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  1. ProducerAlbert Gibel

    Albert Gibel

    30/09/2016
    23 Surprisingly Gorgeous Homes Made From Shipping Containers
    23 Surprisingly Gorgeous Homes Made From Shipping ContainersThis is a shipping container. It’s used to transport large amounts of goods on boats and on trains. By itself, it’s pretty boring. But with a little imagination, the shipping container becomes a cheap, reliable building block that can be...
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    Albert Gibel
    30/09/2016 #1 Albert Gibel
    In some areas you can buy new containers for as low as $500 !
  2. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    01/09/2016
    Can't afford a house because you spent all your money drinking, is no longer an excuse Brian McKenzie
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    Randy Keho
    02/09/2016 #1 Randy Keho
    My ex-father-in-law used to drink Ten High bourbon whiskey by the gallon. My ex-wife would save the bottles and fill them with her homemade Irish cream and give them out as Christmas gifts.
  3. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    24/08/2016
    Soon
    Such a cool region - I can't wait
    Brian McKenzie
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  4. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    24/08/2016
    So excited - at the end of the month, I will get to stay in an off grid mountain yurt for a long weekend. As all the locals are coming back from the summer season - the weekend is two days longer and still half the price of a peak summer stay. I cannot wait to do some hiking, biking, camping, cooking and reading out in the middle of nowhere. Actual pics after it happens. But I could definitely live in a yurt..... I might even paint mine in circus colors .
    30 foot Yurt Construction
    30 foot Yurt Construction Build a 30 foot Pacific Yurt in 300...
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    Irene Hackett
    24/08/2016 #5 Anonymous
    #4 very cool - I love to see the lifestyle applications for small, efficient spaces. I can only imagine the tall tales that were told that weekend !!
    Brian McKenzie
    24/08/2016 #4 Brian McKenzie
    #2 @Irene Hackett There is a company out of Oregon called Pacific Yurt that sends the kits nationally. Very affordable and easy to set up with minimal crew - I helped a friend build one; It took 8 guys a weekend to build , after the concrete slab was poured. Had there not been beer and tall tales to tell - we probably could have done it in just one day. .
    Randy Keho
    24/08/2016 #3 Randy Keho
    Looks like a miniature thunderdome. Watch out for Mad Max.
    Irene Hackett
    24/08/2016 #2 Anonymous
    Never heard of a 'Yurt' - but the video was cool as is the structure! Enjoy your "off grid" time @Brian McKenzie.
  5. Claire Cardwell

    Claire Cardwell

    24/08/2016
    This company is building houses from old plastic
    This company is building houses from old plastic New Zealand-based inventor and engineer Peter Lewis wanted to give used plastic a permanent purpose. http://www.byfusion.com/...
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    Brian McKenzie
    24/08/2016 #1 Brian McKenzie
    Like Giant Legos - how cool... nice job joining recycling, environmental clean up and affordable housing.
  6. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    21/08/2016
    If you need to get off grid but still need some power - without building a power station of your own. Great for camping, boating, RVing - or living in a van down by the river.
    My New Zamp 40 Watt Portable Solar Charging System Model ZS 40 P
    My New Zamp 40 Watt Portable Solar Charging System Model ZS 40 P This is a brief video to show you the new solar power system I will be using for my portable ham radio videos starting in 2015. This is the Zamp 40 Watt...
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  7. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    21/08/2016
    I built one of these in my old back yard - I wanted a secure place to park the BBQ and a clean place to work on motor parts that would not be interfered with (nothing drives a wrencher more crazy than tools and parts moved.) I painted out the sides with an all weather white meant for RV roofs - left the sky lights open, and added structure by wedging in salvage doors when I would find them in a piecemail paneling. In summers - I would often sleep out there, because being under the stars took me back to my youth - and the EX would never venture out there for fear of spiders.

    For under $1000 dollars - you could have a lockable, skylight studio dwelling that rarely needs heat - resists the elements and assembles quickly.

    If I have to do it all over again - this is the first structure I am building on the plot of land - before I take on the barn / garage - meh, who needs a house.
    How To Build A Greenhouse
    How To Build A Greenhouse We show you how to lay a simple jetty-style sleeper deck & then use this as the base for a kit-form...
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    Charles David Upchurch
    21/08/2016 #1 Charles David Upchurch
    Cool. Or warm, I should say!
  8. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    18/08/2016
    Small Spaces - marine life.
    I have a crew member that was in my unit that used to build high end luxury boats - the financial crash killed that market in the Seattle region; the only thing worse than the housing crisis was the damage left in the recreation markets (motorcycles included)
    Once the boat factory closed - he and a couple of friends started to do custom 'barges' - absolutely no marine power train - no steering, and none of the compliance legalities of traditional houseboats / yachts . Fully equipped with solar power and batter back up - they are every bit as luxurious as the former boatable ones - but at half the price ...... ta-da; and the market was back on. He custom builds 6 a year. - all cash, no financing, and you pay to have it delivered and towed - that is not his gig either.
    They would make a great housing alternative ..... even though they are 110- 180 K
    Brian McKenzie
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  9. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    18/08/2016
    I had to leave University in 1990 to go fight a war (wee-hay) Because of that - I lost my student housing spot in the dorms. When I came back from deployment - there were no vacancies. I still had two quarters to complete my bachelors degree - and was completely shut out of the market.

    A friend suggested I check out 'Live Aboards' - University of Washington is surrounded by marinas - and most of the boats are only weekend use - and even then reserved for summer. So I toured the marinas and viola - not only did I score a live aboard - I scored a security job too.

    I got paid 300 a month to 'live a board' a 24 foot sail boat and keep the vandals and drunkards away ..... and the official security job paid me nearly 5 times that for doing the exact same thing. The marina had its' own laundromat and shower facilities - so it was more modern than rugged. A great time.
    ....... and maybe too great - it took me an extra semester to graduate ;)
    Brian McKenzie
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    Brian McKenzie
    18/08/2016 #2 Brian McKenzie
    #1 @Dean Owen All the benefits - none of the down side of having to own the boat myself And for a kid fresh off a war - it was a nice de-tox.
    Dean Owen
    18/08/2016 #1 Dean Owen
    Sounds like an idyllic life. I want a boat!
  10. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    18/08/2016
    Two years after college - a group of us were out helping a friend clear some land, plot out a house and raise a barn. He was getting married and this was going to be the family estate / range (very common in the rural regions of Washington) We were building the barn first because the fiance could not agree on the house .... about anything - the size, the location, the plans, the interior design - hell, they were fighting about flooring of a house that was not even built.
    So all 6 of us continued to build the barn that was supposed to be a 8 horse barn with an upper hayloft.

    Fed up - he finally called off the wedding - and shut down the whole idea of building a house - instead we framed in, plumbed and wired the 'horse barn' as his house. 25 years later - he has no regrets. dodged the marriage bullet - and a high priced mortgage - and horses, which he didn't like anyways. (PS - if you are not a 'horse person' - don't ever get involved with one that is - I have yet to seen it end well)

    There were some great parties out there. Building from plans that are re-purposed from other structures can save you great amounts of money over traditional home construction and prices.
    And the open air construction of the barn means that it is great for entertaining.
    Brian McKenzie
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  11. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    18/08/2016
    One summer I was helping my friend renovate his uncle's cabin -.... I say renovate - it was essentially a complete tear down - it would have been more productive to burn it and start a new - but the county would not give permit to 'new' construction - so rehab it was. I bought a surplus Military GP tent for 300 - and spent all summer living in that as we did basically a ground up make over to the cabin. At the end of the summer - his uncle bought the tent for what I paid - I was back in the dorms in September..... that was one of the best summer's I remember.

    It was a great time to learn framing, roofing, electrical and basic plumbing. I am in no way certified in any of them - but if I have to build it - I can get it done. There are few things better than seeing a cabin in the woods raise out of ruins.
    Brian McKenzie
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  12. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    18/08/2016
    One of the first 'small spaces' that I lived in - a dual axle horse trailer - I ran away from home at 15; I had been working on other peoples farms since 13 - over the course of that time - I saved enough money to buy a second hand trailer from one of the farms I serviced - I got the trailer for 500, and framed it in, and loaded it with a long couch - a dresser and a long closet pole to give me more storage. I tiled it with sticky squares from the hardware store - and all the framed wood was toss out or salvage that I cleaned and prepped. I lived there for a year. When I went to boot camp the guy I bought it from - paid me 15oo for it back - not a bad deal altogether. I have always preferred the small and minimalist escapes. Brian McKenzie
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  13. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    18/08/2016
    A short Tiny home on a Heavy 5.5 Ton axle set up with gas, wired for RV hookups and completely contained for perfect weekend retreat - or living - why pay mortgage ? I like the Murphy bed option better than the tall balcony - it makes for less bumps on my head.
    Cute Lime Green 72 sqr ft Tiny house by Trekker Trailers
    Cute Lime Green 72 sqr ft Tiny house by Trekker Trailers Check us out at www.trekkertrailers.com and click on facebook link for more pics and...
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  14. Jacproject Comercial
    Kitnet - 15 m² ( projetos e montagens) Jacproject Comercial
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  15. Juan Ramón Gutierrez Camporredondo
    Juan Ramón Gutierrez Camporredondo
    Create your own backyard geodesic dome with these super affordable DIY kits
    inhabitat.com Dome company Freedomes offers two dome kits, Classic and Glamping, for everything from outdoor classrooms to greenhouses to luxury...
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  16. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    31/07/2016
    This belongs in Tiny Homes Hive
    Brian McKenzie
    brian mckenzie on Twitter
    twitter.com “Habitat 4 Humanity for Vets https://t.co/aOnEsPTupp via...
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  17. ProducerSusan Rooks

    Susan Rooks

    22/07/2016
    Tiny Cottage -- Big Life!
    Tiny Cottage -- Big Life!Growing up in an era of smallish houses, I was stunned about 25 years ago when houses starting becoming status symbols on a grand scale for ordinary folks like me, not just for the wealthy. Behemoths, even! Small homes -- capes, ranches, whatevers...
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    Comments

    Phil Friedman
    03/08/2016 #37 Phil Friedman
    @Susan Rooks, you can, if you place the comment directly onto the post itsel, where there is a "send" button. Cheers! #33
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/08/2016 #36 Lisa Gallagher
    I was going to ask where you live and before I got to that point, you mentioned Cape Cod! For some reason @Susan Rooks, I had a feeling you were in one of the N. England States. You have a beautiful view! We have talked of downsizing for the past 10 years. My home in small in comparison to many in my age group. Our home is 1800 sq. ft. but we have a full basement, a 2.5 car garage, a breezeway, and a finished attic. My husband uses the attic for his office. I hate to admit this but I would love to have a home the kids can visit yet need to find their own space to stay for the night. It's hard to have 2 little grandson's and 4 adults in a home with no playroom and only 1.5 baths. It's hard on my brain too, as much as I love them! My husband would like more land and less home. I would be happy with less home and 1 acre of land. I think for us, 1500 sq ft. would be do-Able. If I were single (alone) I could handle much less!! You have a beautiful view!!
    Richard Buse
    02/08/2016 #35 Richard Buse
    #32 I am glad it's working out well for you @Susan Rooks. I'm learning from my Dad's living transitions. I also have to write about personal finance issues from time to time. Rather than providing luxury and ease, buying a more expansive residence can just bring more complexity and greater expenses. I'd like to avoid that.
    Kevin Pashuk
    02/08/2016 #34 Kevin Pashuk
    But where do you put all your guitars @Susan Rooks? Oh wait, that's my problem... While I can't say we are down to 500 sf, we cut back on a lot of 'stuff and space' once our youngest left the nest. Perhaps our (ok, my) ulterior motive was to ensure the kids couldn't move back home. I'm a musician, and a woodworker. So I needed some space for those things. It is more about getting priorities straight. Rather than downsize, we called it 'simplification'. We didn't want our home and possessions to be our priority. My darling and I want to travel more while we are healthy, and a big house really is counter productive for that goal.
    Susan Rooks
    02/08/2016 #33 Susan Rooks
    @Richard Buse, sorry. I keep thinking we can break our responses into easy-to-read paragraphs, but we can't. Your dad is lucky to be finding out this same lesson; smaller is easier and much more freeing! And the same goes for you, as you're seeing how it works before you commit.
    Susan Rooks
    02/08/2016 #32 Susan Rooks
    @Richard Buse, I'm finally over the 70 hump (last April), and I appreciate living here in my small cottage more each day. The only slightly difficult thing is I have a stairway from the lower road up to the cottage, but I also have my front door on the upper road. I offload my purchases on the upper road, park behind the cottage down below, and then either walk up the stairs or around the corner to my front door. Slightly awkward, but it works.
    Richard Buse
    24/07/2016 #31 Richard Buse
    @Susan Rooks. I'm heading toward my late 50s (I'm 57 now) and look forward to doing something similar. In the meantime, I've gotten to sort of test drive such a transition with my Dad. Within the 10 years I helped him move from a large two-family house (the upstairs living quarters contained some of this stuff) with a large yard to a 700-square foot mobile home with a postage-stamp yard, to an apartment in the 500 to 600 square-foot range. Each move required a substantial decluttering effort, but yielded simplicity and less time required for cleaning and maintenance. That freed up time for enjoying activities that matter most. To each his/her own, but the more I see, the more I look forward to smaller living quarters.
    Deb Helfrich
    24/07/2016 #30 Deb Helfrich
    #29 Thanks for sharing the link, @Leckey Harrison. Fabulous idea. And the time has come to really start re-defining community and building it back into the fabric of our lives. We learn from those unlike ourselves. We become stagnant when everyone surrounding us is practically the same.
    Leckey Harrison
    24/07/2016 #29 Leckey Harrison
    Tiny houses are making a comeback, as is down sizing. Most of us here at www.fifthstreetcommons.com have downsized from bigger places. Pocket neighborhoods with smaller houses and common areas are growing in popularity, and Detroit is looking at re-purposing land into these types of ideas with higher density and common areas. Ours is an intentional community, and I've seen a some "communities" that are really just houses together with no community among them. Intentionality is a must to make it more than living close.
    Susan Rooks
    24/07/2016 #28 Susan Rooks
    #23 Yup, @Deb Helfrich, that's accurate. It's the book of someone else, or someone else's book. And the spellcheck here is underlining the "else's," but I know it's correct. Surprising that the spellchecks are so slow to pick this one up as right! And just so you know, spellcheck here is hating your last name . . . sheesh!
    Susan Rooks
    24/07/2016 #26 Susan Rooks
    #25 Thanks, @Phil Friedman! Yeah, 500 s.f. sounds and may seem tiny, but when it's all open as mine is, with loads of windows -- it's more than big enough. And I can seat 12 people comfortable -- although not at a table. First husband and I had a 37' cabin cruiser (a wood Egg Harbor) for years, so I know a little about that. I think the way they're configured -- or the way they were configured anyway -- makes that size difficult. Good for you, though!
    Phil Friedman
    24/07/2016 #25 Phil Friedman
    Great post, Susan Rooks. Grammatically correct, too. Having lived and cruised aboard a small yacht for more than seven years, I know that people can live comfortably in a lot less than 500 sf per person. And tiny houses mean less first cost and lower recurring cost going forward. Unfortunately, in many places, the cost of land is very high (often 10 times that of the house) and minimum lot sizes are prescribed by local ordinance. So the full advantages of a tiny house cannot be realized. Cheers!
    Deb Helfrich
    24/07/2016 #23 Deb Helfrich
    #22 I do, indeed, have the most fabulous reason for taking on this task. I might have to succumb to the FB, as craigslist, where I've conducted so much of my life for about a dozen years, has become a ghost town in Seattle over the last few years. I have had new stuff posted at a bargain price for over a month and sold only one major item. The possessive I am wondering about is "else's" none of the spellchecks think it is right, and google seems to think it is OK, at least in the first few results - so I figured there might be an article there. Hope the bay is treating you well and it's not too hot this summer weekend!
    Susan Rooks
    23/07/2016 #22 Susan Rooks
    #20 Let's start with the stuff, @Deb Helfrich. Yes. Rehoming it is wonderful! Do you have any homeless shelters in the area? The folks in them who are trying to find a way to get a place to live often have nothing to take with them. Do you have a Flea Market FB page in your local area? We have one here on the Cape, and folks are always snapping things up for themselves. Sometimes there's a small price; other times the stuff is free.

    Second, I cannot imagine moving that far, even with my few possessions. That's a whole other kind of downsizing/right-sizing/decision making. Ugh. But, of course, you have a terrific reason for doing it . . . don't you. :-)

    Third, I'm not sure exactly what you mean by others' things being possessive. Talk to me, OK?

    Have a great day!
    Susan Rooks
    23/07/2016 #21 Susan Rooks
    #18 Irene Hackett, I feel your pain over the winters! But I'm a New Englander born and bred, and I'm planning to stay put.

    Good for you to have done the downsizing and found out how gratifying it is to not have STUFF everywhere.

    And no, I had no idea that Amour Setter existed, but I shall check the posts out. Thanks so much!
    Deb Helfrich
    23/07/2016 #20 Deb Helfrich
    I have to say, I have always prioritized a view and when that wasn't possible convenience - like living right across the street from work a couple times. Since I was a consultant for so long, I just never had the opportunity to install myself in a large place, and I never felt any sort of loss at not having a bunch of space or stuff. But moving to England is an entirely different sort of small space challenge, as I have to think long and hard about why anything is precious enough to spend the effort and money to send across a continent and an ocean. I am using the approach you do, @Susan Rooks - a few items at a time. Right now, everything I own is in a 10x10 storage unit and since I met someone yesterday on Altucher's post who might help me rehome some stuff - anyone in Seattle needing anything, drop me a message. Everything must be adopted.

    Thanks for sharing your lovely water view and your enthusiasm for being able to chose an experience of living over buying into someone else's normal.

    And geez, just a tad bit of business. Why isn't someone else's things, ideas, or feelings possessive? Have you done a post on this? Would love to see one in the works for the future. I use that kind of construction all the time in comments and I assure myself that it is fine and that I am better equipped than spell checker...but I am sure you can work your magic on bringing a full understanding to what is right and/or wrong with someone else's problems.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    23/07/2016 #19 Mohammed A. Jawad
    With the changing times when everything has become expensive and competitive then life, in frugal terms, does make real sense.
    Irene Hackett
    23/07/2016 #18 Anonymous
    @Susan Rooks - My husband and I recently gave away all our 'stuff' to the adult kids, packed up what we kept in 2 vehicles and hit the road. We are now in a 2 bedroom, 2 bath apt in FL and loving the freedom that less 'baggage brings!! (Have you read recent buzzes by @Amour Setter? ) Minimal, simple - OPEN spaces, when small - can be very, very COZY. BTW, we left a 2 year 'stint in MA after those 2 outrageous winters!! (2012 and 2013) The Cape got hammered too!!! Being in a 'snow State' after 28 years in CA was way too drastic of a weather change - give me sunlight, warmth, and an open, cozy space and I'm golden!! Your home looks lovely by the Atlantic blue!!
    Susan Rooks
    23/07/2016 #17 Susan Rooks
    #5 And one last thought for you, @David Grinberg: I do feel claustrophobic in some friends' tiny homes here in the Village because they're a warren of small rooms with dark walls and low ceilings. I can't get out those places fast enough! They feel like hobbit homes sometimes, and I'm only 5'3".

    You're exactly the kind of person I love showing this place to! Everyone (OK, except for my mom) has walked in, stopped cold, and just beamed. The inside really is a marvel: bright, clean, and light. Maybe they wouldn't want to live in such a small space, but with the high ceilings, no walls, and that killer view -- what's not to love? The most often-repeated comment is: OMG! It's huge!

    So. If you're ever in this area -- come see!
    Susan Rooks
    23/07/2016 #16 Susan Rooks
    #12 It's truly a home, @Ken Boddie! It was built in the '30s, rehabbed once maybe in the '60s, so I had a free hand in complete redoing it to my own style. I didn't have to consult with anyone else who might live here; everything is personal to me. First time ever, and it feels sooooooooo good!

    Downsizing is a state of mind, I think. If we can wrap our heads and hearts around what is really important, it becomes much easier. Of course I do have a few things still in my basement . . . just can't part with them yet. But what I truly need is here in my one-room place, and I love it.

    Who knows? Maybe you and your wife will actually downsize someday -- what would that look like for you? What size house do you have now? What could you imagine for yourselves? I know that although this little place is great for me, its only negative is the lack of another space for another individual to call his own. My basement is only accessible on outside stairs, and there's really place to put an inside staircase.
  18. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    23/07/2016
    Go to school, get good grades, find a job, get married, have kids, work until the day you retire or die ...... or you could end up living in a van down by the River (more likely - you will end up in a divorce - cleaned out - and ..... yes, living in a van down by the river)

    https://youtu.be/Xv2VIEY9-A8

    But hey, if ya gotta - do it in style.
    Brian McKenzie
    Dub Box USA | VW Campers | VW Trailers | Food Carts | Event Carts
    dub-box-usa.com Dub box USA is a new twist on the tailgate camper, family camper, food cart or event cart. While it might look like we are buying up all the camper vans left in the world, rest assured we are not. Oregon based Dub Box USA manufactures campers,...
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    Brian McKenzie
    10/08/2016 #1 Brian McKenzie
    Fiberglass VW Bus based Campers and Trailers
  19. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    23/07/2016
    “I would rather sit on a pumpkin, and have it all to myself, than be crowded on a velvet cushion.”

    * California designer Gregory Kloehn converted a $2,000 dumpster into a home-away-from-home. ~ this is because he lost his previous house in a divorce - and saddled with alimony and market realities of getting into a new home in his southern California enclave - and the crashed credit score that a divorce and garnishment brings : there was no other real alternative. #MGTOW
    Brian McKenzie
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    Brian McKenzie
    10/08/2016 #2 Brian McKenzie
    #1 @Randy Keho I haven't had a TV in 10 years. I have no idea what is on rotation any more - I haven't been to a movie in nearly 3. I am nearly completely unplugged from the incessant media barrage that is Americana Breaking Bad, Game of Thrones, Orange is new Black, Walking dead, etc - I only know of them because they come across the social media stream in memes.
    Randy Keho
    23/07/2016 #1 Randy Keho
    I don't know if you get any American network television, but there is a sitcom called, "Broke Girls."One of them started a relationship with a guy who lived in a dumpster like the one pictured. Turns out his family was filthy rich, but he was uncomfortable with their lifestyle.
  20. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    23/07/2016
    “If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.”

    Remember - it is not that you dreamed of castles in the sky - it is that you built them there - took the steps to plant them there - that you have made the moves, connections, resources, and strength to manifest your dreams to reality.
    Brian McKenzie
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  21. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    23/07/2016
    “If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music he hears, however measured or far away.” Brian McKenzie
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    Fran Brizzolis
    23/07/2016 #3 Fran Brizzolis
    The mother of the pleces for living in peace and with good partner...
    Brian McKenzie
    23/07/2016 #2 Brian McKenzie
    #1 I found it on Pinterest - it has been tagged everywhere from Colorado, Montana, Ireland and the Alps - pity it isn't an Air b-n-b; I would stay there.
    Fran Brizzolis
    23/07/2016 #1 Fran Brizzolis
    Incredibele!!!!... Heaven is now in the earth!.... Where???
  22. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    23/07/2016
    Fools stand on their island of opportunities and look toward another land. There is no other land; there is no other life but this ~ Henry David Thoreau Brian McKenzie
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  23. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    23/07/2016
    Every man is tasked to make his life, even in its details, worthy of the contemplation of his most elevated and critical hour. HDT Brian McKenzie
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  24. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    23/07/2016
    “Nothing makes the earth seem so spacious as to have friends at a distance; they make the latitudes and longitudes.” Brian McKenzie
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  25. Brian McKenzie

    Brian McKenzie

    23/07/2016
    "I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestionable ability of man to elevate his life by a conscious endeavor." HDT

    A dessert oasis shipping container with pavilion tented arches
    Brian McKenzie
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    Brian McKenzie
    23/07/2016 #1 Brian McKenzie
    damnit - desert not dessert - unless somebody is bringing cakes, cookies and ice cream !
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