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  1. ProducerSteve Brady

    Steve Brady

    28/07/2016
    Profile Under Construction
    Profile Under ConstructionThanks to Charles David Upchurch for this idea.Until I get my profile information completed, please refer to:http://linkedin.com/in/steve-brady-62629622Steve...
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  2. ProducerPascal Derrien

    Pascal Derrien

    23/06/2016
    Otto Dix: When Ambivalence Has No Equivalence
    Otto Dix: When Ambivalence Has No EquivalenceI have the option to work from home or from the office when it suits me, when I am in the company building one of my habits at lunch time is to grab a paper and read a couple of articles over my salad and favourite granola yoghurt. Last month that I...
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    Comments

    Pascal Derrien
    04/08/2016 #29 Pascal Derrien
    #26 thanks for adding some context and other pointers to the discussion :-)
    Pascal Derrien
    04/08/2016 #28 Pascal Derrien
    #27 thanks @Don Kerr and thanks form sharing :-)
    Don Kerr
    25/07/2016 #27 Don Kerr
    I too just came upon this post and am so glad to have found it. Like @Dean Owen I have been missing your missives here. Perhaps it is the lack of Irish lilt I find lacking with other writers;) @Pascal Derrien Regardless, the Otto Dix story was clearly waiting there for you to be picked up and although his images are grim they are visceral and truthful unlike some wartime art which was used to glorify battle. Thanks for illuminating this aspect of history. Will share.
    CityVP Manjit
    25/07/2016 #26 CityVP Manjit
    Having finished reading this I simply needed to know more and as I found a Guardian article that satisfied this curiosity https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/may/14/first-world-war-german-art-otto-dix more is what I got. This helped me understand the role of Dada, the connection to German War Artists and the difference between English War Poets.

    I got a sense of a highly patriotic man who was curious about war and on realizing the reality and brutality of it, shared his psyche of that which drove other war artists mad - I am sure a part of this is self-preservation of Dix's mental state, otherwise to keep such horror in one's head is a recipe for madness or suicide. That he also survived the Nazi's who were very much aware of his "degenerate" art only makes Dix even more fascinating to me.

    The guardian article provided me with intro's to the world of George Grosz and I quickly understood from reading that Otto Dix was living his art, whereas another painter Max Beckermann is more representative of art movements. In this regard I identify with Otto Dix as I have already identified with Henri Matisse - in the case of Matisse I enjoyed his originality and humility, which is quite a contrast to the ego and extrovertly admired and loved Picasso.

    Even though I only have this and the Guardian article to go by, I can see in Otto Dix an extraordinarily honest being, maybe initially naive enough to be seduced by patriotic callings to fight a war that took war into an even uglier mechanized dimension. That it took only 21 years for the world to make the same mistake twice tells me that very few paid attention to Otto Dix's hellish warning. I am not sure that global leaders still identify with this for global leaders won't risk their own children where there is hell.
    Gerald Hecht
    24/06/2016 #25 Gerald Hecht
    #24 @Pascal Derrien this whole piece is great --and then I just happened upon your piece, the way you happened upon the story...
    Pascal Derrien
    24/06/2016 #24 Pascal Derrien
    #23 every now and again I get it somewhat right :-) thanks for the encouraging comment too
    Gerald Hecht
    24/06/2016 #23 Gerald Hecht
    #22 @Pascal Derrien it really was an unexpected stimulant this morning
    Pascal Derrien
    24/06/2016 #22 Pascal Derrien
    #21 no problem @Gerald Hecht :-)
    Gerald Hecht
    24/06/2016 #21 Gerald Hecht
    @Pascal Derrien thank you for putting this in a place, where I was able to stumble upon it!
    Pascal Derrien
    24/06/2016 #20 Pascal Derrien
    #19 comment right on the button :-) @Ken Boddie
    Ken Boddie
    24/06/2016 #19 Ken Boddie
    Not often, @Pascal Derrien, that we stumble by chance across something that tugs at our emotions. This picture paints a thousand words, telling of the woeful reality of war - blood, guts and all. Thanks for sharing, and for reminding us that when we ignore history it has a nasty habit of repeating itself.
    Pascal Derrien
    24/06/2016 #18 Pascal Derrien
    #17 thank you for taking the time to read and commenting :-)
    debasish majumder
    24/06/2016 #17 debasish majumder
    Great post sir @Pascal Derrien. enjoyed reading. thank you very much for sharing such insightful post.
    Pascal Derrien
    24/06/2016 #16 Pascal Derrien
    #15 thank you for dropping by @Joanna Hofman :-)
    Joanna Hofman
    24/06/2016 #15 Joanna Hofman
    Awesome post, Pascal. I understand your point, yes, our path to knowledge is more about our personal journey than university education. I graduated two universities but a real journey to the knowladge has started after graduation. Thank you for this wonderful piece of share...
    Pascal Derrien
    23/06/2016 #14 Pascal Derrien
    #13 the power of evolution versus static history in one way I guess he anticipated the contradicting forces at play :-)
    Deb Helfrich
    23/06/2016 #13 Deb Helfrich
    Very Hieronymous Bosch, as well as the comparison to Goya. Thanks for sharing what you learned, @Pascal Derrien, because this is an interesting case study in how the art - the images - stand the test of time, while the words that were said back then about him seem old of place and wrong based on our future perspectives.
    Pascal Derrien
    23/06/2016 #12 Pascal Derrien
    #11 actually think you are right @Kevin Pashuk :-) I started the draft on the same day I read the article and let it rest for couple of weeks
    Kevin Pashuk
    23/06/2016 #11 Kevin Pashuk
    That's why I like the concept of serendipity @Pascal Derrien. There was a reason all the other papers were missing. You were able to get the inspiration for this post, which I thoroughly enjoyed.
    Pascal Derrien
    23/06/2016 #10 Pascal Derrien
    #8 yes agree @Donna-Luisa Eversley the only description I could come up with was un=humanly human I don't even know if it correct in English but I guess people will get my point :-)
  3. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    01/05/2016
    Sara Jacobovici
    Sara Jacobovici - The Trauma Therapist Project
    www.thetraumatherapistproject.com Bio Sara Jacobovici (pronounced Yakobovich) is a Creative Arts Psychotherapist. Sara has been working in the health and mental health field for 30 years, specializing in using the creative arts in Trauma work. She received her Bachelor’s of Music...
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    23/06/2016 #10 Sara Jacobovici
    #5 Sorry to hear about your negative experiences @Brian McKenzie. My perspective is that any one, in any profession, who presents in a false way should not be trusted. As far as medication is concerned. Over prescribing and easy access to prescription drugs is a huge issue. Again from my perspective, consumers/patients have to be aware and an active partner in treatment. Wishing you all the best.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 Hey, I just went off all but my most life-saving drugs! Woo-Hoo! Man, was I ever feeling like I was 97 years old! So I totally get that one, Amen. As for 'talking about it,' #1 God; #2 a true friend who has been through the same ordeal. #3 I think you're perfectly normal, and I love what is uncommon in you: transparency. Keep it, my friend! Keep it!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 It is all my pleasure.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    23/06/2016 #6 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Best of luck and much success in your endeavors, @Sara Jacobovici and thank you for sharing the correct pronunciation of your last name.
    Brian McKenzie
    23/06/2016 #5 Brian McKenzie
    I live in a head shrinker free zone. Not interested in being associated with the fake sunshine, over emoted 'feels' and never ending supply of pharma candy.
    Sara Jacobovici
    23/06/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    #3 Dear @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, your ongoing support is much appreciated. Thank you.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Sara Jacobovici is uniquely qualified to help patients with trauma, through use of the creative arts. I look forward to learning more about her work and accomplishments!

    #DrMargaretAranda
    @Leckey Harrison, @Kimberly Lewis, @Brian McKenzie, @Lisa Gallagher, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Dr. Allen Brown, @Rebel Brown, @Lisa Gallagher, @Cat Gal U., @Ali Anani, Ph.D.
    Sara Jacobovici
    22/06/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 Thanks for your good wishes @Ali Anani. Yes, I know the way the name is spelled is tricky. Often people think it's Italian but it is the original Romanian spelling. (Close to Italian from a Latin point of view.)
    Ali Anani
    22/06/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    Good luck in your great endeavors @Sara Jacobovici. Thank you for correcting the way I used to read your surname. I know now i at the end is not pronounced.
  4. Sara Jacobovici

    Sara Jacobovici

    21/06/2016
    Everything we do serves a purpose and the root of that purpose is survival.
    Sara Jacobovici
    The Fourth F in Survival - Sara Jacobovici
    www.arts-psychotherapy.com Our primitive brain is wired to interpret the sensory information it receives in terms of safety and danger. We then asses the level of danger and...
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    Comments

    Sara Jacobovici
    21/06/2016 #2 Sara Jacobovici
    #1 Much appreciated @Ali Anani.
    Ali Anani
    21/06/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    I have faith in what you write @Sara Jacobovici. This buzz is just one example explaining why I do.
  5. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    02/06/2016
    The root of PTSD is traumatic stress. It doesn't necessarily need a Big T trauma. Learn about trauma and stress. How they work in the body/brain organism. You'll understand PTSD. In front of the flag, in uniform, the face of PTSD. June is PTSD Awareness month
    Leckey Harrison
    Raise Your Resilience
    RaiseYourResilience.com Find meaning, connection, and...
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    18/07/2016 #2 Leckey Harrison
    #1 So am I! I am doing well! Thanks, hope you are as well.
    Steve Brady
    18/07/2016 #1 Steve Brady
    Hi Leckey......We seem to "meet" everywhere! Which is a good thing! Just trying to get my head around BeBee at present. Hope you are well.
  6. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    30/05/2016
    I approach things as a traumatologist. Not a certified one yet, that starts in July. But I've been immersed in it for three years.

    Regarding the question, "Why Isn't America conscious," I consider this: knowing that trauma ab=nd stress have negative influences on the brain, what happens if we as a society begin to release this stress and heal the trauma in our bodies? That potentially then means the brain in higher neurologic capacity comes on line, and what if that makes America conscious?
    Leckey Harrison
    A Neuroscientist’s Radical Theory of How Networks Become Conscious
    www.wired.com It's a question that's perplexed philosophers for centuries and scientists for decades: Where does consciousness come from? Neuroscientist Christof Koch, chief scientific officer at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, thinks he has an...
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