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  1. Jahanara Hoque

    Jahanara Hoque

    17/06/2016
    "Being Muslim in America is living in the shadow of 9/11 despite not remembering 9/11, of reliving its aftermath a thousand times over. It’s freedom of speech against you, freedom of religion except you. "
    Jahanara Hoque
    Being Muslim in America
    m.huffpost.com Being Muslim in America is watching the country praise Muhammad Ali one day and an outpour of racist comments the next. It's seeing how quickly smiles...
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    Cyndi wilkins
    19/06/2016 #11 Cyndi wilkins
    "Because if it’s not your head, it’s your skin. It’s what you are or what you’ve been." These are the indignities faced by our brothers and sisters of color, the LGBT community, supporters of gun control, pro-choice, and anything else that challenges those in positions of dominance... Hate is running rampant in the world because the way in which we live, our thoughts, beliefs, religious practices and the like , have all been controlled by the very people we have entrusted as our LEADERS...So I say to you ALL right now.. we.are constantly being manipulated by the forces that govern us through the use of fear and mistrust of other civilizations (or countries)...Separating us in such a way (with walls or whatever), only serves to empower the self serving desires of those who wish to remain "in control" of the masses. Never before has this been so painfully evident as it is for us here in the US with our up and coming presidential election...I absolutely will not argue politics with anyone...All I will say is PLEASE CHOOSE WISELY...Peace to you Miss Jahanara Hoque...
    Pamela L. Williams
    19/06/2016 #10 Pamela L. Williams
    thank you, that would be wonderful #8
    Jahanara Hoque
    19/06/2016 #8 Jahanara Hoque
    #7 I intend to write a few blog posts in the next fortnight.
    Pamela L. Williams
    19/06/2016 #7 Pamela L. Williams
    It will only stop when the People make it stop. When we start actually telling our leaders ENOUGH #5
    Pamela L. Williams
    19/06/2016 #6 Pamela L. Williams
    @Jahanara Hoque, I want to make a request. Would you write us a post about the Muslim culture and share it in my Cultures of the World hive? I want to know more about the culture, religion, celebrations, rites of passage. Tell us what makes you proud about being Muslim. Let's start here on beBee to bridge the divide.
    Lisa Gallagher
    19/06/2016 #5 Lisa Gallagher
    #4 I was just telling my husband that with wars (excluding those on front lines) but we seem to use drones and bombs more so now- who is injured or killed in these wars- most of the people are innocent people. They are also the casualties of war. In a Nat geo article they give http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/10/131015-iraq-war-deaths-survey-2013/a few stats along with what the war has done emotionally to those living in Iraq. Here are their numbers- "We think it is roughly around half a million people dead. And that is likely a low estimate," says Hagopian. "People need to know the cost in human lives of the decision to go to war." A London based polling agency has the numbers much higher, over 1 Million. This article is a very good read here is the link. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/10/131015-iraq-war-deaths-survey-2013/
    Pamela L. Williams
    19/06/2016 #4 Pamela L. Williams
    A heart-wrenching article. The saddest part is; that it's a scenario that America replays continuously. It's against everything that we were taught in elementary school about what it means to be an American. Yet we continue to let fear determine our actions. Everyone wants to say it's just ignorance, but it isn't. It is fear with a capital F. It's what made us strip the Japanese Americans of all their possessions and incarcerate them in internment camps during WWII. It's what makes the black of our country still have to scream; black lives matter. It's what makes being a single mother is the Bible-belt have to fight for her child to be treated equal to that of one coming from a "normal' family. We talk proudly of our country's freedoms and yet we belie them time after time. When I was young I was a proud daughter of a military veteran and now I question every action in which my country becomes involved; Is it for our safety, is it for the betterment of mankind or does the so-called enemy have something that certain powers want to control or take. I'm sorry @Jahanara Hoque that Muslim Americans face this daily. Believe me I do understand what it means to be a target of discrimination, fear, and hate. I'm embarrassed for my country and any other Western culture that subject a fellow human being to such treatment. I used a term yesterday and I like it: I send you with all my heart a big Bee Buzz Hug!
    Lisa Gallagher
    19/06/2016 #3 Lisa Gallagher
    @Jahanara Hoque, thank you so much for sharing this article and tagging me. This just saddens me that any person should have to live in fear like this. It's quite evident from the article just how much fear Muslims in America live in on a fairly constant basis. I find that to be a form of terrorism too. Maybe that's a heavy term to use but I can't think of another fitting term. This summed up the American's who treat Muslim's badly and speak badly of Muslims, "Being Muslim in America is making excuses for hate because “Maybe they just don’t know any better.” As if ignorance is excuse enough for being treated less-human." Ignorance is a dangerous mindset at times!
    Dean Owen
    17/06/2016 #1 Dean Owen
    I can't imagine how difficult it must be Jahanara. Everyone should read that article. Thanks for sharing.
  2. ProducerLisa Gallagher

    Lisa Gallagher

    14/06/2016
    Are You Islamophobic?
    Are You Islamophobic? *UPDATED WITH A TWEET FROM JOHN FUGELSANG*- Which can be seen belowThis is a touchy topic for many but I feel the need to speak out. I feel the need to give my opinion and I'm not asking everyone to agree with me, I'm just asking that you think...
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    Lisa Gallagher
    19/06/2016 #106 Lisa Gallagher
    #105 Thank YOU for your quick response @Federico Álvarez San Martín! Appreciate!
    Federico Álvarez San Martín
    19/06/2016 #105 Federico Álvarez San Martín
    #104 #103 Exact. Soon we will have solved. Thanks for the feedback. Best regards @Lada Prkic and @Lisa Gallagher.
    Lisa Gallagher
    19/06/2016 #104 Lisa Gallagher
    #103 I have done that before too @Lada Prkic, I will tag @Federico Álvarez San Martín and let him answer your question? Maybe that's something they are working on? Of course my comment below yours is in reply to the comment you just left now :)) I hope your day is a beautiful one!
    Lada Prkic
    19/06/2016 #103 Lada Prkic
    Dear @Lisa Gallagher, when I was browsing the news feed on my mobile, I deleted my comment accidentally. The links for “See more” and “Remove” is so close one to another. beBee should add a safe question before removing a comment, as there is for “Report abuse”.
    I always save my comment drafts that it can be rewritten if necessary. Here's my comment again:
    “Lisa, there are topics on which people will never be able to agree, not because they wouldn't want to, but because they can't; because they survived a traumatic experience that is stronger than any logic. A generalisation of guilt on the entire nation is extremely dangerous and ultimately leads to discrimination. It is easiest to blame the nation so that the real culprits go unpunished. An example for this is the war in the former Yugoslavia. Although it ended more than 20 years ago, the generalisation in relations between two nations, the Serbs and the Croats, is still present among the people. Those who had lost their loved ones in the war, have transferred the guilt of individuals to the whole nation.”
    Lisa Gallagher
    19/06/2016 #102 Lisa Gallagher
    #101 Well stated @Lada Prkic. There are many topics which people will never agree upon. Our life experiences are unique to oneself and that is why we have differing views. I remember the Serbian-Croation war, it was tragic. People have to find someplace to transfer guilt I assume, in order to not hold onto it internally? Thank you for adding relevance to the topic!
    Lada Prkic
    19/06/2016 #101 Lada Prkic
    Lisa, there are topics on which people will never be able to agree, not because they wouldn't want to, but because they can't; because they have survived a traumatic experience that is stronger than any logic. A generalisation of guilt to an entire nation is extremely dangerous and ultimately leads to discrimination. It is easiest to blame the nation so that the real culprits go unpunished. An example for that is the war in the former Yugoslavia. Although it ended more than 20 years ago, the generalisation of relations between two nations, the Serbs and the Croats, is still present among the people. Many of those who had lost their loved ones in the war have transmitted the guilt for that to the whole nation.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    19/06/2016 #100 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #98 @Mark Davis: No need to argue any more. I don't like to argue, especially when our discussion could go privately instead. Sir, you're a good man and you've done a lot of good in your life. Excuse this rehashing of something that goes around and around in circles, and have a great day. I know where you're coming from, and I get it. You are allowed to differ in your opinion, and I'm not taking that away from you. Can do it privately. Your call. And Thank You for all. I know it's not been easy. God Bless you.
    Lisa Gallagher
    18/06/2016 #99 Lisa Gallagher
    You nailed it in your comment below @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, Muslims are 'damned if they do, and damned if they don't." I wonder if the time will ever come when we don't use labels, like 'those Muslims, blacks, whites etc.." We are all people, and I will never lose hope that one day even if it's after I'm long gone, humans remember we all inhabit planet earth and have the same basic needs. We all love, cry and more.
    Mark Tillman Davis
    18/06/2016 #98 Mark Tillman Davis
    #96 @Margaret Aranda 1) Identify the personal assault or name calling. 2) What you call "overly harsh" is what's is commonly referred to as "reality". 3) If having a total of about two years watching Muslims treat each other and others like crap is a "really bad experience" then yeah, I guess so, 4) Some opinions aren't based in fact, they're based in fantasy. Just pointing it out.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/06/2016 #97 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #68 Hey, that was my first thought when the Twin Towers went down and Mohammed Ali or a famous Muslim did not immediately join in to condemn the action. But wow, look at just exactly 'how' the Towers fell. I've witnessed planned, synchronized building demolishment aplenty, and those Towers 'went down' differently than if they had 'just' been hit by a plane. The laws of physics, mathematics, and engineering have left millions of people with more than a shadow of a doubt that what we heard in the news was what 'really' happened. Conspiracy theories aside, yes! That was the time for the 'good' Muslim community to gather for their own sakes...but this is a social phenomenon, a multi-cultural and intensely hot (as you can see) issue...so perhaps the 'good' Muslims were 'damned if they did' and 'damned if they didn't.' I gave up trying to understand how other people think a long time ago, but I allow them to have their opinions, even if they think they have implants in their teeth with Martians speaking to them. There's just all kinds of people in the world, and in hindsight...yes. One person should have said, "I don't give a damn what anyone thinks - I'm going to speak out for all the 'good' Muslims." But we still share the same world together, and we need to remain sympathetic, not apethetic, pathetic, or platonic. Let's just all agree that we should all be 'good' and do the right thing at the right time. BOOM! Now, can we go back to making Honey?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/06/2016 #96 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #71 @Mark Davis, Gosh, I'm just wondering if you had a really bad experience or something...It is just that your comments seem so overly harsh, considering one person is just giving an opinion. In any debate, isn't one supposed to listen to the other side pragmatically and then set up the counter-argument? There isn't room for personal assaults or name-calling when it is a professional conversation, you know? Doesn't our intelligence overrule our emotions in a debate of opinion. I'm just confused. And if you can't answer me without calling me names, then please just disregard this note. We are all adults and we should each agree to disagree. My opinion, and I'm sticking to it.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/06/2016 #95 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #70 Did you get a Share over there, @Lisa Gallagher?
    Lisa Gallagher
    17/06/2016 #94 Lisa Gallagher
    #93 I never heard that one before @Neal Rauhauser, but good one!
    Neal Rauhauser
    17/06/2016 #93 Neal Rauhauser
    #89 I've heard a version that states the coal *might* hit your target, but it *always* burns you.
    Neal Rauhauser
    17/06/2016 #92 Neal Rauhauser
    #91 Terrorism is a noun. Unless we're willing to burn dictionaries first, then a lot of other books thereafter, we can not fight a "War on Terror". We could treat the roots of the problem, but that just doesn't fit with the needs of a global hegemon.
    Lisa Gallagher
    17/06/2016 #91 Lisa Gallagher
    @Neal Rauhauser great point, "in the U.S. we make incredibly self destructive decisions on the basis of the notion of a 'clash of cultures.' Absolutely! It still boggles my brain when I think of the war Bush started in Iraq and we lost as you said 4,500 lives not to mention how many innocent people were killed in Iraq that had nothing to do with terrorism? Any rational person understands that Terrorists are spread out in many countries- you can't go to war with an invisible enemy, one who doesn't wear a uniform. How would people feel that live in the US if we had 8-10 terrorists who caused death and destruction in say China and China declared war on all of us for their actions? I hope your harassment stops now that your using beBee, I don't think that will be tolerated here either.
    Lisa Gallagher
    17/06/2016 #90 Lisa Gallagher
    #89 Thats a great quote and VERY fitting @Franci Eugenia Hoffman!
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    17/06/2016 #89 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    I just came across a quote that I feel is relevant to this thread: "Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned." ~ Buddha
    Neal Rauhauser
    17/06/2016 #88 Neal Rauhauser
    Islamophobia is irrational and it's so embedded in the U.S. that we make incredibly self destructive decisions on the basis of the notion of a "clash of cultures". The prime example of this is Bush's adventure in Iraq, which cost us 4,500 lives and who knows how many hundreds of billions of dollars.

    I have very little patience for hate talkers of any stripe, but the Islamophobes are particularly virulent, due to their outsized influence on foreign policy. One of the things I love about beBee is the Spanish origin - I've faced ongoing harassment from a hate group since I worked for a Hispanic Congressman during the 2010 election. I doubt those people would be tolerated here :-)
    Lisa Gallagher
    17/06/2016 #87 Lisa Gallagher
    cc; @Rebel Brown, not sure if you saw this but thought I'd tag you since we were both somewhat on the same page with our articles. Speaking about your post about Rage in the US.
  3. Jahanara Hoque

    Jahanara Hoque

    06/06/2016
    Ramadan greetings! May we all strive to be the most God- conscious, loving and forgiving people. Jahanara Hoque
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