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Tooth Picks - beBee

Tooth Picks

~ 100 buzzes
Here I post articles, buzzes, links, and whatever else I find that gets me thinking. Why this name? There's a saying, "I'll have to chew on that." people use in reference to some thought or idea that need extra pondering. After you chew on some food, you might need a tooth pick. Using a tooth pick is a good time to muse and savor what you just ate. So here are posts you can mentally chew on and pick a bit.
Buzzes
  1. ProducerVirag Gulyas

    Virag Gulyas

    13/10/2016
    I Most Probably Did It Wrong But I Did Yom Kippur
    I Most Probably Did It Wrong But I Did Yom KippurThis article was originally published on Times of Israel--------------------I'm not here to offend anyone. If you read my past writings, youโ€™ll know Iโ€™m not here for that. And if youโ€™ve ever read anything from me, youโ€™ll also know that I am a...
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    Virag Gulyas
    15/10/2016 #10 Virag Gulyas
    #8 @Aurorasa Sima I am so thankful for your kind comment, it's been a journey, and I am far from the finish line. But I grew to enjoy it. Thank you for reading!
    Josh LeBlanc-Shulman
    14/10/2016 #7 Josh LeBlanc-Shulman
    Hm why did my comment get deleted? :) I was asking Virag about how she associated Judaism and Israel. @Javier ๐Ÿ beBee would you know?
    Virag Gulyas
    14/10/2016 #6 Virag Gulyas
    #3 @Deb ๐Ÿ Helfrich if my posts touch one person, it was worth all my bravery to put these on paper! Thank you for your kind comment
    Virag Gulyas
    14/10/2016 #5 Virag Gulyas
    #1 Thank you for reading, @Sara Jacobovici and giving me more insight into Yom Kippur
    Josh LeBlanc-Shulman
    14/10/2016 #4 Josh LeBlanc-Shulman
    Thanks for this thoughtful post @Virag Gulyas. You offend nobody by being curious.

    By the way, you seem to have an interchangeable attitude toward Israel and Judaism which is great :) Many people feel like these are antagonistic to each other, and I personally agree. Would love to hear your thoughts!
    Deb ๐Ÿ Helfrich
    14/10/2016 #3 Deb ๐Ÿ Helfrich
    This post has helped me step up to my own choices, my own need to come to terms with fasting and feasting and the cycles of life, learning, love, and the truth, to me, that if we don't make a ritual of reflection we will often go astray.
    Matt ๐Ÿ Sweetwood
    13/10/2016 #2 Matt ๐Ÿ Sweetwood
    Thank you for sharing your unique perspective.
    Sara Jacobovici
    13/10/2016 #1 Sara Jacobovici
    Thank you @Virag Gulyas for sharing your journey. One journey started with Abraham and led to a statement of free will. God tells Avraham to "go to the land with" ึฐversus at the beginning telling him, "alone, to go from the land of his father" Both are father and son relationships; at first Avram is to go (to himself) away from his father's land, and now Avraham is to go with his son to the land of Moriah .

    If ever there was a great response to the affirmation that we have free will it is Yom Kippur and choice. Throughout Torah God tells us to choose. But during Yom Kippur services we read Isaiah 44:22

    "I have blotted out, as a thick cloud, thy transgressions, and, as a cloud, thy sins; return unto Me, for I have redeemed thee."

    How humbling can it be?! Here God is letting us know what He has done for us and then He says, so now you can return to Me. He is giving us a choice. Not only that, but He has literally cleared the path. But it is still our choice to take that step. Reminds me of even when we were facing life and death at the sea, as a people we didn't choose to go right in and choose faith and life, we needed a leader who took that first step in to model for us. God was generous then because He took into account our predicament and state of shock. On Yom Kippur we are not only choosing as a people but as individuals. So it is literally up to our individual free will.

    We, as individuals, are a work in progress. We make choices every step along our journey. Thanks again Virag for sharing yours.
  2. ProducerJared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    Burn Your Rรฉsumรฉ for beBee or LinkedIn? Not so Fast...
    Burn Your Rรฉsumรฉ for beBee or LinkedIn? Not so Fast...Some say you should swap rรฉsumรฉsย for online profiles. I disagree. I wish it were that easy!We have no control over what companies need from applicants. Most still have Applicant Tracking Systems, which needย content that only a "Black Hole"...
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    Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    02/02/2017 #50 Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    If you liked this post, please check out a great related post by @John White, MBA:
    https://www.bebee.com/producer/@john-white/the-200-characters-that-will-make-or-break-your-bebee-profile
    Harvey Lloyd
    19/10/2016 #49 Harvey Lloyd
    Some good thoughts on managing your resume. I would think this approach would also survive a B2B examination Good read @Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    17/10/2016 #47 Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    #42 Hi @Charles David Upchurch. Thank you so much for clarifying. Sorry for misunderstanding your intentions. In #39 I was trying to show I had done my due diligence. I can see how the link might not be noticed.

    The issue we posters have is that when you see the blurb of a post on a wall, you only see the first ~250 characters. Those are precious up-front words to capture the reader's attention and let them know what your article is about. If you start by giving a long link to any post, the summary message may be lost. As it stands, I have updated the post to list and link to Steve's post up front:

    'Steve Blakeman wrote a great post, "Burn your rรฉsumรฉ... LinkedIn has made it obsolete", and made a compelling case for companies dropping traditional resumes - burning them, in fact - for online profiles instead. I wish it were that easy!

    The problem i...'

    ... and I added Steve's link again with the end photo credit.

    I may have now lost my main problem statement, but maybe it is clearer this way. Hopefully I am doing better. :) It's a balance.

    All the Buzz...
    Gerald Hecht
    16/10/2016 #46 Gerald Hecht
    #39 @Charles David Upchurch I t may help to read them in an environment/state of mind that is relatively distraction free, that way you can comment in a coherent manner that is germane to the content. This maintains the dynamic of a discussion much more effectively than continually apologizing for commenting in the wrong forum, etc.
    Gerald Hecht
    16/10/2016 #45 Gerald Hecht
    #40 @Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS You are most welcome; I think this the ideas discussed here are worthy of such.
    Gerald Hecht
    16/10/2016 #44 Gerald Hecht
    #41 @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher Thank you for saying that; I don't often feel that my opinions are deemed worthy of attention.
    Gerald Hecht
    16/10/2016 #43 Gerald Hecht
    #42 @Charles David Upchurch I see; BTW --try not to "protest too much" (it's a literary allusion/parable thingie); it may prove to help you in articulating facts/comments in the future,
    Charles David Upchurch
    16/10/2016 #42 Charles David Upchurch
    #28 #39
    1) I had no idea that there was a link under the main photo. I only tried it after your comment #39.
    2) You stated "Steve Blakeman wrote a great post"... of course you did. I did NOT suggest that you were trying to take "credit or anything from Steve Blakeman."
    That wasn't my point at all. I was just hoping that you would add a link to the article that you had already properly mentioned.
    3) I did not see the link "(See https://www.bebee.com/producer/@steve-blakeman/burn-your-resume-linkedin-has-made-it-obsolete for Steve's original post.)" when I first read the article. If it was there, I apologize for missing it.

    I'm not trying to make anyone look bad. I just made the mistake of making a suggestion publicly which I should have either not made at all, or I should have made it privately. Instead of being helpful, I appear to have angered you, and for that I am also sorry.
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    16/10/2016 #41 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #34 I ditto @Milos Djukic's response. Very interested in what you have to say and think. @Gerald Hecht
    Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    16/10/2016 #39 Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    #28 @Charles David Upchurch

    1) I linked the main photo to https://www.bebee.com/producer/@steve-blakeman/burn-your-resume-linkedin-has-made-it-obsolete (if you try clicking on it).
    2) I stated "Steve Blakeman wrote a great post"... In my first 6 words...
    3) Followed by" (See https://www.bebee.com/producer/@steve-blakeman/burn-your-resume-linkedin-has-made-it-obsolete for Steve's original post.)"
    4) Further, see https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/burn-your-resume-bebee-linkedin-so-fast-jared-j-wiese?trk=pulse_spock-articles#pulse-comments-comment-urn:li:comment:(article:7205065201813015847,6192687279354535936) for how Steve shared the post on LinkedIn.

    Please let us know how I could have done better.
    I am not taking a link or credit or anything from Steve Blakeman.

    You have made this exact remark several times, but about other posts I have written. Please verify before posting. Thank you!
    Charles David Upchurch
    16/10/2016 #38 Charles David Upchurch
    I care what you think, @Gerald Hecht. I'm just not always sure that I understand what you are saying!
    Gerald Hecht
    16/10/2016 #37 Gerald Hecht
    #36 @Milos Djukic Given your description of our job (Which I agree with 100%)...We are the one.
    Milos Djukic
    16/10/2016 #36 Anonymous
    #35 Dear Prof. @Gerald Hecht, Our job is to point out what should be right. Only when we are awake, but also a little imaginative, we are able to share with others the most valuable parts of ourselves. And yes, You are the one.
    Gerald Hecht
    16/10/2016 #35 Gerald Hecht
    #34 @Milos Djukic well I believe you --so at least one.
    Milos Djukic
    16/10/2016 #34 Anonymous
    #33 I am interested @Gerald Hecht and for sure I am not the only one.
    Gerald Hecht
    16/10/2016 #33 Gerald Hecht
    #31 @Milos Djukic I think so; but apparently nobody is interested in what I think.
    Milos Djukic
    16/10/2016 #31 Anonymous
    @Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS :) This is a great article. Thank you.
  3. ProducerJoey Reghitto

    Joey Reghitto

    09/09/2016
    What Are You An Example Of?
    What Are You An Example Of?Whether you like it or not, you are an example to someone.What exactly are you an example of?Thatโ€™s a great question.You tell me.Biographies and AutobiographiesJames Altucher says, โ€œadvice is autobiography.โ€ I totally agree, but it is also...
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    Brian McKenzie
    23/09/2016 #3 Brian McKenzie
    I am just an old gear in a box that no longer fits machine. No wife, no kids, no family ~ never any intention of any either. My autobiography would be a cautionary tale of a long list of things not to do.
    Steven Brooks
    23/09/2016 #2 Steven Brooks
    "Whether you like it or not, you are an example to someone." from @Joey Reghitto
    Steven Brooks
    23/09/2016 #1 Steven Brooks
    Good post @Joey Reghitto with solid advice. Reminds me of an old book "Who you are when no one is looking" by Bill Hybels. How active are you with Twitter? If you make regular updates @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian is developing a cool app that as of yet has no name.
  4. Jim Murray

    Jim Murray

    22/09/2016
    Your Daily Buzz for Thursday Jim Murray
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    Harvey Lloyd
    22/09/2016 #2 Harvey Lloyd
    My impeccable judgement is typically flawed. I try not to get irritated when someone shares a different opinion. I guess its the delivery of the difference that sparks the rash. Delivered as an alternative to my own opinion i appreciate and want to reconsider my own. Delivered from the pulpit of all knowing i am reaching for the anti-itch cream, the rash is on.
    Hassan Aman aka Buzzilla
    22/09/2016 #1 Hassan Aman aka Buzzilla
    Quite true, I can confirm that from an experience that happened yesterday when a so called expert who followed me on Twitter first and got pissed because I tagged him in a tweet asking him for a "tip of the day" then when I showed him his apparent flaw...boom he went in denial.
  5. ProducerPascal Derrien

    Pascal Derrien

    21/09/2016
    Thank You For That
    Thank You For ThatHere I am again on the doorstep of a life house full of dust and decorated with tasteless broken windows. Itโ€™s cold and warm, its dark and bright, itโ€™s uncomfortable at times but it is my house with its rotten foundations and hidden alcoves and I...
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    Pascal Derrien
    23/09/2016 #63 Pascal Derrien
    thank you @Irene Hackett I am a bit overwhelmed by the online and off line messages on this particular post :-) All of us seem have more in common than we sometimes dare to think and if that's what this modest story has achieved it is beyond my expectations , to all the perfect imperfections then :-)
    Cyndi wilkins
    22/09/2016 #61 Cyndi wilkins
    #60 Thanks @Deb ๐Ÿ Helfrich...You are absolutely correct...It is all that occurs while leading up to that "final moment" that is so exhausting...Physically and emotionally...In the end, my hope is for all of us to be at peace with it...
    Deb ๐Ÿ Helfrich
    22/09/2016 #60 Deb ๐Ÿ Helfrich
    #57 A big hug @Cyndi wilkins - because in a number of ways this mini-death of his 'freedom' is a lot harder to come to terms with than the final goodbye, as you will both have to live through the decision and all the ramifications for an indeterminate amount of time. I think you are wise to make the decision via your mother. She is the one who knows what is best for you both.

    Pascal, what a gift, the way you have brought so many parental relationships into focus around the world.....
    Pascal Derrien
    22/09/2016 #59 Pascal Derrien
    #57 wow, hmm, ah.... not sure how to answer that one @Cyndi wilkins maybe Thank you for that is appropriate :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    22/09/2016 #58 Pascal Derrien
    #56 sometimes it is best not to stir .....it is what is may be the best option for all parties who knows @Ken Boddie :-)
    Cyndi wilkins
    22/09/2016 #57 Cyndi wilkins
    This is just what I needed this morning as I struggle with arranging care for my father as his health continues to decline...I go to the beach and lie face down in the sand and ask my mother for help...I know she is there...listening, loving...and comforting. You need not be a mystic to believe in the power of spirit...and believe me when I tell you, the crow is the messenger...Your dad was reaching out to comfort you through the energies of your own tears...He heard you...and he loves you...You made me cry this morning @Pascal Derrien...THANK YOU FOR THAT....
    Ken Boddie
    22/09/2016 #56 Ken Boddie
    Every now and then, Pascal, your tales pluck at my heartstrings. Your 'what ifs' stir memories of my own dad and words unspoken. "One day soon" so easily becomes "too late now". Yet some things are best unsaid ..... or what if i'd only ....?
    Pascal Derrien
    22/09/2016 #55 Pascal Derrien
    #53 ahhh you a very generous sharing this @Joanna Hofman thank you for that....
    Mamen ๐Ÿ Delgado
    22/09/2016 #54 Mamen ๐Ÿ Delgado
    #53 Woww @Joanna Hofman... I send you a huge warm hug from Madrid, and you still have him to spend at least a few days every now and then with him.
    All my love with you and with him. ๐Ÿ’ž
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    22/09/2016 #51 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #50 Good analogy @Aurorasa Sima. I used to be a smoker. I quit 4 years ago. I keep a vaping pen on hand in case I'm in a situation that may spark my desire to smoke again. I never want to go back to it. When my mom was told she had a large mass in her lung before her diagnosis, the first thing she said - "I guess you're going to tell me I have to stop smoking now?!" Her doctor was cool, he said "I would never tell a smoker they have to stop, it's like a crack addiction and you need to remember you began smoking long before the data came out." He went on to say, "if you decide to quit and need help, just call me." She quit the next day and never called for help. She did have me buy her a vape pen! @Pascal Derrien, never forgotten- many lessons we learn from those who were so ill. My husbands parents divorced when he was 11 and his mom had a break down when he was 15, my husband lived with his sister and brother for a year, then moved in with an older sister who had drug addiction problems. He finally got his own place when he was 17. He told me before we married, marriage is for life and I have to say, he was and still is an such an awesome father who's been loving and a great influence on both of our children. He broke that pattern!
    Pascal Derrien
    22/09/2016 #49 Pascal Derrien
    #48 I did @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher :-) forgiven but I have not forgotten :-) many thanks for sharing your side of the story much appreciated
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    22/09/2016 #48 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    @Pascal Derrien, my husband's dad was an alcoholic and very abusive. As a matter of fact, so abusive he was only allowed to visit when another adult was present. My husband despised his father for years. I'd love to write a buzz about it but he might get upset with me. Anyhow, his dad died in 2009 and my husband just told me a few weeks ago that he made peace in his heart with is father and he understands now that his dad was a very ill man. He also said, he felt his dad made peace with himself before he passed and that makes my husband feel better. I think it's tougher when there is such a history- the emotions can be all over the place. It sounds like you made peace :))
    Pascal Derrien
    22/09/2016 #47 Pascal Derrien
    #37 aha @Mohammed A. Jawad :-) its out there now indeed :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    22/09/2016 #46 Pascal Derrien
    #36 thanks @Milos Djukic, indeed I am not overly inhibited when it comes to share emotions funny when you think I am not overly extrovert somebody told me I was hybrid whatever that means .... :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    22/09/2016 #45 Pascal Derrien
    #38 ah thanks @Pamela ๐Ÿ Williams :-) writing it was pretty easy in a way :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    22/09/2016 #44 Pascal Derrien
    #39 many thanks @Deb ๐Ÿ Helfrich life ain;t easy, it is just my story many many people got to deal with terrible ordeals, this love thing is a complicated thingie :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    22/09/2016 #43 Pascal Derrien
    #40 thanks for sharing this Jena, alcohol had also been a denominator for a while and then he became a reformed alcoholic but the scars were so deep that I had always remained on the fence
    Pascal Derrien
    22/09/2016 #42 Pascal Derrien
    #41 thanks @Dean Owen .... ditto :-)
    Dean Owen
    22/09/2016 #41 Dean Owen
    Thanks for sharing this gem, and stay positive! (I know you are positive because you said plane half full and not half empty! :) ) I don't believe in life after death, but I do believe our relationships with those we lose continue on. Sometimes they never have the strength to say "I'm proud of you" or "I'm sorry", but they are saying it now.
  6. ProducerJared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    Stop the Madness... Be proactive instead of complain!
    Stop the Madness... Be proactive instead of complain!When around complaining, leave it, change it or accept it!ย This also makes me think of Stephen R. Covey's 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. Before getting into the habits, he talks about making a paradigm shift, focusing on the power we all have...
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    Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    21/09/2016 #14 Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    #12 Thanks for the share in https://www.bebee.com/producer/hive/tooth-picks, @Steven Brooks. It is indeed a stick-in-mouth to ponder ;)
    Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    21/09/2016 #13 Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    #11 ... and the belly laughs!!
    Steven Brooks
    21/09/2016 #12 Steven Brooks
    "When you complain, you make yourself a victim." Hmmm...
    Mamen ๐Ÿ Delgado
    21/09/2016 #11 Mamen ๐Ÿ Delgado
    Love Eckhart Tolle videos. Listening to him is a great meditation itself. โœจ
    Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    21/09/2016 #10 Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    Added some links to Eckhart Tolle. If you ever get the chance to see him live, do it "now" ;)
    Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    21/09/2016 #9 Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    #8 Gracias, @Juan Imaz. Google tells me to say: "que tengas un gran dรญa"
    Juan Imaz
    21/09/2016 #8 Juan Imaz
    #7 done :)
    Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    11/09/2016 #5 Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    #1 @Irene Hackett, what a perfect quote that is so easy to remember! Thanks for that.
    Makes me change my takeaway to: โ€Handling negativity: change, accept or leave it.โ€

    Also, what a beautiful exchange!! Made me smile too.
  7. Federico ๐Ÿ รlvarez San Martรญn
    How loading time affects your bottom line. Federico ๐Ÿ รlvarez San Martรญn
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    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    21/09/2016 #4 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    Nice to see numbers supporting what I noticed instinctively. I see a time in the near future when I will need to fine-tune my web app with no name for the mobile web. This will help, thanks
    Juan Imaz
    21/09/2016 #3 Juan Imaz
    #2 :(
    Javier ๐Ÿ beBee
    20/09/2016 #2 Javier ๐Ÿ beBee
    Cada segundo se cae un 7%.. en alfunos casos en beBee (inicio) se puede llegar a caer un 70%.
  8. Jim Murray

    Jim Murray

    20/09/2016
    Daily Buzz for Tuesday Jim Murray
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    Steven Brooks
    20/09/2016 #4 Steven Brooks
    Jim Murray's version of the "sell the problem you solve" advice.
    Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    20/09/2016 #3 Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    shared with Entrepreneurs hive
    Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    20/09/2016 #2 Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    Great point, @Jim Murray.

    Makes me think of Bob Burg's The Go-Giver "Give exceptional value. Enjoy extraordinary results." book and site: thegogiver.com
    Vincent Andrew
    20/09/2016 #1 Vincent Andrew
    Can't agree more @Jim Murray!
  9. Producerjesse kaellis

    jesse kaellis

    18/09/2016
    Where old sayings come from
    Where old sayings come fromI didn't write this or research this. I found it somewhere, I can't remember. It is informative and interesting.ย Where old sayings come from Us older people need to learn something new every day... Just to keep the grey matter tuned...
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    jesse kaellis
    03/10/2016 #39 jesse kaellis
    #38
    People, common people lived their lives close to the bone. They were not preoccupied with fulfillment and happiness, merely survival, which in a sense IS fulfillment and happiness. I never felt more alive than when I was living straight out of my pocket on a cash income day to day in Las Vegas. Thanks, Donna-Luisa I'm glad you read this article and enjoyed it. I posted it on Linkedin before. Everybody always enjoys reading it.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    03/10/2016 #38 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    Wow, this is great @jesse kaellis..loved it. There was a lot of common sense in these sayings...some we could use to help us regain common sense perspective ๐Ÿ˜Š thanks for sharing๐Ÿค—
    David Lisle
    22/09/2016 #37 David Lisle
    #36 Knock yourself out! Fill your boots! - Now where do those phrases come from?
    David

    So knock yourself out!
    jesse kaellis
    21/09/2016 #36 jesse kaellis
    #33
    David, I will send this to my friend if you don't mind. She is genetically from Scotland and has relations from thereI read somewhere that the people used urine on the floor to make it hard packed. The Amish I think. I'm not too sure about that fragment of a memory. You write in a descriptive manner. Thanks for reading my cribbed essay.
    jesse kaellis
    21/09/2016 #35 jesse kaellis
    #34
    You don't need to credit me, I just happened to find the article somewhere that I can't even remember. My father used to teach ESL students. It was just something he liked to do. He told me one of the real difficulties with the English language is colloquialisms. How do you explain "He lost his marbles." "He went bananas." "Kill two birds with one stone." Anyway, It's hard to convey. Thanks, Don. I'm glad you enjoyed it. I did too.
    Don ๐Ÿ Kerr
    21/09/2016 #34 Don ๐Ÿ Kerr
    Hey @jesse kaellis Just a quick note, we haven't been in touch for a bit, I just love this shit! Going to share with my boys. They're becoming quite voracious readers and encounter these phrases on occasion. Now I can appear knowledgeable. (Of course I will credit you at all times!)
    David Lisle
    21/09/2016 #33 David Lisle
    I read this with interest, originally from England I moved to Vancouver, Canada when I was twenty. I came from Birmingham which at that time was a large Industrial city, dirty and still smoky in spite of clean air laws. I meta girl in Vancouver and we took a trip together to visit her ancestral home in Western Scotland. Little did I know that later I would discover it was also my ancestral home. We visited her Grandmothers brother, a crofter, sheep farmer and part time fisherman. They lived in a small stone cottage and we were welcomed there. The downstairs part of the house was spotlessly clean and the floors shone. The floors were black in colour. I asked what the floor was made of because it was uneven in places and had hollows where people walked the most.

    Dirt. The floors were dirt, this was in the early seventies. Not only was it dirt it was waxed dirt, brilliantly shiny and hard, impervious to water except hot water that took off the shine where it touched the floor. So from the fifteen hundreds and before that right up to the present day dirt floors were actually easily found in peoples homes.
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #32 jesse kaellis
    #31
    I think it costs about 500 bucks to move a single wide. I hope this park is never sold out from under me, Praveen. The dance scene at the end of the movie is the best part. I have the movie in my DVD library. It is a very good movie.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    20/09/2016 #31 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #29 Yeah Jesse I saw that movie! Which Indian hasn't! :) And yeah, I have seen some awesome custom built trailer homes in some movies and man they look enticing and conveniently anonymous, like a hermit's cave ;)! And you can move at will right? A travelin home sort of!
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #30 jesse kaellis
    Ranting
    I lived in LA; in various parts of Los Angles, I lived in different parts of Las Vegas. I lived in Reno. As an adult, I picked up drugs on the streets of LA and of course Vegas.
    The gym I fought out of in the mid-eighties was on Hastings near Main. My first fight was with a guy from Carnegie Centre across the street.
    When I got back here in 2002, I went around there. The devastation was unbelievable; obscene, and outrageous. It was an evil crack wasteland. The miasma of despair seeped into my skin and into my pores; it invaded my soul.
    My gym; my boxing gym had become a safe injection site. The area was honeycombed with agencies that are funded to address the myriad social problems of failed lives. It is big business. In front of Carnegie addicts openly smoked crack and injected smack and meth, while a cop stood nearby next to a police cruiser; smiling.
    Psychotic crack heads were picking on the sidewalk for invisible crumbs.
    See, here in Canada, being enlightened and all, we know this is a medical problem, so rather than throw them in prison and give the larger population some relief...no. NO! Harm reduction! No matter how fucking long it takes. Let them die on the streets!
    We don't want to criminalize social problems. These folks got the right to commit public suicide.
    Okay. I'm glad I got that off my chest.
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #29 jesse kaellis
    #28
    I remember seeing shacks made out of old signs and refuse in rural NJ that black people lived in. This was in the early sixties. My father was involved in a project to build one family a house. He helped out with a hammer and nails. I live in a nice trailer park here in Nanaimo. A seniors park. There are a lot of parks here in Nanaimo and trailers are starting to lose their stigma. My trailer is like a little two bedroom house. It's a nice clean park and I bought it for a very reasonable price. Did you see the movie "Slumdog Millionaire?" I liked that movie. In Vancouver the Downtown Eastside -- it is beyond description. I have a short story. I wonder if I can fit it in on these boards.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    20/09/2016 #28 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    #26 Nope Jesse...no shanty towns or trailer parks here...but tent houses for emergency and rehab ops...but slums yeah...the makeshift tin roofed houses draped over bamboo frames border many opulent townships in cities like Mumbai and to a smaller extent in the other cities.
    Brian McKenzie
    20/09/2016 #27 Brian McKenzie
    @jesse kaellis In America, my height seems to always come up. Overseas ~ nobody gives a shit. I doubt I ever go back to the States. * I used my dating profile as a control gambit for a Statistics class - the results were that I was more apt to get an unsolicited mail if I was 6-0, smoked, had been divorced and had a Bachelors over a Master's Degree. A response to an email that I had sent followed the same trends. While the study garnered me an A for the class, it proved I am a square peg for a round hole for any of the 6 date site / app widgets. 8?/
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #26 jesse kaellis
    #24 I don't know if you have shanty towns in your country. The equivalent now, in places like Vegas are tent cities. Little pup tents. A discordant site among the glitter and opulence of Las Vegas. Thank you, Praveen.
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #25 jesse kaellis
    #23 I WAS 5'6" before all this spinal stuff happened. Thanks, Brian.
    Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    20/09/2016 #24 Praveen Raj Gullepalli
    Wow...that was one can-opener of a post Jesse! Strange how many phrases and idioms we take for granted without really knowing their import! And such fascinating rationale too! I loved that pic too! Such spartan rusticity! Just 50 kilometres from where i live, in a modern cosmopolitan city called Hyderabad, you will see the exact living conditions..same thatched roofs, adobe walls, the hens, the geese, the goats and the cows...in fact, right within this city you will see hamlets, villages, towns and city life, co-existing! Almost as if the past and present have laterally merged!
    Brian McKenzie
    20/09/2016 #23 Brian McKenzie
    5-6 on a generous day. 167 cm for our metric friends
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #22 jesse kaellis
    #21 You can't be any shorter than me, Brian. I was short, to begin with, and I lost precious inches due to my last spinal surgery. I've been sterile since I was 13. I lost my virginity to an eighteen-year-old woman. She took my virginity but left me a gift of gonorrhea which I carried for about four months until I could get to a clinic in Victoria. By then it was too late. Probably for the best. I wasn't repsonsible enough to raise children.
    Brian McKenzie
    20/09/2016 #21 Brian McKenzie
    I am short and have long cut the plumbing. I severed the line at 18, I never wanted kids, still don't.
    jesse kaellis
    20/09/2016 #20 jesse kaellis
    #18 You can sell your sperm if you're smart and tall. Thanks, Brian.
  10. ProducerDenise๐Ÿ Da Vinha Ricieri
    GROWTH MINDSET AS COMPETENCY TO EMPOWER STUDENTS, IN HIGHER EDUCATION
    GROWTH MINDSET AS COMPETENCY TO EMPOWER STUDENTS, IN HIGHER EDUCATIONI like the concept of growth mindset and I think to be an user of this kind of ability long before even knew what it meant. Well, a long time ago, very long before this definition, I always believed that I could improve my skills and both,...
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    Denise๐Ÿ Da Vinha Ricieri
    23/09/2016 #9 Denise๐Ÿ Da Vinha Ricieri
    #7 Kareen, this is a fact! You're right, but my experience is only about higher education. However, I believe that growth mindset already is a kind of birth-chip for Generations Millenium and Alpha, because they have a totally new world around them to estimulate growth mindset, and they response to with behaviors much better than ours, in same age.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    20/09/2016 #8 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Inspiring post. Worth to apply practically and enliven oneself!
    Kareen Havell
    18/09/2016 #7 Kareen Havell
    Growth mindset is also important in younger learners as well.
    Denise๐Ÿ Da Vinha Ricieri
    17/09/2016 #6 Denise๐Ÿ Da Vinha Ricieri
    #4 Good point about your son, Steven. I don't know how old he is, but this behavior is typical of Y and Z generations. They're highly compromised with solve problems, not to do tasks without meaning. That is an important difference to any educator pay attention and explore, in better strategies of learning design. As X generation (I presume you are too), we were teached to make tests, in order to reproduce and sustain ways of think and actuate on very well established professions. This was the "Boomers way of education" to us. For another side, we have to migrate from "to reproduce" for "to disrupt"... It was a very hard transition, that we did (and still doing) with success.
    I believe that our legacy to all new generations is to combine our experience between formal knowledge (tasks to do) with colaborative and empathic models of business (problems to solve) in order to open to them a necessary freedom to develop their own growth mindset.
    Congratulations to have picture it in your son's behavior! Not all parents are able to it. Thank you for your commentโœŒ๐Ÿผ๏ธ
    Steven Brooks
    17/09/2016 #5 Steven Brooks
    Good picture and description of growth mindset here.
    Steven Brooks
    17/09/2016 #4 Steven Brooks
    I enjoyed your Growth Mindset post @Denise๐Ÿ Da Vinha Ricieri. I recently commented to my son that he was smart, during a discussion about solving some kind of problem or dealing with some project. He said "I'm not smart." He does not do well on tests or "book learning." But he is, in the sense that he diligently looks for ways to solve problems. Sometimes in a selfish way - but he is often relentless until he gets to the solution and gets what he wants.
    Gert ๐Ÿ Scholtz
    16/09/2016 #3 Gert ๐Ÿ Scholtz
    #2 @Denise๐Ÿ Da Vinha Ricieri I hope your students know how lucky they are to have your teaching approach! I look forward to more posts and discussions from you Denise!
    Denise๐Ÿ Da Vinha Ricieri
    16/09/2016 #2 Denise๐Ÿ Da Vinha Ricieri
    #1 #1 Hi Gert! I only made a compilation of growth mindset concept for educational spaces and instructional design, which are my expertise. But, like you, I believe that expression can (and must) be applied to any area of knowledge. The illustrations were adapted from articles and another posts, and they reflect my approach with my students, daily. I'm glad you have read (sorry by errors, l'm improving my english!) and liked! Lets do more discussions. I'm in!
    Gert ๐Ÿ Scholtz
    16/09/2016 #1 Gert ๐Ÿ Scholtz
    @Denise๐Ÿ Da Vinha Ricieri Great informative post Denise. I find it interesting how you elaborate and refine the basic duality of growth and fixed mindset of Carol Dweck in education. Understanding this distinction would be beneficial not only in education but in all vocations and all walks of life. Thank you Denise.
  11. ProducerSteven Marshall

    Steven Marshall

    16/09/2016
    Is Group Think Dangerous?
    Is Group Think Dangerous?Editor's Note: I found this excellent article in the Harvard Business Journal by Art Markman. Read on and enjoy. As always, you can find all my blog posts from 2013 to the present on my website at...
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    Steven Marshall
    11/10/2016 #9 Steven Marshall
    #8 Thank you, Ali. I will read yur post very soon.
    Ali Anani
    11/10/2016 #8 Ali Anani
    Excellent share @Steven Marshall and I enjoyed reading it considerably. I am in full agreement with this buzz. Almost a year ago I published a presentation on Unequal opposites:
    http://www.slideshare.net/hudali15/unequal-opposites
    and arrived at similar conclusions and ways to bypass the ill effects of group thinking.
    aI fully agree also with the comment of @Donna-Luisa Eversley
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    11/10/2016 #7 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    @Steven Marshall great post... Individuals are influenced in how 'they think ' without knowing it. Practicing awareness and developing one's own thoughts is a good thing many do not take time to do.
    Steven Marshall
    18/09/2016 #6 Steven Marshall
    #5 Hi Toni,
    I like to float ideas beyond the leadership circle to encompass the people with the ants-eye view of the day-to-day challenges in any environment. If new ideas float with these folks, then I think they have passed a critical test. Then you have a perfect combination of convergence and divergence. Simple to do, too.
    Tony ๐Ÿ Rossi
    18/09/2016 #5 Tony ๐Ÿ Rossi
    It's always a tough balance between convergence to the extent needed for forward progress, but not to the extent of completely writing off outlying ideas that could really make a difference. I believe that the solution is as simple as maintain awareness of the tendency towards groupthink convergence. Such mindfulness should reap the benefits of collective creativity and innovation, and avoid the pitfalls. Much more so that trying to introduce a process to solve groupthink.
    Steven Marshall
    17/09/2016 #4 Steven Marshall
    #1 Thank you, @Steven Brooks, for your comments and tweeting the post forward. The traditional brainstorming model was maybe a good idea 40 years ago but it has been proven that it doesn't work in today's business environment.
    Steven Brooks
    17/09/2016 #3 Steven Brooks
    Group problem solving.
    Steven Brooks
    17/09/2016 #2 Steven Brooks
    "A key element of creativity is bringing existing knowledge to bear on a new problem or goal. The more people who can engage with that problem or goal, the more knowledge that is available to work on it." from @Steven Marshall View more
    "A key element of creativity is bringing existing knowledge to bear on a new problem or goal. The more people who can engage with that problem or goal, the more knowledge that is available to work on it." from @Steven Marshall's post on group efforts to solve problems. Close
    Steven Brooks
    17/09/2016 #1 Steven Brooks
    Great information about brain-storming and its failures in typical settings. The Divergence/Individual vs Convergence/Group model is new to me but I can see how it could work better than the other way. "Have your group members work alone to craft statements describing the problem." it is so important to be able to define what the problem IS and to define it correctly. Often we mis-characterize the problem and then we spend time trying to solve something that is not really the problem. Although that might lead to something useful itself, if we pay attention.
  12. ProducerPhillip Hubbell

    Phillip Hubbell

    16/09/2016
    History and the Lens of the Present
    History and the Lens of the Presentโ€œThe very concept of objective truth is fading out of the world. Lies will pass into history.โ€ George Orwell In my book โ€œInfinity Squaredโ€ I have a chapter about the nature of history as it relates to fiction. The idea is that history...
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    Paul Walters
    18/09/2016 #5 Paul Walters
    Thanks @Phillip Hubbell Nice piece !
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    17/09/2016 #4 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    Very interesting @Phillip Hubbell , one does get ideals and convictions from historical information and this impacts on the present. Without realizing it, we do weave past and present in fictional writings, including some facts to make the illusion appear more credible.
    Thought provoking
    Steven Brooks
    17/09/2016 #3 Steven Brooks
    Quality post shared on my Tooth Picks hive.
    Steven Brooks
    17/09/2016 #2 Steven Brooks
    Very good post, indeed. Great summary statement here, "Facts are facts, but opinions and declarations about the meaning of those facts are often used to promote the fiction of present day superiority even as it applies to the past." And this gem certainly has a lot of implications for today - "Using the standards of the 21st century to belittle people of the 18th century is on its face, biased and intellectually dishonest. This process has current political and social, implications and actions finding fault where no fault lies." When we read of the distant past history, are we reading fiction and thereby making a judgment on fiction? It's been said something like "The victors in wars write the history books." so there is necessarily a lot left out. Thanks for a good buzz!
    Randy Keho
    16/09/2016 #1 Randy Keho
    Very intriguing @Phillip Hubbell. I've often wondered if it will be possible, assuming there's a heaven and I'll be residing there, to meet and converse with people from the past -- to have great unanswered questions answered, etc.
    These are strange times. In some regard, the record is being set straight, as far as factual history, while, at the same time, there's probably never been so much revisionism. Perhaps, we should refer to history, in general, as revisionism. And, thanks for quoting one of my all-time favorite authors, Aldous Huxley.
  13. Don Hornsby

    Don Hornsby

    16/09/2016
    Success comes to the person who does today what you were thinking about doing tomorrow.

    Do what you should be doing today!
    Don Hornsby
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    Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    18/09/2016 #2 Jared Wiese, ๐Ÿ adding VALUE & RESULTS
    Thanks. Got me doing just that...
    Steven Brooks
    16/09/2016 #1 Steven Brooks
    Good advice. The ant works today because winter is tomorrow.
  14. ProducerJesper Christiansen
    Stop ceaselessly talking about making mistakes...
    Stop ceaselessly talking about making mistakes...โ€ฆand start learning the better (and faster) way nowInstead of focusing on mistakes, you have to pay attention to where you want to go, and what is helping you in that direction.I am currently, with great enthusiasm, reading my colleague Paul Z....
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    Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    15/09/2016 #3 Paul "Pablo" Croubalian
    A mistake is only a mistake if you learn nothing from it and repeat it. Experience is what we call a long series of unrepeated mistakes. Call it kaizen if you like.
    Steven Brooks
    15/09/2016 #2 Steven Brooks
    Welcome to beBee @Jesper Christiansen! Great post on how focusing on successes brings success.
    Steven Brooks
    15/09/2016 #1 Steven Brooks
    A friend and mentor of mine who is successful in real estate echos the same thing here - focus on what brings success and you will be successful. And there are plenty of examples of success - in others that are doing the same kinds of things you want to do - that you can learn from.
  15. Amy Walton

    Amy Walton

    14/09/2016
    A personal reflection on praying my sons through life.
    Amy Walton
    When a Child Goes to War: Reflections on Prayer and Letting Go - Amy Walton Coaching
    www.amywaltoncoaching.com As I prepared to write in my journal this morning, I said to myself, โ€œThereโ€™s something significant about todayโ€™s date.โ€ Then I remembered: Thirty years ago today, Russ and I presented our then 19-month-old son Jamie for baptism in our little...
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    Amy Walton
    17/09/2016 #3 Amy Walton
    Thanks, Steven!#1
    Steven Brooks
    14/09/2016 #2 Steven Brooks
    "But this I know: I made a commitment thirty some years ago to pray my sons through life, and even in the midst of some of my own straying down wrong roads, this I have done."
    Steven Brooks
    14/09/2016 #1 Steven Brooks
    Wonderful story. Welcome to beBee!
  16. Kevin Pashuk

    Kevin Pashuk

    14/09/2016
    Hiking along the 'cliffs'...

    Don't always believe what you see. Perspective is everything.

    This 'cliff' is about 2 inches (5 cm) high. I wanted to see if I could create the illusion of a large rock face through camera angles and focal length, and some tweaking in Lightroom and Google's Nik Collection.
    Kevin Pashuk
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    Kevin Pashuk
    14/09/2016 #3 Kevin Pashuk
    #2 Sometimes the best camera is the one you have with you. This shot was taken with my Samsung Galaxy Note5 phone, with some post processing. My main camera is a Nikon D7200 with a range of lenses. For still life in good lighting, the little phone camera is producing some great images. Thanks for asking Froilรกn.
    Froilรกn Pรฉrez
    14/09/2016 #2 Froilรกn Pรฉrez
    Dear @Kevin Pashuk, as always with your pics, I would like to know what camera and lens?
  17. Steven Brooks

    Steven Brooks

    14/09/2016
    Now might be a good time to delegate some of your responsibilities. A good post from Bill Gallagher.
    Steven Brooks
    Why Your Hard Work Is Hurting Your Business
    www.linkedin.com Chances are youโ€™re throwing yourself into your business 110%. Thatโ€™s just what entrepreneurs and executives tend to do. But what if I told you that there is an easier way? Maybe even, a better...
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  18. Steven Brooks

    Steven Brooks

    14/09/2016
    โ€œWho buys a company when the revenue generator leaves after the sale?โ€ An interesting question and a dilemma for some businesses.
    Steven Brooks
    The Profitable Business That Can't Be Sold - Tennessee Valley Group
    tnvalleygroup.com Describes a business that is very profitable but can't be...
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  19. ProducerLisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    Memories and What We Make of Them
    Memories and What We Make of ThemSometimes it can take half a lifetime for some of us to realize how lucky we were. I grew up 3 blocks from the shores of Lake Erie and spent my entire late spring and summer on the beach. I took this beautiful body of water for granted, or I thought...
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    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    06/09/2016 #35 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #34 Ha, love it @Cyndi wilkins, "What the hell were we thinking?" Right?!! I agree, wouldn't trade my life now for the teen years. They were fun and yes, filled with so many memories. Today, teens could not head to that beach with alcohol. I still look back and wonder how we even got away with it.
    Cyndi wilkins
    05/09/2016 #34 Cyndi wilkins
    We would go the 'private side' of the beach because, well... we could bring beer and drink! What a great mix, the sun , guys, lake, and beer, eh? OOOOH man! What a great memory @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher View more
    We would go the 'private side' of the beach because, well... we could bring beer and drink! What a great mix, the sun , guys, lake, and beer, eh? OOOOH man! What a great memory @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher...Then we got married and had kids...What the hell were we thinking? LOL! Just kidding...Best thing that ever happened to me...But I sure do miss the innocence of those days...Thanks for the memories;-) Close
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    04/09/2016 #33 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #32 Hi @Jose Carlos Robles, thanks for taking the time to read my buzz. You are so right, music does stir up many memories! I will listen to songs from a certain time period and feel like I'm transported back to a certain place in time, it's always good!
    Jose Carlos Robles
    03/09/2016 #32 Jose Carlos Robles
    Hi @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher , memories are great. Sometimes you can remember the moments with music, scent. Sometimes the places change but the memories stay. Nice article. โœŒ
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    03/09/2016 #31 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #30 @CityVP ๐Ÿ Manjit, LOVED the video, the message was a great one and good reminder of life in general. I ended up sharing the video on facebook. Thank you for your kind words!
    CityVP ๐Ÿ Manjit
    03/09/2016 #30 CityVP ๐Ÿ Manjit
    Memories are indeed what we make of them and the song made famous by Buzz Luhrman underscores this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTJ7AzBIJoI View more
    Memories are indeed what we make of them and the song made famous by Buzz Luhrman underscores this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTJ7AzBIJoI

    There is a great sense of personal freedom when I sit watching a large body of water, especially on a bright sunny day. The freedom is in being open to a beautiful construct of nature. To be present to nature is a tremendous form of life appreciation. Close
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    03/09/2016 #29 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #28 Hope it was a happier feeling than sad @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD! I still miss my dad on rare occasions and he passed away in the 70's. I think I miss the man I didn't get to know as I grew older. But, when I think of him it always brings a smile to my face. We never forget, no matter how long they've been gone. We just move on and replace the sadness with happy memories, thank goodness.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    03/09/2016 #28 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #27 Awe @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher, now I miss my Dad! (but it's a happy/sad feeling ~ what is it? not 'melancholy' -better than that. 'Longing?' I'm not sure.
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    02/09/2016 #27 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #25 What great memories your father left you with @David B. Grinberg! How much fun that must have been to run on Shea Field and taking home a part of it. Are you still a jets fan? Yes, I bet you will always cherish your father-son bonding, nothing like it!!
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    02/09/2016 #26 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #24 Thanks @Kevin Pashuk, glad you enjoyed this! I have noticed water in your photos and I'm sure I've missed some too! I never tire of viewing other's photos of the water. How nice that you work near Lake Ontario. I saw the photo you posted a few days ago, very nice!! Being near the water does clear the mind and help to refocus, doesn't it?
    David B. Grinberg
    02/09/2016 #25 David B. Grinberg
    What a wonderful read, @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher. My late father had season tickets for the NFL NY Jets football team when I was a kid. Thus, I have many fond memories of going to Shea Stadium in Queens with my dad for Sunday home games. I also recall running on the field and taking home part of the 50-yard line after the very last game the Jets played at Shea Stadium (prior to moving to Metlife Stadium in NJ). And while the Jets usually lost more than they won, the father-son bonding was always a winning experience I will always cherish.
    Kevin Pashuk
    02/09/2016 #24 Kevin Pashuk
    Enjoyed the read @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher. As a certified 'water person' I can fully identify. You will notice that many of my photos have water in them. I live and work near Lake Ontario and often retreat there when I have quiet work (reading or planning) to do, or just need a soul refresh.
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    02/09/2016 #23 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #17 Hi @Lada ๐Ÿก Prkic, such beautiful memories! You reminded me how romantic it was to be alone with 'a first love' near the water! I enjoy looking for seashells. I still do it. I took a photo last year of some shells I found in North Carolina, maybe I'll post it just for fun. Enjoy your trip, I'm sure it will be SO relaxing and thanks for sharing!!
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    02/09/2016 #22 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #16 Hi @Nicole Chardenet, what a great experience you shared! I bet you did have a lot of good and not so good memories come flooding back. The good old days of going from being an older teen to a young adult, the transition can be very tough. Cleveland has changed a lot, hasn't it?! I love the 4th St. district and Playhouse Square. Ah, you reminded me of yes, one of a gals bigger worries back then- guys and feeling like a dork. I bet so many of us felt that way!! Thanks for sharing. Where did you go to school in Cleveland?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/09/2016 #21 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #14 #16 #19 Just a note to express that I'm so touched that you both, @Pascal Derrien and @Nichole Chardenent had twinges of bad memories after reading this piece. I'm in awe at your melodic expressions of mixed feelings, with a slant on the negative ...that serves to remind us that those with good childhoods are so blessed to have what they have. My heart goes out to all children and I work to emphasize Positive Parenting. You Stir Me Along. Thank you.
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    02/09/2016 #20 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #15 Hi @Savvy Raj, thanks for reading and couldn't agree more, getting away is so good for the mind!
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    02/09/2016 #19 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #14 So true @Pascal Derrien, some memories which we all carry aren't so nice. It felt good to share a happier place in time. There are many when I look back, including the many moments shared with my children as they grew up! Thanks for reading.
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    02/09/2016 #18 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    #13 I had no idea sharing memories used to be discouraged @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, I'm glad that's encouraged now. Thanks for reading and glad you enjoyed!
    Lada ๐Ÿก Prkic
    02/09/2016 #17 Lada ๐Ÿก Prkic
    I agree with you dear @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher. I was born and live my entire life by the sea. My all memories are tied to a large body of water. Reminiscence on family walks in the winter and collecting the seashells washed up on the beach, the memories of the first loveโ€ฆโ€ฆ
    I think I couldn't live someplace where there's no view of the sunset behind the sea horizon. Am looking forward to tomorrow's outing with friends and family on a nearby island and making more memories for my book of life. :-)
    Nicole Chardenet
    02/09/2016 #16 Nicole Chardenet
    Memories can be both good and bad when you go back to old haunts...last year I went back to Ohio for an informal reunion with some old university friends and my ex-college roommate and I stayed together in a room downtown...in a motel that hadn't been there back in our day! What I noticed as I walked around by myself that first evening, waiting for Bonnie to arrive from Pittsburgh, is just how many memories and feelings came flooding back as I walked down old neighbourhoods and around my university campus. Both good and bad - the '80s came back to me, hugely, it was like stepping back in time but also surreally not, because it was Freshman Orientation Week and the kids that were there hadn't even been born then - in fact maybe their worried-looking parents hadn't met yet. Along with memories of fun times I hadn't thought about in years though, came a lot of unpleasant memories of insecurities, old loves gone sour, worries about money, feelings that I was a total dork. A couple of days later I asked Bonnie how it had been for her walking around, and she said the same thing...many happy memories, and a lot of memories of just how neurotic we all were, constantly moping and worrying about this or that. Still, it was great to hang out with my ex-peeps, and we had a lot of good times thta weekend. We do it every other year, next year's the next year!!!
  20. Jim ๐Ÿ Cody
    Jim ๐Ÿ Cody
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  21. Mark Blevins

    Mark Blevins

    01/09/2016
    Mark Blevins
    Being present may be enough
    www.linkedin.com Iโ€™ve been roaming our property daily since early June looking for natural things that are small, beautiful, and great subjects for camera close ups and macro shots. Itโ€™s been a profound experience...
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    Comments

    Steven Brooks
    02/09/2016 #1 Steven Brooks
    "Put away that cell phone. Turn away from that laptop. Turn off the brain-chatter. Be present, listen and observe. Turn toward the people in front of you and set an intention to discover something new about them. It may be all you need on your journey to becoming the best leader you can be." Mary Jo Asmus
  22. Joel Anderson

    Joel Anderson

    01/09/2016
    Joel Anderson
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    Deb ๐Ÿ Helfrich
    01/09/2016 #1 Deb ๐Ÿ Helfrich
    Sunrises and sunsets are extremely good at helping us put perspective - literally and figuratively - on the march of the days of our lives. Thanks for allowing me a glimpse of what your eyes and mind were focused on, @Joel Anderson
  23. Aaron Skogen

    Aaron Skogen

    30/08/2016
    I am super excited to have my first story published on The Good Men Project Website. Please share this link on FB and Twitter and help grow organic views on the site, as that can lead to an even broader syndication. I appreciate the help! I have a second article that will also appear on The Good Men project in the near future.

    A special thank you to @Sarah Elkins, @Christian Farber, A @Andrew Books and @John White, MBA for the advice as I made my first submissions to the Good Men Project. Unfortunately, it seems I did not make the change in the correct spot for the Bio, but I'll make sure to fix that going forward. Thanks you all for the help and insight, I appreciate each of you very much!
    Aaron Skogen
    Sunshine in a Bottle -
    goodmenproject.com A tapestry of painted...
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    Aaron Skogen
    03/09/2016 #17 Aaron Skogen
    #15 Aww @Mamen ๐Ÿ Delgado, so happy you were able to meet Little Dude in this story. He's pretty loveable ๐Ÿ˜˜. Hugs from Minnesota!
    Aaron Skogen
    03/09/2016 #16 Aaron Skogen
    #14 thank you so much @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, this comment from you means a lot to me. I sincerely appreciate it!
    Mamen ๐Ÿ Delgado
    02/09/2016 #15 Mamen ๐Ÿ Delgado
    You are so very special @Aaron Skogen! You and little Dude. I love you two, guys! โค
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/09/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Reminiscence bringing great joy here, on so many levels. I immersed myself in the Good Men Project: website, FB, including the membership. I really love all there is to offer, and this article is a genuinely sparkling island in a sea of mediocrity in Men's Health. My opinion. Congratulations on this great merit!
    Aaron Skogen
    01/09/2016 #13 Aaron Skogen
    #12 I'm so glad the story brought all those memories back @Steven Brooks! Wonderful memories indeed! I am sure she will. Thank you.
    Steven Brooks
    01/09/2016 #12 Steven Brooks
    When I was a Little Dude we'd camp at a lake. One time I found a sandy beach and shallow water teeming with baby painted map turtles. I really enjoyed those critters! Last summer, while kayaking with my daughter, we pulled onto a gravelly beach to explore and rest. I found a small heart-shaped rock and presented it to her as a token of my love. She greatly blushed and smiled. I'm sure she'll keep it forever. Thanks for stirring up happy memories!
    Steven Brooks
    01/09/2016 #11 Steven Brooks
    The real treasure is before you.
    Aaron Skogen
    01/09/2016 #10 Aaron Skogen
    #9 thank you so much @John White, MBA, I appreciate the support!
    John White, MBA
    01/09/2016 #9 John White, MBA
    @Aaron Skogen: Great piece. on the GMP! Congratulations and keep publishing over there. I hope we will see more GMP content on beBee soon. CC: @Matt ๐Ÿ Sweetwood @Andrew Books @Christian Farber @Chris Spurvey
    Aaron Skogen
    31/08/2016 #8 Aaron Skogen
    #5 Thank you @David B. Grinberg!
    Aaron Skogen
    31/08/2016 #7 Aaron Skogen
    #6 Thank you so much @Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher. I appreciate the kind comment and the shares! The funny thing about kids (and @Paul O'Neill and I have discussed this) is how often the kids seem to be teaching us just as much!
    Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    31/08/2016 #6 Lisa ๐Ÿ Gallagher
    What a great story @Aaron Skogen, I tweeted it from your page. I love how you call your little guy, "Little dude," and you are teaching him so many valuable lessons.
    David B. Grinberg
    31/08/2016 #5 David B. Grinberg
    Congrats @Aaron Skogen. I always knew you were a good man!
    Aaron Skogen
    31/08/2016 #4 Aaron Skogen
    #3 thank you @Pascal Derrien! I appreciate the support my friend!
    Pascal Derrien
    30/08/2016 #3 Pascal Derrien
    super news and very well deserved :-)
    Aaron Skogen
    30/08/2016 #2 Aaron Skogen
    #1 Thank you so much @Andrew Books! I appreciate your help and support!
    Andrew Books
    30/08/2016 #1 Andrew Books
    Good for you @Aaron Skogen. Congrats!
  24. Kevin Pashuk

    Kevin Pashuk

    01/09/2016
    From above, it looks like a toy my grandson left in the yard. Getting down to his point of view, it becomes a magical world to explore. Sometimes, looking at a situation from someone else's point of view changes everything. Kevin Pashuk
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    Comments

    Kevin Pashuk
    01/09/2016 #2 Kevin Pashuk
    #1 It does apply in writing as well as many other parts of life @Wayne Yoshida. Imagine how many of the world's issue would go away if people would genuinely try to see things from someone else's perspective? Thanks for sharing too!
    Wayne Yoshida
    01/09/2016 #1 Wayne Yoshida
    Thanks @Kevin Pashuk Perspective and point of view change things a lot. Applies to writing as well.
  25. Steven Brooks

    Steven Brooks

    01/09/2016
    Tower sets an example of pegging employee rewards - smaller workweek and more income - to real performance. Everyone seems to benefit as a result.
    Steven Brooks
    What Happened When I Moved My Company To A 5-Hour Workday
    www.fastcompany.com A little over a year ago, Tower Paddle Boards started letting employees leave by lunchtime and offering 5...
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