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Stress - beBee

Stress

~ 100 buzzes
In psychology, stress is a feeling of strain and pressure. Small amounts of stress may be desired, beneficial, and even healthy. Positive stress helps improve athletic performance. It also plays a factor in motivation, adaptation, and reaction to the environment. Excessive amounts of stress, however, may lead to bodily harm. Stress can increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, ulcers, dwarfism, and mental illnesses such as depression.
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  1. ProducerPat Bagano

    Pat Bagano

    21/11/2016
    Ending Traumatic Stress Responses - Faster EFT
    Ending Traumatic Stress Responses - Faster EFT Understanding Traumatic Stress FasterEFT has a complete understanding that every individual reacts and records every single experience uniquely compared another. No two people are identical in this planet, even those who are exposed to the same...
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  2. Pat Bagano

    Pat Bagano

    14/11/2016
    Post-Election Stress consuming you? learn how not to be...
    Pat Bagano
    Outsmart Stress Caused by Post-Election Events - OutSmart Stress
    outsmartstress.com It seems like the election stress disorder is widespread across the United States. In fact, since the American politics have influence...
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  3. ProducerPat Bagano

    Pat Bagano

    08/10/2016
    Tapping Using Faster EFT is Becoming a Trend Among Entrepreneurs
    Tapping Using Faster EFT is Becoming a Trend Among EntrepreneursFaster EFT isn’t totally new. However, the approach that Robert G. Smith developed made a remarkable impact to visualization and positive thinking. More than just programming the mind, tapping using Faster EFT allows people to transform their...
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  4. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    10/08/2016
    Our next workshop will be right here in Langley on September 24th. Preceding discussion will be on Tuesday the 20th, and beginning on October 6 for those trained in TRE, a group shake every other week.
    Leckey Harrison
    Release stress and heal with TRE®
    www.eventbrite.com Sixty to eighty percent of visits to physicians are for ailments whose root cause is stress, but three out of four physicians feel unqualified to advise their patients about how to relieve it. Even if they knew how, doctors couldn't relieve your...
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    12/08/2016 #9 Leckey Harrison
    #8 You are very welcome!
    Lisa Gallagher
    10/08/2016 #8 Lisa Gallagher
    #6 Thanks @Leckey Harrison!
    Leckey Harrison
    10/08/2016 #7 Leckey Harrison
    #4 Execise helps with relief, Mohammad, to be sure. The body needs to release it though, and for some exercise enthusiasts, they create cortisol which does the same damage that stress does. In the case of depression, that would be a hypo state of chronic stress. I do however, like your point of patience. It is very important in any healing.
    Leckey Harrison
    10/08/2016 #6 Leckey Harrison
    #5 Clarification noted. @Lisa Gallagher, This link (http://traumaprevention.com/tre-provider-list) lists the only two that have registered with Trauma Prevention, which is the founders home site. You can also look in Ohio, and even then, it can be learned via Zoom, which means you would want a provider that resonates with you.
    Lisa Gallagher
    10/08/2016 #5 Lisa Gallagher
    #3 @Deb Helfrich @Leckey Harrison I did confuse it. Oops LOL. Lecky does anyone do TRE in my area (NW Pa?)
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    10/08/2016 #4 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Stress dangerously leads to depression; so, scheduled exercises, with passion for patience, will be a greater relief.
    Deb Helfrich
    10/08/2016 #3 Deb Helfrich
    @Lisa Gallagher just confused her initials - we did EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique) I agree, @Leckey Harrison - TRE is best learned initially via someone who has been certified. Although the basic principle is the same in both modalities - the body IS a sorely neglected pathway to healing what we've come to think of as solely mental health issues.
    Leckey Harrison
    10/08/2016 #2 Leckey Harrison
    #1 I would caution about learning third hand in that we certify trainers for a reason. Self-regulation that isn't learned from a certified provider is usually the issue. That's where TRE then becomes problematic.
    Lisa Gallagher
    10/08/2016 #1 Lisa Gallagher
    @Leckey Harrison, I skyped with @Deb Helfrich tonight and she taught me some basics about TRE. I'm going to practice it. Between reading your article and what she shared, I'm convinced it has to work.
  5. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    29/07/2016
    Come join as as we look at the relationship between stress and illness. Better yet, we'll teach you the body's natural tool to release it. Learn the revolutionary method that's a couple hundred thousand years old!
    Leckey Harrison
    Release stress and heal with TRE®
    www.eventbrite.com Sixty to eighty percent of visits to physicians are for ailments whose root cause is stress, but three out of four physicians feel unqualified to advise their patients about how to relieve it. Even if they knew how, doctors couldn't relieve your...
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    22/09/2016 #3 Leckey Harrison
    One seat left! Come learn an amazing and powerful tool to help heal in so many ways.
    Deb Helfrich
    29/07/2016 #2 Deb Helfrich
    I can highly recommend checking out @Leckey Harrison's TRE workshop. Just visiting his website has had a profound effect on me.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    29/07/2016 #1 Mohammed A. Jawad
    When we learn to persevere and be content, then it becomes easier to dispel stress through diverse, simple exercises.
  6. ProducerRichard Scott

    Richard Scott

    01/07/2016
    Fight Or Flight Or FAT – The Hidden Cause Of Weight Gain
    Fight Or Flight Or FAT – The Hidden Cause Of Weight GainDid you know that ‘stress’ is a major contributor to weight gain? It’s true. But how can stress make you FAT? How does stress make you reach out for sweets and cakes? A good starting point is to consider how many of us are emotionally...
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    Comments

    Stephanie Lamoureux
    01/07/2016 #5 Anonymous
    Great info!
    Richard Scott
    01/07/2016 #4 Richard Scott
    #1 exercise will most certainly flood your body with the feel good hormones as well as provide the distraction. Thanks for the comment .
    Richard Scott
    01/07/2016 #3 Richard Scott
    #2 great advice @Justin Thomas, the common sense approach is one that i always suggest first, before any further intervention. When the common sense doesnt seem to be followed or even implemented i have to look into deeper issues and/or secondary gain. Thanks for your comment. Much appreciated.
    Justin Thomas
    01/07/2016 #2 Justin Thomas
    Having a strong disposition when it comes to your eating habits can be tough. Personally, I don't go in for hypnosis, self or otherwise. When the change really does have to come from myself I just try to create the appropriate environment for myself to make that change - throw out the junk food, hobbies instead of the bar and keeping active. But I know these methods can be easier for some and harder for many . Interesting article., thanks.
    Jennifer Martin
    01/07/2016 #1 Jennifer Martin
    I find that exercise is the answer for me, when I go to the gym or take long walks I tend to lose all the stress. After exercising I stop craving any sweats or desserts. I agree, when I do stress with work I go for the cup of coffee and start adding cookies to go with it.
  7. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    25/06/2016
    I love teaching TRE®. Every body I encounter is different, and so working with all these variables to simply unlock the innate stress release/trauma healing mechanism is such a joy. I love watching people feel relaxed like never before. I love watching the light go on as they realize this is THEIR tool now.

    https://RaiseYourResilience.com
    Leckey Harrison
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  8. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    24/06/2016
    PTSD Awareness Month continues. This is why I call it a disorder. This is what PTSD does to the brain: it re-prders, and not beneficially, how the brain functions. This is the result of traumatizing stress, chronic or event based. Leckey Harrison
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    06/07/2016 #42 Leckey Harrison
    #41 One technique I use is a 5 second inhale, 5 second exhale, no break between, for 5 minutes. About three minutes in I feel the diaphragm shift and the next day my intercostals are complaining.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #41 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #40 You're right. Lots of my chronically ill friends/followers seem to get costochondritis, confirmed by pressing on the rib and reproducing the pain. Bet that has to do with the intercostal muscles between the ribs ~ that are not being properly used. Great insight here! Thank you.
    Leckey Harrison
    06/07/2016 #40 Leckey Harrison
    #39 You're welcome. In chronically stressed people, I can see that they're breathing never gets below the diaphragm. It can actually be a physical workout with aces and pains to earn to breathe deeply after years of not doing so.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #39 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #27 @Leckey Harrison: It may sound perfectly silly, but when we sing (I used to be in choir), we were taught how to expand the diaphragm and use "abdominal breathing" to project the voice. I only just got the epiphany that although I do spend much time bed-ridden, I wake up singing. So I'm just hoping that this should help prevent the lung from atelectasis and resulting pneumonia. The most common causes of death from dysautonomia are pneumonia, sudden cardiopulmonary failure, and respiratory arrest. So I think I'll do more singing, yes... 💙 Thank you for bringing up this point. 💙
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #38 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #35 @Ali Anani: Whatever your hands touch, prospers. So whatever you can know about this disease, dysautonomia...it will come to you in portions, as I live with it. Bed-ridden for 10 years now, I've done all I can to increase awareness....and that's the name of this 'game' of life. 💙 ( The "Invisible Illness," dysautonomia, is represented by the color blue. 💙
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #37 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #32 @Leckey Harrison: Absolutely; all the dysautonomias and their classifications continue to confuse physicians and patients alike. A good, short review is here: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/dysautonomia/dysautonomia.htm and there are Resources for adults and youth.
    Leckey Harrison
    27/06/2016 #36 Leckey Harrison
    #35 Ali, awareness is needed. The forefront of any movement is awareness.
    Ali Anani
    27/06/2016 #35 Ali Anani
    #34 This is a crucial issue. I am afraid that my role would be to spread awareness about it. I don't want to contribute much on an issue that I am not qualified to discuss. Thank you @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD View more
    #34 This is a crucial issue. I am afraid that my role would be to spread awareness about it. I don't want to contribute much on an issue that I am not qualified to discuss. Thank you @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD for giving me the opportunity to at least comment and hopefully raise attention even by 0.00001% Close
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/06/2016 #34 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #29 @Leckey Harrison, @Sara Jacobovici, @Dale Masters, @Rebel Brown, @Brian McKenzie, @Randy Keho, @Ali Anani, @Mamen Delgado: We all have reason to help now, and for the future of the family relationships to have love. And the confidence in hope 🏄🏼 .
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/06/2016 #33 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #28 @Dale Masters: We have seen many with invisible illnesses either die, attempt suicide, or commit suicide. I loved our "Gentle Giant" Matt so much...I'll do a Buzz in his memory.
    Leckey Harrison
    27/06/2016 #32 Leckey Harrison
    #31 It can also cause POTS. I have a client that is recovering from it, though it is a slow process.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/06/2016 #31 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #27 @Leckey Harrison, @Dale Masters, @Randy Keho, @Ali Anani: The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is dysfunctional with a traumatic brain or neck injuries. Sometimes, the brainstem can also suffer "mini-strokes" or "transient ischemic attack" (TIA), causing "Dysautonomia." Dysautonomia is my primary diagnosis affecting the entire ANS....and when I stand up, I faint. So do millions of others. Here's a short Eyewitness TV-Los Angeles video on 'Dysautonomia: https://youtu.be/-Blshb2RVMk
    Dale Masters
    26/06/2016 #30 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Actually, I think all four apply to me, esp. #2.
    Leckey Harrison
    25/06/2016 #29 Leckey Harrison
    #28 I can see that. had a similar fear: that I couldn't change. Happy to say I was incorrect on that assumption.
    Dale Masters
    25/06/2016 #28 Dale Masters
    #23 To be honest, my greatest fear in life is that I'll live 50 more years in pain.
    Leckey Harrison
    24/06/2016 #27 Leckey Harrison
    #26 I just trained someone, and I noticed their incapability to take a deep breathe that extended beyond the diaphragm. It's incredibly important in my eyes because that level of constriction is a sign of chronic traumatic stress. The system is so accustomed to short, shallow breathing, that when physical fitness is added, it still stays in the chest. It's the only autonomic function we have control over.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #26 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #18 Love your thoughts on the breath and width of the stress response, and the integration of the major "organs" or systems that are involved in resolving that stress. I really like your positivity, and your way of getting straight to the matter to actually Solve the problem. I'm all about Solutions, too. We'll see where we are, and I am looking forward to it all1
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #25 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #16 Excellent additional thoughts of spiritualism and creativity. Each deserves investigation. Thank you for your comment. Greatly appreciated.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #24 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #15 There are bound to be situational differences that would change the response of a little, fragile woman vs. a huge-muscled male in hearing/seeing a big bear running toward her/him. Male vs female has to be another factor. Within that, we could say that the menstrual cycle and/or postmenopausal and/or hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) are all going to make a difference in a woman vs. a man. More on that from me, later.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #23 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #10 Your 'non-response' to "create" conscious fear may be (1) related to a syndrome of repeated threats that you are 'immune' to now; (2) you may have no fear of death; (3) you may have more faith in God than fear of anything else; (4) your autonomic nervous system (ANS) may be 'less' responsive; (5) the realization of the depth of the potential for danger may not be active; (6) your adrenal glands may not secrete epinephrine and all the other stress responses; (7) you may have been on chronic steroid therapy before, affecting cortisol stress hormone response; (8) your sleep:wake circadian rhythm may be stressed due to loss of day and night cycles; ...and the list goes on...so it depends on the individual, and I think @Leckey Harrison would add more insight, too. Great scenario for thoughts and ideas.
  9. Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    What do you think of this?
    Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    Mental health: Serious lack of crisis facilities, says expert panel - BBC News
    www.bbc.com An expert commission set up to look at Northern Ireland's mental health services says there is a serious lack of crisis specialist...
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  10. ProducerMichael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    The death of Michael Kinnear.
    The death of Michael Kinnear.Like many people, there are times in my life that I wish I wasn't born, or wished I could be no longer on this Earth. I have been through difficult times and whilst they may be less or more severe than other's circumstances, to me I was at my...
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    Comments

    Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    15/06/2016 #3 Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    #2 Great comment James, I agree. Strength and motivation has to come from within.
    James McElearney
    15/06/2016 #2 James McElearney
    Thank you for sharing this story @Michael Kinnear, I´m sure it was not an easy topic to cover. I have lost some friends to suicide and seen the damage it causes in it´s wake first hand. I can only imagine the sort of thoughts that must have been going through your mind at the time. You´ve taken a low point in your life and looked to the positive to turn it around. I´ve had a few low points in my life also, where the pressures get too much at times. When your living on minimum wage and struggling to survive from month to month, not knowing if you´ll be able to afford rent or food. I understand that want to close yourself off to the world and hide away. I´ve done it, and the more you isolate yourself the harder it becomes to find your way back in. But it´s when we face our hardest challenges, stare death in the face, and manage to pull ourselves back that we truly learn how strong we are.
    Dean Owen
    15/06/2016 #1 Dean Owen
    Thanks for sharing this raw account. I think as an entrepreneur, you can't be afraid of losing everything and even if you have nothing, life can be good. If I fail, I would happily work at a supermarket checkout and work my way up. Done it before. Enjoyed every minute of it then, why not now? I was just as happy then as I was earning stupid money working for an investment bank. Gotta be fearless. But it must be seriously scary getting chased down. So glad you turned your life around.
  11. Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    As Entrepreneurs we face all kinds of stress, well I'm putting this out there. If things get too much and you start thinking about suicide please message me. I will start to wear the below lanyard for those who physically see me, but this applies to everyone I know online too. Don't feed the taboo, let's talk. Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
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    Comments

    Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    15/06/2016 #2 Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧
    #1 Most people are not on the edge. Most need someone who can listen. I've been there, I know what it is like being on the edge. Too many people die from suicide, we should all help where we can.
    Zack Thorn
    15/06/2016 #1 Zack Thorn
    @Michael Ian Kinnear 🇬🇧 This is a bold move. Certainly not one I would be willing to make. I'm all about helping others and I'm fairly confident I can talk someone off a ledge in person. But on the phone or on-line? Not so much.
  12. Rodney Fife

    Rodney Fife

    14/06/2016
    Dr. Mary Wingo recently written a book called, "The Impact of the human stress response: The biological origins and solutions to human stress." She is giving those who support her Thunderclap campaign a look at the first chapter of her book.

    Not only do I recommend the book I recommend you follow Mary's blog at www.marywingo.com
    Rodney Fife
    Impact of Human Stress
    www.thunderclap.it I just supported Impact of Human Stress on @ThunderclapIt //...
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  13. ProducerJim Murray

    Jim Murray

    12/06/2016
    Sunday…A Day Of Rest…What A Concept
    Sunday…A Day Of Rest…What A ConceptIf you were raised the North American, as I was, Sunday was always seen as a day of rest.You’d go to church, say hello to the people you only saw once a week take the kids somewhere for brunch and then hunker down to watch whatever was going on...
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    Comments

    Kevin Pashuk
    15/06/2016 #20 Kevin Pashuk
    I'd post a longer comment, but I'm taking a break right now...
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    13/06/2016 #19 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    You are so right, @Jim Murray. We all need a break and take time for ourselves.
    Lisa Lee
    13/06/2016 #18 Lisa Lee
    Fantastic article as always Jim @Jim Murray. I try to make as much of a habit as I can to not talk shop outside of the work day unless |I really have to. Even in passing - my time outside of work is the time to let the rest of my interests to develop, the rest of things I choose to spend my time doing and work very little place there. Thanks for the great reminder to just take it easy once in a while. Very Ferris Bueller.
    Rod Loader
    13/06/2016 #17 Rod Loader
    In that case we'll say you're "play challenged". We could call it the Phil effect. But ultimately its cutting through the bull and telling people what needs to be said, so I don't see a problem. #16
    Phil Friedman
    13/06/2016 #16 Phil Friedman
    #15 Rod, I've tried it all. Sailing, days on the beach, hikes in the mountains, even climbing Ayer's Rock (before it was well known that the Aboriginals didn't like it because it was disrespectful to their holy grounds). But in the end, I still don't play well with others. For example, today, @Jim Murray was moved to explain that I was not "really angry" when telling someone I disagreed, when most others were tip-toeing around the fellow. My conclusion? I don't even know what it is to play well with others. Cheers!
    Rod Loader
    13/06/2016 #15 Rod Loader
    @Phil Friedman, I've only "heard" that it helps us play better with others. It may just be a terrible rumour to distract us from the truth. Although I'm willing to have a week at the beach to test the theory. #14
    Phil Friedman
    13/06/2016 #14 Phil Friedman
    #13 @Rod Loader - Maybe I should take a day off, as I have been told I need to play better with others.
    Rod Loader
    13/06/2016 #13 Rod Loader
    We all need a break @Jim Murray. It helps us think better, work better and (so I've heard) play better with others.
    Gerald Hecht
    13/06/2016 #12 Gerald Hecht
    Depeche...ok, whatever works; that's was @Jim Murray's whole point right? Your enthusiasm shows @Stephanie Lamoureux!
    Jim Murray
    12/06/2016 #11 Jim Murray
    Watching baseball.
    Stephanie Lamoureux
    12/06/2016 #10 Anonymous
    ...in a good way!!!
    Javier beBee
    12/06/2016 #9 Javier beBee
    #8 tomorrow it will a ....."Blue Monday" :)
    Stephanie Lamoureux
    12/06/2016 #8 Anonymous
    @Javier beBee I have New Order on my Spotify playlist now...next up is Depeche mode (just can't get enough) of that music...it makes me feel happy!
    Javier beBee
    12/06/2016 #7 Javier beBee
    I am listeting music (Depeche Mode) while responding some messages from the heroes !
    Stephanie Lamoureux
    12/06/2016 #6 Anonymous
    I do not usually work or run errands on Sundays. I prefer to head outside for a long drive, or stay at home to catch up on reading or gardening. I use Saturdays for errands and parties. I like my ME time :) I feel refreshed when my alarm goes off at 5am Monday mornings!
    Pamela L. Williams
    12/06/2016 #5 Pamela L. Williams
    I used to prepare my mind for Monday; which means I might as well be working because I wasn't existing on Sundays anyway. Now, I make myself remember that Sunday was always a day of rest for my grandfather even though he was a minister and it was in a sense a working day for him. But after church it was pot roast, fresh green beans, and my grandmother's biscuits and a nap on the couch. Today, it's beautiful outside and I am hopping out and in, reading here when I'm in. No job hunting, no emails at all. I don't really consider beBee work (sorry beBee team, I know it is for you, but I hope it's enjoyable as well keeping up with all us crazy buzzing bees!) Enjoy the day everyone (where it is still Sunday!) because we're back at it tomorrow!
    Gerald Hecht
    12/06/2016 #4 Gerald Hecht
    Call me lazy, but I'm with @Jim Murray on this one 💥🎤⬇️
    Gerald Hecht
    12/06/2016 #3 Gerald Hecht
    @Jim Murray nailed it! Time for some guitar playing on the balcony...over and out
    Gert Scholtz
    12/06/2016 #2 Gert Scholtz
    @Jim Murray Enjoyable read Jim! Sundays have changed - I see in the early mornings many people running or cycling these days. Shopping malls are filled to the rafters everwhere. Me? Nothing better than a long walk with my dogs on a Sunday afternoon.
    Javier beBee
    12/06/2016 #1 Javier beBee
    go for a ride !!!
  14. ProducerRichard Scott

    Richard Scott

    13/06/2016
    3 tips to overcome the stress of being an entrepreneur
    3 tips to overcome the stress of being an entrepreneurBeing an entrepreneur is a difficult challenge and to be fair, nobody said it was going to be any different. Balancing the needs of a family and personal life alongside a growing business with its strategies and execution can be a stressful time...
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    Comments

    Richard Scott
    13/06/2016 #5 Richard Scott
    Thanks for the comments guys - I totally respect your views.

    I have personally found more joy in prioritising my workload and being more 'productive' instead of just 'active'. Some people find it difficult distinguishing between the two. I think this was the point I was trying to describe in the #2 section.
    William Davis
    13/06/2016 #3 William Davis
    Some people would think that being an entrepreneur means being the owner of your day and having more time for yourself and family. I differ a little bit since there's more commitments that entrepreneurs have to take upon and more time need involved it them. Even though time is still yours regarding your life activities and decisions taking the one to start your own business is a big deal that we have to be ready for. I agree with Dean Owen on this one, we have to do them all since they're all part of one: yourself.
    Dean Owen
    13/06/2016 #2 Dean Owen
    Great advice. I will take #1 and #3 for sure, but never #2. Unless you are Gary V, I don't believe anyone's day is so full they can't do everything they need to do. No priorities, do them all!
    Justin Thomas
    13/06/2016 #1 Justin Thomas
    This was a very important post to read @Richard Scott so thanks for taking the time to write it and share it with us. Anxiety can be a silent killer especially in the freelancer/ entrepreneurial world and most people ignore it because of the fictitious amount of punches we have set that we are suppose to be able to dealing with during the course of life. Once again, thanks for writing this.
  15. ProducerRodney Fife

    Rodney Fife

    08/06/2016
    Was Muhammad Ali's death actually caused by the stress of boxing?
    Was Muhammad Ali's death actually caused by the stress of boxing?08 June 2016—Provo, UT—Dr. Mary Wingo believes that Muhammad Ali’s death and Parkinson's Disease was brought on by repetitive stress. Dr. Wingo has recently published a book entitled, “The Impact of the human stress response: The biological origins...
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    Comments

    Rodney Fife
    09/06/2016 #5 Rodney Fife
    #3 Justin, I recommend​ you talk with Dr, Wingo. She is the author of the book. Let me know if you would like me to connect you.
    William Davis
    09/06/2016 #4 William Davis
    @Rodney Fife it is similar to the story about CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy) with NFL trying to suppress Dr. Bennet Omalu's theory and research. I mean, it is not that drastic but society, specially organizations should not be involved in terminating big research or investigations on health, it is this type of economy that we have and with help of the law (or absence of it) there's something that needs to be done. Anyway, regarding this article it was very interesting and I also think that awareness on stress related diseases should be raised even more.
    Justin Thomas
    09/06/2016 #3 Justin Thomas
    Really great share @Rodney Fife. Raising awareness of the potential damage that stress can have on the individual especially repetitive stress can be a rather taboo subject in allot of society - we should be able to just roll with the punches (apologies I wrote that before I thought of it!) but that's really just not the case. I'd be interested to read more about the possible links between Ali and stress relating to his Parkinson's disease if you decide to post more. Thanks for sharing.
    Gustavo juan Martinez gonzalez
    09/06/2016 #1 Gustavo juan Martinez gonzalez
    Estoy trabajando ahora pero estoy abierto a nuevos retos
  16. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    02/06/2016
    The root of PTSD is traumatic stress. It doesn't necessarily need a Big T trauma. Learn about trauma and stress. How they work in the body/brain organism. You'll understand PTSD. In front of the flag, in uniform, the face of PTSD. June is PTSD Awareness month
    Leckey Harrison
    Raise Your Resilience
    RaiseYourResilience.com Find meaning, connection, and...
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    18/07/2016 #2 Leckey Harrison
    #1 So am I! I am doing well! Thanks, hope you are as well.
    Steve Brady
    18/07/2016 #1 Steve Brady
    Hi Leckey......We seem to "meet" everywhere! Which is a good thing! Just trying to get my head around BeBee at present. Hope you are well.
  17. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    30/05/2016
    I approach things as a traumatologist. Not a certified one yet, that starts in July. But I've been immersed in it for three years.

    Regarding the question, "Why Isn't America conscious," I consider this: knowing that trauma ab=nd stress have negative influences on the brain, what happens if we as a society begin to release this stress and heal the trauma in our bodies? That potentially then means the brain in higher neurologic capacity comes on line, and what if that makes America conscious?
    Leckey Harrison
    A Neuroscientist’s Radical Theory of How Networks Become Conscious
    www.wired.com It's a question that's perplexed philosophers for centuries and scientists for decades: Where does consciousness come from? Neuroscientist Christof Koch, chief scientific officer at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, thinks he has an...
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  18. ProducerMohammed A. Jawad
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