logoSign upLog in
Psychologists - beBee

Psychologists

3K buzzes
Meet other psychologists and share industry updates. Share your experiences and find out about others. Find opportunities and connect with others.
Buzzes
  1. ProducerTracy Poizner

    Tracy Poizner

    24/04/2017
    Is Aluminum Destroying Our Daughters?
    Is Aluminum Destroying Our Daughters?What can make a beautiful girl want to stop eating, or to cut herself in secret? Naturally, every case has its own context and I don't mean to solve such a complex problem with a simplistic answer. What I am really asking is why more and moreΒ young...
    Relevant
  2. Louise Smith

    Louise Smith

    15/04/2017
    Louise Smith
    Relevant
  3. ProducerDebesh Choudhury
    Can We Survive without Social Media?
    Can We Survive without Social Media?We are so much engrossed with the Internet driven social media I just thought the other day if it so happens that the top social media such as LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook close their business. Then do we have other alternative platforms to...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Debesh Choudhury
    17/04/2017 #17 Debesh Choudhury
    #12 Thanks @Javier 🐝 beBee for your time to write a comment
    Debesh Choudhury
    16/04/2017 #16 Debesh Choudhury
    #8 I agree with your point @David B. Grinberg that social media is a "doubled edged sword" and I have read the "more FB more bad feelings" article from HBR you shared .. Thanks for joining
    Nilesh Dubey
    15/04/2017 #15 Nilesh Dubey
    Nice article .... I am 100% agree with this written post.
    stephan metral 🐝 Innovative Brand Ambassador
    15/04/2017 #14 stephan metral 🐝 Innovative Brand Ambassador
    50/50 l would say , let's toss a coin,
    Ross Hall
    15/04/2017 #13 Ross Hall
    Good grief. We might actually have to go back to ....

    talking to one another!
    Javier 🐝 beBee
    14/04/2017 #12 Javier 🐝 beBee
    @Debesh Choudhury thanks for your buzzes ! Let's keep on producing honey!
    Javier 🐝 beBee
    14/04/2017 #11 Javier 🐝 beBee
    Spammer removed !! 😎😎😎
    Bill Stankiewicz, 🐝 Brand Ambassador
    14/04/2017 #9 Bill Stankiewicz, 🐝 Brand Ambassador
    Great post today , I agree 100%
    David B. Grinberg
    14/04/2017 #8 David B. Grinberg
    Kudos on this excellent buzz, Debesh. You make great points and raise very relevant questions. I think social media is a "doubled edged sword" in that it can have very positive as well as negative consequences in terms of harassment and lack of direct human interaction on one hand, to connecting and networking with people worldwide on the other hand. Did you know a recent major study shows that the more people use Facebook, the worse they feel. Here's the article from Harvard Business Review https://hbr.org/2017/04/a-new-more-rigorous-study-confirms-the-more-you-use-facebook-the-worse-you-feel Like they say, everything in moderation. Keep buzzing Debesh!
    Debesh Choudhury
    13/04/2017 #7 Debesh Choudhury
    #6 @Lisa 🐝 Gallagher, I like the way you brought out altogether in a brief yet pin pointed comment. Life would become too robotic if we don't get out of the #SocialMedia and give some quality time with our acquaintances
    Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    13/04/2017 #6 Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    This is a very thought provoking article @Debesh Choudhury. With advancements in SM which iclude work we would lose our livliehood, and a lot of pertinent data including customers since we rely on social media in so many aspects. But, I think it is vital to go beyond SM as Sarah did and get to know people, keeping the human factor alive! Society could become too robotic if we only rely on technologyand leave the human element out.
    Debesh Choudhury
    13/04/2017 #5 Debesh Choudhury
    #1 Thanks @Milos Djukic for your support
    Debesh Choudhury
    13/04/2017 #4 Debesh Choudhury
    #3 Thanks @Donna-Luisa Eversley for your time .. I agree with your views that we would become more human.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    13/04/2017 #3 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @Debesh Choudhury..very good questions asked. I think many good things would be lost if the internet crashed totally. However maybe we would become more human again, and learn to speak with each other, find time to play together, and even rediscover life on a simple and more meaningful way.
    Ali Gouran
    13/04/2017 #2 Ali Gouran
    with this site : http://www.bestmarker.com/ ! No!
  4. ProducerSara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    13/04/2017
    "In Other Words"
    "In Other Words"Image credit: PinterestThe diversity on beBee is tremendous! Not only do I get to hear different perspectives that are expansive and enriching, but I also get to experience, what I consider to be, the same point being communicated in "other...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Milos Djukic
    17/04/2017 #7 Anonymous
    Thank you @Sara Jacobovici.
    Sara Jacobovici
    14/04/2017 #5 Sara Jacobovici
    #4 It pleases me to no end @Ali Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee to receive from you these generous "titles"; I love "idea bridger". Thank you very much.
    Ali Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee
    14/04/2017 #4 Ali Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee
    Linking two great posts with such ingenuity is a credit to all of you @Ian Weinberg, @Paul 🐝 Kearley and the "idea bridger" @Sara Jacobovici
    Sara Jacobovici
    13/04/2017 #3 Sara Jacobovici
    #2 Thanks for your very generous response @Ian Weinberg.
    Ian Weinberg
    13/04/2017 #2 Ian Weinberg
    Thanks for the mention @Sara Jacobovici your value contribution here on beBee is inspirational.
    Gert Scholtz
    13/04/2017 #1 Gert Scholtz
    @Sara Jacobovici Thanks for highlighting two very valueble posts by @Ian Weinberg and @Paul 🐝 Kearley. Two must reads.
  5. Louise Smith

    Louise Smith

    08/04/2017
    SO many apps
    Louise Smith
    Mobile technology for psychologists: iPHONE, iPOD TOUCH AND iPAD APPS FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS AND PSYCHOLOGY ENTHUSIASTS
    sylvainroy.blogspot.com.au
    Relevant
  6. ProducerIan Weinberg

    Ian Weinberg

    13/12/2016
    NeuroSurge - The cutting edge of wellness, performance and leadership enhancement
    NeuroSurge - The cutting edge of wellness, performance and leadership enhancementIn 1992 I pioneered an application based on the integration of the neurosciences with the developing science of psychoneuro-immunology (PNI) – the scientific study of the mind-immune connection. The application was driven by the need to identify...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Jared Wiese, 🐝 adds VALUE & RESULTS
    11/04/2017 #23 Jared Wiese, 🐝 adds VALUE & RESULTS
    #11 Thanks for the reply, Dr. @Ian Weinberg. Thought I had replied earlier, but I don't see it!
    I will definitely check out the perseverance and enhancing neuroplasticity book by John Pepper!
    Ian Weinberg
    08/04/2017 #22 Ian Weinberg
    #20 Thanks @Javier 🐝 beBee Happy to contribute to the buzz!
    Javier 🐝 beBee
    08/04/2017 #21 Javier 🐝 beBee
    By the way...

    This is great
    https://www.google.es/search?q=The+cutting+edge+of+wellness&oq=The+cutting+edge+of+wellness&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i59.853j0j4&client=ms-android-samsung&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8
    Javier 🐝 beBee
    08/04/2017 #20 Javier 🐝 beBee
    Really really interesting ! Many thanks for sharing it
    Ian Weinberg
    08/04/2017 #19 Ian Weinberg
    #17 No one that I know of in the US at this time applying this complete concept in a clinical/corporate situation @Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    Deb🐝 Lange, Brand Ambassador @beBee
    08/04/2017 #18 Deb🐝 Lange, Brand Ambassador @beBee
    Very interesting. Great that there are medical models like this to assist people. Amazing the research you have done. From my experience I agree it is when people reach about 40 that things may fall apart if they have not been reconciled before this time. I work in a different way, and I am having significant success with my work though our senses. People who have had intense trauma early in life have been able to 'heal", & nurture the pain that has paralysed them into limiting ways of living. I am finding what is happening remarkable. I have a partnership with 1:1 clients and we are learning and discovering groundbreaking methods through the senses.
    Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    08/04/2017 #17 Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    Very interesting @Ian Weinberg, do you have many professionals using this in the US at this time? Kudos to you for all the work/research and development you've accomplished.
    Ian Weinberg
    08/04/2017 #16 Ian Weinberg
    Thanks for sharing @David B. Grinberg
    Ian Weinberg
    08/04/2017 #15 Ian Weinberg
    Thanks for sharing @Milos Djukic
    Melissa Hughes
    15/12/2016 #12 Anonymous
    Thanks for the tag, @Jared! This is very interesting! #6
    Ian Weinberg
    14/12/2016 #11 Ian Weinberg
    #7 @Jared Wiese, 🐝 adds VALUE & RESULTS There's a lot of animal studies done where nurture was interrupted. This resulted in significant increases in cortisol levels in the infants which contributed to deprivation syndromes. Similar observations in humans - children in orphanages have very high cortisol levels and significant deprivation issues. One of my patients is a great success story in having markedly improved his Parkinson's disease without drugs (all his own volition) - on the basis of perseverance and enhancing neuroplasticity (growing new neuronal branches and connections). Try and get his book - his name is John Pepper. A great inspiration.
    Deb 🐝 Helfrich
    14/12/2016 #10 Deb 🐝 Helfrich
    #8 Two great questions, @Zacharias 🐝 Voulgaris. The aforementioned conditions are just personal examples. For Parkinson's specifically, it is a brain malfunction at the fundamental level, so talking about thinking is perhaps a radical, but not entirely off-base thing to try.

    In a very real sense, all healing has some component of linguistic exchange between a care-giver and a patient. A surgery or a medication may be provided after tests and lots of talk to pinpoint the problem.

    Our bodies are in charge of the healing process, not the interventions, and we have a lot of studies about the placebo effect - the belief is what does the work of initiating healing. And that is the arena of this part of Ian's work, when he isn't surgically removing brain tumors, for example.
    Deb 🐝 Helfrich
    14/12/2016 #9 Deb 🐝 Helfrich
    #7 @Jared Wiese, 🐝 adds VALUE & RESULTS - we should talk a bit. Part of why I may be useful is that I can bridge the gap between the scientists and doctor types. After all, I spent my business analyst career getting IT and HR to understand each other.... :)
    Zacharias 🐝 Voulgaris
    14/12/2016 #8 Zacharias 🐝 Voulgaris
    So the healing process is purely linguistic in nature? Also, does it cover all of the aforementioned conditions?
    Fascinating topic btw
    Jared Wiese, 🐝 adds VALUE & RESULTS
    14/12/2016 #7 Jared Wiese, 🐝 adds VALUE & RESULTS
    #4 As I've shared with @Gary Sharpe, I have Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) since a kid that got worse in my 40s. I now take medication that is for Parkinson's. Gary has done some incredible things, like specific music beats at bedtime and of course all the mental improvements to see some incredible results.

    Also, from the "deprivation of neonatal and infant needs", wasn't there an infant study where they specifically removed touch and babies started to die, so they had to immediately cancel the study?

    Very informative info! Thanks for all you have done and for posting this, Dr. Weinberg!!
    Glad it should help you too, @Deb 🐝 Helfrich. Sadly, a lot of this is over my head. But I sense more great buzz on the mind-body-health connection.
    Jared Wiese, 🐝 adds VALUE & RESULTS
    14/12/2016 #6 Jared Wiese, 🐝 adds VALUE & RESULTS
    Dr. @Melissa Hughes, you might like this!
    Ben Pinto
    14/12/2016 #5 Ben Pinto
    #4 Way to go, Deb.
    Deb 🐝 Helfrich
    14/12/2016 #4 Deb 🐝 Helfrich
    #3 I would be thrilled to take you up on this generous offer, @Ian Weinberg. I think it would add a lot to my work in understanding Parkinson's at the lay level and bringing the mental causes and effects to a wider audience. The beliefs and behaviors aspect of the full condition is woefully ignored in so much of the current discussion of what having PD is like and is one of the things that @Gary Sharpe has bravely been bluntly honest about from the start.

    With a tool like you have created, as a neuro-surgeon, maybe we can broaden the discussion in a way that will help people learn to have a better life, even if their substania nigra is not optimally producing dopamine.

    Thank you very much. I will message you my email.
  7. ProducerTracy Poizner

    Tracy Poizner

    08/04/2017
    Bach Flowers for Mother and Daughter
    Bach Flowers for Mother and DaughterBach Flowers are among my very favourite medicines because they are so very gentle but really effective. They are prescribed based solely on an emotional picture so they are very simple to use. Here are a few that I have chosen especially for...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Debesh Choudhury
    08/04/2017 #1 Debesh Choudhury
    I heard bach flower medicines in homoepathy .. are these available in raw forms?
  8. Flavio πŸ‡―πŸ‡΅ Souza 🐝
    Flavio πŸ‡―πŸ‡΅ Souza 🐝
    Scientists might have found the group of brain cells that respond to meditation
    grendz.com For centuries, people have slowed their breathing to calm their minds. For some of us, this takes the form of meditation or yoga; for others, it’s 10 deep breaths before a panic attack sets in. Regardless of what you call it, scientific evidence has...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    02/04/2017 #1 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Fascinating correspondence Flavio. Breath is the rope, the thread, the guide, the lead, the rein, the medium and the mainstay of our very consciousness. Different patterns of breathing can indeed catapult awareness into different frequencies and levels. Anger (and every other emotion) is characterised by a particular breathing pattern...and by controlling the breath you could easily control the emotion. Even depression. But all this has to be guided for it can destabilise some otherwise. Any prolonged anomaly in breathing is a reflection of disease, while moods coincide with breathing shifts from nostril to nostril.
  9. ProducerSonny Melendrez

    Sonny Melendrez

    01/04/2017
    The Weight of the Glass
    The Weight of the GlassAs the story goes, a psychology professor was teaching a stress management class in a large auditorium when he posed a question to his students. Picking up a glass of water, he began, β€œWho can tell me..” While everyone immediately assumed...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Sonny Melendrez
    06/04/2017 #9 Sonny Melendrez
    #1 You can do it, @Paul Walters!
    Sonny Melendrez
    06/04/2017 #8 Sonny Melendrez
    #2 Thank you Louise!
    Sonny Melendrez
    06/04/2017 #7 Sonny Melendrez
    #4 Indee, @Ken Boddie! Thanks!
    Sonny Melendrez
    06/04/2017 #6 Sonny Melendrez
    #5 You are so right, @Ali Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee. Thanks for your insight and kind words.
    Ali Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee
    02/04/2017 #5 Ali Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee
    A simple, but powerful story as it conveys the weight of stress on us if we carry it for prolonged time.If we hold the glass half filled with gen and tonic as @Kevin Boddie wondered, ten we might even be drunk much and be unable to hold the glass. If it shattered it might cause more harm. Thank you @Sonny Melendrez for sharing your lovely buzz.
    Ken Boddie
    02/04/2017 #4 Ken Boddie
    Love the story, Sonny. Now if that large glass was half full of gin and tonic, I know how I'd be getting stress relief. 🀣
    Louise Smith
    02/04/2017 #2 Louise Smith
    Great Analogy !
    Paul Walters
    02/04/2017 #1 Paul Walters
    @Sonny Melendrez Cool. Now I must remember to put that glass down !
  10. ProducerIan Weinberg

    Ian Weinberg

    26/07/2016
    Challenging Limiting Beliefs
    Challenging Limiting BeliefsMuch is being said about seeking and embracing authenticity. Implicit in this authenticity is a mind state free of Β limiting subjective beliefs and the identification and adoption of a universal objectivity, a connection to a greater truth....
    Relevant

    Comments

    Harvey Lloyd
    16/03/2017 #26 Harvey Lloyd
    "...and the identification and adoption of a universal objectivity, a connection to a greater truth. " This answers an earlier question i had asked on a separate post. If we are to change from our early narrative we will need the greater truth or something we see as larger than ourselves that we can push against and doesn't move.

    Great insights.
    debasish majumder
    16/03/2017 #25 debasish majumder
    Great and extremely informative post @Ian Weinberg! enjoyed read. thank you very much for the share sir.
    Devesh 🐝 Bhatt
    16/03/2017 #24 Devesh 🐝 Bhatt
    Now i get a scientifc explanation for some thoughts.

    Points of reference meant to transcend into a different scale often end up as borders of relevance not meant to be crossed.

    Thanks a lot.
    Ian Weinberg
    19/11/2016 #23 Ian Weinberg
    #21 @Donald 🐝 Grandy Used at the moment in rehab of stroke and head injured individuals. A similar application is being used in the neuro-coaching environment to move individuals from limiting beliefs into more resourceful mind states. That's about the limit of my knowledge on neuroplasticity applications right now.
    Gerald Hecht
    19/11/2016 #22 Gerald Hecht
    #20 @Ian Weinberg you are absolutely correct...the precursor to both subjective experience and objective knowledge (ethos and logos, etc.) is always out in front of us ...the only reality is us...where we "point ourselves" and then proceed...or fail to...Yeah it's easier when you're young...to a person who 1) was taught that Neuroplasticity "fades" with age (in the same chapter that discussed the "great developmental neuronal pruning" between birth and age five) ...and 2) actually "fell" for that "empirically derived fact" (from techniques, instrumentation, methodologies of the 1950's-60's)...internalized it and 3) transformed it into dogma ...which they now worship (have faith in)...
    Donald 🐝 Grandy
    19/11/2016 #21 Donald 🐝 Grandy
    Fascinating topic . Is there an application for this in the field of mental health?#20
    Ian Weinberg
    19/11/2016 #20 Ian Weinberg
    #19 @Donald 🐝 Grandy To both. More active in children and decreases with age. But the process is always part of our intrinsic function - never too old to learn and change.
    Donald 🐝 Grandy
    19/11/2016 #19 Donald 🐝 Grandy
    "the process whereby redundant neural circuitry is cleared and new connections formed" Can this process be applied to children or adults?
    Gerald Hecht
    25/10/2016 #18 Gerald Hecht
    @Ian Weinberg I think that as one reads through all of the comments --one realizes "wow; I read through all of the comments"...I tend to add a closing "whoa!"...but that's an idiomatic quirk.
    Leckey Harrison
    29/07/2016 #17 Leckey Harrison
    #11 It's the other way around, @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. As trauma heals, it allows for curiosity which requires a certain level of feeling safe and taking risk. A brain in survival mode won't do that. You didn't ask me but...

    Heller in his book "Healing Developmental Trauma," makes the comment that memory is the actual firing of two neurons. Essentially since memory seems scattered in the brain, and to re-capture it requires pulling from let's say the motor cortex, the olfactory and gustatory regions, and they all finally converge, the firing off that input in the last neuron is the memory. That's quite the thought, and some would say that the "mind" is the working of the brain. That "firing" is how I translate the "working."

    In Buddhism there is little distinction between heart and mind, heart meaning emotion. I haven't yet tried to parse out what that means in terms of William James' assertion that we feel because we move (I fear because I run from danger) not the other way around. There seems to be some credence in that from a vagal nerve aspect, I just haven't put the time into it yet. Buddhism doesn't quite emphasize embodiment like I've experienced, so there seems to be some relationship, as even to Buddhists there is Buddha nature, which exists after the corporeal passes on. I think they refer to it as consciousness. That part of me that can objectively look at my thinking process and thoughts, and indeed, be separate from them.

    What I call a material atheist, meaning one who denies there is any god(s), would deny anything called "spirit," "soul," or "mind," would say it's all electro-chemical. Partly due to biology, and partly due to the inability to prove the existence of non-material other and then claiming "it's a mystery."
    Gerald Hecht
    29/07/2016 #15 Gerald Hecht
    I@Ian Weinberg I don't know if you've given investigated Kessler's latest, FWIW, it continues to grow on me; it only came out a few months Sno and it's already dogeared and margin defaced. https://katesharpernews.wordpress.com/2016/03/20/book-of-the-week-capture-david-a-kessler-m-d/ #2
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #13 I knew you could do it! And you did ~ just awesome ~ I get it...thank you!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/07/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 #9 #10 Well, there's tons of energy, neuroplasticity, and great conversation going here, and I'll add, @Max Carter another esoteric question...because I would love to hear your view: What are the differences between the 'mind,' the 'spirit,' and the 'soul?' I've never really met anyone who could quite explain, but ha! perhaps that is the mystery that we are not to attain in this life. But I'm still curious! So curious to know more about how 'being curious' overrides the brain pathways to diminish PTSD, @Leckey Harrison, too. On another tangent, in 1979 & again in 2002, I raised my children without one jar of baby food. It made them 'different,' nutritionally, than all of their peers. Neither liked 'candy, soda' and such. And they both are great cooks because the 'taste' of homemade is so much more rich. So my point is that if we integrate the memory of smells of say, cinnamon rolls baking in the oven (a very potent smell from 1/2 block away)....then the reminiscences "come back" with this same scent. Much as the reminiscence of for example, music of the 70's bringing us 'back' to associate The Beatles:Mr Ed, @Gerald Hecht. Finally, patients with dementias like Alzheimer's must secrete 'happy high' endogenous endorphins when looking at baby pics, hearing certain songs, etc... it has been proven that reminiscence can halt the progression of Alzheimer's too....so Leckey, what role could reminiscence play as visual therapy (or literally re-visiting the same preschool park) for bringing a teen back to remember good times and be curious while walking in the same park? Oh so much lovely food for thought ~ you are all wonderful, such wonderful minds! And look where we got!
    Leckey Harrison
    29/07/2016 #9 Leckey Harrison
    great article, Ian. What I use as reference to early childhood is the ACE test, and of course www.acestoohigh.com and www.acesconnection.com are all about the all too pervasive child abuse and neglect. As I mentioned in my comment to @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD View more
    great article, Ian. What I use as reference to early childhood is the ACE test, and of course www.acestoohigh.com and www.acesconnection.com are all about the all too pervasive child abuse and neglect. As I mentioned in my comment to @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, it is my opinion that indeed, neuroplasticity is impacted by childhood traumatic stress. Peter Levine said in his little book, "Healing Trauma,: and David Berceli has said the same thing, trauma and curiosity cannot exist together. Curiosity returns when trauma begins to heal sufficiently. David told me that if I wanted to change the world, heal trauma. I've seen the fruit of it in my life, and in the lives of those I've worked with. My work is teaching others how to lift the physiological limit on positive change. Close
    Leckey Harrison
    29/07/2016 #8 Leckey Harrison
    #3 I want to take a crack at that re-wiring thought. Robert Scaer postulated that memories of trauma are "encapsulated." I take that to mean that with the emotional and physiological charge that the even held and was never released. That sets the stage for the brain, and as this article states, limits the ability of the brain's neuroplasticity. I think @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, in our discussion I brought this up, that trauma release (through TRE) acts as a polishing stone in regards to our encapsulated, frozen memories. It slowly tumbles them and takes the rough and ugly stone which we hold at arm's length, if not further, and slowly brings it closer. It has been my experience, and here I speculate, that when the body has finally discharged the energy around that memory, that the memory moves from implicit memory to explicit memory where it belongs. Now, it may be polished, but that doesn't imply it's beautiful. Not all of life is. What makes it beautiful is that we can acknowledge it happened, and that we released it and have moved beyond just being a survivor. For that teen then, if there were explicit memories of joy, then as the brain re-orders itself while healing from a traumatic/stress/survival state, then the portions of the brain that contain those memories come back online. The traumatized brain does not utilize the cortices very fully, the body is "lost" proprioceptively, and the hippocampi can lose mass and function due to elevated levels of cortisol.

    I will caveat here and say I haven't read Levine's book on memory so I could be completely wrong. Based on what I've read of Levine's other works, Scaer's works, and my experience in healing is how I derive this view.
    Gerald Hecht
    29/07/2016 #5 Gerald Hecht
    @Ian Weinberg, thank you, this an area of particular interest to me as well!!! #2
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/07/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 Great subject - the cascade of systemic inflammation. We know from Age Management Medicine that huge issues of heart disease, diabetes, chronic metabolic syndrome, autoimmune disease and cancers all can benefit from an anti-inflammatory diet. I haven't written too much on this, save for my 'Watermelon' breakout Buzz. But I've been waiting for someone else to enter this subject, and I hope we can continue this lively niche. Nitric oxide, flax seed, tumeric, hot peppers...oh, we shall be in for much great and good food for both thought and stomach. Looking forward to all.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 #2 Welcome to beBee, and love everything Neuro! I know we shall have great neuro conversations with you...Too much to say & will follow your fractal Buzzes! I am very aware (yet still superficially touching) your works masterminding an implicit plethora of insight on integrating wellness physiology, performance and leadership through mind state optimization. Ahh..neuroplasticity. Just discussed that with @Leckey Harrison. Most especially in your pioneer work on Applied Psychoneuro-Endocrinology (PNE), I have a special interest in the central endocrine system as affected by the pituitary gland, the autonomic nervous system (ANS), traumatic brain injury with diabetes insipidus (DI), and pure Perseverance. I also noted in 1979 that the skin:skin contact with my newborn baby sent shockwaves of 'high' as apparently (we know now) endogenous endorphines were released. I'm wondering about a child's psyche regarding development into an adult, with the damaging effects of parental alienation from divorce. How is it best to re-wire through neuroplasticity so that a teen will 'remember' her mother? I say this as I am involved with Robin Karr (I need to bring her into beBee) in The Motherless Child Project. We shall be learning from you in lots of dimensions, and if you get too tired or bored, please feel free to say! We need your keen mind to keep paving the way. Thank you for being here.
    Ian Weinberg
    28/07/2016 #2 Ian Weinberg
    #1 Thanks Gerald. Hopefully my profession will integrate some of the PNI components into its mainstream applications in the not too distant future. Time to transcend a very tired bio-medical model!
    Gerald Hecht
    28/07/2016 #1 Gerald Hecht
    @Ian Weinberg this information on neuroplasticity is so very critical on many levels now, I recall how early in my training, the "Standard Position" in Develpmental Neurophysiology was that "CNS construction" was complete by the time one reached the ripe old age of 25...,the recent data on the lifetime potential for plasticity, exercise induced BDNF release, endocannabinoid (CB2 Receptor) activation preventing rogue inflammatory cascades beginning with the typical first dominoes to fall (TNF-alpha, etc)... Offers much hope!
  11. ProducerElliot Caleira

    Elliot Caleira

    28/03/2017
    Unique Approaches in Reaching Troubled Teens
    Unique Approaches in Reaching Troubled TeensThe teenage years are often associated with difficult communication and a lack of understanding. One explanation for this is that adolescents feel as though others cannot relate to their situation. Parents and others trying to communicate with...
    Relevant
  12. ProducerM. Elliot

    M. Elliot

    19/03/2017
    Whistleblower. Government Mental Health Facility.
    Whistleblower. Government Mental Health Facility.FACILITY IN QUESTION: VENTURA COUNTY HILLMONT PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL. NOTE, I WILL BE CALLING IT "HELLMONT" IN MY MOVIE. MORE FITTING IN MY OPINION.DIAGNOSIS: CORRUPT, WIDESPREAD MISTREATMENT AND ABUSE OF INNOCENT PATIENTS. PATIENTS MERELY BEING...
    Relevant
  13. ProducerM. Elliot

    M. Elliot

    19/03/2017
    Letter to Obama. Includes Whistleblowing Activity and Diagnosis of Trump.
    Letter to Obama. Includes Whistleblowing Activity and Diagnosis of Trump.Important message: Time is of the essence. Whistleblower. Unknowingly infiltrated in 2 government agencies (education system and mental health) and Verizon Wireless. Evidence can be found on my LinkedIn page. Please help before it is too late. Trump...
    Relevant
  14. ProducerSonny Melendrez

    Sonny Melendrez

    18/03/2017
    How To Listen To Life
    How To Listen To LifeIn 1897, a musicologist and music critic for the New York Tribune named Henry Krehbeil wrote a book titled, β€œHow to Listen to Music.” Henry said it was for the β€œuntaught lovers of the art.”Perhaps, that is what many of us may be, untaught lovers of...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Sonny Melendrez
    19/03/2017 #2 Sonny Melendrez
    #1 You are so right, Siraj! You said it beautifully and life is, indeed, a "Kaleidoscopic effect." Thanks for your thoughtful words! ~Sonny.
    siraj shaik
    19/03/2017 #1 siraj shaik
    @Sonny Melendrez how wonderful are those three expressions "something to do, to love, to forward" without expectations in return. Every human truly like to hear and it's become a more customized inhumane nature to think what's for me. "Color of life is crystal clear, only upon variances of colors can be seen in depth" and "Life as a music, a choreography of the connections .. like the ways of rhythm, orchestra, chronology and symphony.. resulting in purposeful music (with time and more of customized cultured culture trending trends trend things become more of commercials)". The way I see it: Kaleidoscopic effect.
  15. Louise Smith

    Louise Smith

    13/03/2017
    What do you think?
    Louise Smith
    Study: Most People Have a Mental Illness
    blogs.psychcentral.com Few people make it to the age of 38 without experiencing some kind of mental illness, at least for a time. This is the conclusion of a study published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, which studied 988 individuals at various points in their...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Louise Smith
    14/03/2017 #2 Louise Smith
    Thank you
    What idea did you find the most interesting Robin?
    Robin Barton
    13/03/2017 #1 Robin Barton
    Great article!
  16. Joyce Redlon

    Joyce Redlon

    12/03/2017
    Joyce Redlon
    John Rosemond: Your kids should not be the most important
    lacrossetribune.com I recently asked a married couple who have three kids, none of whom are yet teens, β€œWho are the most important people in your...
    Relevant
  17. Louise Smith

    Louise Smith

    07/03/2017
    My clients and I are ordinary people.
    I help them.
    They accept ideas and tasks.
    They improve.
    I am happy and they are too !
    It's that simple !
    Louise Smith
    Psychologists are for 'every' Australian
    www.news.com.au Seeking psychological help should be as normal as walking into a doctor's clinic or like "getting petrol" for the car to keep it...
    Relevant
  18. Louise Smith

    Louise Smith

    04/03/2017
    Louise Smith
    Psychology News on Twitter
    twitter.com β€œYelp to Help People Find Gender-Neutral Bathrooms...
    Relevant
  19. Louise Smith

    Louise Smith

    04/03/2017
    The Turkey and Banana Myth
    Louise Smith
    Serotonin's Role in Depression and Willpower (and how to make more) - The Best Brain Possible
    www.thebestbrainpossible.com The neurochemical serotonin plays a key role in determining your mood and willpower. There are ways you can increase serotonin...
    Relevant
  20. Louise Smith

    Louise Smith

    04/03/2017
    It's amazing how many of my clients want to talk about this...
    Do we lose confidence as we age?
    Louise Smith
    How to Make Friends as an Adult
    www.psychologytoday.com As you reach your later years, making new friends can feel impossible. It's...
    Relevant
  21. ProducerLiesbeth Leysen, MSc. Brand Ambassador beBee, Inc.
    EMOTIONAL BANK ACCOUNT - Is your balance Positive or Negative?
    EMOTIONAL BANK ACCOUNT - Is your balance Positive or Negative?Imagine that you have dropped and broken your mobile phone, and find it’s going to cost you $200 to repair it.Your reaction to this incident is influenced by the amount of discretionary money you have in your bank balance.If you have a lot of money...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Claire L Cardwell
    08/03/2017 #16 Claire L Cardwell
    Great article @Emilia M. Ludovino! "Experience is not what happens to you – it's how you interpret what happens to you." Never a truer word has been said. Am sharing your article! Have a great day!
    Renata Jakielaszek
    01/03/2017 #14 Renata Jakielaszek
    "We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand." -Randy Pausch,Last Lecture. Best wishes Emilia M. Ludovino and thank you !
    Ignacio Gallo Campos www.ignaciogallocampos.com
    24/01/2017 #12 Ignacio Gallo Campos www.ignaciogallocampos.com
    Insightful, clear, simple and extremely powerful advice if put them into actions. Sharing your message!
    Brian McKenzie
    23/01/2017 #11 Brian McKenzie
    I un-banked when I left the States, I haven't had a telephone in 3 years, if I were to say I have any Emotional Account - it would have been unplugged too. Emotions, and pandering to them, are quite avoidable. We live in a six second world where 'Reality' is faked, scripted, produced ~ where you are an easily replaceable line item on a corporate spread sheet ~ where 'love' is transactional, temporary and disposable ~ where war is not only inevitable but routinely scheduled. Society is merely a herd of widgets - managed through the life-cycle wickets of eat, sleep, work & reproduce well teased with money and goaded with fear before you are shuffled of to the meat packing slaughter house.
    I try to keep my Apathy in check with doses of Indifference and Detached Ambivalence - I am rewarded daily for those efforts.
    David B. Grinberg
    21/01/2017 #9 David B. Grinberg
    As someone who prides himself on positive thinking -- despite naysayers -- I completely concur with your astute advice, Emilia. It's just as easy to think positively than negatively and view the proverbial cup as half full, rather than half empty. I wish you all the best and hope your cup overflows with positive life experiences.
    Lastly, for those who have a negative mindset as knee-jerk reaction, here's some recommended reading by the godfather of positive thinking, the late and great Rev. Norman Vincent Peale https://www.amazon.com/Norman-Vincent-Peale/e/B000APPE7E Keep buzzing in 2017!
    Sushmita Thakare Jain
    21/01/2017 #8 Sushmita Thakare Jain
    #6 Pleasure is all mine dear :) we are all here for each other
    Liesbeth Leysen, MSc. Brand Ambassador beBee, Inc.
    21/01/2017 #7 Liesbeth Leysen, MSc. Brand Ambassador beBee, Inc.
    #4 thank you @Emilia M. Ludovino! You are most welcome.
    Sushmita Thakare Jain
    21/01/2017 #3 Sushmita Thakare Jain
    Such a good read!
    Thank you for sharing. Will be sharing it ahead :)
    Jeet Sarkar
    21/01/2017 #2 Jeet Sarkar
    Good share madam @Emilia M. Ludovino! Thank you for sharing it.
    Liesbeth Leysen, MSc. Brand Ambassador beBee, Inc.
    21/01/2017 #1 Liesbeth Leysen, MSc. Brand Ambassador beBee, Inc.
    everyone should read this one, it is so good to know!
  22. Louise Smith

    Louise Smith

    02/03/2017
    If you are not aware of these Attachment patterns
    that you learn as a child from significant adults
    they can shape your life responses and choices
    positively or negatively.
    Louise Smith
    Attachment as Defense: How Trauma Shapes the Self
    www.goodtherapy.org Attachment styles, often impacted by early trauma, play an important role in relationships and interactions but also affect how a person relates to the...
    Relevant
  23. Louise Smith

    Louise Smith

    02/03/2017
    Can we really tell?
    Louise Smith
    What Depression Looks Like In Your Brain - The Best Brain Possible
    www.thebestbrainpossible.com A depressed brain looks like any other brain. Depression is just the routine activation of certain brain circuits which we all have in specific...
    Relevant
  24. ProducerIan Weinberg

    Ian Weinberg

    27/02/2017
    Humbled
    HumbledConnie presented to me in 1998 with a hopeless medical diagnosis of several brain and lung tumors, metastatic melanoma’s. She had by all accounts only a six to eight week prognosis. I managed to remove one of the brain tumors but relied on...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Ian Weinberg
    01/03/2017 #29 Ian Weinberg
    #28 Thanks @Emilia M. Ludovino And thanks for sharing your input.
    Deb 🐝 Helfrich
    28/02/2017 #26 Deb 🐝 Helfrich
    So much to say about this mind-opening 14 minutes of scientific inspiration.

    Anyone paying attention to their own life can find the snippets of memory that prove that their immune system is affected by their prevalent feeling-state - a malignant mindset accompanies physical dis-ease of all sorts.

    When it comes to health, I was dealt good genetics, but even more importantly, a mother who was a nurse for a pediatrician. I fundamentally believe that my body can heal itself, because she was very pragmatic, and unemotional about the relatively rare instances when I was less than healthy. In fact, once, I had a gash down my leg from a rusty nail climbing a treehouse not up to code and I remember sitting on the patio while she put in paper stitches. We didn't even go to the emergency room, just a routine visit to the doctor's office.

    Today, when anything goes wrong, I have a full-on grumble about the pain, and then affirm that my body knows how to heal. I listen to the pain and take appropriate courses of action to fix the source of the issue, rather than cover the symptoms.

    Something will eventually get me, but until that final situation, I chose to know that health is an abundantly available resource that I am in full control of.

    I am so grateful that you shared this story with the world, @Ian Weinberg. The word needs to spread like wildfire.
    Pamela 🐝 Williams
    28/02/2017 #25 Pamela 🐝 Williams
    Can't wait to watch this when I get home!
    Harvey Lloyd
    28/02/2017 #24 Harvey Lloyd
    #21 Thanks @Ian Weinberg, really enjoyed the recommended posts, they are keepers. Although it may appear with an agenda, it does not. I have always felt that a mentor or some other higher "master" would be needed for me to change. Certainly i can change small degrees, but i require that leadership of greater understanding from someone or something else to guide me.

    Your posts certainly illuminate areas of growth and understanding. @Gerald Hecht #18 is compelling in the seeking of a master within our growth.
    Ian Weinberg
    28/02/2017 #23 Ian Weinberg
    #18 Thanks for that @Gerald Hecht Yes we plod on and sweat and hopefully try and make this a slightly better place.
    Ian Weinberg
    28/02/2017 #21 Ian Weinberg
    #13 Hi again @Harvey Lloyd I've investigated and written extensively on the influences which come to bear upon us - from the maternal in utero environment, through the formative years and beyond. And yes, there are very powerful determining forces at play. The unfolding life narrative will determine many aspects of our later choices in life, behavior and beliefs and importantly, will determine our potential for change. The influences of our resultant 'consciousness' are also formidable - influencing our physical environments as well as our states of wellness or illness. I would refer you to 3 of my previous articles which collectively may provide you with a more comprehensive answer. See https://www.bebee.com/producer/@ian-weinberg/naked-consciousness and https://www.bebee.com/producer/@ian-weinberg/embrace-the-zeitgeist-and-transcend and https://www.bebee.com/producer/@ian-weinberg/the-neuroscience-of-change
    Gerald Hecht
    28/02/2017 #18 Gerald Hecht
    Yourself @Ian Weinberg, like Spinoza, Fechner/Dr. Mises...have "caught it"...thank you so much for sharing the glimpse...behind the curtain; also reminding us of how this practice, just because it's possible, doesn't mean that it's easy...the way the "coaches" who like to just spout out their casual "just breathe deeply/be mindful/listen to Metal with the tribal church leader MAKE IT SEEM! Thank you, again Ian.
    Ian Weinberg
    28/02/2017 #17 Ian Weinberg
    #13 Thanks @Harvey Lloyd I will need to ponder the point you've raised. Will get back to you a little later - got to run to do a surgical procedure!
    Ian Weinberg
    28/02/2017 #16 Ian Weinberg
    #12 Thanks @Deb🐝 Lange, Brand Ambassador @beBee I will indeed seek out your text.
    Ian Weinberg
    28/02/2017 #15 Ian Weinberg
    #11 Thanks @Lisa 🐝 Gallagher Aired in 1998. And yes, very much a preventive application
    Ian Weinberg
    28/02/2017 #14 Ian Weinberg
    #10 Thanks @Pascal Derrien and thanks for your ongoing inspiration.
    Harvey Lloyd
    28/02/2017 #13 Harvey Lloyd
    The mind is a powerful organ, if we can call it by such a simple name. Your post certainly raises the connections between well being and our thoughts/perceptions. I would ask though, does not the mind require a master to grow? In your discussion here you provided this mastery of understanding to assist the patient.

    Our thoughts become cyclical without a master to lead us out of the jungle we create. Your thoughts?

    Great post and appreciate your writing.
    Deb🐝 Lange, Brand Ambassador @beBee
    28/02/2017 #12 Deb🐝 Lange, Brand Ambassador @beBee
    Dear @Ian Weinberg fantastic - I have been writing and exploring this field for many years as well. So great to find another believer and visceral actor in developing new knowledge about our sensory-mind-body connections. FYI I recently published "Trust Your Senses - Embodied Wisdom for The Modern Age" https://www.amazon.com/dp/0995437203 - I look forward to continuing the conversation.
    Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    28/02/2017 #11 Lisa 🐝 Gallagher
    @Ian Weinberg How long ago was this video done? Very interesting to say the least. Can people practice this even if they don't have a diagnosis... what I mean is, will this practice possibly help to prevent? I'm a true believer in the mind/body connection. Kudos to you!
    Pascal Derrien
    28/02/2017 #10 Pascal Derrien
    I wish I could say something smart but let's agree to leave at that, thank you for all that you do :-)
    Gert Scholtz
    28/02/2017 #9 Gert Scholtz
    @Ian Weinberg This is ground breaking Ian. Actual evidence and proof of the mind-body connection - as pioneered by you years ago. Great to see our resident Neuro- surgeon on SA's longest running Carte Blanche television show.
    Ian Weinberg
    28/02/2017 #6 Ian Weinberg
    #4 Thanks @Sara Jacobovici for those very valid comments. Yes, the issue of 'blame' is very important and has to be dealt with very tactfully.
  25. Louise Smith

    Louise Smith

    26/02/2017
    More about colour From My Life Stuff
    Louise Smith
    Emotional and Psychological Meaning of Colours
    mylifemystuff.wordpress.com It can take a lifetime to understand the subtle distinctions among colour ranges, but just knowing the general meaning of each color will help you choose the colour thrust for the market you are...
    Relevant

    Comments

    Ali Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee
    26/02/2017 #1 Ali Anani, Brand Ambassador @beBee
    Colors have different energies. I enjoyed the buzz as I could see some relevance between meanings of colors ad their energies. Apparently colors have also different temperatures with some very hot, others mild and the rest cold to varying degrees. Thank you for this sharing @Louise Smith. Please note that I mentioned you in my last buzz on "Because I loved you so much I stopped loving you"
See all