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Only Humans Tell Stories - beBee

Only Humans Tell Stories

+ 100 buzzes
Where there is life, in any form, there is communication. But only humans tell stories.

Share a story. Share your story. Close
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  1. Bert Purdy

    Bert Purdy

    30/11/2016
    #linkedin
    Bert Purdy
    2 Tips for Writing LinkedIn Posts that People Will Like (and Share)
    www.inc.com Want to write LinkedIn posts that people actually read--and share? This is what one LinkedIn Influencer suggests you...
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    Jared Wiese
    01/12/2016 #1 Jared Wiese
    Great tips, not just for LinkedIn.
    Find your value to the world and focus on it. Then tell your story.
  2. ProducerSara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    29/11/2016
    A Short Story
    A Short StoryMy father had to deal with “being let go” in 1965. I had to deal with “being let go” in 2001. The corporate culture may have looked different but it is only a variation on the same theme; losing your job. In today’s corporate culture, the system...
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    01/12/2016 #10 Sara Jacobovici
    #9 Powerful questions @Deb Helfrich. Powerful statement, "Because we will never be let go from being who we are." Thanks
    Deb Helfrich
    30/11/2016 #9 Deb Helfrich
    A short story about lifelong questions. Are we investing our time in meaningful ways? Are we reflecting our own value? Are we satisfied with how we contribute?

    Because we will never be let go from being who we are.
    Sara Jacobovici
    30/11/2016 #8 Sara Jacobovici
    #7 Popular or not, you bring up an important point @Pascal Derrien; we can't emotionally afford to invest our identity in the work place. Thanks for contributing to this discussion.
    Pascal Derrien
    30/11/2016 #7 Pascal Derrien
    Good stuff all round I know it is not popular but one should build the right emotional distance between work and self I see so many people getting the tatooooo and getting upset when the tattoo company don't want them any more :-)
    Sara Jacobovici
    29/11/2016 #6 Sara Jacobovici
    #5 Much appreciated @Harvey Lloyd. Thank you.
    Harvey Lloyd
    29/11/2016 #5 Harvey Lloyd
    Great story thanks for the post @Sara Jacobovici. These times cause us to reflect on our value to others. Your reflections captured those moments.
    Paul Burge
    29/11/2016 #4 Paul Burge
    #2 You're welcome, I enjoyed reading it. :)
    Sara Jacobovici
    29/11/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 Sounds like good medicine @Mohammed A. Jawad. Thanks for your comment.
    Sara Jacobovici
    29/11/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    Thanks for the share @Paul Burge. Much appreciated.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    29/11/2016 #1 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Rejection, failure and loss makes a person dull..all like ready to drag a person in deep depressions. At such times, a solid dose of perseverance and good memories of past can give a person a sense of contentment and gratitude.
  3. ProducerDonna-Luisa Eversley
    Just Thinking out loud - Control
    Just Thinking out loud - Control Random ThoughtsBlogging has been for me, a way to share as much as I know with the rest of the world. These are my thoughts and examples from my own experiences, so I guess you can say - Dwordslayer shares a real person!There are days I need...
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    30/11/2016 #40 Sara Jacobovici
    #38 So happy to hear from you @Donna-Luisa Eversley! And what a wonderfully written reply!
    Lisa Gallagher
    29/11/2016 #39 Lisa Gallagher
    #37 I'm glad your on Facebook @Donna-Luisa Eversley! It's nice to see some familiar faces from beBee :))
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/11/2016 #38 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #20 @Sara Jacobovici, thank you ..wow, when I read this, you got the weepy emotional blast in my eyes 😉😘 ...it is the truth of music and rythmn ..I am happy it resonates with you so much. As soon as I draw on the music my entire person responds. It is like a conductor bringing the sounds into a crescendo. Controlling emotions need that understanding of self to create harmony for self.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/11/2016 #37 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #19 #hugs right back at you #babydoll @Lisa Gallagher..
    🐝🐝🐝🌹🌹🌹 Thankfully some of us are on Facebook or I would have been in a desert. 😂..glad to be back. I do have some stuff I've written.. will try to publish, but seems quite sad, not happy simply a difficult time with less light and the weepy willows.
    Thanks for reading.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/11/2016 #36 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #18 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman.. I will admit my patience is stretched...like elastic it was on taunt and now it's relaxed so it stung me back to me 😊😎... I will have a spoonful of courage each morning with my coffee 😊 I appreciate you my friend 😘💮💮💮💮💮
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/11/2016 #35 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #17 @Max Carter thank you...yes, storytelling is a part of the healing process which is powerful. It is the feel of the music which makes the story flow , making a melody which makes a whole lot more sense than life on its own sometimes 😉..thank you for your beautiful supportive words 🐝🐝🌻🌻🌻
    Pascal Derrien
    29/11/2016 #34 Pascal Derrien
    turn the volume up, close your eyes and sing....

    keep on keeping on
    Fatima Williams
    29/11/2016 #32 Fatima Williams
    beBee is alive with the sound of Donna's music 💖📯🎼🔊🎶🎵♩🎺🎹🎸🎷🎻🎤🎼🕪
    Fatima Williams
    29/11/2016 #31 Fatima Williams
    #1 Aww ♡@Donna-Luisa Eversley I've missed you . Awesome that your back and buzzing again my dear. Your buzzes are music to the ears. This is a sensational buzz with some great takeaways. Everyone has a song for every situation we just have to sing out loud and let the music fill our lives. Buzzon dear and welcome back to beBeeland.🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗😇🤗🤗🤗🤗
    Pamela L. Williams
    29/11/2016 #30 Pamela L. Williams
    @Donna-Luisa Eversley a very insightful post. It is only ourselves who can control our destiny and we are each destined for greatness in some way, but only if we are able to prevent fear, greed, or opinion to veer us off our path.
    Pamela L. Williams
    29/11/2016 #29 Pamela L. Williams
    I really like this comment Ken. Sometimes you just can't play it safe, you need some adventure, to try new things, to speak out when things go awry. For now it is still some of the greatest freedoms and gifts we have; free will and free speach. The Internet has given us the ability to reach a tremendous audience and as long as we stay tactful and factual great things can be accomplished. Ain't no mountain high enough! Ain't no valley low enough! #28
    Ken Boddie
    29/11/2016 #28 Ken Boddie
    When the wind's blowing hard in our face we need to tack to port and starboard if we are to advance to our charted destination. But sometimes we need to run before the wind and let it take us to uncharted waters.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/11/2016 #26 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #16 🐝🐝🌺 😊 thank you @David B. Grinberg...being in control of self takes us to a position of ownership...and we really need to own ourselves!
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/11/2016 #25 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #15 😘😉🐝🐝 thanks @Irene Hackett.. you just gave me a great compliment , I sure want to hold onto!
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/11/2016 #24 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #10 🐝🐝😊 looking forward to your thoughts @Pamela L. Williams
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/11/2016 #23 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #9 Thank you for reading @Federico Álvarez San Martín😉🐝🐝
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    29/11/2016 #22 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #14 Thank you @Michele Williams...quite right, in facing fear we can take control of our future..😉🐝🐝
    Sara Jacobovici
    29/11/2016 #21 Sara Jacobovici
    @Donna-Luisa Eversley is "sharing to the world".
    Sara Jacobovici
    29/11/2016 #20 Sara Jacobovici
    So grateful to be reading your post @Donna-Luisa Eversley. So grateful to be hearing your voice. You are my quote of the month (or more) on my profile: ""There is a song for every feeling. Every mood and nuance of life has rhythm. Just imagine how you feel when you're excited and listen to the matching sound which fills you at the thought."
  4. ProducerSarah Elkins

    Sarah Elkins

    22/11/2016
    The Spectrum of Humanity
    The Spectrum of HumanityWhat do Jews think about Jesus?He asked me as innocently as a college freshman at a small, Jesuit school could ask. It caught me a little off guard.What do ALL Jews think of Jesus?It was puzzling to me that he would think ALL people of any...
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    Comments

    Sarah Elkins
    28/11/2016 #30 Sarah Elkins
    #17 You hit the nail on the head, @Sara Jacobovici, I'd be willing to say that the vast majority of hate is based in fear. And thank you for that wonderful share and comment. I love our spectrum of humanity. Even the people who are horrible to me teach me something!
    Sarah Elkins
    28/11/2016 #29 Sarah Elkins
    #19 Unfortunately, @Ali Anani, that doesn't surprise me at all. I have similar stories from early in my time here in Montana, and from my travel experiences. What you say here is exactly right, we must connect one-to-one to change the dynamic. And it helps to be a good ambassador for our people, speaking and educating rather than being insulted and defensive.
    Sarah Elkins
    28/11/2016 #28 Sarah Elkins
    #23 Thank you, @Alan Culler, I appreciate that comment!
    Sarah Elkins
    28/11/2016 #27 Sarah Elkins
    #25 Oh dear, @Nicole Chardenet, I know exactly what you're talking about in terms of it being hard to forgive the chronically and willfully stupid. I call it willful ignorance and have a really hard time with it myself. The reason I've been able to look past that issue with some people is that I realize that without talking about it, without having that dialog, the people who voted without the intention of exacerbating hate, fear, and bigotry, we are truly lost. Those who were more intentional with their votes are a lost cause.

    I agree that asking what Jews think about Jesus is a totally fair question, it's the way he asked, as if all Jews would believe the same thing about Jesus. Many Jews fall into the category your mother described, and many do not. Just like some Jews keep kosher, others do not. The best question that is consistently asked by the students I encounter each year is this: "What makes the Jewish belief so different from the Christian belief." And my answer is that practicing Jews are still waiting for the Messiah, while Christians believe he has already been here. (Notice I said "practicing" Jews, as opposed to all Jews.)

    Thanks for that great comment, it made me clarify why I responded that way to the student's question.
    Sarah Elkins
    28/11/2016 #26 Sarah Elkins
    #10 So true, @Kevin Pashuk, and that loss of our humanity begins with fear. Thanks for the comment.
    Nicole Chardenet
    28/11/2016 #25 Nicole Chardenet
    Asking what Jews think about Jesus is a fair enough assessment. It could be interpreted as perhaps the 'party line', with or without a Pope or other centralized figure. When I was a kid, growing up in a Christian family, my mother said that Jews believed Jesus existed but wasn't a Saviour, but that he was a great teacher. I actually cleave toward that view more myself now, rather than the Christian one...but then again, I haven't been Christian in many years.

    As for not judging people en masse, easier said than done sometimes. I find myself struggling with the anger at people who elected a total asshat for world leader and put the rest of us in danger as well. That's not judging someone on biology; that's judging them on their unwillingness to take a real look at what they were voting for. It was eye-opening going to the States for Thanksgiving; it because quite clear that it wasn't just uneducated, chronically unemployed rednecks who hadn't been paying attention during the election campaign.

    Harder to forgive, sometimes, the chronically and wilfully stupid.
    Alan Culler
    27/11/2016 #23 Alan Culler
    @SarahElkins - an amazing post and video thanks so much for sharing.
    debasish majumder
    27/11/2016 #22 debasish majumder
    Great post with incisive amplification about humanity! enjoyed read. thank you madam @Sarah Elkins for this amazing share.
    Lisa Gallagher
    27/11/2016 #21 Lisa Gallagher
    That's the second time I watched that video @Sarah Elkins and it still brings tears to my eyes. If only... most people would realize we are all connected in one way or another, we'd have a more humane world. We are humans, we are not our religion or our designated ethnicity. One day I hope that prejudice and biases end... that's my hope! It sure will be a better world when that time comes. I wish it would happen in my lifetime.
    Ali Anani
    27/11/2016 #20 Ali Anani
    #17 @Sara Jacobovici- thank you for alerting me to this buzz and your shared video. It is fantastic. I wish you good progress with the loop.I am sure some great thoughts shall emerge.
    Ali Anani
    27/11/2016 #19 Ali Anani
    @Sarah Elkins- I experienced what you experienced when I first went to the UK to do my PhD. As an Arab I was mocked. It took me three months before people accepted me as a non-conforming Arab to what impressions they had about Arabs. People tend to generalize and extend their conclusions linearly. I agree with your post. I find your writing "When we paint an entire community with the same, broad brush, we miss incredible opportunities to learn, to grow, and to make connections with each other. The only way to heal our fractured communities is to care about each individual we interact with, and avoid making assumptions". I believe this is the only way.
    Mind you when my elder brother went to study his undergraduate studies in the USA he was asked to show "his tail". Some students believed that Arabs have tails. It is true. However; it is our actions that may change those impressions as my brother and I did.
    Sara Jacobovici
    27/11/2016 #18 Sara Jacobovici
    Another work of art produced by an artist story teller @Sarah Elkins. Beautifully written, beautifully told.
    Sara Jacobovici
    27/11/2016 #17 Sara Jacobovici
    Another work of art produced by an artist story teller @Sarah Elkins. Beautifully written, beautifully told. Thank you Sarah. You write, "The spectrum of humanity is always my first priority." Agreed. I find beauty in the spectrum. Although I am always moved when I hear John Lennon's Imagine, it's the idea of hope that moves me. I don't want a world where we are all the same. Our challenge is to allow the differences to enable us to grow as humans, not to negate us. You write, "When we paint an entire community with the same, broad brush, we miss incredible opportunities to learn, to grow, and to make connections with each other." 100%! I regret to say that that brush is dipped in fear; for some reason we are made to feel that differences are a threat. It's individual behaviors, both verbal and non-verbal, which hold the potential of threat, not our differences.

    @Ali Anani and I spent some time last evening (our time) in a synchronicity loop. I open up your buzz this morning and feel like I have fallen right back into that loop. You write, "The students laughed uncomfortably. I explained why that story was important in our discussion". I have recently shared the following video which I think greatly supports your invaluable message. Thanks again Sarah.https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=tedspr
    Sarah Elkins
    26/11/2016 #16 Sarah Elkins
    #8 @Dean Owen, thank you for the comment. When I notice an immediate response to a person, I dig in to figure out whether it's truly intuition or bias. You're so right, it's human to make a snap judgment - and being introspective about those snap judgments helps us grow as humans.
    Sarah Elkins
    26/11/2016 #15 Sarah Elkins
    #6 Thank you, @Irene Hackett, for the comment and for sharing!
    Mohammed Sultan
    25/11/2016 #14 Mohammed Sultan
    Very impressive @Sarah Elkins.God gave us the gift of life and honored us as humans and let us decide how to live well.Only wise people regardless of their religious devotion know well that a life is worth living when we live it for him.There's only one fact ,but can be interpreted in different ways and different manners because we each receive different "Light" from the same source.Because we receive the same message differently ,we have different and enduring cultures,not related to our DNA but to the paths we chose.Everyone has his own light and his own path and can see and think best within this context.
    Jared Wiese
    25/11/2016 #13 Jared Wiese
    Tweeted:
    The Spectrum of Humanity @sarahelkins "Are you able to truly judge ALL Americans based on.. handful of experiences?" https://www.bebee.com/producer/@sarah-elkins/the-spectrum-of-humanity
    Ian Weinberg
    25/11/2016 #12 Ian Weinberg
    If we all learned to recall just one real exception before defaulting into judgmentalism of an entire group, we would live in a very different world.
    Susan Rooks
    25/11/2016 #11 Susan Rooks
    Beautifully written and wise, @Sarah Elkins! I am also a Jew, but much more secular than many others I know -- of any religion! I identify as a Jew, but it's cultural. Yet one of my daughters is a Kohennet, sort of a rabbi. We are all different in the ways we understand and practice our religion / faith, and you made the point so very well. No group is 100% homogenous.
  5. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    25/11/2016
    A great story teller telling a great story. A must hear, especially for the beBee community.
    Sara Jacobovici
    Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The danger of a single story | TED Talk | TED.com
    www.ted.com Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice -- and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a...
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    Comments

    Deb Helfrich
    25/11/2016 #6 Deb Helfrich
    I have read her novel "Americanah" and it is a fascinating look into the disconnect that Africans feel as they confront African-American culture.

    I would also love to urge anyone who has found themselves equating internet scammers with Nigerian princes to watch this talk - it is a damaging stereotype.

    And to tell a personal story, I have to credit books with the fact that my freshmen year African roommate, who was from Ghana, did not have to bunk with someone who had no African stories of real people.

    I want to challenge us all, let's ask people about their stories, rather than make generalized assumptions.
    Ali Anani
    25/11/2016 #5 Ali Anani
    #4 Thank you for sharing it and providing this splendid comment @Sara Jacobovici. It is a great and inspiring video
    Sara Jacobovici
    25/11/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    @Harvey Lloyd wrote:

    "This video really does share the forest of human existence so well.

    The forest is full of many trees and each tells us a story. In today's narrative, it would appear, we overlook many trees of the human existence. We seek out those trees that offer us a dramatic, emotional view rather than the typical.

    The 80/20 rule is alive and well. The 20 describes the 80. A biased story or narrative that ensnares our imagination."
    Tony Rossi
    25/11/2016 #3 Tony Rossi
    Yes, @Sara Jacobovici - this is perfectly poignant for our community, and such a wonderful message for the world to hear! :-)
    Ali Anani
    25/11/2016 #2 Ali Anani
    Great and thank you my friend @Harvey Lloyd for tagging me. I am going to watch now.
    I have just published a buzz dedicated to you. I hope it is worthy. I strongly invite dear @Sara Jacobovici to read as I belive it shall help her with further developing the movement equation.
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@ali-anani/conscious-and-subconscious-questions
    Harvey Lloyd
    25/11/2016 #1 Harvey Lloyd
    @Ali Anani this video shared by @Sara Jacobovici really does share the forest of human existence so well i wanted to tag you.

    The forest is full of many trees and each tells us a story. In today's narrative, it would appear, we overlook many trees of the human existence. We seek out those trees that offer us a dramatic, emotional view rather than the typical.

    The 80/20 rule is alive and well. The 20 describes the 80. A biased story or narrative that ensnares our imagination.

    I enjoyed this talk and sense it is relevant even within America.
  6. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    22/11/2016
    As a confessed bookaholic I loved seeing this. Enjoy!
    Sara Jacobovici
    Ten of the world’s most beautiful bookshops
    www.bbc.com From an Argentinian theatre and a Dutch church to an underground car park in China, BBC Culture picks the loveliest bookstores around the...
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  7. ProducerSara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    17/11/2016
    A Time to Reflect
    A Time to ReflectImage credit: Clipart KidI opened up a time capsule today; a plastic bag filled with bits of paper with my poems written on them. For about fifteen years, between my late teens and early thirties, I wrote whenever and wherever the muse took me....
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    18/11/2016 #15 Sara Jacobovici
    #13 Thank you so much @Irene Hackett for your kind and generous words.
    Sara Jacobovici
    18/11/2016 #14 Sara Jacobovici
    #12 Hang on to the "maybe" @Pascal Derrien. It may actually get you there!
    Irene Hackett
    18/11/2016 #13 Anonymous
    Truly wonderful sharing, to get an intimate glimpse into the mind of Sara from years gone by. You were a brilliant and creative thinker/writer then as you are now! ❤️
    Pascal Derrien
    17/11/2016 #12 Pascal Derrien
    I relate to the second one most:-) I quite like the concept of time, loss and memories... there is a plaque where my daughter goes to dancing class indicating a time capsule has been buried in 1985 and is not be opened before 2075 I would love to be there when it will be opened but realistically it wont be feasible or maybe......
    Fatima Williams
    17/11/2016 #11 Fatima Williams
    #4 I agree Sara Yes it's very true what you say when you link it with trauma. I love that your helping people gain healing. Its a blessing God Bless your soul dear Sara.
    Sara Jacobovici
    17/11/2016 #10 Sara Jacobovici
    #8 Thank you @Virag Gulyas. I love following you on your very busy travels on facebook Virag. Wonderful work!! Wishing you continued creative energy.
    Sara Jacobovici
    17/11/2016 #9 Sara Jacobovici
    #7 Love your comments @Deb Helfrich. I feel like you are sitting right next to me. I can almost hear your voice.
    Virag Gulyas
    17/11/2016 #8 Virag Gulyas
    Love it!!! @Sara Jacobovici
    Deb Helfrich
    17/11/2016 #7 Deb Helfrich
    Breathe and flow, what a stunning set of words to find from earlier days, @Sara Jacobovici. I also felt this sense of 'completeness' in the way that finding and reading a story from my months right after college held so many nuggets of who I am today. I both recognize those words completely and yet they seem strangely separate - I forgot the piece itself, but the memories of the creation were alive and waiting to be retrieved.

    I am looking forward to more discoveries!
    Sara Jacobovici
    17/11/2016 #6 Sara Jacobovici
    #5 Beautifully written @Mohammed A. Jawad, beautifully told.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    17/11/2016 #5 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Aha...What a poetic ecstasy! Little enjoyments of our past are all great inspirations. As we remember we realize how we wanted to do something to express ourselves. As life unfolds itself with many transitions and when passing time narrates tidbits from our memories, we ought to gauge how well we lived and what's ahead to celebrate our living.
    Sara Jacobovici
    17/11/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    #3 Thank you @Fatima Williams for your generous response and for the added value of your comment. I appreciate your line, "...re-entering time we do it all the time as the strength we draw from the experience is much stronger than the experience itself." It is a very powerful "opposite" to what I refer to clinically when I deal with traumatic memories. When it is too frightening for the individual to remember a traumatic experience, I remind that individual that she or he survived the event and so will surely survive the memory of the event during the therapy work. In this case, when an individual re-enters in order to heal, the strength is in the process of the healing not in the re-entry.
    Fatima Williams
    17/11/2016 #3 Fatima Williams
    Dear @Sara Jacobovici Lovely flash back of memories and I can imagine how the nostalgia. I love your phrase on re-entering time we do it all the time as the strength we draw from the experience is much stronger than the experience itself.

    "its strength never doubted.
    the struggle of morality…..wrestled in our minds
    alongside projections of what’s wrong and what’s right
    already decided in black and white. "

    The battle and struggle has undoubted strength as it's foundation and we can see the beauty of that strength reflected in your writing and you. Thank you 🤗🤗🤗🤗 Loved the read
    Sara Jacobovici
    17/11/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 Dear @Ali Anani, your comment humbles and flatters me, thank you. But it also reflects that a comment by you holds so much more. Thank you for your response and insights.
    Ali Anani
    17/11/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    @Sara Jacobovici- you wrote in this amazing buzz "As I have written about the integrated me, these poems represent a younger personal me whose voice I have carried over into the older professional me". This shows that past influences our present and future and that we are fractal humans as we scale up past experiences. We don't drop our past; more we scale its major events.
    This scaling up shows exactly who you are. The titles of your past capsules are still consistent with your recent titles. Is the past what makes our roots the grow our fractal tree? I tend to say yes because of your great buzzz.
    in fractions and fleeting opportunities
    through distinct forms and underlying plans.
    life threadlike…..ready to snap
    I am ready to say you are a beautiful mind and your time capsule is filled with wisdom. This buzz is unique in its value for it show our footprints over time. Yours are outstanding fractal footprints. Shared
  8. ProducerVirag Gulyas

    Virag Gulyas

    13/11/2016
    Sometimes it takes time to set yourself free...
    Sometimes it takes time to set yourself free...This is me.After my first ever Gaga, dance class. After my 3rd dance class ever since I stepped away from the world that gave me a lot but perhaps hurt me more.I don't know about you, but I spent more than half of my life fulfilling demands,...
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    14/11/2016 #21 Sara Jacobovici
    #14 #20 I couldn't be more impressed or grateful for your ability to "get it" and "communicate it" in your unique and powerful way @CityVP Manjit. It is because of what you have connected to that I went into the field of Music Therapy and trained in collaboration with Art Therapists and Dance/Movement Therapists. That was over 30 years ago. What has been exciting to witness is that using, in this instance, the body through movement and dance, and taking it out of the health and mental health institutional community and into the mainstream and flow of our lives, enables us to return to our organic nature and get our bodies "in sync" with our minds. Anyway, you said it better than me. Thanks again Manjit.
    CityVP Manjit
    14/11/2016 #20 CityVP Manjit
    #18 Virag, this is what Naharin is quoted as saying about fear :

    [ ..." I don’t think I’ve gotten rid of my fear. I’m actually aware of the fear. Sometimes I enjoy being afraid. It’s less a matter of getting rid of the fear and more a matter of knowing that it’s all right to be afraid "... ]
    from http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/famed-choreographer-still-feels-the-fear-1.423779

    You have already confronted the primary fear and stepped forward, what I am enjoying tonight finding out about Naharin is that his thoughts recognize the body is alive and that he see's dance as a living expression. That is why when he says "sometimes I enjoy being afraid", he is so in tune and touch with his body that he reads and recognizes what his body tells him - this is a marvelous faculty. In discussing these things we use our head rather than our body - but when I think I notice most my fingers moving - my brain then serves my fingers and in that I know thoughts have traveled up both my arms to deposit thoughts.

    There are very few people who think of the body as vessel of intelligence, Bruce Lee was one of the rare people who understood putting great meaning to body and this is explored in The Art of Expressing the Human Body" http://bit.ly/2g4GuUb whereas Bruce Lee took that body intelligence into martial arts, Narahin has taken it into dance - and that is why I grasp his greatness.

    When we are scared, it is the foundation of what we are walking into that matters, the foundation that you have had the courage to walk into is full of meaning and spirit, courage that takes us into emptiness is blind folly, courage that takes us into life is why I am happy for you - this form of courage has meaning and in that meaning one finds their freedom, and then sometimes as Narahin says he enjoys being afraid and that it is all right to be afraid.
    Irene Hackett
    14/11/2016 #19 Anonymous
    @Virag Gulyas - I can feel the sense of freedom you have drawn me into with this honest expression and if I could, I would give you a hug! You are beautiful and you are coming to realize it! Continue to live with your hair down and never stop dancing your own moves!! :-)
    Virag Gulyas
    13/11/2016 #18 Virag Gulyas
    #14 Ohad Naharin is a genius who goes against all mainstream. Making his dancers go out of the ballet training towards a movement that is fully pushing their bodies into unknown areas, is simply courageous. And it works. The video clip you've shared with me is incredible, and I have seen it before. Thank you for sharing. Going for a Gaga class for me was scary --- especially after 8 years of no training. But stepping into the 'scary' is where is start to grow.
    Virag Gulyas
    13/11/2016 #17 Virag Gulyas
    Thank you for all of your for reading it, and sharing your kind thoughts. Aren't we all in the same boat after all? :-)
    Milos Djukic
    13/11/2016 #15 Anonymous
    Dear @Virag Gulyas, Freedom of self-expression is worth fighting for, that is the essential meaning of the self - similarity concept. As we get older the desire for freedom is growing. Your concerns and decisions are a sign that you're on the right track. Congrats, I'm a semi-professional dancer, It is just that believe it or not :)
    CityVP Manjit
    13/11/2016 #14 CityVP Manjit
    Oh! Virag Gulyas what have you unleashed here ! You have just put the name Ohad Naharin smack bang into my vocabulary, for when you mentioned freedom, it overwhelmed me to know the extent of freedom as dance philosophy this is. Incredible! I just ran the film trailer for Mr.Gaga and a whole new world opened up https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6gd8xpFMsM a world that I love where freedom is tattooed as a way, as an expression, as a force that is born from a rigid culture, freeing itself from a constraint.

    This reminds me of the antonym side of the movie Whiplash - where Whiplash dictates a passionate man who loves drumming and is grounded into submission by a ruthless teacher - and the antonym here is Mr.Gaga - a dance expression that releases the ruthless world of dance. We already know what it takes to become a professional ballerina, the immeasurable sacrifice, the dream that is chased by many girls but then funneled into a excruciating and demanding test to emerge with the few and not many. Cue the movie Flashdance - but Flashdance was not about creating something new, but another recital of the hero's journey. For sure it dealt with class but it was not a philosophy and it certainly did not offer any form of freedom.

    You should feel justifiably liberated because you are clearly an early adopter of this transformation, this giving dance back to the people, the loosening of rigidity, the renewal of form and function, to exercise what one actually loves about this passion. The more I read http://www.danceadvantage.net/questions-about-gaga/ and http://gagapeople.com/english/ the more I honour your post and I thank you for opening the curtain for me and I say kudos to you for embracing this, for this is truly freedom.
    Sara Jacobovici
    13/11/2016 #13 Sara Jacobovici
    @Virag Gulyas tells how she found her freedom.
    Sara Jacobovici
    13/11/2016 #12 Sara Jacobovici
    You are a great storyteller @Virag Gulyas and it always feels like it's coming straight from the heart.

    Because one of my pillars of life is movement (paradox intended), you made me think that it is not simply the freedom to move but how to move that makes the difference; the freedom lies in choosing the how.

    The other thing that I found "moving" in your story is when you say, "I understood more about my body today than during my whole rigorous dancer education.". Again, here the education lies in the freedom of movement and the understanding that results from that.

    Wow! Thank you for sharing your amazing life experience Virag and wishing you from strength to strength.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    13/11/2016 #11 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Aww, I love this, @Virag Gulyas because you are living your life your way and being who you really are. Life is too short to not fulfill your dreams and just be YOU!
    Michael D. Davis
    13/11/2016 #10 Michael D. Davis
    Good move Virag! It sounds as if you are truly finding your "Smile" Many blessings to you.
    Michael Dowling
    13/11/2016 #9 Michael Dowling
    Go free...
    David B. Grinberg
    13/11/2016 #8 David B. Grinberg
    Kudos to you Virag, for taking that leap after so long. I think your conclusion nails it: "So many of us stay in that tight leotard we force on ourselves - because, we get used to it, we feel too comfortable to leave. But don't stay because you got used it; because it is too comfortable. Wear that damn loose t-shirt and go free."
    Life is too short to be running around on a hamster wheel road to no where. No one ever got anywhere by running (or dancing ) in place. Moreover, I think it would be great if you did a Live Buzz (when ready) from your dance studio. I'm sure you're very good. Remember, we are all our worst critics. Good luck and dance on...
    Virag Gulyas
    13/11/2016 #7 Virag Gulyas
    #6 haha. Nope. "Gaga is a movement language developed by Ohad Naharin in Israel to help dancers (and non-dancers alike) reconnect to the way they move."
    Nick Mlatchkov
    13/11/2016 #6 Anonymous
    What kind of dance is Gaga? Any link to the so-called Lady?
    Donald Grandy
    13/11/2016 #5 Donald Grandy
    Thanks for sharing @Virag Gulyas. Congratulations on setting yourself free! Never lose the song in your heart.
    Mamen Delgado
    13/11/2016 #4 Mamen Delgado
    Your freedom makes me happy @Virag Gulyas, and reminds me my own one and why I keep on fighting for it every single moment.
    THANK YOU!! 💝
    Andrew Goldman
    13/11/2016 #3 Andrew Goldman
    Always follow your passion. It makes you alive. And never give up! That makes us happy! @Virag Gulyas Thank you for being dedicated to your dream!
    Lisa Gallagher
    13/11/2016 #2 Lisa Gallagher
    What a beautiful message @Virag Gulyas. Im so happy you found not just your freedom but your authentic self. A good thing for all of us to keep in mind.
  9. ProducerGary Sharpe

    Gary Sharpe

    12/11/2016
    Acts of Love [Intimacy]
    Acts of Love [Intimacy]Acts of Love.In the adult Stage of our lives, we humans, like all animals who go two-by-two, engage in Physical Acts together. Amongst the Extras - those animals which only play small parts, low down on the role-call - these Actors play their parts...
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    Comments

    Gary Sharpe
    16/11/2016 #12 Gary Sharpe
    #11 Like sex, best left to the imagination of the beholder. ;-)
    Max Carter
    16/11/2016 #11 Max Carter
    #10 No you didn't but inferred greatly.
    Gary Sharpe
    16/11/2016 #10 Gary Sharpe
    #9 *I* didn't mention sex. I agree by the way.
    Max Carter
    16/11/2016 #9 Max Carter
    Here's the thing, sex and intimacy have nothing to do with each other. You are intimate with the people who you make yourself the most vulnerable to with what you share about yourself and how much their opinion actually means to you. That is building intimacy through trust. You can have that without sex and you can have sex without intimacy. When intimacy is built prior to the sex, that is when you have the greatest of tantric experiences as my experience has been after study and application of the art form.
    Deb Helfrich
    13/11/2016 #8 Deb Helfrich
    #7 Wow, @Mohammed A. Jawad, that is a complexly nuanced comment that gets to the heart of intimacy.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    13/11/2016 #7 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Aha....intimacy is a serene, dulcet comforter, a pulsating rage. It's an intense barter in exchange of emotions with deep desires to experience love's sequence.
    Deb Lange
    13/11/2016 #6 Deb Lange
    Intimacy, yes we are all "connected' via technology, but how often do we experience real intimacy? yet, with intimacy ,we open up to sensing and connecting with ourselves and others that enrich our experience beyond measure. When we connect intimately we are open to the source of our creativity. Thank-you for sharing of yourself so we can be intimate together.
    Sara Jacobovici
    13/11/2016 #5 Sara Jacobovici
    Straight from @Gary Sharpe's heart.
    Sara Jacobovici
    13/11/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    Your script @Gary Sharpe, "which wrote itself without edit, in full, free flow of a Creative, Emotional Intelligent, Empathic Storyteller", I believe can be referred to as Prose Poetry. Any way you call it, I call it an important message from heart to heart.
    Irene Hackett
    13/11/2016 #3 Anonymous
    Truly one of the most deeply moving expressions of true love that I've read in a long time. I am breathless as I read this: "I am discovering there is so very much for Humans to gain by Acts of Love. And it totally transcends physical Acts of Love, Superior Emotional Expressiveness and making each other feel like they are indeed, an Audience of just one in the whole wide Universe."
    Deb Helfrich
    13/11/2016 #2 Deb Helfrich
    I am certain that the woman on the receiving end of your intimacy, @Gary Sharpe, must feel spectacularly fortunate.
    Renée Cormier
    12/11/2016 #1 Renée Cormier
    Intimacy says was love does not. There are many degrees and types of love, but the experience of touching the soul by sharing both emotional and sexual intimacy is something not so easily found or given. We humans crave that but often offer so much less.
  10. ProducerPascal Derrien

    Pascal Derrien

    08/11/2016
    Liar Liar Pants On Fire
    Liar Liar Pants On FireIt had never been my intention, it was not by design even but more of a quid proquo almost that led my parents to think I was in relationship with that stunning young girl from Paris inner city. It’s true though that I had a massive crush on her and...
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    Comments

    Pascal Derrien
    12/11/2016 #30 Pascal Derrien
    #29 thanks for dropping by @Lisa Gallagher, in fact there were herd of dogs who had not been fed to a point that in desperation some groups made a few attempts to hop or climb on the truck ☺
    Lisa Gallagher
    12/11/2016 #29 Lisa Gallagher
    It's a good think your mom believed you... or at least she wanted to believe you instead of worrying sick if you were out doing anything other than being a nice boy with your love! How scary that must have been. Your life is unfolding through your stories, love it. Can you explain the dog reference? Were you inferring "Nora" had dogs lol? Thanks for sharing @Pascal Derrien
    Pascal Derrien
    12/11/2016 #28 Pascal Derrien
    #27 thanks @debasish majumder , there were so many of them barking and not looking too friendly........ my nickname is Kat :-)
    debasish majumder
    12/11/2016 #27 debasish majumder
    disliking with the 'dogs' appears little obscure to me! otherwise the post is nice.thanks @Pascal Derrien for the share.
    Pascal Derrien
    09/11/2016 #26 Pascal Derrien
    #25 ah thanks @Ken Boddie :-) this puzzle thing is complicated and I dont have all the pieces yet :-)
    Ken Boddie
    09/11/2016 #25 Ken Boddie
    Another enticing piece slots into the Pascal Derrien jig-saw puzzle. We are just starting to see an image or two when the puzzle gets larger and the corners and straight edges are lost. And the title on the jig-saw puzzle box still remains a blur.
    jesse kaellis
    09/11/2016 #24 jesse kaellis
    #21
    From what I understand Ceaușescu outlawed birth control leading to all these orphans. He was hanged along with his wife. Yeah, the nurses had no food to feed these babies, so they gave them blood intravenously as a nutritional substitute leading to the spread of HIV. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8427299.stm
    Pascal Derrien
    09/11/2016 #23 Pascal Derrien
    #18 Yes @Deb Helfrich I am unsure too they would have supported this I guess I figured out I did not need to ask for permission to live my life, now I am a father too and I am not sure how I am going to deal with this :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    09/11/2016 #22 Pascal Derrien
    #19 thanks @Franci Eugenia Hoffman Daytona is a place I have never been to even though I could today and there woiyuld be no need to lie by omission :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    09/11/2016 #21 Pascal Derrien
    Thanks @jesse kaellis , the orphanage stories resufaced a few years after the revolution took place it was and it is still a beyond shocking state of affairs :-(
    jesse kaellis
    09/11/2016 #20 jesse kaellis
    That's a great story, Pascal. A guy I was writing for asked me to ghost write book for his wife about the AID's epidemic there, the orphaned babies. She is Romanian, It never happened. I was reluctant. Intimidated is a better word. I thought it was beyond my scope. Great writing Pascal.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    08/11/2016 #19 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Quite an interesting story @Pascal Derrien. Some of my adventures would not have been approved by my parents and I got away with most of them. In my teens, I told my parents I was staying overnight with some girlfriends, which was true but we were all in Daytona Beach and not in our respective homes. As you mentioned in one of your comments, some of our adventures could not happen today.

    So I'm looking forward to more stories from our "regular guy".
    Deb Helfrich
    08/11/2016 #18 Deb Helfrich
    I certainly understand that period of not being quite honest with one's parents as they wouldn't have been supportive of my ventures. It is how I got to Paris, if I would have mentioned my intentions there would have been drama. They found out when I informed them to be looking out for my visa.... as I had plans for the summer. It was disappointing to be back at college in the fall of 89....
    Pascal Derrien
    08/11/2016 #17 Pascal Derrien
    #15 I indeed agree @Don Kerr probably make sense for the longer term :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    08/11/2016 #16 Pascal Derrien
    #13 indeed small world, I only measure now how risky or indeed borderline collectively foolish it was :-) There is a strong Romanian community in Ireland too and I always have a soft spot for them. I have been back to Bucharest in a professional capacity in 2007/2008 the city had changed a lot @Sara Jacobovici
    Don Kerr
    08/11/2016 #15 Don Kerr
    @Pascal Derrien Do the book buddy. I did one this summer for my boys that chronicled every day's activities with notes and photos. They're not even remotely interested at this point but in a few years I suspect they'll love it - or their kids will in decades to come when I am worm food!
    Sara Jacobovici
    08/11/2016 #14 Sara Jacobovici
    Another chapter in the story of @Pascal Derrien's life.
    Sara Jacobovici
    08/11/2016 #13 Sara Jacobovici
    How cliche can I get when I say, "What a small world!". Here I am on beBee reading your story when you could have been handing a parcel to either my Uncle, Aunt or cousin! Although I wasn't born in Romania, my first language is Romanian because both my parents were born there (Iasi). My mother learned French at school and because Romanian is a Latin language, when I was learning French going to school in Montreal, I was able to pick it up very easily. I learned about Romania and France's close ties from my mother. I was able to visit my family in Bucharest both during and post Ceausescu. We were glued to the TV and waiting hours on the telephone trying to make contact with the family in Bucharest. It was a very nerve racking 36 hours until we heard my cousin's voice on a very weak connection but letting us know they were safe, traumatized by being too close to the action, but safe. So I owe you a big thank you @Pascal Derrien for putting yourself at risk to help my family!
    Laura Mikolaitis
    08/11/2016 #12 Laura Mikolaitis
    #11 I think that would be a great gift for your kids and a compelling book to read as well.
    Pascal Derrien
    08/11/2016 #11 Pascal Derrien
    #8 thanks @Laura Mikolaitis for following the chronicles of a regular guy :-) I think I may end up compiling them and give them to my kids one day :-) unless beBee wants to sponsor me in the form of a book :-)
  11. ProducerAli Anani

    Ali Anani

    01/11/2016
    Pathogenic Thinking
    Pathogenic ThinkingLife is a full of conflicts. We experience conflict between new ideas and old ones, between the familiar and long-standing beliefs and the emerging new ones. We have conflict of interests. We have conflict between new strategies and old ones and...
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    Comments

    Ali Anani
    04/11/2016 #72 Ali Anani
    #71 And may be to stop all wars @Robert Cormack
    Robert Cormack
    03/11/2016 #71 Robert Cormack
    There certainly are a lot of wars going on inside us, Ali. You'd think that would be reason enough not to start wars outside of us.
    Joanne Swecker
    03/11/2016 #70 Joanne Swecker
    #61 A beautiful addition @Praveen Raj Gullepalli and one worthy of practicing. I'm reminded that for years mediatation was the boat I used to make my way across the river, but once crossed the boat became non-essential.
    Joanne Swecker
    03/11/2016 #69 Joanne Swecker
    #58 Your creative mind plants seeds in fertile soil dear @Ali Anani and I'm most appreciative for you and your open hospitality.
    Joanne Swecker
    03/11/2016 #68 Joanne Swecker
    #59 Thank you @Sara Jacobovivi for the warm welcome. Consciousness and intelligence are synonymous for me. Asking the question where is intellignece, asks the mind for a point of reference and it is no where. When we use no thought to interpret it simply is here, present. The 'isness', we can say nothing about it.
    Sara Jacobovici
    03/11/2016 #67 Sara Jacobovici
    #61 #64 Thank you @Ali Anani for bringing my attention the comment of @Praveen Raj Gullepalli. This is a comment that I need to be with and will look forward to sharing my "thoughts".
    Ali Anani
    03/11/2016 #66 Ali Anani
    #65 Simply, you are an amazing human dear @Praveen Raj Gullepalli. Your enriching comments reveal your great passion for others.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    03/11/2016 #65 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #63 It is a privilege to be connected with such evolved minds and souls, ever curious and ever-searching for meaning and answers, in their personal and professional lives, the way I am, here on beBee. I have rarely seen such Intellect, Passion, Reason, Rationale, Humour, Grit, Satire and Wit showcased on one platform the way it is here. The pleasure is all mine Sir! Shukran!
    Ali Anani
    03/11/2016 #64 Ali Anani
    #61 Dear @Sara Jacobovici- you shall find this comment of dear @Praveen Raj Gullepalli so deep. Just this part shows its quality "Observing thoughts as they surface and get replaced by other thoughts is Awareness".
    Ali Anani
    03/11/2016 #63 Ali Anani
    #60 You are a "short-form communicator mostly", but extremely enlightening. You are a gift to us here dear @Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Ali Anani
    03/11/2016 #62 Ali Anani
    #59 I am on the look out for your feedback @Sara Jacobovici. I welcome @Joanne Swecker greatly as I have frequently exchanged comments with her on LI and she always amazes me with the quality of her comments and before that the quality of herself as a great and passionate human.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    03/11/2016 #61 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #57 Dear Joanne, just to add to your thoughts ...from some reading I had done recently. I share thus:
    Observing thoughts as they surface and get replaced by other thoughts is Awareness. (This is generally done by observing the Breath calmly in a sitting posture, with closed eyes). Being deep in thought, evaluating an idea, process or concept is Contemplation. Focusing mentally on a Thought form/idea/ sound is akin to Meditation. A great lot of importance is given to the breathing rhythm and frequency which resonates with our thoughts and even health.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    03/11/2016 #60 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #33 Jawad Bhai! Thank you for the kind words! Everyone we meet here on this platform connects us either to the past, the present or the future. And helps us Branch out. Take deeper root. As fractals. As forms. As ideators. As creators. As rationalists. Or otherwise - setting up a flow. To help us Grow. I get so distraught at the paucity of time! So much to share and catch up on, but I steal moments off and on to read, respond, participate and share the best I can. My beBee interface is almost always on through the waking hours. I am a short-form communicator mostly. I have been writing off and on through the years, but in short couplets, paras, even doggerel, that fits the thoughts. But I believe I can get into a blogging mode eventually.
    Sara Jacobovici
    03/11/2016 #59 Sara Jacobovici
    #57 #58 First, let me say how wonderful it is to see you on beBee @Joanne Swecker. Your comment is proof already of what a wonderful contribution you are and will be making to this site. Your comment is beautifully written and conceived. No less is the proof that it has inspired @Ali Anani. My gut/heart reaction to your comment Joanne is that you are introducing the concept of thoughts as an entity in and of themselves that can move in and out of our thought consciousness to be experienced but not owned. This inspires me to revisit Jung's collective unconscious and see how your insight/perspective fits in.
    Ali Anani
    03/11/2016 #58 Ali Anani
    #57 Not less even by one inch what your comments inspire me with dear @Joanne Swecker. Even though you meant thought and not though in the following extract of your comment, but it got my mind brewing We can experience a clear observation, in this clarity we are able to allow thoughts to come and go, we recognize that though is an appearance in and of itself."
    Joanne Swecker
    02/11/2016 #57 Joanne Swecker
    Thoughts on thought Dear Ali...Where are thoughts located? When we come from an expanded and open perspective we can direct our experience to what is actually here right now, instead of our attention being scattered in thinking. We can experience a clear observation, in this clarity we are able to allow thoughts to come and go, we reccognize that though is an appearance in and of itself. Thought thinks about appearance, about this and that. But in this openess we come to allow this appearance, coming and going. What is aware of thought is never absent and thought has no intelligence of it's own. I am continually and eagerly challenged to observe my thoughts by your thinking.
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/11/2016 #56 Lisa Gallagher
    #54 ha! Vacuum cleaners, i will have to remember that #
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/11/2016 #55 Lisa Gallagher
    #53 My daughter and I both sing in the car together, and we laugh at ourselves when ee make words up because we dont know all the words to some songs. Sure makes time go by faster and keeps the mind preoccupied
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    02/11/2016 #54 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #46 Talking of energy-drainers, yes, I have read about such energy-vampires and experienced a few thank you! ;) They could be anywhere, among friends, family. I guess they are not to blame, but you do feel all drained up, awry and tired after even a brief stint/conversation/chat on the phone with them. Ah but it is so much easier to ignore such vacuum cleaners on a virtual platform! :)
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    02/11/2016 #53 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #46 Dear Lisa, as long as you are on song it's alright! ;) Even if none else can sing-a-long! :)
  12. ProducerIrene Hackett

    Irene Hackett

    22/10/2016
    SURVIVAL OF THE WEAKEST
    SURVIVAL OF THE WEAKEST“Communities which are very strong, very rigid, that do not take into account the weak points of the community, the people who are in difficulty, tend to be communities that do not evolve.” And when they evolve, it's generally by a very strong...
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    Comments

    Irene Hackett
    16/11/2016 #79 Anonymous
    #78 So glad you enjoyed the message @Lisa Vanderburg - thx for stopping by and commenting.
    Lisa Vanderburg
    16/11/2016 #78 Lisa Vanderburg
    Wow. What a beautiful truth, that through weakness, we are strong - I applaud you @Irene Hackett!
    Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes
    05/11/2016 #77 Maria Teresa Redondo Infantes
    I like the nature

    blessing
    Irene Hackett
    25/10/2016 #76 Anonymous
    #75 Yes @Praveen Raj Gullepalli - a truth that may be necessary in practice for our positive evolution.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    25/10/2016 #75 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #74 Nature is telling us...through the birds...the bees...the trees...the fractals...the forms...etc...of the interdependence that is essential for both survival and evolution. Any development outside the frameworks of interdependence could only be called one thing - Cancer.
    Irene Hackett
    25/10/2016 #74 Anonymous
    #72 As we become aware of our same essential nature, we may also become aware of our interdependence. It may be one and the same concept.
    Irene Hackett
    25/10/2016 #73 Anonymous
    #71 Yes, that is an interesting title, especially for a young adult book! Fear is an important & necessary emotion - it prepares us, strengthens us in confronting danger. Issues can develop when we are imagining danger where there is no real threat before us, but the thought that there is!
    Harvey Lloyd
    24/10/2016 #72 Harvey Lloyd
    #67 @Irene Hackett These styled discussions always make me think of musical chairs. Everyone is focused on the music and the empty chair that is closest to them. Our society, through systems, have initiated and nearly perfected, the game of musical chairs. We focus on the media or social alignment, music and our ability to seek success and joy, the chair.

    Neither of these goals are bad, it's the game. I don't play within that circus. I don't require the music or reflection of media to find my peace and joy. I will have to say, a lounge chair and a umbrella drink is required to watch the game from a distance:)

    "Oneness" i don't believe is the same as interdependence. This may be splitting hairs, but interdependence requires me to understand your journey and how we might benefit from each other. Oneness means that i need to not only share the journey but also belief systems. In this you and i can't be one. This journey of oneness is reserved for our spouses. I can share a portion of others journeys and each can benefit for the time.

    Our answer for interdependence is a homogenized viewpoint that i feel is ground zero for some of our cultural issues. We are requesting oneness in our belief systems when this is next to impossible. We have all refined our systems from our perspectives and the journey has showed us wisdom. In this we are each unique, not one. We can all share a portion of a journey over time but we can't all live in a journey that has been homogenized.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    24/10/2016 #71 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #70 I remember reading Alistair MacLean's fiction through middle school...there was one bestseller called - Fear is the Key...the title kinda stayed with me. Fear can both lock as well as unlock doors. Depending in how we respond to it.
    Irene Hackett
    24/10/2016 #70 Anonymous
    #69 Well said @Praveen Raj Gullepalli. Taking that 'stand' is so powerful - it is that fear you mention that disempowers us - it takes courage to face it.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    24/10/2016 #69 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #68 True Irene. We all have our little "stories" and we are all challenged in some way or the other all the time! We can transfer strength, like knowledge, to the person next...just by standing beside a weaker person! It is just that most folks are afraid of lowering the guard in fear of exposing vulnerabilities.
    Irene Hackett
    24/10/2016 #68 Anonymous
    #64 Thank you @Praveen Raj Gullepalli, I'm glad you also found Dr. Le Pichon inspiring; I admire him so! My 'story' and my challenges are not uncommon, however. We are all challenged in some way or other, is it not so? A matter of degree and perception is the only difference. It may be that when the 'strong' considers the 'weak', it is the strong who is transformed. I appreciate your feedback Praveen, it is always a pleasure to hear from you!
    Irene Hackett
    24/10/2016 #67 Anonymous
    #62 @Harvey Lloyd. I agree whole-heartedly with your case for interdependence. The 'new age' talk about 'oneness' would appear to be something of importance in moving forward - even though aligning oneself with a particular thought group is not required - but awareness is. You have touched on the key message, "It will take individuals that stop listening to the chatter of what success is and realize that the person next to you is who needs to be successful. Building each other is the fractal answer to the time equation."
    Irene Hackett
    24/10/2016 #66 Anonymous
    #61 Thank you @Pascal Derrien, glad you stopped by.
    Irene Hackett
    24/10/2016 #65 Anonymous
    #60 Yes, @Aurorasa Sima, exactly - "inclusiveness is key".
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    24/10/2016 #64 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    A great soul - Xavier Le Pichon! Such a source of inspiration. So's your story and the challenges you have had to surmount Irene! The strong should neither ignore nor oppress the weak. It is their duty - not to gloat about their strength and build a following of loyalists - but use it to raise the others to higher strength and productivity. Transform the weak into the strong...and nothing can be more heartbreaking than seeing a strong man falter and fall. Not just literally. And wise are those who Rise, after the fall.
    Harvey Lloyd
    24/10/2016 #63 Harvey Lloyd
    @Irene Hackett, @Ali Anani and @Fatima Williams thank you for comments and more importantly thank you for considering a different perspective of direction. Our journey as humans is one of interdependence. When we accept this our eyes are opened to possibilities that otherwise didn't exist under dependence or independent. The transformation into interdependence cant happen until we register a strong set of core values that include the success of others.

    Without these values then we will remain either dependent on others success for our own or be the ones others depend. Ali has shown, along with your article here that nature is interdependent this why nature is our guiding light for existence. Nature doesn't have the emotions humans have (in General) so it/they don't create barriers to interdependence.

    Within interdependence we have to have faith. Or in today's language, trust. We have to believe that by serving others the value will be returned in a form that is self fulfilling and rewarding. When we transform from independent our feedback could force us to remain where we are. Courage is needed to keep moving forward. It took us a long time to behave ourselves where we are and it will take a long time to behave our way out of independence.
    Harvey Lloyd
    24/10/2016 #62 Harvey Lloyd
    #54 @Milos Djukic, If i could be so bold as to state, future society, not future leaders, will understand their true value within the scope of fractal math and leaders will become organizers of resources. The larger question is will we arrive at this conclusion through discourse or because of our need for survival? In this concept of fractals i believe that the series will be served regardless the outcome. So time is the elusive equation we all seek.

    Unfortunately we have behaved ourselves into seeing completed fractal elements where folks do not belong nor engage. IMO i sense that this is because we are being taught/shown that individually we are our own fractal within a vacuum. This vacuum could not exist if the societal fractal wasn't present. Until we see that we are all a part of the fractal math and play our role, then time will be the discussion. The fractal cant move forward without each of us participating. The illusion of individual success implies that time is moving, where in fact the fractal development for the next stage is at a stand still. Waiting for the individual to recognize their role in development.

    We all seek that great leader that will draw society/company/country together and serve the fractal math in this context. Those leaders are already present, you and me. No one person can take this responsibility. It will take individuals that stop listening to the chatter of what success is and realize that the person next to you is who needs to be successful. Building each other is the fractal answer to the time equation.
    Pascal Derrien
    24/10/2016 #61 Pascal Derrien
    My favourite part of the post is the New Kind Of Freedom paragraph.......
    Aurorasa Sima
    24/10/2016 #60 Aurorasa Sima
    #59 ❤️
    Thank you, Milos. In addition to my earlier comment to this wonderful post, I´d like to repeat an important lecture from this article: Inclusiveness is key.
  13. ProducerJim Murray

    Jim Murray

    21/10/2016
    Confessions Of A Soon To Be Ex-Torontonian
    Confessions Of A Soon To Be Ex-TorontonianI came to Toronto, by way of Fort Erie and Ottawa, in the late 1960s. Almost immediately upon arriving and getting a part time job at a discount department store called Towers, I met the girl who would eventually become my wife.I owe Toronto more...
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    Comments

    Jim Saelzler
    24/11/2016 #34 Jim Saelzler
    Suddenly remembered I hadn't read this, and I had to know the story under the headline I saw fly by on a busy day.
    Mary Pollock
    23/10/2016 #33 Mary Pollock
    Just flew in to beBee to check on things, Congratulations on your decision to move! (I see a REALITY kitchen sink in your future!) ~M
    Jim Murray
    23/10/2016 #32 Jim Murray
    #22 Thanks @Jerry Fletcher. Yeah. I wouldn't mind this at all if I could do away with the packing part of it all.
    Jim Murray
    23/10/2016 #31 Jim Murray
    #26 Thanks @Sara Jacobovici. You're right about that. My step mother worked down in the towers at that time almost once a week she would tell me about another company reclocating to TO.
    Jim Murray
    23/10/2016 #30 Jim Murray
    #29 Thanks @Renée Cormier. Yeah we times the ride from St Kitts to Burlington.. It's was just 20 minutes. I can't even get across TO in twice that time. We just had out house inspection today. Just a little bit of wiring to deal with. Not too shabby.
    Renée Cormier
    23/10/2016 #29 Renée Cormier
    Well I'm not too disappointed, Jim. You'll be coffee distance from me in Burlington!, which as you may know, is an adorable little city on Lake Ontario and the beautiful Niagara Escarpment. :) Best of luck, Jim.
    Phil Friedman
    22/10/2016 #28 Phil Friedman
    #26 Sara, I lived and worked in Canada during the height of the PQ, and I always laughed when some of the academics in its upper ranks spoke of secession and joining the U.S., where their minority French rights and aspirations would be better treated. For only ivory tower academics could be so idiotic in their world view. No, check that. I think we've seen that exceeded in the current U.S.presidential election campaign by the bad comb over and the orange skin. Cheers!
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/10/2016 #27 Sara Jacobovici
    @Jim Murray tells a good story worth reading.
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/10/2016 #26 Sara Jacobovici
    Loved reading your story @Jim Murray. Especially since I lived in Toronto between 1984 and 2009. I have friends who live in every part of Toronto you mention. I have visited St. Catherines and spent much time in the wine country. It is not just that which made the read so enjoyable. You are a true storyteller Jim, a great communicator. As @Phil Friedman said: "Best wishes to you and your wife for a very long, healthy, and happy stay in the new house. And cheers!"

    PS I moved to Toronto from Montreal. I have a little bit of a different perspective re Toronto's history and growth. One thing is that Toronto owes a lot to Renee Levesque (1968-1985) whose separatist party and government led to a huge move out of Montreal, not only of people but of businesses, especially head offices of international businesses, that changed the look of downtown Toronto.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    22/10/2016 #25 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Congrats, Jim. Nice looking digs.
    Jerry Fletcher
    22/10/2016 #22 Jerry Fletcher
    Thanks for sharing Jim. Somehow your personal tale makes you more of a communications pro to me. A few years back I made a similar decision and moved south of Portland, Oregon to what my friends describe as "where the sidewalk ends." Now, after a divorce and a daughter married and living on the other side of the continent I'm tired of knocking around in a five bedroom house so I'll sell in the spring and try to down size. Moving is never easy, but sometimes you gotta.
    Gerald Hecht
    22/10/2016 #21 Gerald Hecht
    #18 @Jim Murray and it has a beautiful saltwater pool...which probably partially explains the...lol
    Gerald Hecht
    22/10/2016 #20 Gerald Hecht
    #17 @Jim Murray I think I know too!
    Erroll -EL- Warner
    22/10/2016 #19 Erroll -EL- Warner
    Good luck. When I visit Canada for "Caribana" sometime I stayed in Scarborough and use the bus and rail into town. I know quite a few people living in Hamilton Ontario.
    Jim Murray
    21/10/2016 #18 Jim Murray
    #15 @Pascal Derrien. Yeah. it's gotten bigger and more jammed up with cars. There's also a lot more murders here than there ever have been. The real reason, beside a change is that our house is worth a lot more than the house we're buying. A lot.
    Jim Murray
    21/10/2016 #17 Jim Murray
    #16 Thanks @David B. Grinberg. Everybody keeps worrying about Trump becoming president. I never have. I have more faith in your country, and because I subscribe to the Good Old 80/20 Differential, you know what side of the he's on.
    David B. Grinberg
    21/10/2016 #16 David B. Grinberg
    Jim, are you sure this has nothing to do with the Toronto Blue Jays not being in the World Series? (lol). Seriously though, while I've never been to Toronto I've heard wonderful things about it. Plus, I figured if you lived there it had to be(Bee) good. Nonetheless, as I like to say: change is the only constant in life. With that in mind, Jim, it's St. Catharines today and Mars tomorrow (or in 10-20+ years)! Good luck with the move. Also, make some room for us in the USA just in case "you know who" magically becomes President and Americans must flee for greener pastures.
    Pascal Derrien
    21/10/2016 #15 Pascal Derrien
    Good luck with the move and all that :-) Have not been in Toronto in more than 20 years must have changed a lot :-)
    Gerald Hecht
    21/10/2016 #14 Gerald Hecht
    #8 @Laura Mikolaitis I heard about that ;-)
    Gerald Hecht
    21/10/2016 #13 Gerald Hecht
    @Jim Murray Maybe this will come in handy...🇨🇦 https://stcatharines.overdrive.com/media/1674919
  14. Phil Friedman

    Phil Friedman

    21/10/2016
    FALL IN WITH THE RIGHT CROWD. JOIN THE WACKO beBee HIVE. FIND OUSTANDING DIGITAL CONTENT ACROSS A BROAD RANGE OF TOPICS. https://www.bebee.com/group/worldwide-authors-conspiracyPhil Friedman
    Relevant

    Comments

    Phil Friedman
    21/10/2016 #6 Phil Friedman
    #5 Thank you Nicole and @Sara Jacobovici for supporting the Worldwide Authors Conspiracy as Wacko Author-Members. As you well know, the mission of www.wwaco.org is to find and share outstanding digital content on the web. We welcome not only writers, but publishers and discerning readers to join. There is a place for everyone who is interested in seeing the bar raised for Internet publishing. Wacko members are serious about that mission --- although never overly self-serious. Try us, you'll like us.
    Nicole Chardenet
    21/10/2016 #5 Nicole Chardenet
    Phil's right, you're known by the company you keep. I keep company with some pretty wacko people on beBee, and we're always looking for a few more good (weird) men and women :)
    Sara Jacobovici
    21/10/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    @Phil Friedman provides us with a great opportunity to connect and exchange.
    Sara Jacobovici
    21/10/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    Great idea @Phil Friedman. Great connection!
  15. ProducerLisa Gallagher

    Lisa Gallagher

    19/10/2016
    Her Life Wasn't Easy but She Prevailed- My Inspiration
    Her Life Wasn't Easy but She Prevailed- My InspirationTonight I read a buzz about Inspiration by Graham Edwards and his buzz made me think of others who've inspired me. The first person who came to mind was my mom.  Mom did not have an easy life, she grew up with a father who was an abusive Alcoholic...
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    Lisa Gallagher
    31/10/2016 #19 Lisa Gallagher
    #15 Great words to remember @Mohammed A. Jawad, thank you!!
    Lisa Gallagher
    31/10/2016 #18 Lisa Gallagher
    #14 Very blessed @Praveen Raj Gullepalli! My dad probably said something funny, he was so full of humor and such a kind and gentle soul. Thanks, I love this picture. My baby sister is missing from it because she wasn't born yet ;-)
    Lisa Gallagher
    31/10/2016 #17 Lisa Gallagher
    #13 I think she's laughing at me tonight @Donna-Luisa Eversley, I've been a blunder most of the day haha. Love the hashtags, so sweet!!
    Lisa Gallagher
    31/10/2016 #16 Lisa Gallagher
    #12 Thanks @Claire Cardwell!
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    31/10/2016 #15 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Aha...when you have a rewarding inspiration from your mom, I believe that's enough to make your life worthwhile! :)
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    31/10/2016 #14 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Not just fortunate but blessed to have a Mom like that dear Lisa! Her children have to be extra special! And that's one of the happiest family portraits I have ever seen :)
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    31/10/2016 #13 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @Lisa Gallagher your mom was amazing... Life can be quite hard sometimes, but it can show us the real heroes and how much they love us #supermom #daughterlove
    Claire Cardwell
    20/10/2016 #12 Claire Cardwell
    Thanks for sharing this @Lisa Gallagher - your Mum sounds like a really amazing lady!
    Lisa Gallagher
    20/10/2016 #11 Lisa Gallagher
    Thanks for sharing @Deb Helfrich
    Lisa Gallagher
    20/10/2016 #10 Lisa Gallagher
    Mom's start sure didn't predict the majority of her life, including her ending which is very inspiring. Love and hate are both choices. I'm glad mom had no tolerance for hate, we weren't even allowed to use the word hate in our home. Thanks @Deb Helfrich View more
    Mom's start sure didn't predict the majority of her life, including her ending which is very inspiring. Love and hate are both choices. I'm glad mom had no tolerance for hate, we weren't even allowed to use the word hate in our home. Thanks @Deb Helfrich, appreciate your comment! :) Close
    Deb Helfrich
    19/10/2016 #9 Deb Helfrich
    "Mom taught us that life is a constant lesson and when we stop learning, we stop living." Inspirational, @Lisa Gallagher, because of the honest truth that our start doesn't necessarily predict our ending. We do have the ability to choose, most especially to choose LOVE.
    Lisa Gallagher
    19/10/2016 #8 Lisa Gallagher
    #7 Hi @Renée Cormier, I could not agree more about my grandfather. As I grew older and heard the stories (too many offenses to list) I felt the same about him, "he's an evil man." He had 6 brothers who were all nice and not one of them were alcoholics. My mom's real mother fell down a flight of stairs and ended up with a brain injury and amnesia. He had her committed to a state mental hospital back then. She developed pneumonia and was pregnant with her second child. They tried to get a hold of him to have her transferred to the Cleveland Clinic for treatment and he was no where to be found. My mom showed me an add his own family placed in the paper looking for him (I just saw the clipping about 4 years ago). Anyhow, her real mom gave birth to a full term still born and died from pneumonia not long after the birth. He took off and joined the Army. My mom was sent to live with relatives in Florida. She told me she loved them and that was the only good time in her entire childhood. He came back when she was 5 years old with his 'new' wife and took my mom back with them. I'm glad my mom broke ties with him when we were younger, she did us all a big favor. Yes, we all get along like best friends, I feel very fortunate. Mom always felt fortunate to have 5 children that loved her so much and was able to give so much love back to all of us. Sorry this was so long but I'm glad you called him out for what he was, it's true.
    Renée Cormier
    19/10/2016 #7 Renée Cormier
    Such a beautiful family. You are lucky to have had a loving, caring and giving mother. Not all of us get to experience that. As for your grandfather; it has always been my belief that anything you do drunk you would do sober, if you only had the guts. Your grandfather was cruel at his core. Alcohol just made it easier for him to be his true self. I'm glad your mother found a loving family to be a part of and I am especially glad she did not choose to live her life in bitterness. She certainly raised a lovely lady (you) and I am sure the rest of your siblings have been well raised too.
    Lisa Gallagher
    19/10/2016 #6 Lisa Gallagher
    #5 Thanks for taking time to read this @Laura Mikolaitis and sharing! I was able to smile while thinking of the life she gave us as I wrote this :)
    Laura Mikolaitis
    19/10/2016 #5 Laura Mikolaitis
    "Mom taught us that life is a constant lesson and when we stop learning, we stop living. She taught us that life is more than just ABOUT us, it's about those around us." ~ A beautiful reflection on love and inspiration by @Lisa Gallagher View more
    "Mom taught us that life is a constant lesson and when we stop learning, we stop living. She taught us that life is more than just ABOUT us, it's about those around us." ~ A beautiful reflection on love and inspiration by @Lisa Gallagher. Here's to moms or to whomever inspires you. Close
    Lisa Gallagher
    19/10/2016 #4 Lisa Gallagher
    #2 @Pascal Derrien, You're too kind! I'm just an average person who makes her share of mistakes but thats how we continue to learn, right?! Thanks:))
    Lisa Gallagher
    19/10/2016 #3 Lisa Gallagher
    #1 @Vincent Andrew, it sounds like you had very positive role models in your parents too! Im glad I was able to let my mom know snd so very thankful gor her.
    Pascal Derrien
    19/10/2016 #2 Pascal Derrien
    everyday heroes are the ones who don't need to overly demonstrate they care for others, you are one of them @Lisa Gallagher so we thank your mom :-)
    Vincent Andrew
    19/10/2016 #1 Vincent Andrew
    Your mum is an inspiring person Lisa. Despite the setbacks she faced, she stayed positive and helped raise a kind and happy family. She put others' needs before herself. 'I don't think it was until I became a parent myself that I was able to honestly appreciate the life we were given.' I fully agree with this. I am really really thankful to both my mum and my late dad for their toils, encouragement and wisdom just to help us pull through life. Thanks for sharing this Lisa.
  16. Ali Anani

    Ali Anani

    18/10/2016
    Father and Daughter
    This is me with my daughter Satanieh. Is there a generation gap between us? Do my wrinkles tell my history like the rings on the trunk of a tree do? Do my wrinkles tell my age, my seasons and my memories? Does the shape of my wrinkles tell what were the easy times and hard ones in my life?
    My daughter is part of my history, the joy of my present and the hope of my future. The bright moments of the past brings joy to the present and aspirations for the future.

    The triad of time (past, present and future) mixes together while looking at this recent photo. Do I see my present or my daughter's' time? I wonder if time has a sense when we are with our kids!
    Ali Anani
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    Ali Anani
    23/10/2016 #24 Ali Anani
    #23 So that we could continue to live on... in them- you are incredible dear @Praveen Raj Gullepalli with your comment. Few words that pulsate with life
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    23/10/2016 #23 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Lovely picture dear Ali! When we see our children, I am sure that we are actually looking at our own future, that we create to leave behind! So that we could continue to live on... in them. Just thinking out loud on the spur of the moment...
    Ali Anani
    23/10/2016 #22 Ali Anani
    #21 Are you living with us dar @Fatima Williams- Honestly, you reflected the prevailing family sentiments in your comment. I am amazed bu what you wrote and its truthfullness
    Fatima Williams
    23/10/2016 #21 Fatima Williams
    Awww How did I miss this photo @Ali Anani Your daughter looks so so beautiful and this a stunning fantabulous picture of you two. She is much like you.
    All I see is a wonderful dad whose image, work and words are a gracious reflection of his kind heart and humble nature. You are the silver lining to beBee and thank you for sharing this photo with us.
    Ali Anani
    19/10/2016 #20 Ali Anani
    #18 You have a special place in my heart @Harvey Lloyd. Your comments fill me with all positive things in life. I love this from you "The wrinkles and gray hairs are the wisdom they brought to me when I thought I new everything. Their innocent nature showed this crusty bark what life is really about".
    Ali Anani
    19/10/2016 #19 Ali Anani
    #17 You beautified my day with your lovely comment @Vincent Andrew. Thank you
    Harvey Lloyd
    19/10/2016 #18 Harvey Lloyd
    Awesome photo. I couldn't be who I am today with out my daughters. The wrinkles and gray hairs are the wisdom they brought to me when I thought I new everything. Their innocent nature showed this crusty bark what life is really about. I look at you differently now @Ali Anani I know where your views of nature come from . You have raised a beautiful daughter.
    Vincent Andrew
    19/10/2016 #17 Vincent Andrew
    'My daughter is part of my history, the joy of my present and the hope of my future.' I share your sentiments @Ali Anani. Beautiful photograph!
    Ali Anani
    19/10/2016 #16 Ali Anani
    #15 Personalizing virtual relationship injects them with life. As you are like a sister dear @Irene Hackett it would be shameful if you don't get to know my daughter. Your beauty as reflected by your words is a source of energy for me. Blessed you are.
    Irene Hackett
    19/10/2016 #15 Anonymous
    Awww, this picture warms my heart dear brother @Ali Anani ! Your daughter has such natural beauty, to which I am not surprised! And in you I see no time - just present joy - thank you for sharing such a personal and important part of your life in this wonderful photo !
    Ali Anani
    19/10/2016 #14 Ali Anani
    #13 Thank you dear @Sara Jacobovici for expanding beautifully he triad of time and making it glorious with your emotional words
    Sara Jacobovici
    19/10/2016 #13 Sara Jacobovici
    The picture in and of itself holds much beauty and emotion @Ali Anani. When you add your words, it expands the triad of time. Thank you for this share Dr. Ali.
    Ali Anani
    18/10/2016 #12 Ali Anani
    #11 Beauty from the beautiful @Renée Cormier- thank you dear
    Renée Cormier
    18/10/2016 #11 Renée Cormier
    What a beauty she is! Such a nice picture of both if you.
    Ali Anani
    18/10/2016 #10 Ali Anani
    #9 Thank you dear @Javier beBee. I shared it because human emotions are global and exposing our family life makes the readers feel closer to the bees.
    Javier beBee
    18/10/2016 #9 Javier beBee
    What a beautiful picture !!!
    Ali Anani
    18/10/2016 #8 Ali Anani
    #6 I am glad the photo tells the truth and you are correct @Gert Scholtz
    Ali Anani
    18/10/2016 #7 Ali Anani
    #5 Thank you dear @debasish majumder and what I wrote was spontaneous with no preparation whatsoever. I do thank you
    Gert Scholtz
    18/10/2016 #6 Gert Scholtz
    @Ali Anani The love an joy between Father and Daughter is so clear on the photo. Thank you Dr Anani.
    debasish majumder
    18/10/2016 #5 debasish majumder
    what a grand connotation and analysis sir regarding time, the fourth dimension, yet the most prolific and euphoric revelation.! Great post sir Dr. Ali Anani, Phd. absolutely stunning, in terms of its magnitude!
  17. ProducerPascal Derrien

    Pascal Derrien

    18/10/2016
    Frozen Lives & Broken Souls
    Frozen Lives & Broken SoulsThe Berlin Wall fell in 1989 and by 1990 I had already made the decision that I would travel to what was called the satellite countries, I would go accompanied or not but I would go no matter what.Travelling on a low budget I found myself heading to...
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    Pascal Derrien
    21/10/2016 #41 Pascal Derrien
    #40 thank you for reading @Claire Cardwell
    Claire Cardwell
    21/10/2016 #40 Claire Cardwell
    Beautiful story.. Thanks Pascal Derrien.
    Don Kerr
    19/10/2016 #39 Don Kerr
    #37 Vous êtes la plupart de bienvenue.
    Lisa Gallagher
    19/10/2016 #38 Lisa Gallagher
    #26 So very sad, very @Pascal Derrien
    Pascal Derrien
    19/10/2016 #37 Pascal Derrien
    #36 Merci @Don Kerr :-)
    Don Kerr
    19/10/2016 #36 Don Kerr
    Right from the heart. So well crafted and so genuine. Sharing.
    Irene Hackett
    19/10/2016 #35 Anonymous
    #31 Yes, so true Pascal and @Phil Friedman; this truth always inspires me!
    Phil Friedman
    19/10/2016 #34 Phil Friedman
    #32 The stories that most catch our notice are the tales of extraordinary heroism, But truth be told, the majority of truly heroic effort and behavior occurs within the context of day-to-day life, and is instantiated by those who consider themselves "ordinary", but who will not accept what is for what should be. If humanity is to be saved, it will be by the "regular guys" with grit, who will do the job.
    Robert Cormack
    19/10/2016 #33 Robert Cormack
    Keep observing, Pascal. It's working for you. #32
    Pascal Derrien
    19/10/2016 #32 Pascal Derrien
    #30 @Robert Many thanks I think the stories are just the chronicles of a regular guy, now it is true I like to observe... :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    19/10/2016 #31 Pascal Derrien
    #29 @Irene Hackett you are very kind, it is not exceptional by any means many many people do this and much more .... :-)
    Robert Cormack
    19/10/2016 #30 Robert Cormack
    Great piece, Pascal. You've come a long way and you've observed. That's a talent in itself and I think it makes your stories very rich. Thanks for the post. I really enjoyed it.
    Irene Hackett
    19/10/2016 #29 Anonymous
    Wow, you @Pascal Derrien are what I call 'the REAL DEAL'. I praise you, you have put your heart and soul into compassionate action. This buzz has stirred me emotionally and made me know a deeper side of you which I admire greatly. And although this is an excellent story and written so well, it is what you replied in comment to Ken that speaks the loudest in this buzz: "I should help people broken down people getting back up again...... maybe a conversation or a smile means more than....." We need more of you in the world dear Pascal!
    Pascal Derrien
    19/10/2016 #28 Pascal Derrien
    #22 @Phil Friedman wow I am blushing here, not sure it is that good but a compliment is a compliment so thank YOU :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    19/10/2016 #27 Pascal Derrien
    #23 @Dean Owen hmm I could visualize the 4 packs when you mentioned that, the reality has no filters indeed :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    19/10/2016 #26 Pascal Derrien
    #24 thanks @Lisa Gallagher yes a lot of mental illnesses in the street, people not diagnosed or medicalized in any shape or form but it seems nobody cares in the end since my time on the street the drugs plague which was marginal enough is now the biggest problem :-(
    Pascal Derrien
    19/10/2016 #25 Pascal Derrien
    #21 Thanks @Fatima Williams it is evident to me that there is good will when facing adversity sometimes we are not as bad as we think as a specie but on the other hand we have a poor track record at showing it :-(
    Lisa Gallagher
    19/10/2016 #24 Lisa Gallagher
    A story well told @Pascal Derrien. It's so sad because many of the homeless people are mentally ill and from what I've heard, suffer from Schizophrenia. Yes, there are those who are homeless because they lost it all but those who choose to live in the streets through out each bitter winter, well it brings tears to my eyes. You saw it first hand and I'm glad you touched so many lives. I'm sure you touched more than you were ever aware of. Thank you for sharing, you have a kind and caring heart- it's very evident in your writing. Obviously I never knew Joey, but I echo your sentiments, RIP Joey and to all the "Joeys" who died homeless.
    Dean Owen
    19/10/2016 #23 Dean Owen
    You paint an unvarnished picture of reality Pascal. I am cheering for Bebel. And what a great initiative with the Marks and Spencer's leftovers. Their hot cross buns taste good even a few days after expiry.
  18. ProducerAnees Zaidi

    Anees Zaidi

    16/10/2016
    'Chinar Talks' is back
    'Chinar Talks' is backHi fellow Bees....I am back after over two months break. The break was very long indeed with no digital footsteps at all - no email, no browsing, no Facebook, no messaging. But yes, in addition to our (I and my wife) almost daily long walk along the...
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    Comments

    Anees Zaidi
    31/10/2016 #8 Anees Zaidi
    @Fatima Williams thanks for your sharing:))
    Anees Zaidi
    31/10/2016 #7 Anees Zaidi
    #6 Thanks @Fatima Williams for your lovely comment. I will definitely convey your message to little intelligent poetess. I am happy you liked the name of our grand-daughter. Now most of our evenings are filled with Aliza on Facetime.

    My best wishes to you and to your family.
    Fatima Williams
    31/10/2016 #6 Fatima Williams
    I just read this buzz @Anees Zaidi and this is a very smart little niece you have there ! I totally love the poem Opportunities are like buses Very clever :) Please tell her that she is a very intelligent poetess to be :)

    As for Aliza I love what her name means Joy and welcome her to our world with all blessings from above and I'm sure you had an amazing holiday.
    So we can wait to hear you now ? Are you looking for bitten guavas (winks)
    Anees Zaidi
    16/10/2016 #5 Anees Zaidi
    Thanks @debasish majumder, I am happy you enjoyed the post.
    debasish majumder
    16/10/2016 #4 debasish majumder
    after a brief hiatus, the post you rendered are truly refreshing and joyous Anees Zaidi. enjoyed read. thank you for sharing the post.
    Ali Anani
    16/10/2016 #3 Ali Anani
    As you wrote "true love has the habit of coming back" no wonder you are coming back my dear brother @Anees Zaidi
    Anees Zaidi
    16/10/2016 #2 Anees Zaidi
    #1 Thank you dearest brother @Ali Anani. I too missed all of you and the buzzing as well but I wanted to keep myself completely hooked off and give a full quality time to the family. I hope you and other friends keep doing fine during all this period. Soon I will catch up with the sweet honey produced in my absence. My best to you and the family.
    Ali Anani
    16/10/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    This morning I was about to send you dear brother @Anees Zaidi and to dear friend @William King a messages to enquire about your whereabouts. So, as I am reading this buzz I feel great and I say you filled my heart wit "Aliza" my goo brother. Congratulations on the arrival of Aliza with all the joy she brings with her. So happy to see you back and smell the fragrance of your mind. My day is Aliza
  19. ProducerDonna-Luisa Eversley
    A Tale of Two Women - Hillary & Kim
    A Tale of Two Women - Hillary & KimPrelude...I was eighteen when I had my first son. I did not know what it felt like to love someone unconditionally until I met him as he grew in my womb. He was born on November, 22nd 1987, the most beautiful baby boy the earth had ever seen.I had a...
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    Comments

    Jackie Pantaliano
    25/10/2016 #29 Jackie Pantaliano
    Brilliant! You've given me wonderful food for thought about my negative perception of Kim Kardashian. I agree with you completely about Hillary Clinton, and I love the comparison of Hugh Hefner never being judged negatively in the same way that female business leaders and politicians are.
    Pamela L. Williams
    16/10/2016 #28 Pamela L. Williams
    I loved your perspective @Donna-Luisa Eversley. Though I empathize with Kim's robbery experience I just can't find her 'business' as having a positive impact on society or the young women of today, which to me is just as harmful to women as anything Hugh Hefner has done. Just because it's women getting rich from the exposure doesn't change the negative stereotype is places on all women.
    As for Hilary, that is one strong woman, of that there is no doubt, I'm just not sure she is Presidential material. But if I have to chose between her and DT, I'm Hilary all the way.
    Antoinette Capasso-Backdahl
    15/10/2016 #27 Antoinette Capasso-Backdahl
    I don't agree with either candidate most of the time but that is what we are left with for our choices. Both are not quitters. Both have more in common than not. Now I recognize what I admire about you Donna-Luisa... Thank you for sharing.
    David B. Grinberg
    14/10/2016 #25 David B. Grinberg
    Belated kudos on sharing that personal story @Donna-Luisa Eversley. I'm reminded of that old saying: what doesn't kill us makes us stronger. I think going through adversity and facing immense challenges -- while no fun at all -- does in fact strengthen people's character, determination and steadfastness.
    I recall at the last town hall presidential debate, the last questioner asked each candidate to say something they admired about the other. Donald Trump sounded sincere, at least in this instance, when he praised Hillary for being a fighter and never giving up. I think all her past challenging life experiences helped to mold Hillary into the person she is today. And ditto that for most, if not all, people.
    And while it's terrible what happened to KK in Paris, one would think she would have bodyguards to protect her in public when she flaunting very expensive jewelry while playing games on social media. But that's just my 2-cents.
    Andrew Porter
    14/10/2016 #24 Andrew Porter
    #19 I must admit @Donna-Luisa Eversley I did see the buzz and thought it was going to be about politics which I try to avoid!
    As quite a few bees have said which I will reiterate I just cannot imagine what must have been going through your and everyone else's minds, how frightening for you all. and what a really moving piece you have produced here on bebee...I take my hat off to you for a remarkable contribution.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    14/10/2016 #23 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #17 😉🌹 🌷 🌼 🌸 💐
    Mamen Delgado
    14/10/2016 #22 Mamen Delgado
    My dear @Donna-Luisa Eversley, I confess I saw this Producer a couple of days ago but, as @Pascal Derrien has said before, I was so silly I didn't feel any engagement with the title neither with the two pictures on the top.
    I simply can not imagine what you were through in that night you have described, as a mother I don´t feel strong enough to try to imagine it.
    Your article is full of sensibleness and sobriety, as well as of emotion. The same emotion any human being can feel, because as you wisely say none is inmune or set apart from humanity in a life or death experience.
    Thanks so much for tagging me. Love you, dear being. 💞
    debasish majumder
    14/10/2016 #21 debasish majumder
    wonderful post madam Donna-Luisa Eversley! absolutely stunning! i wonder, how state sometimes act as a male and sometimes as a female! we have seen number of states where female at the helm, but the character of state remain same. there is no absolute masculinity or feminism. still, i believe, female are more compassionate and caring, as they can only endow motherhood. however, lovely post madam. thank you very much for sharing the post.
    Laura Mikolaitis
    14/10/2016 #20 Laura Mikolaitis
    Excellent piece, @Donna-Luisa Eversley. What a chilling recall of your experience. I can't even begin to imagine what it must have been like, but you paint a vivid picture that speaks volumes to your own faith, strength and resilience. I am sad to hear that you went through something so terrifying, but it seems in spite of it all you have found the grace within. You have crated and penned such a well-written piece here and opened eyes so that we can see beyond the media hype. It can be challenging to dissect the authenticity that is often overshadowed by the propaganda. In the end, both women are human beings - and as you have so eloquently pointed out - there's more than what meets the eye.

    You have brought to light some interesting perspective with regard to both Kim K and Hillary Rodham-Clinton. While I may not necessarily agree with or be a fan of either, what I will openly acknowledge is their perseverance and resilience. It takes a great deal of tenacity to be a public figure and both women have demonstrated these traits under some dire and heated situations. And for that, I give them credit. It's not easy to be torn down and ridiculed at every turn but they fight back where some might never find the strength to get up and keep going.

    Thank you Donna-Luisa for leading me to this. I did miss it's original posting somehow.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    14/10/2016 #18 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #15 Wow @Don Kerr... can I quote you? Thanks so much. Felt all sorts of happy emotions when I read your comment... showed off to my family :-)
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    14/10/2016 #17 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #13 Wow .. @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, thank you very much. I appreciate your feedback and comments. Its never easy sharing some things, but you make it okay. #worldbestcheerleader #bebeehugs Yes women have come a long way, and we keep moving forward, because we are #ablewomen
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    14/10/2016 #16 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @Dean Owen yes, it is traumatic experiencing any level of gun violence... does not go away , so we have to really try compassion when these things happen. Thanks for understanding! Appreciate your comment! #12
    Don Kerr
    14/10/2016 #15 Don Kerr
    If there were a hall of distinction for postings I would personally deliver this and hammer it on the wall. The best you have created @Donna-Luisa Eversley and one of the most visceral moving pieces I have read anywhere. Brill!!!
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    10/10/2016 #14 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Sharing in LinkedIn, Creative Writers
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    10/10/2016 #13 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    @Donna-Luisa Eversley, you just hit a homerun with this post. I agree with Pascal in that this is the best article I have read all week. I can't imagine how you endured the robbery but so glad you did or I wouldn't be reading this 5 star read. I am not a fan of Kim Kardashian but give her credit for making herself into a multi-million dollar empire. Hillary is a smart and gutsy woman and has endured a lot, as well. She seems to have the ability to bounce back and ready for the next hurdle. Women have come a long way and are making great strides but we still have a rocky ride ahead of us. It takes time and patience - and endurance to make the world a better place. Bravo Donna-Luisa and buzz on.
    Dean Owen
    10/10/2016 #12 Dean Owen
    I cannot imagine the trauma of being held at gunpoint. How horrific. Kim Kardashian - I have no idea who she is and had no idea she had been robbed. I empathize with Hillary for the fact that she had to deal very publically with a cheating husband. I have never thought "if Hillary was a man" but I have thought if Michael Moore looked like Robert Redford, he'd probably be heralded as an American icon. Weird world we live in.....
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    10/10/2016 #11 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #5 Thanks for sharing @Vincent Andrew
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    10/10/2016 #10 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #4 @Vincent Andrew thank you for understanding us women 😉...you have had the privilege to be surrounded by many females and you get to protect and love and care for all our hormones! The robbery was awful. I try not to think about it, and I guess I have not really laid it to rest. The feel of the gun remains, and my son is 29 next month. I was crazy about safety and security after that..sleeping lightly, keeping my home locked tightly day and night. Not opening windows, being obsessed with locks...took almost twenty years for me to relax. When one is robbed like that the physical things lost are nothing, it is the way your personal safety was violated, that, is a loss hard to recover from. 🐝🌸
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    10/10/2016 #9 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    #3 @Pascal Derrien ..geeze wow, haha...thank you my friend. It is actually the longest post I've written, in quite possibly the shortest time.🐝🌼
  20. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    10/10/2016
    Both versions; the embellished and the reality are worth reading (and the stories within the stories). The moral of the story is not new; everything you do counts. But seeing it in action is a great reminder.
    Sara Jacobovici
    Boldt Action
    www.snopes.com William Waldorf Astor rewards friendly hotel employee's kindness by making him manager of the...
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    10/10/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 Thank you for your comment and shares @Ali Anani.
    Ali Anani
    10/10/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    A moving story and I absolutely loved the lined buzz dear @Sara Jacobovici. If we plant very good seeds hey shall yield the best plants. Little and considerate acts may move mountains. The reward for kindness in this telling story is simply a great example of the butterfly effect of small acts ending in exfoliated results. I shared on three hives because the buzz moved me.
  21. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    07/10/2016
    Worth watching and listening to his story.
    Sara Jacobovici
    Dushun Wang
    www.youtube.com Dushun Wang an 80 year old Chinese actor-turned-model by trade featuring in Hollywood films such as he Forbidden Kingdom (2008), Detective Dee: Mystery of...
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  22. ProducerLaura Mikolaitis
    You're a Hero in My Eyes
    You're a Hero in My Eyes"There goes my heroWatch him as he goesThere goes my heroHe's ordinary"Foo FightersThis blog post is dedicated to my ordinary hero: my husband. A man who has filled my life with happiness and has made me laugh so hard my sides hurt. My soul mate, my...
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    Comments

    Lori Boxer
    13/10/2016 #42 Lori Boxer
    #41 You're most welcome. It was an honor to be let into your inner sanctum of emotions. All the best to you.
    Laura Mikolaitis
    13/10/2016 #41 Laura Mikolaitis
    #40 @Lori Boxer, thank you so much for such an enriching comment. I appreciate you taking the time to read this post and for sharing some of your experience here with us. It does seem that everyone, in one way or another, has someone in their circle who has fought the fight. What you say here is so true: "...It was they who motivated me and taught me what real strength is." I know I feel that way about my husband, and so many others close to us who have been down this road. I have a sister-in-law who has been battling cancer in all its various forms for over 13 years now. She's a fighter and I've learned so much from her and how valiantly she faces each new chapter. Thanks again for your contribution Lori, I really enjoyed reading your comments.
    Lori Boxer
    12/10/2016 #40 Lori Boxer
    Laura, your story conveys breathtakingly well when the power of love and a tower of strength meet, anything can be overcome. There's none among us who doesn't have someone (or 2 or more) in our circle of family or friends who has gone through the battles of cancer. For several years I was on the Board of Directors of the Cancer Support Community here in NJ. Once a month we had our evening Board meetings at the CSC facility where, simultaneous to our convening in the conference room, cancer 'clients' (those going through treatment and those who had successfully completed their treatment) would be at the in other rooms for various activities such as group therapy, yoga, drum circles, spin class, and so forth. Anyway, after a very long work day, and then a long board meeting, you'd think I'd want to get right home. I didn't. I looked forward to hanging out a while longer JUST SO I could chat with people before their class or as they ended, or just catch a cup of coffee in the kitchen with them. I say without hesitation that every single man and woman and teenager that I met through that experience were the toughest, strongest, most important people I have met in my life, bar none. THEY taught me about what fighting for something is all about. THEY taught me to really understand that a business problem I may have had during the day was insignificant bullshit. THEY taught me that the only 'fighting' with Steve (my husband) I should hope I DON'T have to do is to fight cancer together, and that fighting with each other is just a needless time suck. The point is: These people always gave me a dose of reality. Initially, I thought engaging them in conversation, perhaps to motivate them, would be good for them. Boy, was I wrong: It was they who motivated me and taught me what real strength is. So, I salute your husband because I know there is no stronger soldier, or one deserving of life, than one who's been to hell and back.
    Lori Boxer
    12/10/2016 #39 Lori Boxer
    Laura, your story conveys breathtakingly well when the power of love and a tower of strength meet, anything can be overcome. There's none among us who doesn't have someone (or 2 or more) in our circle of family or friends who has gone through the battles of cancer. For several years I was on the Board of Directors of the Cancer Support Community here in NJ. Once a month we had our evening Board meetings at the CSC facility where, simultaneous to the our convening in the conference room, cancer 'clients' (those going through treatment and those who had successfully completed their treatment) would be at the in other rooms for various activities such as group therapy, yoga, drum circles, spin class, and so forth. Anyway, after a very long work day, and then a long board meeting, you'd think I'd want to get right home. I didn't. I looked forward to hanging out a while longer JUST SO I could chat with people before their class or as they ended, or just catch a cup of coffee in the kitchen with them. I say without hesitation that every single man and woman and teenager that I met through that experience were the toughest, strongest, most important people I have met in my life, bar none. THEY taught me about what fighting for something is all about. THEY taught me to really understand that a business problem I may have had during the day was insignificant bullshit. THEY taught me that the only 'fighting' with Steve (my husband) I should hope I DON'T have to do is to fight cancer together, and that fighting with each other is just a needless time suck. The point is: These people always gave me a dose of reality. Initially, I thought engaging them in conversation, perhaps to motivate them, would be good for them. Boy, was I wrong: It was they who motivated me and taught me what real strength is. So, I salute your husband because I know there is no stronger soldier, or one deserving of life, than one who's been to hell and back.
    Lisa Gallagher
    06/10/2016 #38 Lisa Gallagher
    #16 @Laura Mikolaitis, you wrote with each other we find support, that is SO true! We will all face a time in our lives where we will need extra, loving support and likewise, we need (or shall I say), or should try to be keen to others when they may need us. Life sure comes with many ups and downs.
    Laura Mikolaitis
    06/10/2016 #37 Laura Mikolaitis
    Thank you John Rylance. We are believers in fighting the good fight, and so we do. Even when the fight knocks you down and knocks you out. Somehow we keep getting back up. "Out thinking" definitely has a lot to do with it and I am a firm believer in the healing power of the mind.
    Laura Mikolaitis
    06/10/2016 #36 Laura Mikolaitis
    #34 Thank you @Jim Murray. It's true what you said about "nobody ever thinks about it when they first start out together." I know I didn't and I'm fairly certain Paul didn't either. In fact, if you had asked me when we first got married, or at any point during the early years of our marriage, if we'd face something like that I would have shrugged it off. But we also thought we were invincible too. Little did we know. We are fighters that's for sure and he is also one of my biggest supporters. We've had many ups and downs, but we get through them together - because together we are strong.
    John Rylance
    05/10/2016 #35 John Rylance
    Being positive in these circumstances is hard, but as this post proves wel worth the effort. It underlines the thinking expressed elsewhere on "out thinking" something, in that case Parkinson's Disease.
    You might not as beat the problem, but it's better than just giving up. As the hymn says "Fight the good fight with all your might"
    Jim Murray
    05/10/2016 #34 Jim Murray
    Wow...that kind of courage and fortitude is hard to come by in this day and age. In sickness and in health. Nobody ever thinks about it when they first start out together. We all think it's just thrown in there for dramatic effect. But sooner or later it touches us all. You touched a lot of people with this story in both a scary and ultimately hopeful way. Your faith and support combined with your husband's strength were the keys to a good outcome.
    Rose Spot
    05/10/2016 #33 Rose Spot
    #19 @Laura Mikolaitis You are truly welcome, let's keep fingers crossed that scientists are finaly right on the target "cancer" everyday something new that give hope and cure once and for all...
    Laura Mikolaitis
    05/10/2016 #32 Laura Mikolaitis
    #27 Thanks @John White, MBA. I had to re-read your comment a couple of times because I was taken aback. Thank you so much! This was a close to my heart post and it's evoking more emotion in me as that day and night go on. I guess I didn't realize how much of an impact putting it down would have but I am so glad that I did. We all have stories that involve trials and tribulations...they are the links that make us who we are and bind us together near and far.
    Laura Mikolaitis
    05/10/2016 #31 Laura Mikolaitis
    #29 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, I don't know about being an amazing person, but thank you for your thoughtful and encouraging words. You have uplifted my spirits for sure. I have to say that my husband and I make a pretty good team even though we get on each other's nerves from time to time. We've seen each other at our worst and at our best and I couldn't imagine writing these chapters without him. And I'm glad that I don't have to. Thanks so much for reading and being a part of the conversation Franci, I really appreciate it.
    Laura Mikolaitis
    05/10/2016 #30 Laura Mikolaitis
    #26 @Aaron Skogen, I got the message - thank you. I just sent one back to you - I had to go compose myself for a bit. My eyes were sweating terribly. Lots of emotion is swirling around me tonight but I am so thankful for all of these wonderful contributions. Thank you for your continued support and encouragement. It means so much to me. I'm feeling so inspired.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    05/10/2016 #29 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    You are an amazing person, @Laura Mikolaitis. You endured and you never gave up your spirit. That spirit spilled over to your husband giving him the strength to endure all that he had to go through. You are both pillars of strength and I wish you both good health and happiness for many years to come.
    Don Kerr
    05/10/2016 #28 Don Kerr
    #21 love
    John White, MBA
    05/10/2016 #27 John White, MBA
    Really a great one, @Laura Mikolaitis. We have scheduled shares on 15 social media accounts associated with beBee. Keep on buzzin, Laura!!!
    Aaron Skogen
    04/10/2016 #26 Aaron Skogen
    #24 @Laura Mikolaitis you have a rather long message sitting in your beBee inbox. . . I would have had to written it in four parts to post here.

    I ended the message with this. . . "What I really want to say, is thanks for this today Laura. It was a gift to me and I sincerely appreciate it and I really needed the uplifting message today. Thank you!"

    You'll have to check your inbox to read the whole chapter.
    Laura Mikolaitis
    04/10/2016 #25 Laura Mikolaitis
    #13 Thanks, @Milos Djukic. I appreciate you taking the time to read, comment and share my story. I'm overwhelmed by the kindness going on here, and so glad that my words resonate on some level. Thank you again.
    Laura Mikolaitis
    04/10/2016 #24 Laura Mikolaitis
    #12 @Aaron Skogen, I look forward to you coming back...in whichever way you so please. Thanks for taking the time to read this...it was a very personal story to share and I had my reservations at first. But I'm so glad that I did it.
    Laura Mikolaitis
    04/10/2016 #23 Laura Mikolaitis
    #11 Thank you @Gert Scholtz. I appreciate your thoughtful comments and well wishes. It's definitely made us stronger on many levels. Here's to making the moments count!
  23. Sue Chien Lee

    Sue Chien Lee

    28/09/2016
    Compartiendo la cultura china

    “葉公好龍” (Yè gōng hào lóng)

    Esta frase se puede traducir como La adoración de los dragones de Yè. La historia es la siguiente:

    Erase una vez un noble llamado Yè, de quien se dice que estuvo vivo durante la época de los Anales de la Primavera-Otoño (春秋) entre los años 722-481 aC. La historia cuenta que profesaba su amor por los dragones con tanta claridad, que todo el mundo lo conocía como el de las ropas bordadas con dragones. Un dragón de carne y hueso había oído hablar de esto y fue a encontrarse con este amante de los dragones. Cuando llegó el dragón, Yè quedó aterrado por su intimidante presencia. El dragón, aturdido, le preguntó por qué estaba asustado, a lo que Yè respondió que sólo apreciaba la imagen del dragón, no la real. A partir de entonces, fue conocido por provocar el dicho popular: La adoración de los dragones (葉公好龍) de Yè. Cuando una persona dice que les gusta algo, pero en realidad sólo le gusta su imagen, o dice una cosa y hace otra, se puede utilizar este dicho, por ejemplo cuando alguien dice que “disfruta” del otoño. La emoción del otoño no es alegría, es tristeza. Por supuesto, todas las emociones son para ser vividas con moderación. La importancia de esto es que sirve para decir que es normal que uno sienta una ligera tristeza durante la estación del otoño. La sensación de una falsa alegría podría no permitir que el corazón descansara, lo que llevaría al agotamiento en invierno.
    Translated from Chinese by Dr. Chandler Stump (https://es.linkedin.com/in/chandlerstump)

    Source:
    Sue Chien Lee
    Sea Turtle Wellness |
    seaturtlewellness.com
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  24. ProducerPhillip Hubbell

    Phillip Hubbell

    22/09/2016
    Daddy
    Daddy"Greater things are believed of those who are absent." TacitusI didn’t know much about my father until I was 18 years old. I knew who is was, but his life was a mystery. I lived most of my life up until that point, where my mother was home with...
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    Comments

    Javier beBee
    27/09/2016 #5 Javier beBee
    @Phillip Hubbell thanks for sharing it ! :-)
    Irene Hackett
    22/09/2016 #4 Anonymous
    What a wonderful, honest account of real family life - quite an honor you shared it with us @Phillip Hubbell. Thank you!
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/09/2016 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    I am in awe of what we refer to as a "human being". The individual stories, and each of us has a story, never cease to amaze me. Thank you for your story @Phillip Hubbell; you have kept me in awe.
    Aurorasa Sima
    22/09/2016 #2 Aurorasa Sima
    It´s hard to comment on this one so that I will just thank you for sharing that story.
    Pascal Derrien
    22/09/2016 #1 Pascal Derrien
    What a story :-)
  25. ProducerPascal Derrien

    Pascal Derrien

    28/08/2016
    The Cave In The Basement
    The Cave In The BasementNovember 1978, somewhere in Brittany it is about 6.30 in the evening, it’s dark it’s cold and I am sobbing. I have some difficulty to come to terms or comprehend how I have ended up in the basement of the 5 storey building surely a 10-year-old...
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    Comments

    Pascal Derrien
    22/09/2016 #29 Pascal Derrien
    #26 thanks @Sara Jacobovici maybe it is helpful for some hopefully :-)
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/09/2016 #28 Sara Jacobovici
    An important story @Pascal Derrien. Well written and straight from the core.
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/09/2016 #26 Sara Jacobovici
    An important story @Pascal Derrien. Well written and straight from the core. I echo @Laura Mikolaitis' words, "...sharing our stories certainly offers hope and perspective. I'm glad that you shared yours here."
    Pascal Derrien
    30/08/2016 #25 Pascal Derrien
    #24 thanks @Laura Mikolaitis not sure originally I could or should write about 4 to 5 topics this year that were very personal, in the end besides the need to position it as a sharing excercise and not self pity it seems to have spoken to many if I judge by the overwhelming messages I got off line. Life is not perfect but great we only have one anyway so better get on with it :-) u just to get rid of excess baggage evrery now and again :-)
    Laura Mikolaitis
    29/08/2016 #24 Laura Mikolaitis
    Very powerful and personal story @Pascal Derrien. Thank you for sharing it. I can't begin to understand your circumstances and clearly it is something that caused you pain but your openness and ability to talk about your childhood experience here in this forum demonstrates your strength and character. It is clear that you didn't let your pain define you and instead have channeled it so that you can pave the way for others to feel more comfortable sharing their stories. None of us are immune to life's imperfections but sharing our stories certainly offers hope and perspective. I'm glad that you shared yours here.
    Pascal Derrien
    29/08/2016 #23 Pascal Derrien
    #22 thanks @Vincent Andrew your view point is extremely valuable and help put things in perspective thanks to you :-)
    Vincent Andrew
    29/08/2016 #22 Vincent Andrew
    What you went through is difficult, no make that very very difficult for any child Pascal. I am sorry you went through this but your story is also one of being in control of yourself at such a young age. Faced with adversity, you looked for solace in a place only you could call home. You found solace in your books. You also had some good times with your father when you played soldiers with him. Thank you for sharing your story.
    Mark Anthony
    29/08/2016 #21 Mark Anthony
    Dear Pascal , there may be many of us with heavy backgrounds and experiences due to the horrors of alcohol use however I don't think that makes one persons any less, or more,heavier than anothers. Each individual experience , I think, is unique and the impact it has is incomparable . Thank you for sharing this story as, for me, it is inspiring. #11
    Aurorasa Sima
    29/08/2016 #20 Aurorasa Sima
    #18 I agree with @Lisa Gallagher. Maybe if you could tag me?
    Lisa Gallagher
    29/08/2016 #19 Lisa Gallagher
    #18 For non-promotional reasons (and I mean this), please share them to my hive so I don't miss them @Pascal Derrien. I check my hive every day or two at the least. You are a very kind person and I'm sure your experiences shaped you for the better!!
    Pascal Derrien
    29/08/2016 #18 Pascal Derrien
    #17 actually @Lisa Gallagher you are right I have only scratched the surface on 3 to 4 articles maybe later...... thanks for your caring comments as usual :-) You are a great human being :-)
    Lisa Gallagher
    29/08/2016 #17 Lisa Gallagher
    @Pascal Derrien, thank you so much for sharing your story. I'm sure it's a story you don't share often because it's painful. No shame, just pain. I'm sure your story is much deeper than what you shared since I know someone personally who grew up with an Alcoholic dad and step mother who was both co-dependent and an enabler. I would hear one horrid story and possibly years later when I didn't think the stories could get worse, this person would let another story slip. Maybe that's half the battle, getting it out there and validating your own pain which is healthy. I'm so sorry this happened to you. I can't imagine the fear, I'm glad you were left alone (even though that had to be uncomforting too) in your 'cave,' your 'safe place'
    Pascal Derrien
    29/08/2016 #16 Pascal Derrien
    #15 thanks @Deb Helfrich my simple take is you are what you were and there is no getting away from it so you better incorporate it rather than shining away from it :-)
    Deb Helfrich
    29/08/2016 #15 Deb Helfrich
    You captured this nook of your childhood with such a vivid story that it seems to me as if I watched it unfold, @Pascal Derrien. Masterful memory-surfing. That knack for creating your own security has likely helped you make your own path one of clearing the brush for others.
    Aurorasa Sima
    29/08/2016 #14 Aurorasa Sima
    #12 You are allowed to suffer. Pain is not rational like that. Yes, it can help to put things into perspective sometimes. But even the compassionate ones - we´re selfish creatures and suffering because of the biggest current problem. That doesn´t mean we don´t care about others. There is a certain amount of "base" pain. We will not hurt double as much or half as much if something that can be rationally described as "double as bad" or "half as bad" happens. If a child gets veggies instead of the treat it was hoping for, it´ll cry as hard no matter if it´s least favorite or 10th least favorite veggie is being served. You don´t have to deserve to hurt by being the most hurt person in the world.
    Pascal Derrien
    28/08/2016 #12 Pascal Derrien
    #3 Thanks @Aurorasa Sima I am unsure it is courage I think people in Syria or any other troubled country have courage, I think it was driven by necessity maybe a bit selfish too, however I think I get what you meant so ... Merci :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    28/08/2016 #11 Pascal Derrien
    #4 thanks Mark I suppose I was the not the only one I am pretty sure others have heavier background but I guess we have a common understanding of how destruction function many thanks for the comment sincerely yours Pascal :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    28/08/2016 #10 Pascal Derrien
    #5 that's a thumbs up from the Chief Story teller himself many thanks Don @ @Don Kerr :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    28/08/2016 #9 Pascal Derrien
    #6 Indeed @Praveen Raj Gullepalli things settled when I was about 17 when i survived a car crash, he spent 20 years trying to mend the mess he had created we were kool I somewhat forgiven him but I cannot forget..... :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    28/08/2016 #8 Pascal Derrien
    #7 Hey @Cyndi wilkins this a very nice thing to say :-)
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