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Mental Health - Anxiety - beBee

Mental Health - Anxiety

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  1. John White, MBA

    John White, MBA

    17/11/2016
    Today's column 11-17-16.
    John White, MBA
    How To Cope With a Panic Attack At Work According To Science
    www.inc.com Anxiety disorders affect 40-million Americans and many of them have no idea what to do to get...
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    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    17/11/2016 #3 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    First let me thank you for writing this article which is an important topic for so many @John White, MBA. Your dad had to be fairly young when he passed. I found out something interesting just last night. Those who lose parents when they are younger tend to worry about dying earlier in age too along with the pain of loss which never leaves us, it just changes with time.

    You also brought up another important topic, fleeing a place to be alone when a panic attack comes on. When I first developed anxiety disease and had no clue what a panic attack was and had a fear of passing out in front of people not to mention, a fear of what the hell is happening to me?! I remember being in a store once writing a check and my sister was with me. I signed it then quickly said, you need to finish this and ran out of the store. I sat in the car crying, not sure what was going on and she came out asking, what just happened? It was so embarrassing.

    Thanks for writing what you do to cope and reiterating how important it is to get help. People should not have to be embarrassed because they have an illness they have no control over. Excellent article John and I thank you for tagging me!!
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    17/11/2016 #2 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #1 I just typed an entire comment and it disappeared when I hit reply, let me try again.
  2. ProducerVincent King

    Vincent King

    09/08/2016
    Is the world to much? Part I
    Is the world to much? Part IASK YOURSELF THE QUESTIONI think every good experience from life usually comes from an unanswered question we have deep inside. Something that has been in my mind for a bit, is the question asked in the title. Really though, is it too much? Most of...
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    Franci๐ŸEugenia Hoffman
    28/08/2016 #8 Franci๐ŸEugenia Hoffman
    Yes, the world can be too much depending on your perspective. โ€œInch by inch, life's a cinch. Yard by yard, life's hard.โ€ - John Bytheway
    Pamela ๐Ÿ Williams
    28/08/2016 #7 Pamela ๐Ÿ Williams
    Making your weaknesses your strengths.
    Pamela ๐Ÿ Williams
    28/08/2016 #6 Pamela ๐Ÿ Williams
    You ended this perfectly Vincent; "The only thing "too much" about the world is that there is too dang much of it. We are in a world sized labyrinth of choices and decisions, and sometimes if we are in it alone, we could be lost forever. We can't do it alone everyone, even if that is our biggest struggle.." Enjoyed this post very much. You make some excellent points. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    28/08/2016 #5 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    @Vincent King...Margaret @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD...yes, the world is enough, our typical individual situation in life is enough, to teach us and to learn from i presume. Nobody owes us answers. We vote the people who make our laws into power. We allow our smiles to be mistaken for signs of weakness so that we are taken advantage of, and then we put on a poker face for greater control! ;) We shut ourselves up, we keep secrets from the ones who love us truly, we neglect priorities, indulge inconsiderately, we are afraid to raise our voices, to express clearly, we do not treat others the way we would like to be treated, we exploit people, the planet, we have forgotten to give back, even in the face of blow after blow to our ego, right from childhood days, we cling to the vanity, the pride, the bling and every little inconsequential thing...and call it our freedom to choose, a nice excuse. Many have found answers, showed us the way, in the hoary old past, through the ages, even in this day. If we listen to the voice inside, I believe we can still succeed in hearing the sound of that one hand clapping ;) Great indeed is the love of God who gives without receiving, of this Earth constantly sacrificing itself, of our near and dear who care regardless of our responsiveness...and that will keep us alive long enough to learn the truth, even if it means coming back again and again into this Matrix. It is nice indeed, in fact irresistible, to delve into the origins, the evolution, into space, into time, into the root cause...but not at the cost of losing grip on the present, the here and now that has all the answers embedded in it. This post reminded me of CSNY... http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/crosbystillsnash/wastedontheway.html
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/08/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    beBee Shares: Shared to 3 Hives: "Mental Health: Anxiety" and "Invisible Illnesses" and "Invisible Illnesses and God." @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher, @Dean Owen, @Matt ๐Ÿ Sweetwood, @Franci๐ŸEugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani, PhD, @Matt ๐Ÿ Sweetwood, @John White, MBA, @Juan Imaz.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/08/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    "if our greatest weaknesses can become our greatest strengths, then surely our greatest strengths can become our greatest weakness." Awesome! BRILLIANT message of positivity, motivation, and goal direction to Evolve upwards & not spiral awry from genetic mutations! Keep Creation a Creation with ethical standards throughout. @Dale Masters, @Randy Smith, @Mandi Loren, @Praveen Raj Gullepalli, @CityVP ๐Ÿ Manjit, @Randy Keho, @Michele Williams, @Charlene Burke, @Franci๐ŸEugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani, PhD, @John White, MBA, @Juan Imaz.
    David B. Grinberg
    09/08/2016 #2 David B. Grinberg
    Nice buzz, Vincent, many good points.
    Brian McKenzie
    09/08/2016 #1 Brian McKenzie
    We must make great pets.
  3. ProducerVincent King

    Vincent King

    06/08/2016
    Six Things We Would Like You To Understand About Mental Illness
    Six Things We Would Like You To Understand About Mental IllnessFrom inside our mindsI would like to share with you a few things that someone suffering with mental illness would like you to know. Thank's to the wonders of social media, its incredible to me the wealth of people who are willing to share given the...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/08/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    'That old self is the same person, with the same struggles, just letting you in more than usual, or something is making the struggle worse than usual. ' 1 in 10 USA suicides are linked with Invisible Illnesses. People need to understand that it is #2 #4 "Definitely not a Choice."~@Leckey Harrison. And on the 'higher' level of self-awareness, we are reminded to be productive. Positive. Nurturing. Fluttering our wings to keep the water from contaminating the Hive. Let's do that.
    Brian McKenzie
    16/08/2016 #10 Brian McKenzie
    #9 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I was a licensed PI for the state of Washington. I don't play nice. When I "run" a clinic, a HIPAA violation is the usual appetizer; the billing fraud hammer comes later, usually after I have forced/ threatened a State Compliance Audit.....and the drug ring cases I usually dumped at the FDA, DEA doorstep - they have a heavier hammer than I.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/08/2016 #9 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 @Brian McKenzie, my dear friend who I hold in great hugs, MaN ~ you did it again! Got to the heart of the worst things in sight - plain as day. Can you be my PI? Man, you've got instinct. You always send me reeling. Never change.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/08/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 @Dale Masters: you are so so kind. You always come from a place of love. That's why I love you back.
    Brian McKenzie
    16/08/2016 #7 Brian McKenzie
    You will never get to be "Uncrazy" - there is no test for normal personality, every clinical interaction will reaffirm the current Dx or assign a new Dx that perpetuates the treatment, counseling, maintenance, meditcation carousel. The system does not want you cured but on an ever revolving cycle of meds and side effects that keep feeding their machine. Try it sometime - go to a provider and tell them you feel fine.....you will leave with at least one "illness" and a med script.......PS this is how I used to bust providers that were suspected of over prescribing opiods because of a nice pharma kickback incentive.
    Dale Masters
    16/08/2016 #6 Dale Masters
    @Vincent King You have my support, my understanding...and my love.
    Leckey Harrison
    08/08/2016 #4 Leckey Harrison
    I loved the structure! Definitely not a choice. I had no idea myself until a couple years ago. I was just busy trying to hide it and figure it out.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/08/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 #2 So many thoughts are extremely well stated, and I love your personal twist: to dedicate each component into separate entities for which you attribute a particular person(s) as having a special insight. Just love that ~ building relationships is what beBee is all about....and we'll "be there" for you, too. We are now beginning that road alongside you. Others will jump on...and we'll keep pushing on to support, love, accept, and have no regrets. ๐ŸbeeZ working together. Love your valuable contributions ~ keep it up!
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    07/08/2016 #2 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    Well articulated @vincent king! Thank you for sharing something so personal and becoming another voice to help end the stigma. I loved the analogy you used about someone with chronic pain
    Ella de Jong
    07/08/2016 #1 Ella de Jong
    "please please please support us the entire way,..." hoping you will have those people around you! Thank you @Vincent King
  4. ProducerVincent King

    Vincent King

    01/08/2016
    I can't handle today
    I can't handle todayIt Started Off Like Every OtherWho, what, when, where, why, dunno, dunno, dunno, dunno, dunno. All I know is today was looking to be great. Had an awesome day yesterday with the family. Went out and had a great little adventure. I was looking...
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    Emily๐Ÿ Bee
    10/12/2016 #9 Emily๐Ÿ Bee
    #5 Anxiety is a chronic problem for me too. I have GAD & also depression, sometimes high functioning (if I'm lucky) and sometimes not. I'd be happy to keep in touch Vincent.
    Emily๐Ÿ Bee
    10/12/2016 #8 Emily๐Ÿ Bee
    Vincent, how are you today? Have you found some ways to handle the panic episodes? I invite you to try mindful meditation or practice simple deep breathing. Inhale for 4, hold for 4, then exhale for 8 (letting the air all the way out). Do this intentionally at least 5 times and you should notice your body relax and your blood pressure regulate. You may also be interested in the Calm app for your smartphone. I use it to manage my challenging mental health and I swear by it. A free version is available. I wrote an article about it. It's on my beBee Blog.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/08/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 So glad to know that your anxiety panic attacks are sparse, my friend. Your writings here are beautiful, and I started your own Pinterest Board: Please follow me on Pinterest & click your pins off your posts~ we'll get the most out of your wonderful messages: (1) You're invited to Share my Board: For NewBeeZ: https://www.pinterest.com/Dmargaretaranda/bebeez-dr-arandas-newbeez/ and (2) here is your own Pinterest Board: https://www.pinterest.com/Dmargaretaranda/real-person-vincent-king/ ! @Vincent King.
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    07/08/2016 #6 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #5 I understand, sadly I've been there. I find they may disappear for a long time and come back out of the blue. But, there's usually an event that triggers them or a series of events. Then they seem to come on after stress let down for me, if that makes sense? Do you have a counselor?
    Vincent King
    06/08/2016 #5 Vincent King
    #3 Thank you for your comments. This isn't PTSD related. Anxiety has been a life long companion of mine. This past Sunday just so happened to be my first unprovoked panic attack which held more severe than usual physical implications. I'm doing better now. It took until Tuesday to get fully back to normal.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/08/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 In total agreement and sincere appreciation of your contribution to actually have a solution! So much of life is 'lip service' to ailments, and that's a disservice overlooked by many health care 'unprofessionals' who just dare to write an Rx. You ROCK! @Vincent King, let us take this to the next level and get you better ~ that's how bees thrive!
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    06/08/2016 #3 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    @vincent King, I'm so sorry you were experiencing panic and anxiety. It's not fun. I see this was written 5 days ago, how are you now? Do you suffer from PTSD or Anxiety/Panic disorder without PTSD? There are others on here who have been where you are and can offer suggestions/help. One person that comes to mind is @Leckey Harrison. Keep us updated!! Sending good thoughts your way.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/08/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    P.S. @Vincent King, I'm also Sharing this on my Twitter (@medibasket ), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/margaret.aranda.1), Pinterest (https://www.pinterest.com/Dmargaretaranda/ ), Google (https://plus.google.com/u/0/111846950139615364972 ), and more! Follow me & let me know! Oh.....P.S. Perhaps @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher and others can help me put together a Talk Radio Show on Anxiety...it would be my pleasure to feature you both & your contact info on "I'M ALIVE AND LIVE" ~ (1st Broadcast here; Join 1000Mikes.com First: http://en.1000mikes.com/user/manageArchive.xhtml ) ~ Let's Jive on this Hive & Get This Show on the Road! Anyone else with a Passion? Let's DO IT!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/08/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    A Warm beBee Welcome, our friend @Vincent King! So many of us...patients with chronic illness, entrepreneurs, mental health advocacy, veterans, teens....the list goes on...need this! Love how you go through stages of paragraphs that could really be pages...so much unsaid, yet you write with rising bread, yeast coalescing with molecules of un-power to transform from flat to tower! Keep on writing, dear kind sir-bee....stirring you on to keep singing your song, as wee neeed it! @Randy Keho, @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher, @Sara Jacobovici, @Anees Zaidi, @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian, @Paul Walters, @Brian McKenzie, @debasish majumder, @Ali Anani, @Javier ๐Ÿ beBee....as I bring others on to Buzz personal memories along, we appreciate your candor and courage, dear Vincent. We do.
  5. ProducerLisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    Is Anxiety Disease Interfering With Your Job?
    Is Anxiety Disease Interfering With Your Job?We all get anxious when it comes to our jobs, however, Anxiety Disease - also called Anxiety Disorderย can lead to missing too much time from work, leaving work early, or ultimately losing your job.Many people aren't aware they have Anxiety disorder...
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    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    02/02/2017 #71 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #70 Interesting stuff @Robert Cormack and great analogy with the use of ginger ale 'going off in my head,' by Tony Soprano!
    Robert Cormack
    01/02/2017 #70 Robert Cormack
    They did some studies at the University of Toronto, comparing certain centres of the brain using MRIs. Depression causes red areas whereas, when the brain is more stimulated (read happy or relaxed) the centres turn yellow. Both CBT and SSRIs produced the same yellow areas over essentially the same time (SSRIs were quicker but tended to move from red to yellow to red while the CBT patients were more consistent). Yoga and meditation are particularly good before stressful days, parties, lectures, etc. It takes time, but it's important to reduce stress levels whenever possible. Anxiety is really the build up of stress, acting like a release valve. If you think of air suddenly coming out of a tire puncture, that's what anxiety is like. That's why Tony Soprano once said about his panic attacks "It feels like a can of ginger ale going off in my head." Very apt description.
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    01/02/2017 #69 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #67 lol no biggie @Lisa Vanderburg :)) Should see my typing when I don't have my glasses, I have typo's galore.
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    01/02/2017 #68 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #66 Hi @Robert Cormack, I agree... I've found after being in therapy for quite a few months now that was the beginning of my tipping point. I always thought maybe there were many triggers but never brought it up to the Dr because I didn't want to sound like a major complainer. Sad that with an illness we still get embarrassed. Thankfully, this is the first Counselor who seems to really know what he is doing. CBT for quite a few months and just began my first session of EMDR followed by some type of meditative techniques to bring the mind back down before I left. As even my Dr. told me, this can work much better than meds- we shall see, I have a lot of hope! I haven't given up on the idea of taking yoga either. Tag me in one of your next buzzes, thanks!
    Lisa Vanderburg
    31/01/2017 #67 Lisa Vanderburg
    #65 My bad - you're right Lisa...it was his friend Bobby. MUST put my glasses on! :)
    Robert Cormack
    31/01/2017 #66 Robert Cormack
    I've written on this as well, Lisa. So many people change jobs, linking those jobs directly to their panic disorder. Unfortunately, events at work may only be the tipping point of many early unresolved issues. I think panic disorder is the result of too many "triggers." It's not the job so much (Let's call it the irritant factor), it's all the triggers making an anxiety soup in our brains. CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) takes timeโ€”more time than most people want to spendโ€”but it can be just as effective as relying on SSRIs, etc. I also firmly believe that medication and yogaโ€”together with CBTโ€”is more effective SSRI therapy (and a lot less expensive if Trump really bungles healthcare). Thanks for the post.
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    31/01/2017 #65 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #64 Hi @Lisa Vanderburg, My brother is still alive. I forget what I said that may have been misinterpreted that I lost him. Appreciate your kind words!
    Lisa Vanderburg
    30/01/2017 #64 Lisa Vanderburg
    You have really brought home the concept of applied perception @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher, in such a heart-gripping way! The idea that the very thing that 'turns us on' or fulfills us, can turn around and become the acid that burns deep. I am so very sorry to hear your brother didn't make it - would the outcome (of your perception) have changed if he'd lived? Maybe for a while?
    Like @Deb๐Ÿ Lange so astutely conveyed, we often await for that final drop to take us from 'in control' to out of control; of our minds.
    Beautifully written, lovely Lady - thank you so much for allowing us in.
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    20/01/2017 #63 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #62 Thanks for reading @Sandra Smith, yes it can feel like a heart attack or as if your going to faint ( I think I've read that some people have fainted) obviously many more symptoms and if it lasts long enough un-treated or not treated properly it can lead to clinical depression. I was going to begin with EMDR quite some time ago but I wasn't ready. It's taken a lot of work (and that means, still in a state of anxiety because of the work) but now ready for EMDR. We've been doing CBT for quite some time. Had a few set backs and will begin EMDR in 2 weeks. I may write about my set backs.. this has been one hell of a journey. I have faith in my counselor though, he's awesome and doesn't coddle.
    Sandra Smith
    19/01/2017 #62 Sandra Smith
    Great post, Lisa...I remember from my psych 101 class that panic attacks feel a lot like heart attacks to the sufferer... but therapy and relaxation techniques can make all the difference. As well as medicine of course.
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    04/01/2017 #61 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #60 I just became anxious reading about you getting fired lol. Did you really get fired because of anxiety? Its happened to some, sadly.
    Lyon Brave
    03/01/2017 #60 Lyon Brave
    Anxiety, how naughty! I once got fired from a job, and then for awhile i was really anxious about getting fried from a job lol
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    21/10/2016 #59 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #57 Hi @Deb๐Ÿ Lange, your poor dad! I have to tell you, somatic therapist is a new term to me. I will have to check that out. As you explained your fathers surgeries, on-going pain for years and PTSD it made me think of the back and neck pain I've been dealing with for a very long time which got worse after I fell and broke my left shoulder and right hand 2 years ago. I notice on days that my anxiety is at an all time low, the pain is too. They are inter-connected. I will check out the link you left and appreciate you sharing what you did! Sharing information is very helpful. Thanks!
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    21/10/2016 #58 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #56 Thnaks @Paul Walters, not sure how I missed your comment, since you only posted it 7 days ago LOL. I find it easier to share some of these issues that used to be kept so hush. Thanks for reading Paul!
    Deb๐Ÿ Lange
    21/10/2016 #57 Deb๐Ÿ Lange
    @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher an inspiring post of truth and trust. I am glad you found ways to release your anxiety. There are so many ways available today, somatic therapists, body work, yes you name exercise etc. My Dad had a car accident at 60. He then had 3 back operations which did not work. Finally, a psychiatrist said, "If we had treated you for post traumatic stress, it is likely you would not have had those back operations and you would have an able body and mind today." Yes, if Dad had been able to see a somatic therapist, he could have released the pain and tension of trauma from his body. The psychiatrist also said, the accident was like a trigger for all of the stress from him post world war 2, that he had held onto for 60 years. You might like my post and be interested in my new book that will be released shortly. Thank-you for sharing your experience. So imprtnat for people to know there are ways back to wellness. https://www.bebee.com/producer/@deb-lange/trust-your-senses-embodied-wisdom-for-the-modern-age
    Paul Walters
    13/10/2016 #56 Paul Walters
    @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher Again a brave and insightful piece Ms Gallagher. Whatever works for you when it comes to treatment is YOUR choice and good on you for voicing your opinions !!!!!
    Robert Bacal
    01/08/2016 #55 Robert Bacal
    #54 Ok. Rebel @Rebel Brown I'm making this one last comment. The numbers DO matter, and 10% or 50% or 60% being non verbal is factually wrong, and a result of ignorance which is shared by a LOT of very smart people who simply don't know better. To promulgate falsehoods, or to repeat falsehoods does a disservice to others, and not an insignificant one. The numbers people quote are ALL bullshit. FInally, if the numbers don't matter, why did you use a number? Let's have a little accountability and responsibility for spreading bullshit.
    Rebel Brown
    01/08/2016 #54 Rebel Brown
    @Robert Bacal I've heard what you're saying and I've studied that research and what M said. My bottom line around this whole argument is simple.... specific numbers DO NOT MATTER. You can make words 50% or whatever will make you happy. Words are still not the only source of input into our minds, and they are certainly not the majority of the communication inputs into our unconscious minds. We have individual interpretations of words that are stored as programs that trigger with the words. Which is one of the reasons we've all seen the miscommunication in emails, social media, any form of the written word. For complete and clear communication to occur - our minds need more. Especially our unconscious minds which control our data filtering and processing. The language of our UM is the senses, not words. So we need MORE... And that was my point. Which I am guessing you already knew anyway...
    Robert Bacal
    01/08/2016 #53 Robert Bacal
    #52 Rebel @Rebel Brown Not to minimize the importance of non verbals, but you are propagating a commonly held myth here. What you say about the 10% is simply and absolutely not true. It's a gross misinterpretation of Meharabian's research, one that he often bemoaned. For a full explanation, http://work911.com/communication/mehrabian.htm
    Rebel Brown
    01/08/2016 #52 Rebel Brown
    #50 No Worries @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher Words comprise less than 10% of our total communication processing, which is why email, social media etc are such nebulous forms of communication. I know your heart sistah!!