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metaphor - beBee

metaphor

~ 100 buzzes
"What draws me in is that a trip is a leap in the dark. It's like a metaphor for life. You set off from home, and in the classic travel book, you go to an unknown place. You discover a different world, and you discover yourself." - Paul Theroux
Buzzes
  1. ProducerSara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    05/11/2016
    What was left on the cutting room floor.
    What was left on the cutting room floor.It took me quite a while to write my blog Why the Duality of Business and Pleasure Does Not Work.  After editing it down to its final draft, I was left with a lot of pieces I found interesting but...
    Relevant
  2. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    02/11/2016
    Inviting you to use your imagination: what do you see, how do fill in the this image?

    My contribution:

    Autumn smiled
    and her wind brushed against
    the surface of the trees.

    Her colours touched the lips of the leaves
    before they found their way
    down
    to the ground.

    She knows her time to leave has come
    as she lets Winter make his entrance.

    Together they sway and move in their seasonal dance.

    Image credit: Surrealismo
    Sara Jacobovici
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    Comments

    Cepee Tabibian
    03/11/2016 #17 Cepee Tabibian
    beautiful.
    Germán Roda
    03/11/2016 #16 Germán Roda
    Congratulations!!! Idea very well and truly!!! 💡😊
    John Rylance
    03/11/2016 #15 John Rylance
    #14 Sara, getting out my nit pickers, isn't all imagination creative.
    Sara Jacobovici
    03/11/2016 #14 Sara Jacobovici
    #11 That's not odd @Irene Hackett. Your seeing with your creative imagination.
    Sara Jacobovici
    03/11/2016 #13 Sara Jacobovici
    #10 Thanks for your contribution @Rod Loader.
    Sara Jacobovici
    03/11/2016 #12 Sara Jacobovici
    #8 Love it @John Rylance!
    Irene Hackett
    02/11/2016 #11 Anonymous
    How fun! It is odd, but I can almost see a face with playful eyes looking towards the left!
    Rod Loader
    02/11/2016 #10 Rod Loader
    In Summer's heat her eyes reach to my soul.
    In Autumn's cool her hair flows in the breeze.
    In Winter's grey her lips I miss the most.
    John Rylance
    02/11/2016 #8 John Rylance
    #6 The Cheshire Cat was worried where had her smile gone. She couldn't show herself in society without it. Then she noticed the leaf under her tree. Perhaps that would do shame it wasn't the colour of her usual lipstick, but a smile is a smile, and a little lip gloss would add the finishing touches.
    Sara Jacobovici
    02/11/2016 #7 Sara Jacobovici
    #6 Wonderful @Fabio Marzocca. Beside appreciating the beauty of what you wrote, it brought a smile to my face as I was reading it.
    Fabio Marzocca
    02/11/2016 #6 Fabio Marzocca
    A smile is forever, even if it is the last thing left on the floor.
    DILMA BALBI -Contratos e Gestão
    02/11/2016 #5 DILMA BALBI -Contratos e Gestão
    wow... amazing picture.. thanks @Sara Jacobovici
    Deb Helfrich
    02/11/2016 #4 Deb Helfrich
    The smile tells you all you need to know.
    Mamen Delgado
    02/11/2016 #3 Mamen Delgado
    Love it @Sara Jacobovici!!
    Sara Jacobovici
    02/11/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 Your comment is filled with warmth @Ali Anani. Thank you for your contribution. Be well!!
    Ali Anani
    02/11/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    The red leave looks like red lips with warm passion. So, my mind reshapes when I have a dialogue with you @Sara Jacobovici. WE may reshape our ideas with the advancement of seasons, but we end up with shining warmth.
  3. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    01/11/2016
    This is it! The fourth part of my series. The grand finale! Please let me know what you think. I value your input.
    Sara Jacobovici
    Why the Duality of Business and Pleasure Does Not Work Part 4 - Sara Jacobovici
    www.arts-psychotherapy.com Why the Duality of Business and Pleasure Does Not Work I am an integrator. And it is my business to know how to do that and help others do the same. Humanity has been struggling with the tension of living in dualities since the beginning of time....
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    01/11/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    #3 Thank you @Deb Helfrich. Your support means a lot to me.
    Deb Helfrich
    01/11/2016 #3 Deb Helfrich
    "Integrating makes good business sense."

    Fantastic series using the metaphor of light and shadow to illustrate that personal and professional are truly inseparable.
    Sara Jacobovici
    01/11/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 Thank you @Ali Anani for your on going support and encouragement. Much appreciated.
    Ali Anani
    01/11/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    Every part of us contributes to the “who” we are. It is in my best interest to know that. Things like success and failure don’t differentiate between the personal me and the business me. Neither should I.
    With the above @Sara Jacobovici View more
    Every part of us contributes to the “who” we are. It is in my best interest to know that. Things like success and failure don’t differentiate between the personal me and the business me. Neither should I.
    With the above @Sara Jacobovici ended her four episodes so powerfully. Episode four needs quality time to read and comprehend. Bt it is to be time well-invested. This is a deep and meaningful buzz and I assure the readers of its relevance to their lives. A must read Close
  4. ProducerSara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    31/10/2016
    The Business of Defense
    The Business of DefenseImage credit:  ekunji The concept: The Body’s Immune System Antibodies are small proteins that circulate in the bloodstream. They are part of the body's defense, immune system. Antibodies attach to proteins and other chemicals in the...
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    03/11/2016 #41 Sara Jacobovici
    #35 Thank you @Fatima Williams for our connection and exchanges.
    Fatima Williams
    03/11/2016 #40 Fatima Williams
    Thank you dear @Ali Anani with-out you and your rainbow of idea formation this wouldn't be possible.
    Ali Anani
    02/11/2016 #38 Ali Anani
    #37 Love your mind and your thinking my dear @Fatima Williams. THis segment of your comment "How do we alert our mind to give us warning signals when our assumptions lead us astray ? This is where our WPD factor comes into action it's the hero that needs to alert us if what we are facing is indeed a villain or hero" is going to be the theme of a forthcoming buzz. It is hugely relevant. Thank you
    Fatima Williams
    02/11/2016 #37 Fatima Williams
    @@Ali Anani
    Our bodies immune system identifies a harmful pathogen before it attacks yes it does and we give warning signals from our body when this happens.
    How do we alert our mind to give us warning signals when our assumptions lead us astray ? This is where our WPD factor comes into action its the hero that needs to alert us if what we are facing is indeed a villian or hero ! I am filled with wonderment from the outcome of thoughts from this buzz and this is just a tiny drop to the ocean of wonder that is yet to come from this amazing platform of beBees from beBeeland. Thanks @Javier beBee. for being the bridge that holds this platform together.
    Fatima Williams
    02/11/2016 #36 Fatima Williams
    @Deb Helfrich . I love how you said assumptions are shape shifters this is so true and I also agree that what matters is not the individual 'chunk of data,' what matters is how it fits into the system and how well it's utilised.
    Fatima Williams
    02/11/2016 #35 Fatima Williams
    Thank you @@Sara Jacobovici Your knowledge and intruging explanations never ceases to amaze me. You talk about our immune system and defense techniques that are so important to us and our assumptions that we take so easily for granted..The ongoing check has to take place every now and then.

    This assumption is the greatest enemy for the WPD factor and I Thank you and @Ali Anani for pointing out the importance of avoiding the contamination of the same by the said factors.
    Day in and day out we make decisions that will change our life momentarily or forever, these decisions are based on the assumptions and the strength of the WPD factor and owes to its success or failure and will affect us and those around us simultaneously.
    We should Take caution for the human mind is like th how too much cholesterol can block the heart and its funtions so can too many negative thoughts/actions. The flow, our immunity system needs to be regulated by positivity and strengthening of the WPD.
    Sara Jacobovici
    02/11/2016 #34 Sara Jacobovici
    #33 I am highlighting @CityVP Manjit's name to ensure he sees your response @Savvy Raj. Thank you for your comment Savvy, written in your creative way, you bring a flow and integration unique to you.
    Savvy Raj
    02/11/2016 #33 Savvy Raj
    I like the flow of thoughts and its integration in interdependence here @Sara Jacobovici as much as your sense of metephor.
    It propositions and promotes patterns of thoughts The ensuing discussion is rich and varied . How beautiful to see the way the mind perceives and perfects the flow of patterns of thoughts. Thank you for bringing me here @ City Vp Manjit
    Sara Jacobovici
    02/11/2016 #32 Sara Jacobovici
    #30 #31 Thank you so much @Deb Langefor sharing some of your stream of consciousness (as well as your link). Your sharing your perspective of and feelings about the fellow you worked with are invaluable to this discussion. Looking forward to reading your article.
    Deb Lange
    02/11/2016 #31 Deb Lange
    It is interesting that recently I wrote about our beliefs and our biology and mentioned Dr Bruce Lipton's work. I think this also relates to your buzz. https://www.bebee.com/producer/@deb-lange/how-do-we-make-sense-of-the-world
    Deb Lange
    02/11/2016 #30 Deb Lange
    Dear @Sara Jacobovici it is wonderful how you have built on the immune system idea that @Ali Anani began. I have so many ideas buzzing around I feel like taking time to reflect and write. Is thus my idea immune system going into defense to stall ideas, to make them "good" before writing? Perhaps, I will just write a stream of consciousness. I used to work with some-one who was very defensive. He also had an immune system problem with his white platelets. I always imagined that there was something going on with the way he thought about the world, as of everyone was attacking him, is he had to be ready to defend, that his white blood platelets were mirroring his thinking. He used to assume he was being attacked, when in reality he was attacking himself, and so his white blood platelets were attacking his other blood platelets. Dr Bruce Lipton, has written much about the biology of our beliefs. Do our cells mirror our ways of thinking much more than we realise?
    Sara Jacobovici
    02/11/2016 #29 Sara Jacobovici
    #28 You are a whole and integrated thinker (and feeler) @CityVP Manjit. Your comment is a valuable contribution to this discussion. Thank you for taking the time to read, respond and share. Much appreciated.
    CityVP Manjit
    02/11/2016 #28 CityVP Manjit
    I cannot give up sadness if what I experience is sad and I cannot give up happiness if what I experience is happiness. The autoimmune disease of society is when we are sad that people are happy, or happy that people are sad. The best immune system restores our being to nature by recognizing the material that is immaterial.
    Sara Jacobovici
    01/11/2016 #27 Sara Jacobovici
    #25 Thank you so much @debasish majumder for introducing this important tension that exists in human reality; the shift of balance between the individual and the social body. Ideally we should be able to "feed off each other", in an interdependent relationship. Society can not thrive without bringing together its individual members in a healthy and balanced manner and individuals can not thrive without the support and healthy exchange within the social body. This system is challenged on a day to day basis and leaves the individual attempting to survive on his or her own merit. Not a happy solution.However, I never estimate the profound difference a single individual can make on that social body. I remain hopeful.
    Sara Jacobovici
    01/11/2016 #26 Sara Jacobovici
    #24 Great connection @Jean L. Serio, CPC, CMC. Thanks for your contribution to the discussion.
    debasish majumder
    01/11/2016 #25 debasish majumder
    lovely insight @Sara Jacobovici! i am bit confused about self-determination. self and its emotions are nothing but the reflections it receives from a collective social fabric, which eventually guide and navigate one to determine its path of thinking as well. we are habituated to be wondered, as well our passion and drive greatly influenced by external proposition a lot.if we are to face any catastrophe being emanated from social unrest, can an individual be saved by resorting to his own immune mechanism? the antigen antibody system in the body politic how far having relevance with the social structure? unlike immunity, emotional vibes in the society could be translated vividly, impacting the vicinity in such a fashion, where individual have very little or almost no significance. however, nice insight! enjoyed read. thank you very much madam for sharing such nice post.
    Jean L. Serio, CPC, CMC
    01/11/2016 #24 Jean L. Serio, CPC, CMC
    An excellent article, Sara. Thanks so much for taking the time to write it and share it with all of us. Your comment "In order for this dynamic process to take place, individuals need to be consciously connected to how they relate to their environments; internal and external. This ongoing checking in and assessing enables us to put in the complimentary backup systems", resonates highly with me. And reminds me - when it comes to management and leadership - if you are well connected to your environment, the considered input of those you manage and/or lead can help you develop solid backup systems which not only help you function and succeed but help those you manage and lead develop their own backup systems too.
    Ali Anani
    01/11/2016 #23 Ali Anani
    In response to this great buzz by @Sara Jacobovici I have just uploaded a buzz titled Pathogenic THinking. I hope that the buzz would reflect at least partially the value of this buzz and the value of exchanging comments to reshape our thinking.
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@ali-anani/pathogenic-thinking
    Sara Jacobovici
    01/11/2016 #22 Sara Jacobovici
    #18 Your responses are always appreciated @Mohammed Sultan. Your insights seem based on experience and knowledge and deserve to be considered. As we are communicating; we don't have to see things in the same way in order to engage. On the contrary, engaging through the sharing of ideas coming from different directions can only add to our ability to make choices; options to consider is always preferable to limitations. Even when we reject an idea or perspective, being able to articulate why we reject it is in and of itself a valuable exercise. And as is being communicated, exercise is good for strengthening the immune system. Thanks again for your contribution to the discussion.
    David Navarro López
    01/11/2016 #21 Anonymous
    Where to find an "extra boost of vitamines"? Healthy practices like mentioned in the previous comment are just for our day to day life, for our routines, and are not a "boost" which could make us "invincible" when facing a major threat.
    Compassion, solidarity, charity, generosity, altruism, are behaviors which can be taken as a "concept", or as a practice. When you struggle yourself and give from yourself to others who will never be able to pay you back, in a way that it really means a compromise, dedicating a relevant amount of your energies and resources, is when this "extra boost" appears. I used to visit regularly a friend who was at oncology dep. until the day she passed away. During the visits, I got to know many other people who were there too, just waiting their last day, and used to chat with them, listening and trying to comfort them by just accompanying them. After my friend's last day, I kept visiting my "new friends" several months until I moved to Germany, and the joy and gratefulness I saw in the faces of my "new friends" when visiting them are memories which have "boosted" me ever since. One can learn a lot from experienced people who are at the doors of death and providing them affection and comfort has a much bigger return than one can think.
  5. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    28/10/2016
    In relation to the WPD (wonderment-passion-drive) Factor cc@Ali Anani, @Fatima Williams): Fabio Marzocca writes: "Martin Heidegger stated that to understand the world, to recover our authenticity, we must return to those who thought about the world before Socrates; that is, to the origins of our amazement for the wonders of being."
    In relation to the Defining Creativity Hive, Fabio Marzocca writes: "Creativity really flows when we are linked to our deepest roots, the most deeply rooted knowledge structures, representing the most powerful tools to be able to "trigger" the process of developing a fruitful thought. A "creative" thought always arises from the transformation of a substrate of basic knowledge that (sometimes unknowingly) takes part in the process, and then becomes itself a base for the next one in a continuous transformation."
    Sara Jacobovici
    Creativity Draws on the Deep Well of the Past
    www.linkedin.com [Italian version here] In the tetralogy "Joseph and His Brothers", Thomas Mann states, "Deep is the well of the past...". Sometimes this well is bottomless and it may appear far away and passed,...
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    31/10/2016 #11 Sara Jacobovici
    #10 When I read something about creativity, I think of you @Savvy Raj. Glad you liked the article.
    Savvy Raj
    31/10/2016 #10 Savvy Raj
    #9 Dear Sara truly appreciate your thoughtful and fascinating shares in the flow . Yes indeed our creativity is as unique as we are . And our unique experiences shape our creativity. A great post share Sara .And the lines you have chosen from his work are my favourite too .
    Fatima Williams
    28/10/2016 #8 Fatima Williams
    #5 I agree with @Sara Jacobovici that flow is a quality of drive and our drive is measured from how flow is. A very intruging buzz. Thank you Sara for sharing this with us.
    Fatima Williams
    28/10/2016 #7 Fatima Williams
    Thank you so much for tagging me on this buzz. @Ali Anani Creativity flows from our deepest roots.. I think I should agree on this, as some of our thoughts come from the sub-conscious mind and we would have never thought that we were capable of thinking something like that before that thought had been woken up. Much of what we think has its base from our deepest roots similar to that of a seed, that gives birth to a fruitful plant which later spread its branches and then provides delicious fruits
    Ali Anani
    28/10/2016 #6 Ali Anani
    #5 This is an example of what you mentioned in your buzz dear @Sara Jacobovici "A "creative" thought always arises from the transformation of a substrate of basic knowledge that (sometimes unknowingly) takes part in the process, and then becomes itself a base for the next one in a continuous transformation.", We are living this transformation and our (you, @Fatima Williams and myself) WPD factor is being transformed by us. Yes, it is a journey with a bottomless end.
    Sara Jacobovici
    28/10/2016 #5 Sara Jacobovici
    #2 Your questions are evocative @Ali Anani. My gut response is to say that flow is a quality of drive. Our drive can be observed, measured, assessed, based on its flow. Do we need to make adjustments, are there any points of blockages, and so on. An important question Dr. Ali.
    Sara Jacobovici
    28/10/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 Your response flatters me to no end @Ali Anani. Thank you for your comment and shares.
    Ali Anani
    28/10/2016 #3 Ali Anani
    @Fatima Williams- your feedback is of high importance on this buzz. Thank you
    Ali Anani
    28/10/2016 #2 Ali Anani
    Just an innocent question @Sara Jacobovici- how do you relate flow to drive? Would you see the WPD the same as WPF with flow replacing drive in WPD?
    Ali Anani
    28/10/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    You shall never cease to bewilder me with your great thoughts and in connecting the dots of various experiences @Sara Jacobovici. This is a deep buzz and as deep the bottomless deep well of the past. Depth and creativity- depth of the past, depth of the roots of experiences, and the depth of ideas that all lead to deep creativity. The question is as we dig deeper, the challenges change and new layers of thinking become a necessity. Deep down the ocean we have challenges as animals and plants do, which differ greatly from challenges on the surface. I believe you bring a hugely relevant idea Sara in that creativity and depth are interconnected.
    So many worthy issues this buzz brings to the surface. Thank you Sara for sending me deep in the bottomless well of creativity.
  6. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    05/10/2016
    The Trees
    by Franz Kafka

    "For we are like tree trunks in the snow. In appearance they lie sleekly and a little push should be enough to set them rolling. No, it can't be done, for they are firmly wedded to the ground. But see, even that is only appearance."

    Kafka's words are a powerful reminder to me that we live in the tension of strength and vulnerability, perception and reality. We can never rely on our perceptions as we look outward but can access our reality when we reach inward.
    Sara Jacobovici
    Relevant

    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    05/10/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    #2 @Debra De-Jong how exciting to see you on beBee. I realize you just got in and I can't wait to give you a welcome you deserve.
    Debra De-Jong
    05/10/2016 #2 Debra De-Jong
    Powerful words....
    Sara Jacobovici
    05/10/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    Image credit: mirceaverona.blogspot.com
  7. ProducerSara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    26/09/2016
    Compounding Communication
    Compounding CommunicationImage credit: Solutions.3m.com We are organic, biological units and as such we are part of what we refer to as “nature”. Although we invented the wheel, we don’t need to go very far to look at why we invented it and what we are trying to enhance....
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    Comments

    CityVP Manjit
    19/10/2016 #54 CityVP Manjit
    #53 Dear Sara, music is one element of the beautiful, it does not cost us anything to find that beauty other than the cost of attention and if our attention happens to be gratitude, then that is what we experience.
    Sara Jacobovici
    19/10/2016 #53 Sara Jacobovici
    #52 "...serving is the DNA of leadership...", in these few words @CityVP Manjit, you have captured the essence of leadership, something that is still being described and defined in volumes of writings. If we can make this wise choice, we then can have the experience you had; realizing that our roles are not measured through a lesser than and greater than comparison but rather through measuring the the factor of enabling; a learning, an opportunity, an experience. Thank you for your link. I would like to say that your post breathes new life into the overused (and often misused) word "authentic". I also appreciate how you describe thankfulness or gratitude as an alternative to escaping reality. After having the joy of seeing and hearing the video of Montego Bay that you share, I'm wondering if one of the reasons music is so powerful is that music is not so much an escape from reality but a means through which we can experience gratitude. I would like to express my gratitude to you Manjit for our engagement, thank you.
    CityVP Manjit
    19/10/2016 #52 CityVP Manjit
    #50 Dear Sara, yes I have read this after the event has been completed. The success of the last weeks and the effort associated with it was a servant role. As we encouraged our students to attend and my goal was to make them feel proud of such an event, the role I chose as organizer was in the background - standing outside the event hall, to ensure speakers were not disturbed, recognizing that sometimes this lesser role is the greatest role we could have chosen, and it was. This is what Montego Bay, my post at LinkedIn is about https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/montego-bay-cityvp-manjit?articleId=6191220543887273984#comments-6191220543887273984&trk=prof-post - that conflict between sacrifice and serving, that dissipates when one recognizes serving is the DNA of leadership - as a wisdom within us which we can choose.
    Sara Jacobovici
    17/10/2016 #51 Sara Jacobovici
    #49 Thanks for the share @CityVP Manjit.
    Sara Jacobovici
    17/10/2016 #50 Sara Jacobovici
    #49 Dear @CityVP Manjit, I am sure you will be reading this after your speaking engagement. I envy your audience. Thank you for taking the time to read this buzz and for your invaluable contribution to the discussion. The flow of communication took me straight from the opening word to the last. And what a wonderful ending it is, "With the right combinations we become poetic."
    CityVP Manjit
    16/10/2016 #49 CityVP Manjit
    Finally, I have reached this destination and got to read this wonderful buzz and more importantly I am able to pay my full attention to it, an attention that it deserves. Tomorrow at my public speaking club I am leading with the theme "Word Power". Earlier today I began compiling a hidden page for club members that fleshes out the role of the Grammarian, the intent being to enrich the meaning of that role, rather than the very basic way it has to date been delivered.

    http://sheridanbruins.toastmastersclubs.org/grammar.html

    This grammar page is at the beginning line of the continuum of communication and on the other end of this continuum is "Compounding Communication". What brings this continuum in flow is the force of nature, rather than the condition of the unnatural which is when we turn this continuum into a machine and our communication is either mechanical or vapor.

    Communication is a distillation towards essence and the metaphor of atoms and molecules brings me to the nature of things - and words are things that we apply meaning to. When our communication is unclear the way those atoms and molecules vibrate either lose their meaning (a gas state) or they get too hard (the solid state). The way I interpret the continuum is that which is between gas and solid - a flow. This is what we do to words and synonyms.

    Now add to that the complexity when we look at words and synonyms as a power of three. The combinations that are then produced are an extension or compression of the original essence. These combinations that maintain their flow are more valuable to us then those that lose their meaning or become rigid and inflexible. With the right combinations we become poetic.
    Sara Jacobovici
    04/10/2016 #48 Sara Jacobovici
    #47 "...development gets hijacked". Powerful line @Leckey Harrison.
    Leckey Harrison
    04/10/2016 #47 Leckey Harrison
    #46 There is some notion @Donna-Luisa Eversley, that it starts before then. Your mom had every egg she would ever produce when she was born, according to Mark Wolynn. Whatever she went through in utero (think stress/trauma), the egg went through and was biochemically effected at the gene expression level. The mom grew up and had her own experiences, and then the egg that you became started to grow, and whatever mom experienced directly she passed to your biochemistry as it was forming. For example, women from 9/11 in Rachel Yehuda's study that were pregnant and had PTSD, gave birth to infants with the identical biochemistry markers of PTSD.

    What you say about a human smell, and the voice timbre and so is so true. It wasn't my experience, nor that of many, some worse than mine, so development gets hijacked. Development that includes emotional presence and ability to communicate down the road. There is also the flip side of that in those with highly attuned emotional radar (self acclaimed empaths) that are so only because they needed that ability to survive, and are stuck in that mode. Withdrawn or highly sensitive, neither system returns to the state of safety. The project those states of being into relationships twenty years down the road.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/09/2016 #46 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    The cognitive development of people starts from our beginning, rather than outside the womb, hence the ability to sense the need to stay close to another human who smells like mom...As we grow older this intuitive process is honed and helps with our confidence, which is our internal response to knowledge... I'm not sure I'm on the right path @Sara Jacobovici, haha, you have somehow managed to get me swimming in the deep.. .very very stimulating!
    Sara Jacobovici
    29/09/2016 #45 Sara Jacobovici
    #4 Not long enough @Donna-Luisa Eversley. I love reading your comments. Beside being a great storyteller you offer much insight. Your 3rd comment is great. Couldn't agree more. Thanks.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/09/2016 #44 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    I'm sharing all of this to say, as one branches out, that innate sense of establishing contact can take any form, and the environment can be the same but affect everyone differently. Thus the way they choose to 'speak' will be within their talent parameters as determined by what is absorbed through developmentl conditioning....
    O dear, it's quite long @Sara Jacobovici but these are my thoughts
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/09/2016 #43 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @Sara Jacobovici, continuing my second son did not speak until he was eighteen months and we were worried. When he started it was in sentences... 😊 I was quite busy and spoke to him less but spent more time with him. He was a strange child, a bit quiet but thoughtful in his expressions. He was able to communicate through some strong facial expressions. It worked.
    My daughter the baby of the bunch was a real trooper...she had the least time with me because of work, and is the most spoilt and coodled. She started speaking at 2 years and was what seemed to me at the time as normal. She loved coloring and writing in squiggles. Her brothers would know what she wanted and they spoke for her mostly... There was an eight year difference..
    Part 2
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/09/2016 #42 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #41 Yes @Sara Jacobovici , as I reflect I recall the different ways each of my three children responded to the art of speech, and the activities I was engrossed in while they were housed within me 😉..My eldest started to speak at Nine months. I loved listening to music and sang all the time. I read a lot in those days also .We were driving and Phil Collins - groovy kind of love - was playing and he actually sang two lines of the chorus. I was shocked, this baby was learning to walk too early and now sing..crazy...I would sing it to him, and when it came on the radio he was able to identify and communicate in like manner...
    Part 1
    Sara Jacobovici
    29/09/2016 #41 Sara Jacobovici
    #40 No apologies necessary @Donna-Luisa Eversley. You're right on! It starts with our development in the womb. There is communication on a cellular level and, yes, our innate system of communication is on from the beginning. In this way we may think for the developmental stages of communication as "in-born", experience and meaning (another triad?). The other forms seem to "branch" out from there. What do you think?
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/09/2016 #40 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @Sara Jacobovici as I read this post my thoughts strayed to a young child growing up and how he/she learns to make decisions and process actions. Are we hardwired with an innate ability which we tap into with each move we make? In the womb a baby knows the surroundings yet somehow adapts to the new world, steadily. Understanding communication and the talent imposed by simply being alive is one a baby, I think shows great awareness of without being taught on how to adapt on the outside....
    My apologies if I stray but I enjoyed the stimulation of this discussion.
    Ali Anani
    28/09/2016 #39 Ali Anani
    #38 Yes I am 80 better. Thanks For your good wishes and the links dear @Dale Masters
    Dale Masters
    28/09/2016 #38 Dale Masters
    #30 @Ali Anani Trees communicate with each other and plants around them:
    http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20141111-plants-have-a-hidden-internet

    http://www.positivenewsus.org/trees-communicate-with-each-other.html

    I hope sincerely that you feel beter as soo as possible.
    Leckey Harrison
    28/09/2016 #37 Leckey Harrison
    #35 Done....@Sara Jacobovici @Deb Helfrich I could have been more specific on the neurological process, and will if I get enough engagement. Good takeaway, @Sara Jacobovici. That's the upshot, the work I do is showing people how to self-induce and self-regulate that mechanism.
    Leckey Harrison
    28/09/2016 #36 Leckey Harrison
    #34 I had that same feeling....
    Sara Jacobovici
    28/09/2016 #35 Sara Jacobovici
    #33 "Once we learn to work with the body's innate mechanism to release, we can become open, curious, and engaged people, and then the world will change." This is my take away from your comment @Leckey Harrison View more
    #33 "Once we learn to work with the body's innate mechanism to release, we can become open, curious, and engaged people, and then the world will change." This is my take away from your comment @Leckey Harrison. And I echo @Deb Helfrich words: your comment deserves its own buzz. Close
  8. ProducerAnna Valadzko

    Anna Valadzko

    21/09/2016
    The Honey Hive: Lesson 2.  Balance and imbalance. Motivational Reading.
    The Honey Hive: Lesson 2. Balance and imbalance. Motivational Reading.Balance: so easy and difficult at the same time. The honey hive: How to achieve easily and with happiness what you wish for. Practical course.Storytelling is one of the most powerful techniques we have as humans to communicate and motivate. So, let...
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    Comments

    Richard Buse
    22/09/2016 #8 Richard Buse
    A wonderful story @Anna Valadzko. Admiration, respect and trust flow to those who remain focused amid turmoil. Thanks for sharing.
    Deb Helfrich
    21/09/2016 #7 Deb Helfrich
    Yep, @Anna Valadzko, such a hard skill to learn, but one which is crucial. The world is full of people paid large salaries to distract us from our own priorities. We must learn to balance important information coming in via our senses and disregard the storms that are merely passing fury, then we can shine our light with clarity into the world. It is perhaps interesting that we tend to lose our sense of physical balance as we age - perhaps we lose focus on paying attention to the functioning of our bodies.
    Flávio Rodrigues Vieira
    21/09/2016 #6 Flávio Rodrigues Vieira
    @Anna Valadzko thanks to you, given me a new learning! ^^
    Anna Valadzko
    21/09/2016 #5 Anna Valadzko
    Thanks @Flávio Rodrigues Vieira for sharing!
    Anna Valadzko
    21/09/2016 #4 Anna Valadzko
    #2 Thanks @Sara Jacobovici, I love this fable a lot. Happy you have enjoyed it🍀
    Sara Jacobovici
    21/09/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    PS Love the photograph!
    Sara Jacobovici
    21/09/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    Great share by @Anna Valadzko. There is an important "moral" to this story.
    Sara Jacobovici
    21/09/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    Great share @Anna Valadzko! So many layers of truth and love the "moral" of the story: "Harmony and balance come from the capacity of being able to focus your attention, in the middle of a storm, on what is a priority for you."
  9. Producerjesse kaellis

    jesse kaellis

    18/09/2016
    Where old sayings come from
    Where old sayings come fromI didn't write this or research this. I found it somewhere, I can't remember. It is informative and interesting. Where old sayings come from Us older people need to learn something new every day... Just to keep the grey matter tuned...
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    Comments

    jesse kaellis
    03/10/2016 #39 jesse kaellis
    #38
    People, common people lived their lives close to the bone. They were not preoccupied with fulfillment and happiness, merely survival, which in a sense IS fulfillment and happiness. I never felt more alive than when I was living straight out of my pocket on a cash income day to day in Las Vegas. Thanks, Donna-Luisa I'm glad you read this article and enjoyed it. I posted it on Linkedin before. Everybody always enjoys reading it.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    03/10/2016 #38 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    Wow, this is great @jesse kaellis..loved it. There was a lot of common sense in these sayings...some we could use to help us regain common sense perspective 😊 thanks for sharing🤗
    David Lisle
    22/09/2016 #37 David Lisle
    #36 Knock yourself out! Fill your boots! - Now where do those phrases come from?
    David

    So knock yourself out!
    jesse kaellis
    21/09/2016 #36 jesse kaellis
    #33
    David, I will send this to my friend if you don't mind. She is genetically from Scotland and has relations from thereI read somewhere that the people used urine on the floor to make it hard packed. The Amish I think. I'm not too sure about that fragment of a memory. You write in a descriptive manner. Thanks for reading my cribbed essay.
    jesse kaellis
    21/09/2016 #35 jesse kaellis
    #34
    You don't need to credit me, I just happened to find the article somewhere that I can't even remember. My father used to teach ESL students. It was just something he liked to do. He told me one of the real difficulties with the English language is colloquialisms. How do you explain "He lost his marbles." "He went bananas." "Kill two birds with one stone." Anyway, It's hard to convey. Thanks, Don. I'm glad you enjoyed it. I did too.
    Don Kerr
    21/09/2016 #34 Don Kerr
    Hey @jesse kaellis Just a quick note, we haven't been in touch for a bit, I just love this shit! Going to share with my boys. They're becoming quite voracious readers and encounter these phrases on occasion. Now I can appear knowledgeable. (Of course I will credit you at all times!)
    David Lisle
    21/09/2016 #33 David Lisle
    I read this with interest, originally from England I moved to Vancouver, Canada when I was twenty. I came from Birmingham which at that time was a large Industrial city, dirty and still smoky in spite of clean air laws. I meta girl in Vancouver and we took a trip together to visit her ancestral home in Western Scotland. Little did I know that later I would discover it was also my ancestral home. We visited her Grandmothers brother, a crofter, sheep farmer and part time fisherman. They lived in a small stone cottage and we were welcomed there. The downstairs part of the house was spotlessly clean and the floors shone. The floors were black in colour. I asked what the floor was made of because it was uneven in places and had hollows where people walked the most.

    Dirt. The floors were dirt, this was in the early seventies. Not only was it dirt it was waxed dirt, brilliantly shiny and hard, impervious to water except hot water that took off the shine where it touched the floor. So from the fifteen hundreds and before that right up to the present day dirt floors were actually easily found in peoples homes.
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #32 jesse kaellis
    #31
    I think it costs about 500 bucks to move a single wide. I hope this park is never sold out from under me, Praveen. The dance scene at the end of the movie is the best part. I have the movie in my DVD library. It is a very good movie.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    20/09/2016 #31 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #29 Yeah Jesse I saw that movie! Which Indian hasn't! :) And yeah, I have seen some awesome custom built trailer homes in some movies and man they look enticing and conveniently anonymous, like a hermit's cave ;)! And you can move at will right? A travelin home sort of!
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #30 jesse kaellis
    Ranting
    I lived in LA; in various parts of Los Angles, I lived in different parts of Las Vegas. I lived in Reno. As an adult, I picked up drugs on the streets of LA and of course Vegas.
    The gym I fought out of in the mid-eighties was on Hastings near Main. My first fight was with a guy from Carnegie Centre across the street.
    When I got back here in 2002, I went around there. The devastation was unbelievable; obscene, and outrageous. It was an evil crack wasteland. The miasma of despair seeped into my skin and into my pores; it invaded my soul.
    My gym; my boxing gym had become a safe injection site. The area was honeycombed with agencies that are funded to address the myriad social problems of failed lives. It is big business. In front of Carnegie addicts openly smoked crack and injected smack and meth, while a cop stood nearby next to a police cruiser; smiling.
    Psychotic crack heads were picking on the sidewalk for invisible crumbs.
    See, here in Canada, being enlightened and all, we know this is a medical problem, so rather than throw them in prison and give the larger population some relief...no. NO! Harm reduction! No matter how fucking long it takes. Let them die on the streets!
    We don't want to criminalize social problems. These folks got the right to commit public suicide.
    Okay. I'm glad I got that off my chest.
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #29 jesse kaellis
    #28
    I remember seeing shacks made out of old signs and refuse in rural NJ that black people lived in. This was in the early sixties. My father was involved in a project to build one family a house. He helped out with a hammer and nails. I live in a nice trailer park here in Nanaimo. A seniors park. There are a lot of parks here in Nanaimo and trailers are starting to lose their stigma. My trailer is like a little two bedroom house. It's a nice clean park and I bought it for a very reasonable price. Did you see the movie "Slumdog Millionaire?" I liked that movie. In Vancouver the Downtown Eastside -- it is beyond description. I have a short story. I wonder if I can fit it in on these boards.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    20/09/2016 #28 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #26 Nope Jesse...no shanty towns or trailer parks here...but tent houses for emergency and rehab ops...but slums yeah...the makeshift tin roofed houses draped over bamboo frames border many opulent townships in cities like Mumbai and to a smaller extent in the other cities.
    Brian McKenzie
    20/09/2016 #27 Brian McKenzie
    @jesse kaellis In America, my height seems to always come up. Overseas ~ nobody gives a shit. I doubt I ever go back to the States. * I used my dating profile as a control gambit for a Statistics class - the results were that I was more apt to get an unsolicited mail if I was 6-0, smoked, had been divorced and had a Bachelors over a Master's Degree. A response to an email that I had sent followed the same trends. While the study garnered me an A for the class, it proved I am a square peg for a round hole for any of the 6 date site / app widgets. 8?/
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #26 jesse kaellis
    #24 I don't know if you have shanty towns in your country. The equivalent now, in places like Vegas are tent cities. Little pup tents. A discordant site among the glitter and opulence of Las Vegas. Thank you, Praveen.
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #25 jesse kaellis
    #23 I WAS 5'6" before all this spinal stuff happened. Thanks, Brian.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    20/09/2016 #24 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Wow...that was one can-opener of a post Jesse! Strange how many phrases and idioms we take for granted without really knowing their import! And such fascinating rationale too! I loved that pic too! Such spartan rusticity! Just 50 kilometres from where i live, in a modern cosmopolitan city called Hyderabad, you will see the exact living conditions..same thatched roofs, adobe walls, the hens, the geese, the goats and the cows...in fact, right within this city you will see hamlets, villages, towns and city life, co-existing! Almost as if the past and present have laterally merged!
    Brian McKenzie
    20/09/2016 #23 Brian McKenzie
    5-6 on a generous day. 167 cm for our metric friends
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #22 jesse kaellis
    #21 You can't be any shorter than me, Brian. I was short, to begin with, and I lost precious inches due to my last spinal surgery. I've been sterile since I was 13. I lost my virginity to an eighteen-year-old woman. She took my virginity but left me a gift of gonorrhea which I carried for about four months until I could get to a clinic in Victoria. By then it was too late. Probably for the best. I wasn't repsonsible enough to raise children.
    Brian McKenzie
    20/09/2016 #21 Brian McKenzie
    I am short and have long cut the plumbing. I severed the line at 18, I never wanted kids, still don't.
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #20 jesse kaellis
    #18 You can sell your sperm if you're smart and tall. Thanks, Brian.
  10. ProducerSara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    10/09/2016
    Bubbling Ideas
    Bubbling IdeasA contribution to @David Navarro López's new Hive inspired by @Ali Anani's Buzz.*  cosmopolitancornbread.com*All quotes by Ali Anani.Metaphorically speaking Dr. Ali has made a connection between bubbles created in nature and ideas. This...
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    Comments

    Ali Anani
    11/09/2016 #10 Ali Anani
    #9 Having just commented on your last buzz dear @Savvy Raj I say we need your presence in the hive. You have flowing poetry running in your blood with superb thinking.
    Savvy Raj
    11/09/2016 #9 Savvy Raj
    Fantastic bubbles in the flow, am glad to connect in between and float amongst this spirited lightness of being amongst you all @Sara Jacobovici @Ali Anani David @David Navarro López @Irene Hackett @Franci Eugenia Hoffman @Fatima Williams It is indeed such a positively inspiring environment . Thank you @Sara Jacobovici and all here ....and more .
    Ali Anani
    11/09/2016 #8 Ali Anani
    Let our minds bubble together. One bubble can't do it alone. Together, we shall make the hive of bubbling honey a bubbling story.
    Dear @Sara Jacobovici- did I say all these quotes// I may, but without your induction of new ideas as well as those of others these quotes would have never bubbled out.

    @David Navarro López, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Irene Hackett and @Fatima Williams (in reverse order of your comments)- my heart bubbles honey with your support. Thhank you all
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    10/09/2016 #7 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    I like the new hive Bubbling Honey and joined.
    Sara Jacobovici
    10/09/2016 #6 Sara Jacobovici
    #5 Dear @Irene Hackett, your support and energy is so much appreciated. Thank you!!
    Irene Hackett
    10/09/2016 #5 Anonymous
    @Sara Jacobovici - how many times can I tell you how awesome you are? Well here it is again - you are nothing less than AWESOME - this is the most perfect first buzz for this new hive inspired by our wonderful friend dear @Ali Anani! 😍
    Sara Jacobovici
    10/09/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 You put me at a loss for words @David Navarro López. Thank you for your kind and generous words.
    Sara Jacobovici
    10/09/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    #2 @Fatima Williams, your comment "bubbles with sweetness". Always appreciative of your responses.
    Fatima Williams
    10/09/2016 #2 Fatima Williams
    Wow @Sara Jacobovici This buzz is simply astounding and gives a crunch to the idea of bubbles and it's purpose with us. Each cripsy bite only tends to make the meal even more appetising. Bon Appetite 😊😊😊😊Thanks to the wise beBee @Ali Anani
    David Navarro López
    10/09/2016 #1 Anonymous
    OMG, you are fast. I was already thinking on how to put all these ideas together, and you have already done it so nicely.
    If I had many things to be grateful to @Ali Anani, getting to know you is another.
  11. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    06/09/2016
    How @Ali Anani sees and hears the qualities/properties of nature and how they can be successfully applied to the nature of business.
    Sara Jacobovici
    Complexity thoughts
    www.slideshare.net Singing sounds from trees and the movement of tree branches inspired few thoughts on complexity. The video embed makes easier to follow up on those thoughts....
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    Comments

    Ali Anani
    06/09/2016 #3 Ali Anani
    #1 Thank you dear @Sue Chien Lee
    Ali Anani
    06/09/2016 #2 Ali Anani
    With such simplicity you described complexity dear @Sara Jacobovici. Much obliged to your sharing
    Sue Chien Lee
    06/09/2016 #1 Sue Chien Lee
    Thank you @Ali Anani and @Sara Jacobovici for sharing.
  12. Gary Sharpe

    Gary Sharpe

    01/09/2016
    Gary Sharpe
    Why There is More to Parkinson's than just Neuro-degeneration
    niume.com OK, World, here is your proof positive that Parkinson's is not just a "neurodegenerative condition" but that there is much more to it. The research results on walking with the disease which I present in this video I hope will be viewed as quite...
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    Comments

    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    04/09/2016 #7 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Sincere, motivating and useful information. Thank you for bringing us along on your journey @Gary Sharpe.
    Irene Hackett
    02/09/2016 #6 Anonymous
    Your intentions are so pure, I am at once, drawn to and awed by the essence of your journey: "I share this for the same reason I share all my posts - to Inspire, Motivate and Demonstrate that there is always Hope and through Loving Kindness we Humans can rewrite our own Stories." It doesn't get any better than that dear Gary and I thank you for all that you are and all that you are doing!
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/09/2016 #5 Lisa Gallagher
    Wow very powerful. What a difference from January and seeing the video in the garden. I love the idea of the mosaic tiles, it seems they would/will be very helpful.
    Sara Jacobovici
    02/09/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    @Gary Sharpe: "Humans can rewrite our own Stories."
    Sara Jacobovici
    02/09/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    The reason I shared this in my Hive Metaphor is because @Gary Sharpe proves how his capacity to see beyond the literal can lead to transformations.
    Sara Jacobovici
    02/09/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    @Gary Sharpe: "I share this for the same reason I share all my posts - to Inspire, Motivate and Demonstrate that there is always Hope and through Loving Kindness we Humans can rewrite our own Stories."
    Deb Helfrich
    01/09/2016 #1 Deb Helfrich
    These interlocking floor tiles are really great ideas for using vision to trigger movement in people with Parkinson's.
  13. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    30/08/2016
    Marshall Goldsmith offers a "design" worth looking at.
    Sara Jacobovici
    Four Simple Steps to the Life of Your Dreams!
    www.linkedin.com My good friend, designer Ayse Birsel, has taught me a wonderful new and fun way to make amazing changes in my life. She calls her process Design the Life You Love. If you’re like me and you...
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  14. ProducerFranci Eugenia Hoffman
    Sharing buzz and links for Charles David Upchurch
    Sharing buzz and links for Charles David UpchurchFor anyone who is resistant to the Honey Bee and Bumblebee memes and theme which playfully inspires those in beBee hivequarters and their UX design approach, let me remind you, as did the creators of "The Bee Movie," of one crucial fact that...
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    Comments

    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    16/08/2016 #6 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #1 You are most welcome. I had some difficulty in sharing it as a buzz thus my reason for creating a post.
    Charles David Upchurch
    15/08/2016 #5 Charles David Upchurch
    Comment by @Ali Anani Watched the short video and it is truly educational dear @Charles David Upchurch
    Charles David Upchurch
    15/08/2016 #4 Charles David Upchurch
    There are also some interesting metaphors that could be drawn from this simple animated music video, in terms of the beBee platform. I especially like the lyrics "Pollen and nectar...are your protectors" and "Are you still alive? Come into your hive!"
    Charles David Upchurch
    15/08/2016 #3 Charles David Upchurch
    Here's the link to that copyrighted educational music video, entirely for educational purposes: https://youtu.be/3h663rrl8g8
    Charles David Upchurch
    15/08/2016 #2 Charles David Upchurch
    Copying the comments to here from the "stuck" (stung?) buzz.
    Charles David Upchurch
    15/08/2016 #1 Charles David Upchurch
    Thank you very much, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman for posting this un-shareable (for technical reasons) buzz.
  15. Lisa Gallagher

    Lisa Gallagher

    09/08/2016
    Fractals for @Milos Djukic @Ali Anani @Anees Zaidi @Sara Jacobovici. I took a photo tonight of the train trestle that crosses the Allegheny River in Pennsylvania and edited it. Lisa Gallagher
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    Lisa Gallagher
    10/08/2016 #12 Lisa Gallagher
    #11 Thanks @Mamen Delgado!
    Mamen Delgado
    10/08/2016 #11 Mamen Delgado
    Beautiful @Lisa Gallagher!!!!
    Milos Djukic
    10/08/2016 #10 Anonymous
    Dear @Lisa Gallagher, Thank you very much. We recognize the images and those images are about us
    Anees Zaidi
    09/08/2016 #9 Anees Zaidi
    #8 Its my pleasure @Lisa Gallagher. Debate must go on.
    Lisa Gallagher
    09/08/2016 #8 Lisa Gallagher
    Thanks for sharing @Anees Zaidi!
    Lisa Gallagher
    09/08/2016 #7 Lisa Gallagher
    #6 So beautifully articulated @Anees Zaidi, and couldn't agree more! Thanks. :))
    Anees Zaidi
    09/08/2016 #6 Anees Zaidi
    Dear @Lisa Gallagher @Milos Djukic @Ali Anani @Sara Jacobovici and other wonderful bees, we all tread our own path. But in our journey time comes when we cross many stations. I call it 'points of convergence' where we come together and we share/exchange our thoughts, our ideas, our happiness, our sorrows and much more. But we do not stop here. We again continue our journey with new perspectives, new life and new "I".
    Lisa Gallagher
    09/08/2016 #5 Lisa Gallagher
    Thanks for sharing @Milos Djukic and @Ali Anani!
    Lisa Gallagher
    09/08/2016 #4 Lisa Gallagher
    Thanks @Sara Jacobovici, it was @Milos Djukic and the rest of you who have inspired me :))
    Sara Jacobovici
    09/08/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    Well done @Lisa Gallagher!! Beautiful work. I am experiencing your creativity as fractal..
    Lisa Gallagher
    09/08/2016 #2 Lisa Gallagher
    #1 Thanks @Ali Anani. I was going to post the original which was great. But I began playing with my editor for quite some time and thought of all of you above!
    Ali Anani
    09/08/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    @Lisa Gallagher-what a beautiful dedication from from the fractal heart of Lisa. Stunning photo and that reflects your inner beauty as well. Shared
  16. ProducerSara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    05/08/2016
    Balance comes in threes.
    Balance comes in threes.Image credit: prjobcoach.blogspot.com I have often heard authors compare writing and publishing a book to the experience of giving birth. Well for me, it feels more like climbing a tree; each time I write something it branches off into another...
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    Comments

    Irene Hackett
    07/08/2016 #34 Anonymous
    #33 Thank you for the most positive feedback and continued thought. Very true, @Sara Jacobovici - only humans ask "Why?". I would add one more thought to ponder..in the Western world of affluence, Frankl says: "as the struggle for survival has subsided (for food, shelter and safety) , the question becomes: survival for what? Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for."
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/08/2016 #33 Sara Jacobovici
    #32 Beautifully written and a great contribution to the discussion @Irene Hackett. You write, "No other animal has ever cared whether or not there is a meaning to life." Agreed. Everything we do serves a purpose and the root of that purpose is survival. All animals can respond to the questions:
    What (identifying/recognizing) – was that sound?
    Where (direction/location) – do I go for shelter?
    When (time) – I have to go find a mate.
    Who (other) – do I choose to fight?
    Which (selection) – is my pack?
    How (action) – will my cub get food?
    Only humans ask Why - was I born, am I here, did this happen to me, do I feel this way, are there stars in the sky?

    Our search for meaning is part of our survival.
    Irene Hackett
    07/08/2016 #32 Anonymous
    @Sara Jacobovici - thank you for this important contribution in sharing Frankl's important concept of the 'noetic core'. I like the parallel thought of 'the triad' and balance. It is spurring thought energy! I really appreciate Frankl's book - 'The Unheard Cry for Meaning.' In it, he exposes - and I pull this from the back flap: "the absence of the human dimension in psychotherapy" where he talks about the "mass neurotic triad, comprising depression, aggression and addiction" and says: "rather than exhibiting mental illness, someone worrying about meaning of life is proving his humanness. One need not be a neurotic to be concerned with the quest for a meaning to life, but one does need to be a truly human being. The search for meaning is a distinctive characteristic of being human. No other animal has ever cared whether or not there is a meaning to life." I am happy you are spreading the hope found in Frankl's work. Be blessed!
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/08/2016 #31 Sara Jacobovici
    #29 #30 Love it @Gerald Hecht! This reminds me of the anecdote where 2 men go to the village leader to help them settle a problem. One presents his side and the leader says, "You are right." The other presents his side and the leader says, "You are right." At which point the leader's assistant turns to him and says, "You said to each that he is right. They can't both be right". And the leader responds, "You, too, are right." Well Gerald, all I can say is, you are right! You have given me a great insight into the paradox of balance. Thank you.
    Gerald Hecht
    07/08/2016 #30 Gerald Hecht
    @Sara Jacobovici Is not a "raging inferno" nothing more than a phenomenon that begins as a triad? 1) Fuel, 2) Oxygen, 3) Spark (Heat Source) ?#26
    Gerald Hecht
    07/08/2016 #29 Gerald Hecht
    @Sara Jacobovici threes are very "high energy constructs" because of their inherent instability and lack of balance...they are therefore very powerful, dynamic conditions/configurations (found in an almost infinite variety of phenomena in the universe). Their power comes from their precarious, and omnipresent "danger" of the tremendous energy release when their transient (appearance of) balance is lost, i.e., the attention capturing excitement in syncopated triads in music, the fragility of our very existence--dependent upon very narrow parameters of water, sunlight, and composition of plant contains soil...the unrelenting tension of a "love triangle" ( a fail safe topic for fiction) --in books, visual and musical art, and film; in my humble opinion. #26
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/08/2016 #28 Sara Jacobovici
    #21 Thank you gentlemen @Mohammed Sultan and @CityVP Manjit for this great dialogue.
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/08/2016 #27 Sara Jacobovici
    #20 Thank you @Cyndi wilkins for the gift you have offered through the sharing of your story, of your experience!
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/08/2016 #26 Sara Jacobovici
    #19 Dear @Gerald Hecht. I need your help to understand what you mean. Can you please expand?
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/08/2016 #25 Sara Jacobovici
    #18 What a touching and beautiful comment @Franci Eugenia Hoffman. I am honoured to be placed in this triad and to receive this message from you.
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/08/2016 #24 Sara Jacobovici
    #17 Thank you @CityVP Manjit for creating a great framework for triads based on your perspective. The one line that sticks out for me at this time is, "Once we learn to wrap metaphor around the power of three we can develop our storytelling abilities."
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/08/2016 #23 Sara Jacobovici
    #16 Thank you @Gert Scholtz for the connection. My impression of you is that you are always and will always be learning something new.
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/08/2016 #22 Sara Jacobovici
    #15 Thank you so much for your valuable contribution to this discussion @Mohammed Sultan.
    Mohammed Sultan
    06/08/2016 #21 Mohammed Sultan
    #17 Absolutely the man's creativity is and always has been restricted by his assumptions and established habits.When our minds are concentrating on a problem we often constrained within this self -imposed boundaries.We should break this traditional patterns and stretch our thinking beyond the logic and the organised knowledge of science.Thanks @ CityVP Manjit for your creative remark.
    Cyndi wilkins
    06/08/2016 #20 Cyndi wilkins
    "Challenging the meaning of life is the truest expression of the state of being human." - Viktor Frankl I agree with Frankl's view in that our attitudes about our experiences ignite our creative expression...It is very often that one does not truly begin to live until they have been challenged by great pain or life threatening illness...I had an interesting experience the other day while in session with a client....She is an energetic channel as well and gave me a most extraordinary gift...While I was working on her I was struggling with an issue of feeling completely depleted of my energy when my client expressed to me that she noticed a woman with long black hair approach me from behind..."She's helping you with something," she said..."She's worried about you and giving you energy....She says she's your mother." OK...I'm a channel and I get this...but I'm still creeped out! She begins to describe her to me...very accurately...My mother was very ill in her life and this was a constant source of heartache for me..."She's telling you to stop grieving now...She's happy and she's free." I am crying now...I can not even speak..."She says her body was ill, but she, (her spirit) is well...her illness served a purpose...it is why you do what you do...She says she loves you." I can barely breathe now, but somehow I am still a bit skeptical...Suddenly my client bursts out laughing...Ok...she's dancing now and singing that song from The Sound of Music...so long, fair well, auf wiedersehen goodnight!! OMG...That was her favorite musical! My heart jumped out of my chest...Hi Mom!!!! Thank you @Sara Jacobovici...for igniting a spark in my memory;-)
    Gerald Hecht
    06/08/2016 #19 Gerald Hecht
    @Sara Jacobovici turns out --no it doesn't
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    06/08/2016 #18 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Our beBee Triad @Sara Jacobovici @Ali Anani @Anees Zaidi - like monocot flowers. The one seed in the seed coat is their common denominator which is the gracious sharing of their extensive and exceptional knowledge. To quote Ali Anani, Triads are everywhere and we are so fortunate to blessed with our powerful three right here on beBee.
    CityVP Manjit
    05/08/2016 #17 CityVP Manjit
    #15 Dear Mohammed, the reason we have triads in communications is to simplify what would otherwise be highly complex ideas. The power of three is a fantastic means of communication because we can understand things in three's and we tend not to remember more than an average of 7 bits of information.

    Once we learn to wrap metaphor around the power of three we can develop our storytelling abilities. This is where the world of science needs to communicate around the framework of what is powerful about human narrative. Otherwise science speaks in its own language and then complains that religion has captured the imagination of the world. At that point I simply shrug my shoulders and move on with life because science is an important form of understanding - whether that be the physical, the Earth or life.

    Ultimately the triad also contributes to meaning making and as intelligent beings we are good at pattern recognition. If the power of three helps with that, then it is a way of opening our own mind to understanding - because we cannot know it all.
    Gert Scholtz
    05/08/2016 #16 Gert Scholtz
    @Sara Jacobovici Frankl's view on how we find meaning in life - how deeply wise. Thanks for learning me something new Sara.
    Mohammed Sultan
    05/08/2016 #15 Mohammed Sultan
    The universe,people and organisations,all posses triads .The sun ,the moon and the stars are the universe triad.Creativity,innovation and analytics are the engine of value creation for any organisation which should be kept in balance to achieve commercial success,is also another triad.The triad of the "habit" according to Dr.Stephen Covey are Knowledge ,skill and attitude,in other words; What to do ,how to do and why to do.There's also a triad for winners;gold ,silver and bronze medals.Insuring a healthy level of personal balance of these triads will help people become more effective .Your sharpened inquisitiveness @ Sara Jacobovici breaks the traditional patterns of our brains in their search for meaning.We may have limitless triads that needs to be uncovered!
  17. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    26/07/2016
    @Jeffrey Strickland wrote a post titled “Which End Holds The Gold?”
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/which-end-holds-gold-jeffrey-strickland-ph-d-cmsp?trk=hp-feed-article-title-comment

    In it he writes, “Somehow, I get the feeling that there is no gold at the end of the rainbow.” In my comment, I wrote, “…have you heard, the rainbow is not an arc but a circle. I guess that's why we can't find the pot of gold; it's not at any one end, it's there throughout, waiting to be found.”

    I was travelling in an airplane about 30 years ago when I saw the full circle of the rainbow in the sky. It is a powerful image. Enjoy!

    Image description and credit: This double full-circle rainbow was seen in 2013 from a helicopter over Perth, Australia. (Photo: Colin Leonhardt, Bird's Eye View Photography)
    Sara Jacobovici
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    Donald Grandy
    26/07/2016 #1 Donald Grandy
    Beautiful pic. How rare it must be to see this. Have a great week.
  18. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    24/07/2016
    Metaphorically speaking....
    Sara Jacobovici
    Declare war on misleading metaphors
    www.economist.com Like the "war" on everything from drugs to...
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    Comments

    CityVP Manjit
    24/07/2016 #2 CityVP Manjit
    I browsed other articles in the Prospero section http://www.economist.com/blogs/prospero and find that all correspondents only use initials on their post.. The same is true for their Twitter account https://twitter.com/EconCulture - I have viewed Economist articles for years and somehow always missed this oasis about culture. The writings I am finding under Prospero deserve greater recognition.
    CityVP Manjit
    24/07/2016 #1 CityVP Manjit
    Sara, you are bringing to me a far greater understanding of metaphor than I had ever appreciated before, just as much as @Richard Claydon opened my eyes to irony as a means of understanding organizational life in his thoughts expressed currently mainly via LInkedIn. This article further reinforces how powerful the effect of metaphor is and why we should be cognoscente of its power and how that power can be more wisely exercised.
  19. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    24/07/2016
    Metaphorically speaking....
    Sara Jacobovici
    The Eight Metaphors of Organization
    www.ribbonfarm.com Gareth Morgan’s Images of Organization is a must-read for those who want to develop a deeper understanding of a lot of the stuff I talk about here. Though I’ve cited the book lots of...
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    24/07/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    "Organization as System of Change and Flux" is one of the metaphors used to describe organizations in this interesting article. Yet I would suggest that change and flux are the threads that run through all the other metaphors.
  20. ProducerAnees Zaidi

    Anees Zaidi

    23/07/2016
    My name is 'Chinar' and I am a Tree
    My name is 'Chinar' and I am a TreeMy name is ‘Chinar’ and I am a ‘Tree’.A native to Persia, Italy, Belgium, America and Greece, I was planted on a large scale across the length and breadth of the Kashmir Valley by fourth Mughal emperor Jahangir during his reign from 1605 to...
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    Comments

    Anees Zaidi
    26/07/2016 #58 Anees Zaidi
    #57 Dear @Praveen Raj Gullepalli another extremely beautiful and thoughtful composition. Amazing indeed. Many commentators showed interest about this paradise on earth and the ensuing conflict. You have marvellously described in your poem. Thanks for your fabulous contribution.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    26/07/2016 #57 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Spectacular indeed, the land and the tree! Dear @Anees Zaidi, here are my thoughts, inspired by your words! About those that would take, out of selfishness, pride and prejudiced hate, that which is neither's property...the paradise on Earth that Kashmir is...

    Take not that which belongs to
    another; even if by own decree;
    Find your own space under the sun,
    and let them all just be!

    Share what you need not,
    and let the others be fed;
    let not a single species on our planet,
    go extinct or go dead.

    This Earth belongs to no man,
    but the wind, the creatures and the tree;
    A Human is just a citizen,
    meant to be footloose and fancy free!

    Stake no claim over territory,
    Let the world be without any measurable boundary;
    The only things that divide us,
    should be the hill, the dale, the glacier or the sea.
    Anees Zaidi
    25/07/2016 #56 Anees Zaidi
    Dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD your profound intetest for the buzz, for Kashmir and it's people and your reading each comment with brilliant responses is amazing. The Chinar Tree is overwhelmed with your love and affection. It is preparing itself to speak more on Kashmir valley, it's people, flora and fauna, magnificent landscapes covered with snow and it's sufferings as well. As Chinar speaks language of breeze it needs some time to make it understandable by us. Thanks for sharing and spreading Chinar breeze widely.
    Anees Zaidi
    25/07/2016 #55 Anees Zaidi
    #51 Dear @Mohammed A. Jawad this is the narrative tale from the beautiful plant. I have given only words understood by us as plants have their own language which,alas, we don't understand/listen.
    Anees Zaidi
    25/07/2016 #54 Anees Zaidi
    #50 yes @Nick Mlatchkov this beautiful gigantic plant is found in European countries as well.
    Anees Zaidi
    25/07/2016 #53 Anees Zaidi
    #49 Thank you @Don Kerr for your insightful comment. I am greatfull for your sharing and spreading the message. Much appreciated.
    Anees Zaidi
    25/07/2016 #52 Anees Zaidi
    #48 A good question @Ken Boddie. You prompted me to find the answer. Hopefully my next buzz will provide you few of their takes. In the meantime thank you finding time reading the buzz and liking it.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    25/07/2016 #51 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Aha...the reading goes as if we're hearing the narrative tale from the beauteous tree. Isn't every creation has a worthwhile story? But, we humans oft become negligent and reckless to take note of our marvelous Nature.
    Nick Mlatchkov
    25/07/2016 #50 Anonymous
    It's seen in other Euro countries as well.
    Don Kerr
    25/07/2016 #49 Don Kerr
    Chinar as allegory is wonderful @Anees Zaidi This is a lovely piece with a powerful message about change and protecting that which is precious (or should be) to all humankind. Am sharing in The Beezers Hive with pleasure.
    Ken Boddie
    25/07/2016 #48 Ken Boddie
    Your Chinar metaphor stirs the imagination, @Anees Zaidi . If these trees could indeed speak what takes they could tell.
    Anees Zaidi
    24/07/2016 #47 Anees Zaidi
    #46 such a profound comment @Lada Prkic. I also wish the trees could speak and tell their sufferings as well at the hands of mankind. Thousand of trees are uprooted every all day around the word endangering even our own existence. As I mentioned in one of my comment below I am thinking on writing my next buzz on these lines. Thanks for your interest and time to read and comment.
    Lada Prkic
    24/07/2016 #46 Lada Prkic
    I almost missed this post. Like @Sara Jacobovici said with her post title: “So many posts, so little time”.
    What a lovely post, @Anees Zaidi, and a powerful message too. You gave a Cinar tree your voice, but just imagine if trees could talk, we would have heard such moving testimonies of the suffering of the nations throughout the history. Like Cinar trees in the Kashmir Valley that witnessed the deadly showings, and Olive trees in the Middle East could tell us tremendous stories about bloody history in this cradle of civilisation.
    We would have heard similar stories all over the world, since the history of mankind is a history of conflicts.
    Anees Zaidi
    24/07/2016 #45 Anees Zaidi
    Dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD your speed and capacity is mind blowing. I have marked full day tomorrow in your name. In the meantime thanks a lot for so much attention and interest in my buzz. You are amazing.
    Anees Zaidi
    24/07/2016 #44 Anees Zaidi
    #43 Dear brother @Ali Anani I am very much here but holding my head with my both hands. I am crying for paucity of time seeking @Milos Djukic help on fractal and multi fractal time series and this amazing lady our freind @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD has read each comment on my post and has herself commenting upon as well. Not only mine but I see her everywhere on beBee with same zeal. I must take lessons from her in private if still she has some time left. Amazing indeed!!
    Ali Anani
    24/07/2016 #43 Ali Anani
    I ma amazed with your attention to almost all comments on this buzz. That reflects very positively on you dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. I have a feeling @Anees Zaidi is still without internet; otherwise he would jump on the wagon
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #42 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #21 Amen to the humanization of the globe, and questioning our role in being by-standers or activists. But I'm still not familiar with more insight on this, and I am feeling the beauty of Kashmir right now. My heart pleads to understand the tears, whether of joy or sadness. I am not afraid to know. #22 These are important issues for us all.#23 Worthy issue, so so worthy to understand different perspectives. #25 Your quotations keep my goosebumps going.#30 The rustling of the leaves echoes my wails in the wind. #32 #35 Don't the trees whisper in the shade, in the shadow of our dreams, "where all are one, and one is whole?" ~ Led Zeppelin, Stairway to Heaven: https://youtu.be/oW_7XBrDBAA ..."It makes me wonder." "The voices of the trees, and the voices of those who stand looking. And it makes me wonder...it really makes me wonder..."
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #41 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #17 I would love to see a Buzz on Kashmir, with the song by Led Zeppelin alongside: https://youtu.be/ZDwotNLyz10 , my fav version. "Let the sun beat down upon my face..." Your Comment is so worthy of a Buzz, I just can't say it enough, kind sir. Please consider gracing us. #19 All the more reason to discuss it more. Love the open points of view, great for those of us not familiar with the history as you both are. Love it all! Teach us! I really want to understand more about Kashmir. Conflict occurs from the time we leave the womb to take our first breath... I am envisioning that the caterpillar cannot be stripped of her cocoon as she struggles to get out, or she will die. If a surgical procedure is performed to free her of the pain of squeezing out of the cocoon, her lungs will not be squeezed of their water, and her resulting spongy wet lungs will cause her to die from suffocation. This has to tie in. Take off with it! Enlighten! You draw me in...
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #39 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 Sorry; just seeing this beautiful piece today, along with the accompanying goosebumps! #2 We all adore you and your humble nature so much, dear Dr. We hang on every word you say, and this dedication is yet another piece that goes down in the history of the mindfulness you create in us. What a grand teacher you are, to have a student inspired to excel in front of your eyes. Telepathy..yes, I believe in that. Pheromones, twin women having babies at precisely the same time...all these things are in the Great Mystery and Rhyme of life. #3 Ahh! "The Chinar Smile" indeed! I 2nd that motion! #5 I wish you could post a Buzz on that from your unique perspective...it would be folly for me (speaking for myself) to taint these works by reading them first! #7 seems to agree! #11 Yes, the best post, #12 embracing nature, parenting, changing of ourselves, and the beauty of each step. Much to behold, for certain, #35. Multidimensional writings led to multi-angular expressions, all beautifully valid. The piece has as much poetry in it as the Comments do, a true signature of a great writer.
    Anees Zaidi
    24/07/2016 #38 Anees Zaidi
    #35 Thank you @F.K (Koetloe) Ercan-Kocer for fabulous comment. I am happy you also have experienced the cool breeze under Cinar tree. You are right to call it old wise man/women. My Chinar tree has also spoken few wise words full of wisdom to end the story. Sharing of your Cinar experience is much appreciated.
  21. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    23/07/2016
    Instead of zeroing in wording between molecules and bits, I think we should take a leaf out of the movement that Jerome Feldman makes, which is molecules to metaphors https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/molecule-metaphor Now the question becomes how does that metaphor translate universally rather than temporally. When a metaphor enlightens me it opens the universe in my mind, but when a metaphor misses it's mark and is but a temporal illusion, then imagine losing Rumi. Ask ourselves another question, with all this movement of molecules to metaphor,how come the world has not seen arise another Shakespeare? The novelty of the new is not the appreciation of the universal. This is what perplexes people when they read the Book of Ecclesiastes where the author claims "that there is nothing new under the sun" - for this is a universal rather than temporal metaphor. Science tells us that there is plenty new under the sun but this paradox does not matter if all we are exercising is a momentary media. My mind is not wrestling with the naming of this but the living of this. The good news is that what we are now exchanging is making me feel more alive not less - but in the liberation of meaning it is the meaning that lives within us, enlightening our own molecules and that which become the molecules of our home. Home is not just bricks it is something we pass on to our kin and kind. @Deb Lange's molecules and @Sara Jacobovici's metaphors are a great contribution, but our life directions are guided as unique pathways. These pathways may form tapestries but the enrichment of diversity is our personal being. This is where I am live and as I understand the Earth as my home, I must know my heart as my home. What enters our heart are experiences and moments that are unique to us. At the Earth level we find commonalities but diversity moves our heart.
    Sara Jacobovici
    Manjit & Many?
    www.bebee.com I am fulfilling here a promise I made to Ali Anani that I will elaborate further upon the private discussion that transpired on 17th July and...
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    Ali Anani
    24/07/2016 #3 Ali Anani
    I am reading and digesting and feel elevated. This buzz is a great example of mind-boggling posts and I need little time to breathe before commenting. Thank you dears @Sara Jacobovici and @CityVP Manjit for exciting my mind at this late hour of night.
    Sara Jacobovici
    23/07/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 You honour me with this gift of a comment @CityVP Manjit. Thank you.
    CityVP Manjit
    23/07/2016 #1 CityVP Manjit
    My placement of a link at the end of my original buzz about the Metaphor Hive is followed by the much covered song "The Windmills of My Mind" and the singer I have chosen is Barbra Striesand (because in my opinion her voice of this classic is the greatest rendition) and couple this with the extraordinary video chosen by a you-tube reader - this is how I view this share - thank you @Sara Jacobovici - this is the primary thing that I thought of and in this I also praise this extraordinary flow between us - and here I include the other points of this compass in @Ali Anani and @Milos Djukic - circles within circles yet each of us with our own True North compass - is there a better description of a fractal relationship than this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfNhe63S798
  22. ProducerLiesbeth Leysen

    Liesbeth Leysen

    21/07/2016
    Removing The Veil
    Removing The VeilHe lived in darkness all his life. His eyes were shaped by the environment in which he was raised since he was a young boy. Every day seemed so boring. Grey thoughts haunted him the minute he woke up. When he looked in the mirror he saw an old man...
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    Liesbeth Leysen
    21/07/2016 #12 Liesbeth Leysen
    #11 thank you @Sara Jacobovici, have a magnificent week.
    Sara Jacobovici
    21/07/2016 #11 Sara Jacobovici
    A beautiful story beautifully told by @Liesbeth Leysen.
    Sara Jacobovici
    21/07/2016 #10 Sara Jacobovici
    Beautiful story @Liesbeth Leysen, beautifully told. Thank you.
    Liesbeth Leysen
    21/07/2016 #9 Liesbeth Leysen
    #8 fully agree @Franci Eugenia Hoffman and let's support others as well, so yes let it be contagious.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    21/07/2016 #8 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    This is a very inspiring post @Liesbeth Leysen. To remove the veil and to see our own inner beauty should be a lifetime dedication. Let it be contagious.
    Liesbeth Leysen
    21/07/2016 #7 Liesbeth Leysen
    #6 May all your dreams come true @Ali Anani, thank you!
    Ali Anani
    21/07/2016 #6 Ali Anani
    @Liesbeth Leysen- I say and I quote you "Next to him he saw a box titled 'all your dreams are coming true, just allow them in'..A great post to read and enjoy
    Liesbeth Leysen
    21/07/2016 #5 Liesbeth Leysen
    #4 thanks so much @Irene Hackett, a beautiful day to you.
    Irene Hackett
    21/07/2016 #4 Anonymous
    @Liesbeth Leysen - This is such a refreshing buzz! It was both mysterious and yet quite true to life - with such hope in its messag - a modern day fairytale! Love it!!
    Liesbeth Leysen
    21/07/2016 #3 Liesbeth Leysen
    #1 wow how kind to say that @Chas Wyatt, I just love writing and it is awesome that people love what I write.
    Chas Wyatt
    21/07/2016 #1 Chas Wyatt
    @Liesbeth Leysen; You have such a vivid imagination. I love your stories. You weave magic with your words, not unlike a sorceress of storytelling.
  23. ProducerDon Kerr

    Don Kerr

    20/07/2016
    Imagination is my brother
    Imagination is my brother"I'm not writing non-fiction. I don't feel anything about me as a kid was unique. Except that I had more interest in being alone and using my imagination."John IrvingDo you have a brother?There is a special bond with brothers. It is a spiritual...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    25/07/2016 #33 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #27 I'll keep a running log of your Quotes for ya...you shall read it one day🎀!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    25/07/2016 #32 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 Awesome Quote, one for the books. Oh! But wait! You need to 🖊write one (again lol)!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    25/07/2016 #31 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 That is exactly the same glaring message I also get from this beautiful vision of a writing. Awesome piece, @Don Kerr. You are already a writer. All it takes to be a writer is 'to write.' So I suppose that all it takes for a bee to write is to write a 🐝Buzz🐝 on the beautiful things in life!
    Don Kerr
    21/07/2016 #30 Don Kerr
    #29 thank you @Phil Friedman
    Phil Friedman
    21/07/2016 #29 Phil Friedman
    #28 Shared at the Man Up Project, @Don Kerr.
    Don Kerr
    20/07/2016 #28 Don Kerr
    @Matt Sweetwood Would love it if you'd share this on Man Up Project. I have maxed out on shares to hives! Thanks.
    Gert Scholtz
    20/07/2016 #27 Gert Scholtz
    @Don Kerr Wonderfully written Don. These lines are profound: "Our lives are non-fiction works with the occasional dip into fantastic fiction. When I write I try to explore the space between those two solitudes."
    Don Kerr
    20/07/2016 #26 Don Kerr
    #22 Thanks @Jim Murray @Phil Friedman has scared me off adding any more to this note and I can't quite get the hang (yet) of adulterated blarney!
    Don Kerr
    20/07/2016 #25 Don Kerr
    #23 I will endeavour to improve my skill with 'adulterated' blarney @Phil Friedman
    Don Kerr
    20/07/2016 #24 Don Kerr
    #21 I thought you were going somewhere entirely different with that @Kevin Pashuk!
    Phil Friedman
    20/07/2016 #23 Phil Friedman
    #18 There you go again, @Don Kerr, with the unadulterated blarney. This is simply a terrific post. Case closed. Cheers!
    Jim Murray
    20/07/2016 #22 Jim Murray
    Nice piece @Don Kerr...added it to the Beezers Hive
    Kevin Pashuk
    20/07/2016 #21 Kevin Pashuk
    @Don Kerr... you are certainly waxing the elephant these days (waxing eloquent for those who don't get my sense of humour).

    Like you, I grew up with and older sister, and no brother. You describe the dynamic well. Like you, my imagination was a friend. It has certainly been a great muse for you.
    Don Kerr
    20/07/2016 #20 Don Kerr
    #13 A truly lovely commentary @Sarah Elkins thanks for sharing it with me.
    Don Kerr
    20/07/2016 #19 Don Kerr
    #17 I really appreciate this @Franci Eugenia Hoffman and am so pleased you found a family of friends.
    Don Kerr
    20/07/2016 #18 Don Kerr
    #16 Thank you very much my friend @Phil Friedman This means a great deal coming from someone I admire.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    20/07/2016 #17 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    This is a beautiful piece, @Don Kerr. I was an only child and I had a few imaginary friends, however, I always wanted a brother or sister. I surrounded myself with friends, which when we younger, we adopted each other as brothers and sisters. Not the same as the real thing but we never felt alone.
    Phil Friedman
    20/07/2016 #16 Phil Friedman
    This is a piece brimming with
    THIS PIECE by @Don Kerr brims with distilled insight. And in unusual fashion looks at both sides of one of Life's coins. You shoul take.a moment to read it Cheers!
    Phil Friedman
    20/07/2016 #15 Phil Friedman
    This is a piece brimming with distilled insight. And in unusual fashion looks at both sides of one of Life's coins. Thanks, @Don Kerr. Cheers!
    Sarah Elkins
    20/07/2016 #14 Sarah Elkins
    Imagination is a great companion! But I'm really grateful for my sibs.
  24. ProducerAli Anani

    Ali Anani

    13/07/2016
    RACE as the New Strategic Model
    RACE as the New Strategic ModelThere are so many different strategic models in business. I am suggesting a new one here that I believe is applicable to any business. It is the RACE Strategy. RACE was inspired by coal firing. It is important that when do a four-stage process...
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    Ali Anani
    14/07/2016 #26 Ali Anani
    #25 Thank you @CityVP Manjit- all these comments gave me new perceptions, which I hope to publish within 48 hours.
    CityVP Manjit
    14/07/2016 #25 CityVP Manjit
    #21 In the hands of a great practitioner like @Sara Jacobovici a metaphor is very powerful but a metaphor alone cannot help a person to change, for that to happen the will to change must be there. The metaphor may build bridges of trust but until the individual is ready, one must wait. We are not in control of the projections others have, but once there is that permission, the mirror we hold is that projection - not something we describe but something the other see's. It is hard to say for me because I don't have that much experience with people whose trust has been broken. So the metaphor helps the practitioner to be creative, to try new means or ways, and in this regard Sara would succeed with people that I or many could not. Most of us are not good at waiting even if we are creative - so our profession fits likewise, in what we profess, and find flow.
    Sara Jacobovici
    14/07/2016 #24 Sara Jacobovici
    #23 Always looking forward to the results of what brews in your mind @Ali Anani.
    Ali Anani
    14/07/2016 #23 Ali Anani
    #22 Dear @Sara Jacobovici- this is my next buzz. I have some "odd" observations. The Kaleidoscope is a terrific idea. I might be offering an off-shoot metaphor. It is brewing in my mind and I feel "waxed" by it
    Sara Jacobovici
    14/07/2016 #22 Sara Jacobovici
    #21 Thank you @Ali Anani for the opportunity to take part in this rich discussion. From my perspective I see metaphors more like mirrors in a Kaleidoscope; operating on the principle of multiple reflections, reflecting different perspectives, colours, and shapes.
    Ali Anani
    14/07/2016 #21 Ali Anani
    #20 @CityVP Manjit- do you consider a metaphor a mirror for people to help them self-change?
    My second point to your lovely comment is your writing "For transformation to be complete there is a constant tending required otherwise people are liable to return to their prior shape". I agree 100% and in chemisty we call this tendency to revert to type. We are molecules and behave like molecules!!! Yes, the transformation part is the real impacting stage as we may become unable to revert to type even if we wanted to.
    As dear @Sara Jacobovici is a queen of metaphors I also wonder what she would think about metaphors being like mirrors?
    CityVP Manjit
    14/07/2016 #20 CityVP Manjit
    At a time when the word "race" is becoming a politically loaded word, it is nice to get back to the word as a meaning of the "human race" and the first starting point is reviewing the acronym "RACE" and removing or washing away any negative context.

    Avoid is more difficult because I find human beings to be rubber bands rather than transformational. For transformation to be complete there is a constant tending required otherwise people are liable to return to their prior shape. Even when we can avoid that, the transformation gets us to the diamond in the rough http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/diamond%20in%20the%20rough and then we inspire polish of that diamond.

    I personally find conversion of energy as the ticket to the dance and earlier this morning (being that I awoke at 2am today, it is not even 4:30am where I am right now) we discussed practical wisdom and so the employ is as W.Edward Deming called "a constancy of purpose". My friend Roy Woodhead https://uk.linkedin.com/in/roy-woodhead-0395694 introduced me to "action learning", so I am fond of how we deploy and employ.

    The one caveat personally for me is that people are not my projects, I do not go out to change anyone, but if we offer an intelligent person a mirror of their own soul to them and if they appreciate this then it is they who have made the change. I do not want to reside in that part of society that has cultivated learned helplessness. The first step is permission when dealing if appreciate we are working with an adult. I will take a brief kip now - it has been a rather interesting early morning :-)
    Ali Anani
    14/07/2016 #19 Ali Anani
    #17 Again, thank you @Sara Jacobovici for your comments are boosters. Yes, I agree and may add that coal is a solid fuel making it easy to handle .
    Ali Anani
    14/07/2016 #18 Ali Anani
    #16 With all honesty my dear @Sara Jacobovici is that the tetrahedron is similar to that of the repeating tetrahedron in diamond (the second image). This is the illumination I had- to produce diamond from a cheap resource (coal). Coal is a fuel and we need to improve its quality and so are people as in essence they are energized, but we want to boost their energy. This is how I thought about the idea of this buzz.
    Sara Jacobovici
    14/07/2016 #17 Sara Jacobovici
    An added thought @Ali Anani. I appreciate the reference to coal because of all the qualities you mention and for me, the fact that coal, out of "the three fossil fuels, coal has the most widely distributed reserves; coal is mined in over 100 countries, and on all continents except Antarctica." This lends well to the metaphor as to its far reaching implementation.
    Sara Jacobovici
    14/07/2016 #16 Sara Jacobovici
    Your gems are very polished @Ali Anani. I appreciated your visual depiction as a 3 dimensional structure with "review" at its tip. Very crucial placement. I also like the clockwise motion of the process. I am now struggling to find an appropriate word to identify this structure's foundation. The 2 words that come to mind are development or potential. What do you think? What is from your opinion the source of this model?
    Ali Anani
    14/07/2016 #15 Ali Anani
    #13 Your comment dear @Sara Jacobovici made me the intangible is tangible. I appreciate your continuous support
    Sara Jacobovici
    14/07/2016 #14 Sara Jacobovici
    @Ali Anani “builds on RACE a physical and tangible metaphor”. A must read. Written in an insightful and practical way.
    Sara Jacobovici
    14/07/2016 #13 Sara Jacobovici
    @Ali Anani “builds on RACE a physical and tangible metaphor”. A must read. Written in an insightful and practical way.
    Ali Anani
    14/07/2016 #12 Ali Anani
    #10 My dear friend @Alan Geller- great to hear from you again. I just woke up and I hope that I haven't missed the party. I am checking now with thanks.
    Ali Anani
    14/07/2016 #11 Ali Anani
    #9 Dear brother @Anees Zaidi- so it shall be RCR. The reward is discrete in RACE as converting a low quality effort or resource into a high value-added one is a reward by itself. However, there are many other rewards such as boosted morals, joy, learning, discovering, achieving and many more. I love your suggestion as it is RACER and this is my reward for the day. You are blessed and blessing dear Anees.
    Anees Zaidi
    14/07/2016 #9 Anees Zaidi
    Dear brother @Ali Anani your diamond-like RACE Strategy Model is excellent. I see it as a refining process to achieve maximum output. Your coke and coal metaphor is brilliant. Without disturbing your diamond-like structure can we make it 'RACER' adding 'R' (Reward) at the end? Although I see it covered under 'A' (show appreciation) to some extent, I see 'Reward' (not necessarily monetary) as an important component in any HR strategy. This 'R' on the completion of a task will bring lasting 'happiness' @debasish majumder looks forward. This shared happiness will also break the 'law of uncertainty'.
    Ali Anani
    13/07/2016 #8 Ali Anani
    #7 Dear @debasish majumder- I thank you for providing so many interesting thoughts. This time I invite dear @Anees Zaidi to comment on your lovely comment. I know he has a lot to offer. I am collecting few of your comments soon dear Debasish to use them as a core sample for a buzz.
    debasish majumder
    13/07/2016 #7 debasish majumder
    #6 happiness is a state of mind which cannot be visualized.but it is equally a matter. but the gravity of happiness resonates with the like minded people, matching the frequency of wave length, making a bonding by caring and sharing the valence, like that of hydrogen, negative to positive ion and helping to form a stable format of matter, i guess breaks the law of uncertainty principles.the strength of delivering ideas through your articles bears the testimony of how from distant and invisible place you can configure a matter, an idea, fluid in nature, causing such indelible impact on many. is n't it breaks the uncertainty principle i am trying to propagating. whenever, an idea crop up in my mind and feeling an urge to write, surprisingly i noticed, you reduced my workload and deliver the topic in much comprehensible manner, beyond my capacity to emphasize. i cannot explain how it works so effectively, but trying to work on it. value of employ thus heralding a new magnitude. i am grateful to you for many occasions, you dispel my doubts and enable to realize complex matters with ample clarity..your continuous support and admiration helping me to deal with numerous complex mater with ease. truly a great teacher you are!
    Ali Anani
    13/07/2016 #6 Ali Anani
    #5 I love your comment dear @debasish majumder as you stretch the value of employ. Fantastic and we need to better each step to make the whole strategy purposeful. Lovely and I am truly happy.
  25. ProducerJoel Anderson

    Joel Anderson

    06/07/2016
    Life as Flux:  A walk with Heraclitus--Traversing Rivers of Discombobulating Discombobulated Discombobulations
    Life as Flux: A walk with Heraclitus--Traversing Rivers of Discombobulating Discombobulated DiscombobulationsI took a walk with Heraclitus today. As I took that first step in the river of my daily journey, with him by my side, I found myself reflecting on how that first step and each one following would present a different perspective, a different...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Chas Wyatt
    06/08/2016 #14 Chas Wyatt
    #13@Joel Anderson, Thank you for mentioning it. I hope many on beBee view it. It is for everybody.
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/07/2016 #12 Sara Jacobovici
    #11 Your comment @Joel Anderson, from beginning to end, is a gift that I will keep and treasure. Thank you.
    Joel Anderson
    07/07/2016 #11 Joel Anderson
    #8 Sara, a follow on thank you and note from a previous post. "Sometimes not saying anything--just sitting back in quite solitude, listening, hearing and thoughtfully thinking through and reflecting on it all, just might be the important thing." Observe away--for in that, there are daring foot steps that got you to the bank of the river in the first place. And in observing, the associated value of that solitude, the act of seeing the river(s) before you, listening and thinking through it all you have given us a lesson from which we can gain great insight. From you, in your particular moment; on the bank on your river; that in so observing we all can find the goodness, simplicity, positivity and wisdom that surrounds us.. "...To acquire knowledge, one must study; but to acquire wisdom, one must observe..." Marilyn vos Savant
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/07/2016 #10 Sara Jacobovici
    #9 I'm very glad our paths have crossed @Joel Anderson. Thank you for all the insights you have shared with us.
    Joel Anderson
    07/07/2016 #9 Joel Anderson
    #8 “How much of live have I missed, he wondered, simply by failing to look? Or by looking and not seeing?” When Nietzsche Wept
    One of the things I like about beBee is that it allows us to look and see. Whether anything I write is truly insightful I will leave to you and the others but I do hope that you all can and will accept it in the spirit intended and that in writing I hope that my thoughts leave you—in some small way satisfied. To all who look to see, listen to hear and speak with words intended to truly make a difference all the best on your journeys..
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/07/2016 #8 Sara Jacobovici
    Thank you @Joel Anderson. I so appreciate your choice of sharing your ideas in this way. Your walk with Heraclitus is priceless. It brought to mind 2 writings which I think you would appreciate: Sartre and Freud - https://books.google.co.il/books/about/The_Freud_Scenario.html?id=0RAvuAAACAAJ&redir_esc=y; Breuer and Neitzche - https://www.amazon.com/When-Nietzsche-Wept-Novel-Obsession/dp/0062009303

    Heraclitus said, "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." I am not ready to do what you did Joel, to take on both at the same time. I am stilling in the first part, "it's not the same river". "Not the same man" is still on the bank being an observer at this point of my journey.
    Sara Jacobovici
    07/07/2016 #7 Sara Jacobovici
    #5 I don't have to tell you (but I will) how much I love your writing and your work, thoughts and reflections @Deb Helfrich. so...my next point is not you but one of my pet peeves (after goldfish and a cat, although I always wanted a dog, I had to settle for peeves); the past has gotten a bad rap. There is absolutely nothing wrong or bad about being aware, conscious, learn from and carry along some aspects of your past into your present. Movement, or lack thereof as in being stuck, is the issue. That's why Heraclitus' thoughts are so relevant; to be in the flow and movement and change.
    Joel Anderson
    07/07/2016 #6 Joel Anderson
    #5 Thanks so much Deb. To be simply present for each new step and experience the joy of the unexpected new moment. Well said. Keep making a difference.
    Deb Helfrich
    07/07/2016 #5 Deb Helfrich
    "How each step presents an ever so slight, ever so subtle change in direction." Absolutely true, @Joel Anderson. We need to be simply present for each new step, each breath, because every single advancing second is subtly, yet phenomenally different. Calculating from where we were, even in the just passed past, sets us up for never experiencing the joy of the unexpected next moment. Enjoyable walk, indeed.
    Joel Anderson
    07/07/2016 #4 Joel Anderson
    #1 thanks @Graham Edwards make the most of each and every one of those steps.
    Joel Anderson
    07/07/2016 #3 Joel Anderson
    #2 thanks @Julie Hickman .
    Much appreciated.
    Julie Hickman
    06/07/2016 #2 Julie Hickman
    "'...sometimes you will be addled, baffled, bamboozled, beaten, befogged, befuddled, bemused, bewildered, buffaloed, confounded, confused, disoriented, flummoxed, foxed, fuddled, muddled and beset"- @Joel Anderson View more
    "'...sometimes you will be addled, baffled, bamboozled, beaten, befogged, befuddled, bemused, bewildered, buffaloed, confounded, confused, disoriented, flummoxed, foxed, fuddled, muddled and beset"- @Joel Anderson
    I've been there Joel! I believe it's the price we pay for being thinkers :) What I wouldn't give to have a famous philosopher to chat with on walks! Your story transported me. Close
    Graham Edwards
    06/07/2016 #1 Graham Edwards
    Thanks for this @Joel Anderson! I really enjoyed it as I step along.
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