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Positive Parenting: Outside - beBee

Positive Parenting: Outside

~ 100 buzzes
"Can Johnny come outside and Play? Let's remember the day! Buzzing here and there....
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  1. Selah Leinwand

    Selah Leinwand

    17/08/2016
    Beyond Limits - Motivational Video
    Beyond Limits - Motivational Video ★☆★ FOLLOW ME BELOW: ★☆★ Website: http://www.Yourworldwithin.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Yourworldwithin Twitter:...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/08/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Thank you! Following you on Twitter! I'm @medibasket / https://twitter.com/MediBasket
  2. ProducerAmour Setter

    Amour Setter

    15/07/2016
    Why downscaling is the new black
    Why downscaling is the new blackWe live in a plastic world where everything seems to have become disposable. Surrounded by stuff we don't need, bought with money we don't have, we keep accumulating things to make ourselves feel more at home in the world. For many, having a lot of...
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    Comments

    Amour Setter
    24/07/2016 #53 Amour Setter
    #46 Thanks Bill
    Amour Setter
    24/07/2016 #52 Amour Setter
    #48 Thank you Leckey.
    Amour Setter
    24/07/2016 #51 Amour Setter
    #50 Thank you Richard.
    Richard Buse
    24/07/2016 #50 Richard Buse
    A wonderful post @Amour Setter. Thanks for sharing. Your ideas for downsizing are great. I am very much of a work in progress, but I've set aside 15 minutes per day for downsizing. That seemed daunting at first, but now every 15-minute session feels liberating.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #49 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 #1 #45 #34 Just coming back to muse the Comments through again. So liberating, as if each of us was stowed away in your luggage! And I really like your conclusion: "If you consider how stressful it is to manage a high-maintenance lifestyle and the associated health risks, it makes sense to think about downscaling." From a practical, medical point of view, you are absolutely right. Better to eat an apple than a box of truffles, any day.
    Leckey Harrison
    24/07/2016 #48 Leckey Harrison
    Done most of these. I prefer living in intentional community, which emphasizes, in our case, a lot of this. Not certain I could pack it all into a suitcase, but I've though about being a dharma bum on the road again. I'm likely to have another conversation with a different bee about communities for wounded people, who have identity issues and find relaxing very difficult on their best day. I teach people how to heal those wounds so they can, which then makes the possibility of downsizing and choosing an alternative way of living a possibility. I love this direction though.
    Bill Stankiewicz
    24/07/2016 #47 Bill Stankiewicz
    thx @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, hope you are having a great Sunday :)
    Bill Stankiewicz
    24/07/2016 #46 Bill Stankiewicz
    Nice post @Amour Setter, thanks for sharing @Gerald Hecht. It seems that at times, we baby boomers need to be sure we act as parents & not friends to our children. Many parents I see are trying to act as friends & do not want to say no.
    Gerald Hecht
    24/07/2016 #45 Gerald Hecht
    @Amour Setter thank you for this...very much
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #44 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #43 To be "a good Mom," we can't be "friends" with our children. We must teach them how to live in this world as caring human beings, showing them how to "Share" even as toddlers. There's no nice way to do some of the things we have to do so that we can let them 'fly the nest' and say we did our best. We are all just humans, and we learn so much in retrospect. One of the greatest mercies of being a Mom is that when our children grow up and have their own babies, POOF! they 'get' the epiphany that they were actually "mothered." And don't we raise our own children in the best ways that we wanted to be raised? They too, do the same with our grandchildren. They create and re-create the same universal motherhood, one with nature and love. For some who underwent child abuse or mental torture, there is still great pride in knowing that one becomes a good person either 'because of' or 'in spite of' our parents. As with down-sizing, it all boils down to the core: relationships, the little things, and the memories that we keep. All the 'junk' is hopefully lost to the memory or used to make us stronger. Sorry for my rant, but I know you were and are a great mom. Perhaps you just needed to know that today. :-).
    Amour Setter
    23/07/2016 #43 Amour Setter
    #42 LOL, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I'm definitely sure I wasn't always a great Mom, although I tried my best ;)
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    22/07/2016 #42 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #41 You did it all! I'm sure you were always a great Mom, too. It shows through and through. It actually shines.
    Amour Setter
    21/07/2016 #41 Amour Setter
    #40 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I definitely kept my children's baby photos. The photos are all securely stored away and I made digital copies of everything which I've stored in the clouds and also have albums on Facebook. The beauty of digital :)
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    21/07/2016 #40 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #39 Best to keep the sentimental pics, the baby shoes, I think. And make an album for the children to keep when they get married. Or when they run away from home, thinking that their life was so bad. "Stuff" can definitely send a message that is meant to be shared. Lovely, loving messages of tenderness and histories that need to be remembered...
    Bonaventure Chikamanzi
    17/07/2016 #39 Bonaventure Chikamanzi
    Sadly... keeping stuffs feels easier to do than letting go... But happily letting go feels liberating than keeping... Dicey choices to make indeed....
    Amour Setter
    17/07/2016 #38 Amour Setter
    #35 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, it's very liberating to get rid of excess stuff.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #37 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #34 ...and @Randy Keho, would that be with a baby blue ribbon on top of his head?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #36 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #31 WoW. What an eye-opener!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #35 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Just fantastic! Makes me want to have a garage sale or just donate tons this very weekend!
    Randy Keho
    16/07/2016 #34 Randy Keho
    I was at my happiest when I could load all my stuff in my car and head out. That was college. It would ring true today, 40 years later, if I hadn't bought a sports car. I could still do it, but my dog would be a bit cramped. Fortunately, he's a mini pinser. He could fit in the glove box.
  3. ProducerAnees Zaidi

    Anees Zaidi

    23/07/2016
    My name is 'Chinar' and I am a Tree
    My name is 'Chinar' and I am a TreeMy name is ‘Chinar’ and I am a ‘Tree’.A native to Persia, Italy, Belgium, America and Greece, I was planted on a large scale across the length and breadth of the Kashmir Valley by fourth Mughal emperor Jahangir during his reign from 1605 to...
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    Anees Zaidi
    26/07/2016 #58 Anees Zaidi
    #57 Dear @Praveen Raj Gullepalli another extremely beautiful and thoughtful composition. Amazing indeed. Many commentators showed interest about this paradise on earth and the ensuing conflict. You have marvellously described in your poem. Thanks for your fabulous contribution.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    26/07/2016 #57 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Spectacular indeed, the land and the tree! Dear @Anees Zaidi, here are my thoughts, inspired by your words! About those that would take, out of selfishness, pride and prejudiced hate, that which is neither's property...the paradise on Earth that Kashmir is...

    Take not that which belongs to
    another; even if by own decree;
    Find your own space under the sun,
    and let them all just be!

    Share what you need not,
    and let the others be fed;
    let not a single species on our planet,
    go extinct or go dead.

    This Earth belongs to no man,
    but the wind, the creatures and the tree;
    A Human is just a citizen,
    meant to be footloose and fancy free!

    Stake no claim over territory,
    Let the world be without any measurable boundary;
    The only things that divide us,
    should be the hill, the dale, the glacier or the sea.
    Anees Zaidi
    25/07/2016 #56 Anees Zaidi
    Dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD your profound intetest for the buzz, for Kashmir and it's people and your reading each comment with brilliant responses is amazing. The Chinar Tree is overwhelmed with your love and affection. It is preparing itself to speak more on Kashmir valley, it's people, flora and fauna, magnificent landscapes covered with snow and it's sufferings as well. As Chinar speaks language of breeze it needs some time to make it understandable by us. Thanks for sharing and spreading Chinar breeze widely.
    Anees Zaidi
    25/07/2016 #55 Anees Zaidi
    #51 Dear @Mohammed A. Jawad this is the narrative tale from the beautiful plant. I have given only words understood by us as plants have their own language which,alas, we don't understand/listen.
    Anees Zaidi
    25/07/2016 #54 Anees Zaidi
    #50 yes @Nick Mlatchkov this beautiful gigantic plant is found in European countries as well.
    Anees Zaidi
    25/07/2016 #53 Anees Zaidi
    #49 Thank you @Don Kerr for your insightful comment. I am greatfull for your sharing and spreading the message. Much appreciated.
    Anees Zaidi
    25/07/2016 #52 Anees Zaidi
    #48 A good question @Ken Boddie. You prompted me to find the answer. Hopefully my next buzz will provide you few of their takes. In the meantime thank you finding time reading the buzz and liking it.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    25/07/2016 #51 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Aha...the reading goes as if we're hearing the narrative tale from the beauteous tree. Isn't every creation has a worthwhile story? But, we humans oft become negligent and reckless to take note of our marvelous Nature.
    Nick Mlatchkov
    25/07/2016 #50 Anonymous
    It's seen in other Euro countries as well.
    Don Kerr
    25/07/2016 #49 Don Kerr
    Chinar as allegory is wonderful @Anees Zaidi This is a lovely piece with a powerful message about change and protecting that which is precious (or should be) to all humankind. Am sharing in The Beezers Hive with pleasure.
    Ken Boddie
    25/07/2016 #48 Ken Boddie
    Your Chinar metaphor stirs the imagination, @Anees Zaidi . If these trees could indeed speak what takes they could tell.
    Anees Zaidi
    24/07/2016 #47 Anees Zaidi
    #46 such a profound comment @Lada Prkic. I also wish the trees could speak and tell their sufferings as well at the hands of mankind. Thousand of trees are uprooted every all day around the word endangering even our own existence. As I mentioned in one of my comment below I am thinking on writing my next buzz on these lines. Thanks for your interest and time to read and comment.
    Lada Prkic
    24/07/2016 #46 Lada Prkic
    I almost missed this post. Like @Sara Jacobovici said with her post title: “So many posts, so little time”.
    What a lovely post, @Anees Zaidi, and a powerful message too. You gave a Cinar tree your voice, but just imagine if trees could talk, we would have heard such moving testimonies of the suffering of the nations throughout the history. Like Cinar trees in the Kashmir Valley that witnessed the deadly showings, and Olive trees in the Middle East could tell us tremendous stories about bloody history in this cradle of civilisation.
    We would have heard similar stories all over the world, since the history of mankind is a history of conflicts.
    Anees Zaidi
    24/07/2016 #45 Anees Zaidi
    Dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD your speed and capacity is mind blowing. I have marked full day tomorrow in your name. In the meantime thanks a lot for so much attention and interest in my buzz. You are amazing.
    Anees Zaidi
    24/07/2016 #44 Anees Zaidi
    #43 Dear brother @Ali Anani I am very much here but holding my head with my both hands. I am crying for paucity of time seeking @Milos Djukic help on fractal and multi fractal time series and this amazing lady our freind @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD has read each comment on my post and has herself commenting upon as well. Not only mine but I see her everywhere on beBee with same zeal. I must take lessons from her in private if still she has some time left. Amazing indeed!!
    Ali Anani
    24/07/2016 #43 Ali Anani
    I ma amazed with your attention to almost all comments on this buzz. That reflects very positively on you dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. I have a feeling @Anees Zaidi is still without internet; otherwise he would jump on the wagon
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #42 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #21 Amen to the humanization of the globe, and questioning our role in being by-standers or activists. But I'm still not familiar with more insight on this, and I am feeling the beauty of Kashmir right now. My heart pleads to understand the tears, whether of joy or sadness. I am not afraid to know. #22 These are important issues for us all.#23 Worthy issue, so so worthy to understand different perspectives. #25 Your quotations keep my goosebumps going.#30 The rustling of the leaves echoes my wails in the wind. #32 #35 Don't the trees whisper in the shade, in the shadow of our dreams, "where all are one, and one is whole?" ~ Led Zeppelin, Stairway to Heaven: https://youtu.be/oW_7XBrDBAA ..."It makes me wonder." "The voices of the trees, and the voices of those who stand looking. And it makes me wonder...it really makes me wonder..."
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #41 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #17 I would love to see a Buzz on Kashmir, with the song by Led Zeppelin alongside: https://youtu.be/ZDwotNLyz10 , my fav version. "Let the sun beat down upon my face..." Your Comment is so worthy of a Buzz, I just can't say it enough, kind sir. Please consider gracing us. #19 All the more reason to discuss it more. Love the open points of view, great for those of us not familiar with the history as you both are. Love it all! Teach us! I really want to understand more about Kashmir. Conflict occurs from the time we leave the womb to take our first breath... I am envisioning that the caterpillar cannot be stripped of her cocoon as she struggles to get out, or she will die. If a surgical procedure is performed to free her of the pain of squeezing out of the cocoon, her lungs will not be squeezed of their water, and her resulting spongy wet lungs will cause her to die from suffocation. This has to tie in. Take off with it! Enlighten! You draw me in...
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/07/2016 #39 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 Sorry; just seeing this beautiful piece today, along with the accompanying goosebumps! #2 We all adore you and your humble nature so much, dear Dr. We hang on every word you say, and this dedication is yet another piece that goes down in the history of the mindfulness you create in us. What a grand teacher you are, to have a student inspired to excel in front of your eyes. Telepathy..yes, I believe in that. Pheromones, twin women having babies at precisely the same time...all these things are in the Great Mystery and Rhyme of life. #3 Ahh! "The Chinar Smile" indeed! I 2nd that motion! #5 I wish you could post a Buzz on that from your unique perspective...it would be folly for me (speaking for myself) to taint these works by reading them first! #7 seems to agree! #11 Yes, the best post, #12 embracing nature, parenting, changing of ourselves, and the beauty of each step. Much to behold, for certain, #35. Multidimensional writings led to multi-angular expressions, all beautifully valid. The piece has as much poetry in it as the Comments do, a true signature of a great writer.
    Anees Zaidi
    24/07/2016 #38 Anees Zaidi
    #35 Thank you @F.K (Koetloe) Ercan-Kocer for fabulous comment. I am happy you also have experienced the cool breeze under Cinar tree. You are right to call it old wise man/women. My Chinar tree has also spoken few wise words full of wisdom to end the story. Sharing of your Cinar experience is much appreciated.