get to my Ear,Nose, Throat doctor until Tuesday. I had severe swimmers ear and my ear drum was raw like a busted blister. The acid drops were making the rawness worse and contributing the excruciating pain. Friend and family wonder why I say; if I don't see 5 quarts of blood, I'm not going to the ER.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 Gotcha on the new paragraph; sometimes I can do it, and sometimes not...somehow, I think it works on the Buzzees and not on the Comments; but it's too much for my brain right now. So (1) Awareness: we're starting here & now with a SOLUTION, hence your presence, @Leckey Harrison. You have both personal experience and have witnessed things that we can't imagine. Most of us have tried so many different things to solve the pain...and that's the novel & special gift you bring to us ~ compassion, 1st-hand experience, & an alternative. (2) Shift in national priorities: we have the "downsizing of narcotics for pain" as a mandate from the government now. This only validates this: people need what we have here! and (3) we invite all others with Solutions to the table. Just don't give us attitude or garbage. We've all had enough of that. So here we go, onward & forward! Together, we are strong!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 @Randy Keho: WoW. Patton. Wow. Let me whittle this down to some plans here. (1) Please contribute any photos you have of Veterans into my Hive ~ Veterans: To Honor OR Veterans: To Serve. It is international. (2) I have PTSD re: car crashes, due to my Warriorhood in the matter. It's real, it affects battered wives, abused children, and so many more. We are here to address the mental health issues resulting from trauma, and your input is valuable! Gosh, can you just turn your story into a Buzz & let it land here? That would really Bzzzzz! and (3) Yes, we are also addressing exactly what you describe ~ the inhumane doctors that inflict more damage than help; and I am NOT one of them! All your points are so valid. Love ~ Love ~ Love ~ Love ~ Love your input!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 @Jason Attar: Chronic pain is a huge issue for all who suffer from it. Some of us ~ perhaps more than we would guess ~ have learned to bear lots of pain before complaining about it. Chronic pain changes your world. I know it. One of the best things is that we have one another. @Leckey Harrison and I are here to bring Solutions forward. And you're right...before we figure out nerve mapping in our lifetimes, let us get to a Solution for TODAY & NOW! That's what this Hive is all about!
    Leckey Harrison
    24/06/2016 #5 Leckey Harrison
    I have got to learn how to create a new paragraph....I agree: a huge need for awareness. Also a huge need for a shift in national priorities.
    Leckey Harrison
    24/06/2016 #4 Leckey Harrison
    The invisible illness world is full of young and old people who go to work every day, do their jobs, go home, and repeat ad nauseum, due to sickness. There is dissociation, addictions, disconnections at high levels, that robs these people, and the rest of us, of the best they can be for themselves, and us.
    Randy Keho
    24/06/2016 #3 Randy Keho
    My father recalls when U.S. Gen. George S. Patton slapped two U.S soldiers in evacuation hospitals because they were reportedly suffering from "battle fatigue," during WWII. It's better known today as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Patton, whom my father served under, saw them as cowards. He was temporarily relieved of command and forced to issue an apology. Nonetheless, he received another command, and led the charge into Germany following the invasion of Normandy. There are still military commanders, disguised as doctors, in the health care system. I've met them.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    The circle of 'life' for the disabled who search and search for a diagnosis.
    Jason Attar
    24/06/2016 #1 Jason Attar
    Though painful enough and humiliating, the next step is to seek out the painful world of nerve mapping. What a horrible experience to go through. I was hit by a drunk driver over two years ago, and the knee and hip pain is still unbearable at times....
  20. ProducerLisa Gallagher

    Lisa Gallagher

    24/06/2016
    Suffering From Anxiety Disease and Social Implications
    Suffering From Anxiety Disease and Social ImplicationsWarning- This post will be bluntly honest. Many of you that follow me know that I suffer from Anxiety and Panic Disorder. My mom passed away in January and it seems my Anxiety has been full blown for the past 4-6 weeks.  The only way I can describe...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Lisa Gallagher
    01/09/2016 #50 Lisa Gallagher
    #48 Hi @Paul Walters, I'm sorry you've been afflicted with Anxiety and depression too. There is oft times no predictability to its pattern which is extremely frustrating. It comes and goes without warning. I have breaks from it. It always lurks. I think many times we try to put on our happy and fake demeanor to accommodate those around us and that alone, can take a physical toll on the body. There are people who say they understand but I dont think its possible if they've never experienced it. I see a lot of people who write about "anxious " times in their lives and how they overcame them etc.. thats great and I admire those people but if they really had Anxiety disease, the illness, they'd find its different than dealing with issues that cause a person to become anxious. I dont read articles about self help, perspective etc.. when it comes to illnesses like heart disease, thyroid disease and on the list goes. Why, because they are medical illnesses just like Chronic Anxiety disease and other illnesses classified as MENTAL, there in lies the problem, the stigma associated with the damn label and lack of education on behalf of many. Sorry I ranted, it hasn't been a good week , it came back with a fervor last week. Hoping your week was better! :)
    Lisa Gallagher
    01/09/2016 #49 Lisa Gallagher
    #47 Hi Robert Mckormic, sometimes people need drugs to get over the hump period, but they are not a cure. I agree, they are over prescribed and CBT is a good standard therapy that produces welcome results with many.
    Paul Walters
    01/09/2016 #48 Paul Walters
    Thanks @Lisa Gallagher When one digs a little one finds that often people you know well suffer from this terrible affliction, I bing one of them. I wrote a piece a few years ago on the subject of anxiety and depression and I was astonished at the amount of responses I received . Its an affliction that receives no sympathy but oftimes scorn as on the 'outside' you look fit and healthy. Its a battle that I have discovered is never really won, some days you have defeated the demon only for it to return with a few more heads !!!! However, from what I read, you are eloquent and focussed and I guess focussing on those two elements is the first steps to keeping the beast locked in its cage where it belongs .
    Robert Cormack
    31/08/2016 #47 Robert Cormack
    A study done at the University of Toronto found that CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) is just as effective as drugs (based on heat source MRIs). The problem for MDs? People want a quick fix. They want a pill. As you say in your article, issues associated with anxiety are longstanding and deeply ingrained. A pill isn't going to change what you've continually ignored from your past. CBT takes a lot of commitment, but when you understand the "triggers" of anxiety, they become easier to deal with and tolerate. I'll post an article I did for The National Post called: In Hollywood, Anxiety is the New Alcoholism.
    Lisa Gallagher
    29/08/2016 #46 Lisa Gallagher
    #45 So young! Ironically, I was diagnosed with nerve damage in my left ear too @Debbie O'Halloran, a virus destroyed the balance nerve in my left ear. I take medication for life which for the most part keeps the vertigo away but the brain also learned to compensate some what with exercises. OMG, running out of the house, well if rolling over something got you over the panic, that's awesome LOL!
    Debbie O'Halloran
    25/08/2016 #45 Anonymous
    #44 @Lisa Gallagher, I was diagnosed at age 8. When I was diagnosed, I was told that I was born with it. Of course that was the early 70's and that's what we were told. Now the doctor thinks it was a virus that I had as a toddler. Unfortunately, this same virus caused nerve damage in my left ear.

    The panic started in 1997. The last attack I had in May, forced me out of the house, in pouring rain, and I ended up on a short drive. I ended up rolling over something with my husband's car and leery him with a flat. Got me over my panic attack. LOL!

    Thanks for your kind words!
    Lisa Gallagher
    23/08/2016 #44 Lisa Gallagher
    #43 Hi @Debbie O'Halloran, I'm so sorry I missed your comment. I'm also sorry you suffer from Panic Disorder, it's a tough battle at times. Were you diagnosed a child with Juvenile diabetes or as an adult? I have a brother in law who developed type 1 Diabetes at age 29, they think a virus affected his pancreas. Sending good thoughts to you!!
    Debbie O'Halloran
    16/08/2016 #43 Anonymous
    Thank you for writing a Buzz I can totally relate to. Panic disease is horrible. You feel helpless. It is exactly as you describe it. By the way, I also have type 1 diabetes too.
    Lisa Gallagher
    23/07/2016 #39 Lisa Gallagher
    #38 Thanks for sharing your experience @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. I don't take issue with mental health. I do however, despise the term Mentally ill, or Mental Illness. It's vital to focus on the mind, body and spirit, they are all connected. Thanks for you comment!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #38 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #34 #35 #36 : As a medical student, I was taught 'differently.' Apparently. Not only did we have a Nutrition class (the only mandatory one in the nation), but we focused on mind, body, and soul. So because the "Mind" is often "left out of the healing equation," I give credence to the word "Mental" only because it increases awareness and categorizes a huge need. And on that point, I do not use "Mental Illness" at all. Never. I use "Mental Health." For that is the point of healers: to focus on the positive, to give smiles and laughter, to do good, and to keep a laser-vision on 'health.' Period.
    Lisa Gallagher
    07/07/2016 #37 Lisa Gallagher
    Thanks for sharing my buzz @CityVP Manjit!
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/07/2016 #36 Sara Jacobovici
    #34 Amen to that @CityVP Manjit.
    Lisa Gallagher
    07/07/2016 #35 Lisa Gallagher
    #34 @CityVP Manjit what a great response! I'm glad to hear someone else dislikes the term mental. The brain is one our vital organs yet when something goes wrong that can't be seen, people use terms that do cause stigmas and it also makes others afraid to seek help or possibly share what they are experiencing- it becomes a vicious cycle. My new granddaughter does give me renewed hope and I couldn't agree more, it's my HOPE too that the next generation will be much more enlightened, less judgmental and compassionate. Thanks so much for your wonderful comment!
    CityVP Manjit
    07/07/2016 #34 CityVP Manjit
    I love your courage Lisa Gallagher because the very nature of anxious suffering includes seeing it as a stigma which is even more challenging. I also respect your dislike of the word "mental" - and I can well understand why you do not like this word. Being that I responded on the night of 7th July - when you look at your newly arrived grand-daughter the great hope is that her generation will be far more enlightened than prior generations were, so that conscious awareness hopefully moves us all to an increasingly more thoughtful future, one which is an era of far greater personal understanding.
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/07/2016 #33 Lisa Gallagher
    Thanks for the share @John White, MBA!
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/07/2016 #32 Lisa Gallagher
    Thank you for sharing my buzz @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD! You sure do buzz around and fast.. you are quite the bee!! :))
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/07/2016 #31 Lisa Gallagher
    #30 Thanks for your kind comments @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD :))
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #30 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Another huge WoW here. My heart it. It's just growing
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #29 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #13 Great point @Dean Owen, straight from the heart. As time progresses, I can see two things evolving: the bonds are being made with one another, and the chains of despair and sadness and all that is negative? The chains are being broken. God Bless you and your family.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #28 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 @Diane Schultz: "Lord God, we pray in the Power of Two that @Lisa Gallagher gets a touch from Your hand. Let her find the peace that passes all understanding, the No More Tears of heaven, where the lion plays with the lamb. We know this is found in You, Christ. Help her, guide her. Lead her, and let her follow as a good servant without fear. For you said 365 times in the Bible, 'Do not be afraid.' "Have no fear." And we agree that we shall all have this freedom from that deep fear that belongs nowhere near us. We pray this in Jesus' name, as he promises us that you shall give us that which we ask in His name. Amen."
  21. ProducerSara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    22/06/2016
    Healing trauma and self love
    Healing trauma and self loveAnother great TRE testimony, from someone healing a severe case of C-PTSD. This is partly why I love this work."TRE & Self Love.In the area of self help and healing there is a lot of talk about the value and benefits of self love. No one handed...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    22/06/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    Well said @Leckey Harrison and a message which needs to be heard. Self love definitely equals success. The challenge is that a human paradox exists that sets us up to strive to be individuals who are nonetheless dependent on others. When I work with adult survivors of childhood trauma I ask who there was in their life that made a difference in any way that was internalized by the individual. I very rarely offer a link to my posts in a comment but I would like to share this one in which I speak of relationships. Thanks for your Buzz Leckey. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/born-under-wings-other-paradoxes-sara-jacobovici?trk=mp-reader-card
  22. Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    What do you think of this?
    Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    Mental health: Serious lack of crisis facilities, says expert panel - BBC News
    www.bbc.com An expert commission set up to look at Northern Ireland's mental health services says there is a serious lack of crisis specialist...
    Relevant
  23. ProducerEmilia M. Ludovino
    EMOTIONAL PAIN HURTS MORE THAN PHYSICAL PAIN
    EMOTIONAL PAIN HURTS MORE THAN PHYSICAL PAINDid you know that emotional pain hurts more than physical pain? That’s right. Pain caused by emotional distress such as rejection, loneliness, guilt, failure etc., is more deeply felt and cause longer-lasting damage to your health and quality of...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Emilia M. Ludovino
    28/06/2016 #34 Emilia M. Ludovino
    #33 Vivian Chapman - Thank you for taking your time for reading this post. I appreciate your comment. Though the scope of the article is not dismissed physical pain but rather bring awareness for the consequences of the emotional pain. Blessings!
    Vivian Chapman
    27/06/2016 #33 Vivian Chapman
    Good buzz but I'm just not sure it's true. Doesn't physical pain cause emotional pain, if it's bad enough or prolonged enough? If we are whole integrated beings, is it right to distinguish between physical and emotional pain? Physical pain can cause people to commit suicide. One might argue that physical pain has an explanation, therefore others will understand. But will they? Both kinds of pain can cause loneliness, isolation, and desperation. Both body and soul do have remarkable healing mechanisms.
    Fran Brizzolis
    18/06/2016 #32 Fran Brizzolis
    #31 Es un placer. Y es una verdad absluta. Lo se muy bien por motivos personales (TDAH)
    Emilia M. Ludovino
    18/06/2016 #31 Emilia M. Ludovino
    @Fran Brizzolis @Anycka HC Gracias por compartir me zumbido por las otras colmenas :). Buen finde.
    Emilia M. Ludovino
    18/06/2016 #30 Emilia M. Ludovino
    #29 Thank you @Louise Smith fo your comment. It seems you already read my book - The Seven Irrefutable Laws of emotional Intelligence - where I explain what you said very well and also the importance of​ journaling.
    Louise Smith
    18/06/2016 #29 Louise Smith
    Yes @Emilia M. Ludovino. People can improve their emotional life by becoming aware of something that hurts and starting to do something to heal it sooner. Mindfulness, meditation and self reflection through journaling are good for developing this awareness. We have busy lives and need to set aside some time every day to process what has happened.
    Brian McKenzie
    18/06/2016 #28 Brian McKenzie
    #27 Alcohol is a depressant - I am not a "happy" drunk - tis why I don't do it often or heavily. Booze amplifies my anti-social 'get the fuck away from me' moods.
    Marcel Arvizu
    18/06/2016 #27 Marcel Arvizu
    #26 Wow @Brian McKenzie, that was the happy version? Lol! Let's see how your version is after a few drinks?
    Brian McKenzie
    18/06/2016 #26 Brian McKenzie
    #20 @Marcel Arvizu That was the "happy" version 😂
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    17/06/2016 #25 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #24 Thank you for the birthday wishes @Emilia M. Ludovino
    Emilia M. Ludovino
    17/06/2016 #24 Emilia M. Ludovino
    #23 Thank you, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman for your comment and HAPPY BIRTHDAY - many blessings and many returns of the day my dear.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    17/06/2016 #23 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Emotional pain is difficult to deal with because it is not always evident to others. Plus, some people harbor their feelings, which your article states numerous health problems. You fix a broken arm by putting it a sling but you can't do the same with your emotions. Insightful buzz, @Emilia M. Ludovino.
    Henri Galvão
    17/06/2016 #22 Henri Galvão
    #17 good point
    Emilia M. Ludovino
    17/06/2016 #21 Emilia M. Ludovino
    @Jim Cody @Deb Helfrich @Henri Galvão @Cyndi wilkins - Thank you all for your amazing support in reading the buzz, sharing it all over the internet (special LinkedIn) and for your beautiful comments that resonate so much with my outlook on life and work. Big Big thank you all. It's a privilege to have such beautiful people like you in my connections. Blessings to y'all.
    Marcel Arvizu
    17/06/2016 #20 Marcel Arvizu
    #18 Lol, Brian! I agree with you but maybe on a little less gloomy level.
    Jim Cody
    17/06/2016 #19 Jim Cody
    Totally agree.
    Brian McKenzie
    17/06/2016 #18 Brian McKenzie
    Lock it down, comparmentalize it, mitigate future losses by always expecting the lie & betrayal - get rewarded often for your new diligence. "Love" is just another happy bullshit lie they use to sell you shit and goad you into a mind numb dumb herded compliant sheep. PS Valentines Day Chocolates are always at least half off on February 15th.
    Deb Helfrich
    17/06/2016 #17 Deb Helfrich
    #16 @Henri Galvão - the thing is that we sometimes don't see ourselves clearly enough to tap on the really difficult stuff and other times we think we merely have a physical pain but it is entirely an emotional wound, so we don't tap while expressing the actual underlying issues. I know when I get stuck having a session with another person who doesn't have my blindspots can truly help.
    Henri Galvão
    17/06/2016 #16 Henri Galvão
    #14 I'm happy to hear that's worked for you as well, Deb! I'm not always successful with it, but when it does work, it's always a powerful experience.
    Deb Helfrich
    17/06/2016 #15 Deb Helfrich
    This is a really great article, @Emilia M. Ludovino for those people who still focus solely on their physical health. The mental aspects really do underpin so much of the foundation of our health.

    I do have one point to make, though, which is that being introverted is not caused by negative emotions. In fact, most introverts, who recharge by enjoying alone time to think and process life are overall more likely to be in touch with their emotions and be able to deal with them more appropriately because they are not always focused on outward validation from others.
  24. ProducerDonald Grandy

    Donald Grandy

    15/06/2016
    Global Transformation of Healthcare
    Global Transformation of HealthcareThe Secret SauceWe are right in the middle of a tremendous global transformation that has already greatly influenced the foundation of conventional medicine. We no longer divide the body and mind into independent entities.. We are beginning to...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Donald Grandy
    16/06/2016 #9 Donald Grandy
    #6 Thanks for sharing. great article.
    Sara Jacobovici
    16/06/2016 #8 Sara Jacobovici
    Important message and well communicated @Donald Grandy. It's time the pendulum stopped swinging and found its balanced space.
    Deb Helfrich
    16/06/2016 #5 Deb Helfrich
    #4 @Pamela L. Williams, Great to hear that the coconut oil is helping you cutback on several cups of coffee. The right kinds of fats at breakfast really can power us through the day. I also swear by good old-fashioned cream - pure dairy fat. With none of the milk proteins like the half-n-half stuff, it gives me the same feeling of one and done.
    Pamela L. Williams
    16/06/2016 #4 Pamela L. Williams
    I stopped the punishing on a diet all the time rollercoaster a long time ago. I also stopped punishing myself because I don't get on the treadmill everyday (it's boring!) I eat reasonably, cut out a lot of sweets but treat myself occasionally and the best thing I've done I just realized was cut back on coffee to one cup in the morning, in which I add a teaspoon of coconut oil. It was suggested on a post by @Gary Sharpe and it's amazing that I don't want that second, third, and sometimes fourth cup. Just one and I'm done! My exercise is working in the yard. I do it longer because I'm enjoying it. I parked my riding lawn mower and now use the push (though self-propelled). Overall I'm just feeling better and thinking more clearly.
    Donald Grandy
    16/06/2016 #3 Donald Grandy
    #2 l Congratulations! You have made a lifestyle change. Welcome to the 10% that make this decision.
    Irene Hackett
    16/06/2016 #2 Anonymous
    I couldn't agree more @Donald Grandy! Holistic approach is the way to optimum health for sur. For the past 11 days My husband & I have been doing an herbal 'cleanse' and getting back to large veggie / fruit portions - low portions white meat. I have to get back to my yoga & walking - I believe movement is critical and so hard to be consistent!!!
    Deb Helfrich
    16/06/2016 #1 Deb Helfrich
    It would be great if we could focus more on understanding the simple ways to promote health, rather than investing tremendous amounts of time and money on the minutia of each specific illness. I am going to do some EFT right now, @Donald Grandy View more
    It would be great if we could focus more on understanding the simple ways to promote health, rather than investing tremendous amounts of time and money on the minutia of each specific illness. I am going to do some EFT right now, @Donald Grandy, because my balance is off today. Close
  25. ProducerMichael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    7 Points to Successfully Live in the Grey
    7 Points to Successfully Live in the GreyAfter watching the TED.com talk from Jon Ronson on Strange answers to the psychopath test  with playlist All kinds of minds there was one paragraph towards the end of the talk which resonated very strongly with the situation I am in. I highly...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    15/06/2016 #2 Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    #1 You should read my next buzz,.
    Zack Thorn
    15/06/2016 #1 Zack Thorn
    Trite as it may sound Michael, you need to become your own best friend. Some people say that hearing voices or talking to yourself is a sign of mental illness. To which I say BS ! That inner voice is your sub conscious, your better half in many cases and more often than not the soundest counsel you will ever recieve. A constant companion with a sympathetic ear and a knack for understanding. When you sink into the doldrums and find yourself dwelling in the past. listen to your buddy when he tells you it's a dead end road. Trust him.....he's been there before. Dwelling on past mistakes is no answer for the future. Or course you will never forget them, which is how it should be. We learn from them, vow to ourselves never to repeat them and move on. That's called life. Constantly dwelling upon them is a road to ruin, a slow and painful death. So introduce yourself to your brand new best friend and give yourself a hug. Today is the first day of the best......rest of your life.
See all