logoSign upLog in
Mental Health Therapists - beBee

Mental Health Therapists

~ 100 buzzes
Buzzes
  1. Donald Grandy

    Donald Grandy

    28/11/2016
    Donald Grandy
    Overview - Resilience
    kpjrfilms.co Resilience is a new documentary that delves into the science of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and a new movement to treat and prevent toxic...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Donald Grandy
    28/11/2016 #1 Donald Grandy
    .
    Brilliant new documentary on the physiological and mental health impact of abuse on children, and on adults who endured abuse (physical/sexual / emotional) in childhood. https://vimeo.com/137282528
  2. DILMA BALBI -Contratos e Gestão
    Artigo em inglês relativo à depressão
    DILMA BALBI -Contratos e Gestão
    6 things you’re probably doing wrong on LinkedIn
    www.linkedin.com You’ve finally filled out your LinkedIn profile — summary section and all. You’ve updated your experience, had a second person review for typos, and finally found a professional photo that you...
    Relevant
  3. Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    Dream therapy can help you realize and fulfill goals, improve your performance and problem solving ability, discover and understand your deeper self, and increase your focus and energy.
    Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    Hypnosis & Dream Analysis | Cathexis Therapeutic Imagery | Shawn Quinlivan | Chatsworth
    shawnquinlivan.com How Analysis & Interpretation Of Dreams In Hypnotherapy Helps You Fulfill Goals & Realize Your True...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    30/08/2016 #2 Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    Thanks for sharing, @prabhakara rao rajarapu!
    Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    20/07/2016 #1 Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    Thank you for sharing this, @Julie Hickman!
  4. ProducerGary Sharpe

    Gary Sharpe

    15/04/2016
    My Experience with Counselling and Parkinson's Disease
    My Experience with Counselling and Parkinson's DiseaseWhy Cry?For me, it began when my own mind was changed and with it the opening up of my ability to be emotive. My Mind Change is quite literal. New pathways, new mental capacities, new thought horizons. Not just thinking different thoughts,...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Deb Helfrich
    01/07/2016 #22 Deb Helfrich
    #21 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD We actually have some research supporting a circadian aspect to PD. Haven't quite nailed the treatment protocol. But it is certain that sleep cycles really do make a Seattle / England partnership way more challenging than one that isn't 8 hours out of phase.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #21 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #13 Oopsies. I forgot to mention how important the day/night cycle is for mental health and the treatment of depression or sadness. "Lights on" & stay awake during the day. "Lights off" and sleep at night, no TV, and don't fall asleep at your laptop (of course I've never done that lol). Wait....I have to see what this ridge is that's on my forehead...oh. Oh! My head fell asleep on the laptop... (but I didn't just actually say that). Now I have 'keyboard' imprints....oh well. It makes me smile just at this moment. So it's all ok... and Oh! Without the circadian day/night cycle, a patient will get sad, depressed (Seasonal Affective Anxiety Disorder, SAAD), or get ICU psychosis complete with hallucinations. The Solution? Light by day, dark at night. Sit/lay by a window. That's it!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #20 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #15 The additional thought that @Gary Sharpe ignited in me was that as patients, we have to take care of ourselves. If we don't sleep at night, or eat watermelon instead of potato chips, then our physical bodies cannot maintain the mental capacity to stay focused. We need to take care of ourselves first. In order to do that, we need to listen to our bodies....and do what they say. Stop working if needed ~ Take a nap instead!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #19 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #12 You would like the book I wrote while in the hospital. I'll write a blurb soon. The PTSD still kicks in when I write or talk about the car accident my daughter and I were in, but I don't cry anymore when relating that or the subsequent (and current) bed-ridden state I am in. My faith in God has allowed me to get through all, and ministering to others is still a part of my being able to be a doctor that heals.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    01/07/2016 #18 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 I am happy that @Deb Helfrich has been and is there for you. We only need one person to really care. We can hold on to that.
    Lisa Gallagher
    01/07/2016 #17 Lisa Gallagher
    I have to add, I could feel the emotions with your writing @Gary Sharpe! So deep, thank you for sharing.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    30/06/2016 #16 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Wow! I am also speechless. Very moving and and informative. Shedding tears can be the first step towards seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.
    Lisa Gallagher
    30/06/2016 #15 Lisa Gallagher
    What a moving and informative post @Gary Sharpe! This really stood out, "“And what about compassion for yourself?”
    I will remember those words for the rest of my life and, yes, the remembering brings deep emotions even as I write this. Because they cut through the defences I had erected like a knife." If we don't have compassion for ourselves we are failing ourselves and It's hard for others to have compassion. I think it's hard because they aren't sure if their compassion will be accepted.
    Gerald Hecht
    29/06/2016 #14 Gerald Hecht
    #3 @Gary Sharpe hey...just not today, lol
    Gary Sharpe
    28/06/2016 #13 Gary Sharpe
    #5 You have just left me speechless @Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.. I feel your words at the visceral level.
    Gary Sharpe
    28/06/2016 #12 Gary Sharpe
    #7 While things are difficult right now, at least I know what I want and what future I am working for. I am sure the tears will then be joyous thereafter @Sara Jacobovici
    Gary Sharpe
    28/06/2016 #11 Gary Sharpe
    #8 To tie both ends of your deeply felt comment, @Deb Helfrich has been the one present for a lot of my tears lately, @Cyndi wilkins
    Gary Sharpe
    28/06/2016 #10 Gary Sharpe
    #9 Thankyou for this thoughtful words @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD - yes I like the last lines a lot. These speak to me about some of my current troubles (I have been doing a lot of Crying lately).
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/06/2016 #9 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 Completely overwhelming scenario, that mimics where each one of us has been at one time or another, for different reasons. What really resonates is our need, yes...and our own "letting go" of the facade of happy faces that are crying invisible tears. We have to get those tears out. We just must be able, one day, to talk about our tragedy without crying. It is then, that we know we have indeed dealt with it.
    Cyndi wilkins
    28/06/2016 #8 Cyndi wilkins
    The shedding of tears is a show of great strength...especially when done in the presence of another...it is a show of love and empathy for oneself or another...A most profound healer...Thank you for sharing your tears with us Gary...and to you @Deb Helfrich View more
    The shedding of tears is a show of great strength...especially when done in the presence of another...it is a show of love and empathy for oneself or another...A most profound healer...Thank you for sharing your tears with us Gary...and to you @Deb Helfrich, for the mention in this powerful expression of a man's heart and soul...It is an honor to have connected with you both. Close
    Sara Jacobovici
    28/06/2016 #7 Sara Jacobovici
    Dear @Gary Sharpe, I am very grateful I got to meet you through your courageous work and inspirational commitment to keep on growing and thriving as a human being. You are passing the baton with your story and you are having a tremendous impact on the quality of life of so many you connect with. You trusted Elle and you trusted the process of therapeutic counselling, but finally and most importantly you trusted yourself. You need all three to make it work and Gary, you are making it work! Wishing you continued strength and may you cry and shed many tears of joy!
    Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    28/06/2016 #6 Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    #2 Thank you so much for your kind words, @Deb Helfrich.
    Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    28/06/2016 #5 Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    This is beautiful and compelling and insightful, @Gary Sharpe. But perhaps more importantly, it is inspiring! To embrace your situation on an emotional level is to meet the challenge at its heart. The mind and body operate in crystalline transmission of vibrational frequencies, and it is our emotional state that tunes the antenna. The crystalline nature of our mind and body functionally stores the negative energy of conflict, tension, and trauma, and the positive energy of passion, joy and enthusiasm. The critical relationship of positive intention is learning to mindfully control this transmission of energy to manifest positive changes in our emotional state, which translates to charging our consciousness into actualization and self-possession. Weeping clears the slate. We let go of bitterness, disappointment, anger, rage . . . FEAR . . . which serve as a mental, emotional and physiological disconnect! Once we do this, we begin fine tuning the connectivity we are seeking within ourselves and open up to the abundance of love that surrounds us--the love upon which the human organism thrives--love which is the organic sentience and unity consciousness of our living, breathing universe. Holistic health and emotional presence are one in the same. And yes, sometimes it takes a little therapy to shine a light into the diamond mine.
    Sara Jacobovici
    28/06/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    #2 Your kind and generous words mean alot @Deb Helfrich. Thank you.
    Gary Sharpe
    28/06/2016 #3 Gary Sharpe
    #2 Also we must thank @Gerald Hecht for all his free giving of scientific expertise - the REAL inquiring science not the dogmatic
  5. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Invisible Illnesses: We are "Paralyzed"
    Invisible Illnesses: We are "Paralyzed"by Dr Margaret Arandaby Dr Margaret ArandaThe "Invisible Illness" world is full of young women and men who lay in bed all day, living solitary lives due to sickness. There is a huge need for awareness, research, donations, non-profit Activism,...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 @Pamela L. Williams: WoW. I'm so sorry to hear your report that the ER doc did such a traumatic thing to you. Has happened to me 1000 times and I had no choice BUT to go to the ER...purple lips on the floor...wearing just my panties and a tank top...spotted images of handsome EMT bodybuilders ....too embarrassed to be embarrassed....to sick to see anything but those big muscles, not out of adoration, but out of desperation that they actually could carry me downstairs....dOn'T LEt mE FaLl! .... Stay with us as we tell all to help others. Knowledge is power. Women Helping Women, and Men Helping Women. Men Helping Men, and Women Helping Men. It's a small world, after all.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 @Leckey Harrison: I figured out how to start a new paragraph! Whoa, Baby! You just write the Comment on another avenue, like "Word.doc" or "Notes"...and then Cut & Paste. Ha!! Baby steps, man...gotta love the Baby steps 💪!
    Pamela L. Williams
    24/06/2016 #9 Pamela L. Williams
    What a nightmare it is to contend with the limited scope of a closed minded medical staff. Thanks for sharing Margaret. I'll never forget going to the ER for severe ear pain and being treated like someone in search of drugs. I was given ear drops with an acid base. This was on a Saturday and I couldn't get to my Ear,Nose, Throat doctor until Tuesday. I had severe swimmers ear and my ear drum was raw like a busted blister. The acid drops were making the rawness worse and contributing the excruciating pain. Friend and family wonder why I say; if I don't see 5 quarts of blood, I'm not going to the ER.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 Gotcha on the new paragraph; sometimes I can do it, and sometimes not...somehow, I think it works on the Buzzees and not on the Comments; but it's too much for my brain right now. So (1) Awareness: we're starting here & now with a SOLUTION, hence your presence, @Leckey Harrison. You have both personal experience and have witnessed things that we can't imagine. Most of us have tried so many different things to solve the pain...and that's the novel & special gift you bring to us ~ compassion, 1st-hand experience, & an alternative. (2) Shift in national priorities: we have the "downsizing of narcotics for pain" as a mandate from the government now. This only validates this: people need what we have here! and (3) we invite all others with Solutions to the table. Just don't give us attitude or garbage. We've all had enough of that. So here we go, onward & forward! Together, we are strong!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 @Randy Keho: WoW. Patton. Wow. Let me whittle this down to some plans here. (1) Please contribute any photos you have of Veterans into my Hive ~ Veterans: To Honor OR Veterans: To Serve. It is international. (2) I have PTSD re: car crashes, due to my Warriorhood in the matter. It's real, it affects battered wives, abused children, and so many more. We are here to address the mental health issues resulting from trauma, and your input is valuable! Gosh, can you just turn your story into a Buzz & let it land here? That would really Bzzzzz! and (3) Yes, we are also addressing exactly what you describe ~ the inhumane doctors that inflict more damage than help; and I am NOT one of them! All your points are so valid. Love ~ Love ~ Love ~ Love ~ Love your input!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 @Jason Attar: Chronic pain is a huge issue for all who suffer from it. Some of us ~ perhaps more than we would guess ~ have learned to bear lots of pain before complaining about it. Chronic pain changes your world. I know it. One of the best things is that we have one another. @Leckey Harrison and I are here to bring Solutions forward. And you're right...before we figure out nerve mapping in our lifetimes, let us get to a Solution for TODAY & NOW! That's what this Hive is all about!
    Leckey Harrison
    24/06/2016 #5 Leckey Harrison
    I have got to learn how to create a new paragraph....I agree: a huge need for awareness. Also a huge need for a shift in national priorities.
    Leckey Harrison
    24/06/2016 #4 Leckey Harrison
    The invisible illness world is full of young and old people who go to work every day, do their jobs, go home, and repeat ad nauseum, due to sickness. There is dissociation, addictions, disconnections at high levels, that robs these people, and the rest of us, of the best they can be for themselves, and us.
    Randy Keho
    24/06/2016 #3 Randy Keho
    My father recalls when U.S. Gen. George S. Patton slapped two U.S soldiers in evacuation hospitals because they were reportedly suffering from "battle fatigue," during WWII. It's better known today as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Patton, whom my father served under, saw them as cowards. He was temporarily relieved of command and forced to issue an apology. Nonetheless, he received another command, and led the charge into Germany following the invasion of Normandy. There are still military commanders, disguised as doctors, in the health care system. I've met them.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    The circle of 'life' for the disabled who search and search for a diagnosis.
    Jason Attar
    24/06/2016 #1 Jason Attar
    Though painful enough and humiliating, the next step is to seek out the painful world of nerve mapping. What a horrible experience to go through. I was hit by a drunk driver over two years ago, and the knee and hip pain is still unbearable at times....
  6. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    01/05/2016
    Sara Jacobovici
    Sara Jacobovici - The Trauma Therapist Project
    www.thetraumatherapistproject.com Bio Sara Jacobovici (pronounced Yakobovich) is a Creative Arts Psychotherapist. Sara has been working in the health and mental health field for 30 years, specializing in using the creative arts in Trauma work. She received her Bachelor’s of Music...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    23/06/2016 #10 Sara Jacobovici
    #5 Sorry to hear about your negative experiences @Brian McKenzie. My perspective is that any one, in any profession, who presents in a false way should not be trusted. As far as medication is concerned. Over prescribing and easy access to prescription drugs is a huge issue. Again from my perspective, consumers/patients have to be aware and an active partner in treatment. Wishing you all the best.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 Hey, I just went off all but my most life-saving drugs! Woo-Hoo! Man, was I ever feeling like I was 97 years old! So I totally get that one, Amen. As for 'talking about it,' #1 God; #2 a true friend who has been through the same ordeal. #3 I think you're perfectly normal, and I love what is uncommon in you: transparency. Keep it, my friend! Keep it!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 It is all my pleasure.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    23/06/2016 #6 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Best of luck and much success in your endeavors, @Sara Jacobovici and thank you for sharing the correct pronunciation of your last name.
    Brian McKenzie
    23/06/2016 #5 Brian McKenzie
    I live in a head shrinker free zone. Not interested in being associated with the fake sunshine, over emoted 'feels' and never ending supply of pharma candy.
    Sara Jacobovici
    23/06/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    #3 Dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, your ongoing support is much appreciated. Thank you.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Sara Jacobovici is uniquely qualified to help patients with trauma, through use of the creative arts. I look forward to learning more about her work and accomplishments!

    #DrMargaretAranda
    @Leckey Harrison, @Kimberly Lewis, @Brian McKenzie, @Lisa Gallagher, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Dr. Allen Brown, @Rebel Brown, @Lisa Gallagher, @NO one, @Ali Anani, Ph.D.
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/06/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 Thanks for your good wishes @Ali Anani. Yes, I know the way the name is spelled is tricky. Often people think it's Italian but it is the original Romanian spelling. (Close to Italian from a Latin point of view.)
    Ali Anani
    22/06/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    Good luck in your great endeavors @Sara Jacobovici. Thank you for correcting the way I used to read your surname. I know now i at the end is not pronounced.
  7. ProducerDonald Grandy

    Donald Grandy

    15/06/2016
    Global Transformation of Healthcare
    Global Transformation of HealthcareThe Secret SauceWe are right in the middle of a tremendous global transformation that has already greatly influenced the foundation of conventional medicine. We no longer divide the body and mind into independent entities.. We are beginning to...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Donald Grandy
    16/06/2016 #9 Donald Grandy
    #6 Thanks for sharing. great article.
    Sara Jacobovici
    16/06/2016 #8 Sara Jacobovici
    Important message and well communicated @Donald Grandy. It's time the pendulum stopped swinging and found its balanced space.
    Deb Helfrich
    16/06/2016 #5 Deb Helfrich
    #4 @Pamela L. Williams, Great to hear that the coconut oil is helping you cutback on several cups of coffee. The right kinds of fats at breakfast really can power us through the day. I also swear by good old-fashioned cream - pure dairy fat. With none of the milk proteins like the half-n-half stuff, it gives me the same feeling of one and done.
    Pamela L. Williams
    16/06/2016 #4 Pamela L. Williams
    I stopped the punishing on a diet all the time rollercoaster a long time ago. I also stopped punishing myself because I don't get on the treadmill everyday (it's boring!) I eat reasonably, cut out a lot of sweets but treat myself occasionally and the best thing I've done I just realized was cut back on coffee to one cup in the morning, in which I add a teaspoon of coconut oil. It was suggested on a post by @Gary Sharpe and it's amazing that I don't want that second, third, and sometimes fourth cup. Just one and I'm done! My exercise is working in the yard. I do it longer because I'm enjoying it. I parked my riding lawn mower and now use the push (though self-propelled). Overall I'm just feeling better and thinking more clearly.
    Donald Grandy
    16/06/2016 #3 Donald Grandy
    #2 l Congratulations! You have made a lifestyle change. Welcome to the 10% that make this decision.
    Irene Hackett
    16/06/2016 #2 Anonymous
    I couldn't agree more @Donald Grandy! Holistic approach is the way to optimum health for sur. For the past 11 days My husband & I have been doing an herbal 'cleanse' and getting back to large veggie / fruit portions - low portions white meat. I have to get back to my yoga & walking - I believe movement is critical and so hard to be consistent!!!
    Deb Helfrich
    16/06/2016 #1 Deb Helfrich
    It would be great if we could focus more on understanding the simple ways to promote health, rather than investing tremendous amounts of time and money on the minutia of each specific illness. I am going to do some EFT right now, @Donald Grandy View more
    It would be great if we could focus more on understanding the simple ways to promote health, rather than investing tremendous amounts of time and money on the minutia of each specific illness. I am going to do some EFT right now, @Donald Grandy, because my balance is off today. Close
  8. ProducerSara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    08/06/2016
    When "the clocks are not in unison".
    When "the clocks are not in unison".An insight into "madness" by Franz Kafka. First: breakdown, impossible to sleep, impossible to stay awake, impossible to endure life, or, more exactly, the course of life. The clocks are not in unison;...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    12/06/2016 #20 Sara Jacobovici
    #18 Nicely said @Brent Floyd.
    Sara Jacobovici
    12/06/2016 #19 Sara Jacobovici
    #17 Great comment @Melissa Hefferman. Thanks for your contribution.
    Brent Floyd
    12/06/2016 #18 Brent Floyd
    My clocks are rarely, if ever, in unison. And yet, somehow the universe still works.
    Ali Anani
    10/06/2016 #16 Ali Anani
    Since I stole the title with minor modification in one of my recent posts here "When "the kites are not in unison" I am thinking of finding how they the posts may relate more to each other.
    Sara Jacobovici
    08/06/2016 #15 Sara Jacobovici
    #13 Thank you so much for your generous comment @Anees Zaidi. I look forward to future exchanges.
    Ali Anani
    08/06/2016 #14 Ali Anani
    When "the kites are not in unison- this is my buzz answering your question @Sara Jacobovici.
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@ali-anani/when-the-kites-are-not-in-unison
    Anees Zaidi
    08/06/2016 #13 Anees Zaidi
    @Sara Jacobovici your thoughts and writings are amazing. I need to read again and again to catch up few nodes. Time is short for me now. I need to pack off for the day. Tonight I will have ample time to brush up my sensory tentacles in order to speak up tomorrow. Good bye!! Will catch up tomorrow:))
    Ali Anani
    08/06/2016 #12 Ali Anani
    #10 I have just thought of a metaphor to answer your question Sara @Sara Jacobovici. I am writing a buzz now
    Ali Anani
    08/06/2016 #11 Ali Anani
    #9 @Sara Jacobovici- I shall not comment on your reply now for fear of influencing the thinking of other contributors. I have my answer to my question, but soon afterwards.
    Sara Jacobovici
    08/06/2016 #10 Sara Jacobovici
    #8 I invite all the readers to contribute to the question posed by @Ali Anani: "Do yo want your clocks to be in unison all the times or would you rather have them out of phase sometimes?"
    Sara Jacobovici
    08/06/2016 #9 Sara Jacobovici
    #8 I always said I love your thinking and the questions you ask @Ali Anani. Now, I have the challenge to respond. Let me begin with time as is used in music. There is a meter and the rhythmic patterns are designed to fit within the measured meter. The patterns themselves can be "off-beat" but still make sense within the meter as a whole. Many composers prefer to compose arrhythmical pieces. These are sometimes "in sync" with the listener and paradoxically creates a sense of synchrony. I guess what I am trying to say is that I want to have the experience of the clocks being out of phase sometimes as long as the time horizon is there to hold the experience in balance.
    Ali Anani
    08/06/2016 #8 Ali Anani
    @Sara Jacobovici- a question to you. Do yo want your clocks to be in unison all the times or would you rather have them out of phase sometimes?
    Sara Jacobovici
    08/06/2016 #7 Sara Jacobovici
    #6 Great response @Ali Anani. Much appreciated.
    Ali Anani
    08/06/2016 #6 Ali Anani
    Amazing post @Sara Jacobovici! I repeat here what I commented on your comment on my post Mind Batteries of the Genius, but in a different style. When we have chaos inside and chaos outside- the degree of instability and disorder becomes extensive. Either we stay patient (as you suggested) knowing that order shall emerge or we end up in smoke. I love this post
    Sara Jacobovici
    08/06/2016 #5 Sara Jacobovici
    #4 Agreed @Robert Johnson. That's what makes us each so unique and interesting.
    Robert Johnson
    08/06/2016 #4 Robert Johnson
    I guess no one is ever in a total unison and we all have a little madness.
    Sara Jacobovici
    08/06/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    Thanks for your shares @Catalina "Cat" Galvez Urrutia.
    Sara Jacobovici
    08/06/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 Thank you for your response @Nancy Walker. Good to hear from you.
    Nancy Walker
    08/06/2016 #1 Nancy Walker
    Kafka's writings have provided me with hours, if not days worth of conversation and friendly debate amongst friends and peers. Thank you for sharing the works of this fantastic writer!
  9. Carolyn Taratuta
    I would say it is a learned behavior more than "insanity" behavior.
    Carolyn Taratuta
    Chronic tardiness 'is a sign of insanity', scientists claim
    www.dailymail.co.uk A science writer in the US has claimed that people who are consistently late to engagements could be suffering from a form of mental insanity because their notion of time is...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Carolyn Taratuta
    05/06/2016 #3 Carolyn Taratuta
    Well @Sara Jacobovici, maybe they can create a pill with a high price that will cure this newly labeled problem. It seems it is what is happening with other newly manufactured ailments and deficits that have gone mainstream these days. Ask your doctor what you can do to cure you of your chronic lateness...
    Sara Jacobovici
    05/06/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    Thanks for sharing this article @Carolyn Taratuta as it links a behavior with a sensory perception. But. here is a first for me, I am going to respond with sarcasm. Ready? Hey, I've got an idea, let's pathologize everything we do. What is it going to be next; being on time, being early? Seriously, mental health issues are real and deserve real attention, not quick labels and quick fixes.
    Carolyn Taratuta
    05/06/2016 #1 Carolyn Taratuta
    And it it can be learned, it can be "un-learned."
  10. ProducerLeckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    03/06/2016
    Healing Trauma
    Healing Trauma"Trauma is the most avoided, ignored, denied, misunderstood, and untreated cause of human suffering." - Peter Levine, Healing Trauma, page 7.I agree. I think I could add that stress rolls in at the number twocause. The solution can be simple....
    Relevant

    Comments

    Neville Gaunt
    04/07/2016 #16 Neville Gaunt
    #15 @Margaret Aranda - simple advice.... will others use it?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 My biggest attitude of unrelenting Perseverance plowed me through enough to put me in a conversation that almost no MD's can have with millions of patients...and what we are doing here is so positive...I'm 'curious and curious-er' to see where we evolve together in one year. For me, I walk with the Lord most heavily, and I believe in miracles. My famous quote (haha) is: "You see a crack in the cement. If only one dandelion grows out of a crack in the cement, then that dandelion should be You." ~ I just Googled myself the other day and discovered the quote is official. So, keep track of your phrases and Quotes. Gather them as your essence, and you will have allowed your values, your inspiration to live on in one small way. I would like to see that for each one of us.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #10 Fascinating that the memory of drowning came to you....you should write a Buzz/short story on that, as I almost drowned as a child, also. I'll share my story, too....and wonder.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 Oh...don't I know That One all too well! "It's All in Your Head." Yup. These have to be the worst words a doctor can tell any patient.
    Leckey Harrison
    03/07/2016 #12 Leckey Harrison
    #9 Where I think cognitive tools are helpful is in the narrative we all live. It sometimes helps to put t all together, and, a fresh set of perspective and eyes can't hurt. I just don't start there. My body is the bacon, ammo, and motorcycle. As Bessel van der Kolk, titled his book, "The Body Keeps the Score." The body can even it.
    Neville Gaunt
    02/07/2016 #11 Neville Gaunt
    Thanks for prompting me @Gary Sharpe and I was most taken by the last para - worth repeating ... "It has to start with each of us healing our own hurts. Hurt people, hurt people. Not policies, or warm fuzzies talking about how great the world would be. It requires doing the work. It isn't a microwave solution, but the change will begin immediately. Then you won't have to just imagine the world as an invocation, you'll start to feel it. You'll start to live it." @Leckey Harrison. Because the first and last step is raising one's awareness and that applies to everyone and everything - not just the extreme nature of trauma. The one and only thing we can control is ourselves, our attitude and behaviour and that's probably what people don't like to believe, but it's true. That's the biggest elephant in the room so we just have to deal with it. Gary refers to Mind Fit and from 20 years of experience it's a process that works in your context, any context. Happy to explore more if it makes sense.
    Gary Sharpe
    02/07/2016 #10 Gary Sharpe
    @Leckey Harrison very interesting, because one of the things I wanted to share about my experience with counselling https://www.bebee.com/producer/@gary-sharpe/my-experience-with-counselling-and-parkinson-s-disease is that done right it is not just about talking and listening but it gives you the mind tools to be able to start tackling these things for yourselves. Another source which helped me to even begin to think about what traumatic events may have occured in my life which could have contributed to developing Parkinsonism's is @Neville Gaunt's "MindFit". Interestingly, I was just lying here before turning on the computer thinking back to past events to see if I could uncover anything. And I remembered an incident as a young man where I very nearly drowned.
    Brian McKenzie
    02/07/2016 #9 Brian McKenzie
    I never found talking about it did any good; especially since the prevailing wind of sentiment seems to be - get over it, it's all in your head, that was decades ago,.... etc. And the 'clinical' solution always seems to be the next and new pharma - candy that they are getting paid to push. F*ck - just give me bacon, ammo, and a motorcycle and I will deal with the shit on my own.
    Leckey Harrison
    02/07/2016 #8 Leckey Harrison
    #7 Thanks!
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    02/07/2016 #7 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Welcome to beBee Leckey Harrison.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 I'm happy to have you here, too, @Leckey Harrison...our Invisible Illness population is so neGlEcTEd.....the rEsTLesSnESs iS jUsT aN eChO. @Anees Zaidi, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani, @Deb Helfrich, @debasish majumder, @Gary Sharpe, @Brian McKenzie, @Dr. Allen Brown.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/06/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Well, you know I just couldn't stop reading your Buzzes and was waiting for one just a mite 'Buzzier'...and low and behold! You ROCK! This is waiting for you: https://www.bebee.com/group/invisible-illnesses-traumatology
    Leckey Harrison
    03/06/2016 #4 Leckey Harrison
    #1 Thank you, @Javier beBee!
    Leckey Harrison
    03/06/2016 #3 Leckey Harrison
    #2 Thanks, Jessica. You will. I might be the spear point for a while, but that's okay. Trauma is the number 1 planetary health crisis. I wouldn't be surprised if you could contribute!
    Jessica Robinson
    03/06/2016 #2 Jessica Robinson
    Interesting, I think that bringing awareness about this issue is great. Thank you for this wonderful initiative, hope to read more about this in beBee!
    Javier beBee
    03/06/2016 #1 Javier beBee
    Thanks for sharing it ! Welcome.to beBee !
  11. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    03/06/2016
    Avoid the Beer Belly Blues: Rethink Your Drink
    Avoid the Beer Belly Blues: Rethink Your DrinkThe official first day of summer is almost here.  Sun.  Surf.  Sand.  Barbecues and beer.  Beautiful beach sunsets and bottles of wine.Happy hours and hang-overs.Alcohol is deeply entrenched in our culture as a way to have fun, let loose, and be...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Nick Mlatchkov
    04/06/2016 #9 Anonymous
    That's especially relevant in US & Germany ;D
    Oliver Moloney
    03/06/2016 #8 Oliver Moloney
    I make a point of no beer during the week to battle the belly .....HOWEVER, It's independent beer week here in Madrid... So these rules do not apply right now!
    Oliver Moloney
    03/06/2016 #7 Oliver Moloney
    And you shared this while it's beer week in Madrid!?.
    Álvaro Beltrán
    03/06/2016 #6 Álvaro Beltrán
    You ruined my next White Russian! Now I'm gonna need two or three more to forget it :p
    Nick Mlatchkov
    03/06/2016 #5 Anonymous
    #3 Lol
    Jessica Robinson
    03/06/2016 #4 Jessica Robinson
    I think that looking for a balance is good and you can still drink a couple of beers, but always paying attention to what you're eating while drinking these.
    Brian McKenzie
    03/06/2016 #3 Brian McKenzie
    If you make your own homebrew - without all the additives, you will find that you don't get that bottled beer gut. I spent a year in Ukraine - samogon and Kvas was always on the table - because you couldn't trust the water.
    Aurorasa Sima
    03/06/2016 #2 Aurorasa Sima
    That´s right! Vodka has the best calorie/intoxication ratio. ... Kidding
  12. Aurorasa Sima

    Aurorasa Sima

    02/06/2016
    Stress impacts us deeply.
    Aurorasa Sima
    Hormone Causes Decline in Cognition After Social Stress
    neurosciencenews.com Summary: Researchers explore how stress can influence our cognitive performance.Source: Max Planck Institute.How does stress influence our cognitive performance? This is an issue scientists...
    Relevant

    Comments

    CityVP Manjit
    03/06/2016 #6 CityVP Manjit
    #5 from Sara - I've not looked inside it, only heard people talk about it. No excuse now though, looks like someone has made an extensive PDF from it here http://www.mta.ca/pshl/docs/zebras.pdf
    Sara Jacobovici
    03/06/2016 #5 Sara Jacobovici
    #3 You may know of this book already @CityVP Manjit. Just in case: Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers by Robert M. Sapolsky
    Aurorasa Sima
    02/06/2016 #4 Aurorasa Sima
    #2 Thank you for sharing this info
    CityVP Manjit
    02/06/2016 #3 CityVP Manjit
    Stress is not a human creation, it is a natural part of our being. That it can be transformed into a chronic form is where I examine the human impact on stress. The normal function of stress can aid sharpness, it is the frequency and exposure which turns stress from a healthy stress to distress. Some impacts of modernity affect our stress biology because our biology has not evolved to that modernity - that is when meditative practices are most helpful - if it allows us to distinguish between natural stressors and man-made stressors. Natural stressors are meant to be short-lived, followed by growth in our cognition as we learn from the experience. Unfortunately we cannot learn if we bombarded and we are most bombarded when we are cognitively and emotionally overwhelmed. Do note also that boredom itself acts as an acute stressor since boredom impacts cortisol. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24202238 My personal relationship with stress is how it supports my health and in seeking that purpose - stress finds it proper place again as healthy purpose. When Sara and Lisa stress me I love them more for it :-)
    Sara Jacobovici
    02/06/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    Thank you @Lisa Gallagher and @Aurorasa Sima for sharing this very relevant and important article.
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/06/2016 #1 Lisa Gallagher
    Interesting findings @aurorasa sima, thanks for posting this article!
  13. ProducerRichard Scott

    Richard Scott

    27/05/2016
    MISSION SlimPOSSIBLE
    MISSION SlimPOSSIBLEAmong millions of people who try make a New Year’s weight loss resolution, around only eight per cent are able to keep it. And even if they lose weight initially, it usually returns. Why? Because most dieters tend to forget the emotional component...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Richard Scott
    30/05/2016 #8 Richard Scott
    #1 I often ask my clients - who are you feeding? Is it you or is it boredom, emotion or something else?
    Louise Smith
    28/05/2016 #7 Louise Smith
    #5 WOW !
    Richard Scott
    28/05/2016 #6 Richard Scott
    #1 Thanks John, the substitution tactic was to intentionally wean the addiction onto lesser evils, while tackling the root of the craving or addiction. It may well be a personality trait. But they're just like other learned behaviours or coping mechanisms. Using some pattern break and installing alternatives usually works really well.
    Andrea Luquesi Scott
    28/05/2016 #5 Andrea Luquesi Scott
    #3 There's actually a SlimPOSSIBLE Meetup group in Brisbane that @Richard Scott runs (last one was last Tuesday). It's all about teaching people about the priciples of effective weight management, plus the reasons why we put weight on, maintain it, and how to shift it. Look it up. Next one is 29 June.
    Louise Smith
    28/05/2016 #4 Louise Smith
    "Before you have any snack or meal ask yourself: Am I eating this because I’m hungry? If the answer is no, look for the root of your motive."
    Yes @Richard Scott I think this is very important ! regardz Louise
    Louise Smith
    28/05/2016 #3 Louise Smith
    Clever catchy title Richard !
    John Williams
    27/05/2016 #1 John Williams
    Emotional connection with food, hummm yes, I love food. I've heard other suggestions like looking for another thing to do when you crave food for an emotional reason. I disagree on that one since it would be almost like to quit drugs but substituting them with cigarettes, at the end you still can find yourself on an addictive pattern. That is why I find your 3 tips great.
  14. ProducerRichard Scott

    Richard Scott

    27/05/2016
    How to choose a good therapist: A checklist
    How to choose a good therapist: A checklistA practitioner who claims to use hypnosis and be a hypnotherapist – or any other therapist for that matter – should demonstrate utmost professionalism at all costs. It’s unfortunate that this age of convenience has spawned an explosion of instant...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Michael Watkins
    05/06/2016 #6 Michael Watkins
    Thinking of hypnosis? Make sure to read through this article with good points and questions to ask.
    Michael Watkins
    05/06/2016 #5 Michael Watkins
    Thank you Richard

    This does highlight those that do a one day induction course and think that they are expert hypnotists.

    The client must do due dilligence when seeking the Hypnotherapist who is caring for them.

    Thanks again

    Michael Watkins
    Richard Scott
    28/05/2016 #4 Richard Scott
    #2 Hi Nancy, thank you for reading. You'll soon find out that I often write things that will create a stir. Sometimes even causing friction... But isnt that what gets people talking. :o)
    Richard Scott
    28/05/2016 #3 Richard Scott
    #1 Thank you. Yes, i absolutely agree. With modern society devouring everything that's instant and convenient, they often overlook just how important spending time investing in your health actually is.
    Nancy Walker
    27/05/2016 #2 Nancy Walker
    These sort of articles can still be seen as rather taboo subjects to discuss. Thanks so much for proving those people wrong and sharing this information.
    Lisa Lee
    27/05/2016 #1 Lisa Lee
    Great buzz @Richard Scott, I think that respecting professionals and trying to find the best one is also about respecting ourselves as the patient. Also, I want to share something that my gynecologist told me and got me thinking, you should never be sparing of health issues and money, you can't put a price on health.
  15. Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    Western medicine and complimentary therapy practices that rely on the healing power of the mind share many common facets.
    Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    The Healing Mind
    shawnquinlivan.com The Placebo Effect & Peer Reviewed Research Demonstrate The Mind's Influence On...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    25/05/2016 #7 Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.
    Thank you for the comments and shares @Deb Helfrich, @Julie Hickman, @Sara Jacobovici. I look forward to checking out the TED talk when I get a chance. Lissa Rankin is a hero!!
    Deb Helfrich
    25/05/2016 #6 Deb Helfrich
    #3 I've been following Lissa Rankin for years - her book 'Mind Over Medicine' is a classic when it comes to celebrating that we all come standard with all the healing equipment we need.
    Deb Helfrich
    25/05/2016 #5 Deb Helfrich
    This is a very illuminating article, @Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht. The most important question in medicine right now is "How do we learn how to replicate the placebo effect consistently?" Thanks for the highlight, @Sara Jacobovici - it is rather well known that PwP's can be stars when it comes to placebo's. The mechanism, in my opinion, is their unique nervous system wiring along the parasympathetic/sympathetic axis. And furthermore, while it seems they have lost movement, it is more accurate to say their mind's can't initiate movement - the body still works fine, as it proves during their daily on/off cycles. So if the mind is involved in the core movement disorder symptoms, it certainly CAN play an enormous part in believing in various interventions.
    Sara Jacobovici
    25/05/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWQfe__fNbs
    Sara Jacobovici
    25/05/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    Very informative article @Shawn Quinlivan, C.Ht.. I think you will find the following ted talk of interest.
    Sara Jacobovici
    25/05/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    @Gary Sharpe and @Deb Helfrich, thought of you when I read this. You may want to check it out if you haven't already done so.

    "A study comparing the effect of a placebo versus the drug L-Dopa in patients with Parkinson’s disease demonstrated that even when taking a placebo, the patients’ nervous system function improved and reduced the effects of the disease (see Huffington Post Article ‘The Placebo Effect: Harnessing The Power Of The Mind’ here)"
  16. ProducerPascal Derrien

    Pascal Derrien

    23/05/2016
    Are You A Professional Alcoholic?
    Are You A Professional Alcoholic?Years ago sometime @ the beginning of the previous decade I went for an interview for a job in sales. I had no sales background at the time and was asked pretty bluntly if I could entertain clients? In Ireland it meant whether I could play golf or...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Pascal Derrien
    24/05/2016 #18 Pascal Derrien
    #14 Thanks @Juan Imaz for dropping by, true the good thing is bees dont drink alcohol unless they have a special liquor made out of honey that I am not aware of :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    24/05/2016 #17 Pascal Derrien
    #15 Thanks @Nicole Chardenet I feel really at ease with my muslims friends on that front I must say :-)
    Nicole Chardenet
    23/05/2016 #15 Nicole Chardenet
    Business and alcohol often don't mix. I've seen some of those stereotypical parties where things get REALLY out of hand. There's a place for alcohol...and entertaining, but Western society in general, I think, has a very tangled relationship with alcohol and it can get ugly. Sometimes I think the Muslims & the Mormons have the right idea!
    Juan Imaz
    23/05/2016 #14 Juan Imaz
    You are very right @Pascal Derrien . In certain societies this has become a habit and it is 100% integrated within the business culture. I know it should not be like that but it is and will be the reality...
    Pascal Derrien
    23/05/2016 #13 Pascal Derrien
    #12 I think many have been there as long it has come to an end it is all good now for tho se who kept on going with the same moduc operandi............. :-)
    Don Kerr
    23/05/2016 #12 Don Kerr
    Good on 'ya @Pascal Derrien Memories of the '80s came flooding back reading this. Wasted indeed!
    Pascal Derrien
    23/05/2016 #11 Pascal Derrien
    #5 thanks Ken for taking the time to share some background I agree I see it here it is hard to say no otherwise you sometimes get singled out for now apparent reasons except that you dont do a '' a few scoops'' pretty hard for youngsters I think
    Pascal Derrien
    23/05/2016 #10 Pascal Derrien
    #6 It is scary when it becomes the norm in the corporate world :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    23/05/2016 #9 Pascal Derrien
    #8 a fair comment @Mohammed A. Jawad :-)
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    23/05/2016 #8 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Drinking alcohol in moderation is beginning of addiction, and its use by excessive doses is bizarre, leaving vacillating soul, muzzled mind and deteriorating health. That’s lately understood when life is at brink!
    Brian McKenzie
    23/05/2016 #7 Brian McKenzie
    4th generation moonshiner - we appreciate your continued patronage ;)
    Mary White
    23/05/2016 #6 Mary White
    I agree with you @Pascal Derrien I think that a professional environment specially shouldn't be surrounded by an alcoholic one. Some companies in several countries are still used to closing deals and having meetings by getting drunk. I personally don't think that the best decisions are made with the influence of alcoholic beverages.
    Ken Boddie
    23/05/2016 #5 Ken Boddie
    When you say, "lift up your spirit", @Pascal Derrien, that is exactly what I used to do as a young fella. Having been socially baptised in Scotland, where drinking, back in those days, was not optional but virtually mandatory, my spirit of choice was a single malt whiskey, 'single' applying to the 'malt' and not to the number of drinks that passed through my system on a night out, abusing my liver on the way. The number of brain cells I must have lost in my late teens and early twenties is scary. Luckily, my life changed dramatically when I moved away from the land of the 'half and a half' (i.e. a half pint of beer and an accompanying nip of whiskey). It took a lot of maturing, diversity of interests and passage of time, to be able to enjoy social engagement without drinking alcohol and, these days, a glass of wine, which I enjoy on occasions, is exactly one glass of wine. It worries me when I see young men and women going out with the sole purpose of getting 'hammered' and illustrates one of the worst aspects of western society and culture, which sadly has in some instances seduced its way into eastern culture. Good on ya, Pascal, for bringing this subject to the table for discussion.
    Pascal Derrien
    23/05/2016 #4 Pascal Derrien
    #3 Thank you for reading @debasish majumder :-)
    debasish majumder
    23/05/2016 #3 debasish majumder
    lovely post sir Pascal Derrien. enjoyed reading. thank you for sharing the post.
    Pascal Derrien
    23/05/2016 #2 Pascal Derrien
    Indeed Navinya the problem is for those a go a bit further than one or two :-)
    Navinya Lee
    23/05/2016 #1 Navinya Lee
    I think a glass of wine in a social setting is fine and allows people to relax and get to know one another as people, not just colleagues. The key factor is moderation, as many forget that if you dont have your health, you dont have much else!
  17. ProducerCyndi wilkins

    Cyndi wilkins

    20/05/2016
    Facing The Fire: Release The Dragon
    Facing The Fire: Release The Dragon"Experience is the teacher; Our response is the gateway to evolution. It is all a matter of choice."We all have them. Those dark fragmented selves that continually rear their ugly heads to seek notice. We often see them reflected in the faces of...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Cyndi wilkins
    22/05/2016 #13 Cyndi wilkins
    Thank you @Sara Jacobovici for your thoughts and "shares"...I very much appreciate it:-)
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/05/2016 #12 Sara Jacobovici
    Bravo @Cyndi wilkins. A great message beautifully expressed and communicated. It all starts with, "The experience is the teacher...Our response is the gateway to evolution. It is all a matter of choice."
    Lisa Gallagher
    22/05/2016 #10 Lisa Gallagher
    #9 Thanks @Cyndi wilkins, so nice of you to say!
    Cyndi wilkins
    21/05/2016 #9 Cyndi wilkins
    #7 Thank you @Lisa Gallagher...I love the new pic;-)
    Qamar Ali Khan
    21/05/2016 #8 Qamar Ali Khan
    #5 Thank you @Sue Chien Lee! Good day to you!
    Lisa Gallagher
    21/05/2016 #7 Lisa Gallagher
    Excellent story @Cyndi wilkins and what a great lesson to share.
    Cyndi wilkins
    21/05/2016 #6 Cyndi wilkins
    Thank you for sharing @Javier beBee, @Qamar Ali Khan, @Pamela L. Williams and Sue Chien Lee...with humble gratitude...Cyndi
    Sue Chien Lee
    21/05/2016 #5 Sue Chien Lee
    Good morning and thank you @Qamar Ali Khan
    Qamar Ali Khan
    21/05/2016 #4 Qamar Ali Khan
    Excellent reminder to remain positive in every situation. This is what the humanity is all about. Thank you @Cyndi wilkins for this wonderful buzz!
    Cyndi wilkins
    20/05/2016 #3 Cyndi wilkins
    Thank you both Madeline and @Tausif Mundrawala...Facing my own fire breathing dragon is a constant struggle for me....Al\ways a work in progress;-) Hence, that is why there is water in my profile image...Never know when I might need to douse some flames;-)
    Tausif Mundrawala
    20/05/2016 #2 Tausif Mundrawala
    We all should invest our time in improving ourselves rather than finding flaws of others. I liked your post in its entirety, Cyndi.
    Madeline Anderson-Balmer
    20/05/2016 #1 Madeline Anderson-Balmer
    This is so true. Being open to the experience for the experience rather than trying to turn it into something else can be a lesson in itself.
  18. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    22/05/2016
    I am a big fan of @Gretchen Schmelzer's work in trauma and healing. Here is her latest blog and a link to my blog that describes the place called "pause". http://www.arts-psychotherapy.com/that-place-of-rest-the-p…/
    Sara Jacobovici
    The Healing Power of Pause.
    www.emotionalgeographic.com “In bullfighting there is an interesting parallel to the pause as a place of refuge and renewal. It is believed that in the midst of a fight, a bull can find his own particular area of safety in the arena. There he can reclaim his...
    Relevant

    Comments

    CityVP Manjit
    24/05/2016 #2 CityVP Manjit
    There is so much power in a pause and in silence and Gretchen Schmelzer captures it very well. I loved the reference to Querencia - that is a most delightful world. The wikipedia page references the quote attributed to Tara Brach to actually originate from Ernest Hemingway's book "Death in the Afternoon" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Querencia As as site about trauma/healing I like Gretchen's site at http://www.emotionalgeographic.com/ I also was not aware of your site at http://www.arts-psychotherapy.com and see that you are launching a new one, the old one looks good, so I look forward to the new.
    Sara Jacobovici
    23/05/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    Thank you @Lisa Gallagher for your shares of this and other Buzzes. Your support is much appreciated.
  19. Carolyn Taratuta
    Carolyn Taratuta
    Selfie-takers tend to overestimate their attractiveness, study finds
    www.psypost.org People who regularly take photos of themselves, or selfies, tend to overestimate their attractiveness and likability to a greater extent, and are seen as m...
    Relevant
  20. Deb Helfrich

    Deb Helfrich

    06/05/2016
    I could not be more proud of the achievements that @Gary Sharpe has made to live life on his own terms, even though he has Parkinson's Disease. We want to inspire hope in others. Find out about where we are on our 4 month anniversary
    Deb Helfrich
    A Wake Up Call for People with Parkinson's
    www.outthinkingparkinsons.com As I write this it is four months to the day since Deb and I started the Out-Thinking Parkinson's project. Throughout this time, Deb has repeatedly challenged me to answer this question: "Why do you think you developed Parkinson's?" Deb's...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Deb Helfrich
    06/05/2016 #9 Deb Helfrich
    #6 You nailed it, @Sara Jacobovici. Gary likes to think of it as engineering and I like to think of it as applied Neuroplasticity. Either way, we are trying to do exactly what you indicated. Find nuggets within the journals and research and see if we can scale a hypothesis into an action that anyone can test for efficacy in their own life.
    Deb Helfrich
    06/05/2016 #8 Deb Helfrich
    #5 I appreciate your comment, @Ali Anani. The thing is that once you take your pills, a person with a chronic disease still has over 99% of their day to get through. Using a small bit of that time to try other basic wellness interventions can add to quality of life significantly. But as I said to Franci, in a lot of cases their isn't immediate, visual feedback on whether something works. We've always wanted to help not only PwP's, but to contribute to helping people with many different diseases and health issues.
    Deb Helfrich
    06/05/2016 #7 Deb Helfrich
    #4 Thanks @Franci Eugenia Hoffman! We really think that PD is a good testing ground, because the symptoms are so highly visible. It is hard to see cancer, but easy to see the extremes of frozen and wiggly that PD creates - and therefore easier to see when an intervention provides actual results which can be extrapolated for many other less visible conditions.
    Sara Jacobovici
    06/05/2016 #6 Sara Jacobovici
    @Gary Sharpe is transforming theoretical frameworks which live mostly in people's minds or journals into reality. His work is a must read for anyone challenged with health or mental health issues and professionals who are working with individuals facing these challenges. I would like to bring @Edward Lewellen's attention to a phrase Gary uses in his article; "And in the Arms of Morpheus, I started to forget
    Ali Anani
    06/05/2016 #5 Ali Anani
    Nice post and thanks for sharing @Deb Helfrich. I agree with @Franci Eugenia Hoffman and may add this attitude should extend to all diseases and problems You control it rather than it controls you."
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    06/05/2016 #4 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    This is a very inspiring article @Gary Sharpe and @Deb Helfrich. Out-thinking Parkinsons - what an amazing idea. You control it rather than it controls you.
    Deb Helfrich
    06/05/2016 #2 Deb Helfrich
    #1 What a perfect compliment, @Julie Hickman. Thanks so much!
  21. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    01/05/2016
    Sara Jacobovici
    “A Third Element: Decision” - Sara Jacobovici
    www.arts-psychotherapy.com I had the good fortune recently to be interviewed by Guy Macpherson of the West Coast Trauma Project. Guy is such a great interviewer, establishing a nice rhythm and having a nice narrative style. He encourages his interviewees to tell their story....
    Relevant