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  1. Geoff Molyneux

    Geoff Molyneux

    07/11/2016
    Sick and tired of being sick and tired ?
    For things to change you have to change from 4 people in a room 10 years ago with an amazing simple product backed up by 20 years of scientific research to now over 50000 franchise partners around the world inspiring healthy living and taking control of their own lives building their own online business from their mobile phones !
    Geoff Molyneux
    Team Rhino TV – Join us! Be more rhino!
    www.teamrhinotv.com
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  2. Kylie Bown

    Kylie Bown

    31/07/2016
    @Zack Thorn
    Kylie Bown
    'I was a zombie'
    i.stuff.co.nz Mum-of-two who took 92 codeine pills a day "constantly hid" boxes of...
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    Comments

    Zack Thorn
    31/07/2016 #1 Zack Thorn
    Yep....92 will have that effect....if it doesn't kill you first. Come to think of it, a person would need to be very determined to be an addict to get up to 92 alive.
  3. ProducerGary Sharpe

    Gary Sharpe

    07/06/2016
    Simple but Powerful Movement Recovery Method
    Simple but Powerful Movement Recovery MethodBased on the original concept by Deb Helfrich, we have created a guide to our gentle, but effective movement recovery methodology. First, here is an introductory video: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01G8UDFSY Our e-guide covers powerful techniques for...
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    Comments

    Joanna Hofman
    01/07/2016 #2 Joanna Hofman
    Gary, this is super... Deb's concept works and you have done it !!!!
  4. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    05/06/2016
    Trauma --- traumatic stress --- PTSD. The list is not extensive. It isn't expicit about adverse childhood experiences. June is PTSD Awareness month. There is a cure. Leckey Harrison
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    04/07/2016 #18 Leckey Harrison
    #17 I think one thing we've seen over time is that those who were violent and are in prison, had "hurt" at the foundation of their lives. James Gilligan wrote a book about it several years ago. The obvious presence of developmental trauma is clear: hurt people, hurt people. It doesn't mean all hurt people will, but just as clearly, sane healthy people don't. I think also we might see that even in icons, like Dr. Martin Luther King, that there were behaviors one would consider less than optimal. President Bill Clinton comes to mind. What prompts a man to commit adultery (a relative moral label), and then, to lie about it? If he was healthy in his relationships, would he have done that? If he were responsible, would he have owned it instead? Nothing is absolute, including the idea that hurt people, hurt people. When we look closely though, in my experience, it either happens via psychological hurt, and at the very least, self-hurt.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #17 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 I wonder who has studied the kids of abusive/alcoholic parents who haven't carried on the bad behavior. For another time, but aren't we all so glad to know that love can still conquer all? @Lisa Gallagher View more
    #11 I wonder who has studied the kids of abusive/alcoholic parents who haven't carried on the bad behavior. For another time, but aren't we all so glad to know that love can still conquer all? @Lisa Gallagher, @Rebel Brown, @Leckey Harrison, @Gerald Hecht @Dr. Allen Brown. Those who end up being loving, caring parents are definitely to be commended. ☺️ Close
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Not to pound it in, but here's an interesting animal study over 33 years of observation in 5 large families. Regarding infant abuse recurring over the generations: "Conclusions: This study provides the first evidence of genealogical effects on infant abuse in nonhuman primates. Several characteristics of infant abuse in socially living macaques suggest that this phenomenon could represent a good animal model for studying the etiology of child abuse and neglect." Reference: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213497000069
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 I did it again. Reference on comment below, #14 on the right side: http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/3/560.short
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Study results of almost 7,000 Indian men who, in childhood, had witnessed their father abusing their mother: "Conclusions These findings from northern India are congruent with those from other geographical/cultural settings in suggesting that witnessing violence between one's parents while growing up is an important risk factor for the perpetration of partner violence in adulthood." @Lisa Gallagher, @Rebel Brown, @Leckey Harrison, @Gerald Hecht, @Sara Jacobovici...
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Oopsies. Reference on my #11 comment: http://www.jsad.com/doi/abs/10.15288/jsa.2003.64.472
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Definitely worthy of a Buzz. Here's a 3-generational study of sons of alcoholics: "Results indicate continuity of aggression across three generations and also indicate that the child's pathway into risk for later Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) is not simply mediated by parental alcoholism, but is carried by other comorbid aspects of family functioning, in particular aggression. /☝️ The patient population here may be most important in picking 'the right man." ☝️ i.e., 'don't have kids' with an alcoholic man, esp if his parents were alcoholics. And grandparents, especially. @Lisa Gallagher, @Rebel Brown , @Leckey Harrison, @Gerald Hecht, @Sara Jacobovici...hmm.
    Lisa Gallagher
    30/06/2016 #11 Lisa Gallagher
    #6 @Rebel Brown, I have to agree with you that not all abused people grow up to be abusers. My mother was horribly abused yet she never abused us. She guided us with love. I honestly believe she got through life fantasizing about the life she would have once she got away from her parents. I believe she put her fantasies into action and we were very blessed to have had such a beautiful soul as a mother. I'm not sure what leads an abused person to abuse others but in many cases they don't repeat their own history. I have no stats so I don't discredit that this is a problem with abusers as well. I agree with not putting everyone into one category. This is a great topic and should be discussed. Thank you for tagging me too @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    30/06/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 @Sara Jacobovici: Absolutely agree that awareness is key. I have seen so many patients with this "generational" family abuse pattern...and the devastation inflicted on abandoned children as young as 15 yrs of age (have discussed with @Selim Yeniçeri, @Dr. Allen Brown, @Brian McKenzie, and more). I see the devastation, and have been both a battered wife and the wife of an alcoholic. So I've lived it, too. Please feel free to join my Hive: named "Invisible Illnesses: Child Abuse:" ( https://www.bebee.com/group/invisible-illnesses-child-abuse ). Also extending this Hive invite to @Rebel Brown, @Mamen Delgado, @Deb Helfrich, @NO one, @Ali Anani, @CityVP Manjit, @Leckey Harrison, and opened up to all. @Gerald Hecht, @Lisa Gallagher, @Kirstie-Sweetie Louise, too.
    Rebel Brown
    30/06/2016 #9 Rebel Brown
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Hey sistah. I havent been commenting here much because I have fundamentally different perspectives from most of the comments here, based on both my experience and my coaching clients, many of whom come to me to release the trauma of PTSD and move on with their lives, quickly and effectively.. They aren't abusers, I'm not an abuser and so assuming that the abused are the source of abuse is much too broad a generalization for me to comfortably accept. I know too many people who were never abused that are some of the nastiest abusers ever. Especially i today's world where the masses are being constantly programmed toward fear which then breeds anger and violence. But I wanted to thank you for tagging me.
    Rebel Brown
    30/06/2016 #8 Rebel Brown
    #7 I believe that generalizations are dangerous in their intent and result @Leckey, and that insanity and rage are often undetectable. Its certainly not only abused people that hurt other people. So saying all abused people hurt people is unfair in my world. But thats the beauty of our lives - we all get to have our opinions. Blessings...
    Leckey Harrison
    27/06/2016 #7 Leckey Harrison
    #6 It's not that it's a guarantee, Rebel. It is fairly common though. Hurt people, hurt people doesn't mean that it HAS to happen, but that healthy sane people don't hurt people.
    Rebel Brown
    27/06/2016 #6 Rebel Brown
    Well, as an horribly abused child (my therapists told me to call it what it was, torture), I'd like to point out that I've never abused anyone and have the opposite response to many of the assumptions here. I've worked with a number of abused women and men. None of them were abusers either. In fact, every one of them became exactly the opposite type of person. Loving, caring,going out of the way to be different than their abusers. As with all things, I suggest to clients that they not apply broad brush applications to people about anything. We are ALL unique in our mind programming, and we all deserve to be given the respect of a positive perception until proven otherwise. Negative generalized assumptions be gone.
    Leckey Harrison
    27/06/2016 #5 Leckey Harrison
    #1 Hurt people, hurt people. The cycle continues. An activated sympathetic system becomes the norm, and the emotions associated with it.
    Sara Jacobovici
    27/06/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    #3 Thank you @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD for bringing my attention to this update and its message as well as your comment. I will compact the complexity of the topic at hand into one word that is appropriate to the posting of: awareness. Imperative that we as a community are aware of the fact that traumatic events do take place and will impact on individuals as well as the community. That the impact can vary and to be aware of the signs and means to address those signs. Important that we use information and learning to treat each individual and individual situation with educated awareness and not preconceived ideas of what will happen, just what the potential of what may happen is and to ensure the support necessary for a positive outcome.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/06/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Sara Jacobovici, @Leckey Harrison, @Rebel Brown, @Randy Keho, @Mamen Delgado: In the continuum of the child who underwent child abuse, let us consider: (1) Phase I: The (abused) adult who underwent intervention(s) to mitigate their own precious salvation; (2) Phase 2: The newborn babies of the abused parent, who has no idea what is ahead of her/him after looking into their newborn's eyes with true Love; (3) Phase 3: The parent's potential capacity (and statistical likelihood) of inflicting mental, physical, and emotional harm onto their baby as (s)he grows; (4) Phase 4: Transformation to consider all human actions to be either (A) Love or (B) a call for Love. (5) Phase 5: Forgiveness. Please help me forward to other interested parties I miss here: @Ali Anani, @debasish majumder, @Mohammed A. Jawad, @Mohamed S, @Daniel, ..... thank you.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/06/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Also note and wish that child abuse was specifically mentioned, but would you agree: child abuse leads to the next generation of child abuse, etc....and perhaps it is these abused children that grow up to be abusive husbands and wives, with the mental issues becoming more dominant if not addressed at the time, i.e., in childhood, youth, or teenage years. Increased awareness for Teens & Youth may be a good strategy working towards a solution? Would love your insight.
  5. Sharly Sawant

    Sharly Sawant

    17/05/2016
    Sharly Sawant
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  6. Jim Cody

    Jim Cody

    27/03/2016
    Jim Cody
    9 Mental Habits That Will Turn You Bitter Over Time
    www.psychologytoday.com The way we talk to ourselves day-to-day greatly affects our emotional...
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