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Traumatologistas - beBee

Traumatologistas

~ 100 buzzes
Artigos, notícias sobre os avanços da tecnologia, e informações sobre a carreira dos profissionais que trabalham dentro dessa especialidade médica.
Buzzes
  1. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    23/06/2016
    Kal Jurdi and David Berceli teaching TRE in Lebanon. Kal goes back to teach in the refugee camps in Lebanon.
    Demonstation of TRE
    Demonstation of TRE Kal conducting workshop with...
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    17/07/2016 #2 Leckey Harrison
    #1 This is where TRE was "born" in essence. Where Dr. Berceli first noticed the human response to a sudden threat. It didn't matter to nationality, religion, or race. Everyone in their bombarded building responded the same. The rest was connecting the dots (Sudan), confirming (ethology), further education (massage, bioenergetics, etc), and the revolutionary question: "Can I reverse engineer this process to self-induce and self-regulate it to eliminate the suppressed natural response?"
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    WoW. Your addition to beBees solidity is awesome. Just love the historic roots, and the non-Western emphasis that is totally refreshing and "out of the box.' Perfect for those that have exhausted both Traditional and Alternative Medicine, still searching for the magic bullet. Lovin' it. This is a real service for those in dire need, who are also bound to be very depressed and sullen about life, as if they are living in a fog. Thank you for Sharing! Great for people to see: @Jim Cody, @Javier beBee, @Juan Imaz, @Dr. Allen Brown, @Lisa Gallagher, @Sara Jacobovici, @Randy Smith, @Stacy Hall, @Ray Looker.
  2. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    05/06/2016
    Trauma --- traumatic stress --- PTSD. The list is not extensive. It isn't expicit about adverse childhood experiences. June is PTSD Awareness month. There is a cure. Leckey Harrison
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    04/07/2016 #18 Leckey Harrison
    #17 I think one thing we've seen over time is that those who were violent and are in prison, had "hurt" at the foundation of their lives. James Gilligan wrote a book about it several years ago. The obvious presence of developmental trauma is clear: hurt people, hurt people. It doesn't mean all hurt people will, but just as clearly, sane healthy people don't. I think also we might see that even in icons, like Dr. Martin Luther King, that there were behaviors one would consider less than optimal. President Bill Clinton comes to mind. What prompts a man to commit adultery (a relative moral label), and then, to lie about it? If he was healthy in his relationships, would he have done that? If he were responsible, would he have owned it instead? Nothing is absolute, including the idea that hurt people, hurt people. When we look closely though, in my experience, it either happens via psychological hurt, and at the very least, self-hurt.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #17 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 I wonder who has studied the kids of abusive/alcoholic parents who haven't carried on the bad behavior. For another time, but aren't we all so glad to know that love can still conquer all? @Lisa Gallagher View more
    #11 I wonder who has studied the kids of abusive/alcoholic parents who haven't carried on the bad behavior. For another time, but aren't we all so glad to know that love can still conquer all? @Lisa Gallagher, @Rebel Brown, @Leckey Harrison, @Gerald Hecht @Dr. Allen Brown. Those who end up being loving, caring parents are definitely to be commended. ☺️ Close
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Not to pound it in, but here's an interesting animal study over 33 years of observation in 5 large families. Regarding infant abuse recurring over the generations: "Conclusions: This study provides the first evidence of genealogical effects on infant abuse in nonhuman primates. Several characteristics of infant abuse in socially living macaques suggest that this phenomenon could represent a good animal model for studying the etiology of child abuse and neglect." Reference: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213497000069
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 I did it again. Reference on comment below, #14 on the right side: http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/3/560.short
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Study results of almost 7,000 Indian men who, in childhood, had witnessed their father abusing their mother: "Conclusions These findings from northern India are congruent with those from other geographical/cultural settings in suggesting that witnessing violence between one's parents while growing up is an important risk factor for the perpetration of partner violence in adulthood." @Lisa Gallagher, @Rebel Brown, @Leckey Harrison, @Gerald Hecht, @Sara Jacobovici...
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Oopsies. Reference on my #11 comment: http://www.jsad.com/doi/abs/10.15288/jsa.2003.64.472
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Definitely worthy of a Buzz. Here's a 3-generational study of sons of alcoholics: "Results indicate continuity of aggression across three generations and also indicate that the child's pathway into risk for later Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) is not simply mediated by parental alcoholism, but is carried by other comorbid aspects of family functioning, in particular aggression. /☝️ The patient population here may be most important in picking 'the right man." ☝️ i.e., 'don't have kids' with an alcoholic man, esp if his parents were alcoholics. And grandparents, especially. @Lisa Gallagher, @Rebel Brown , @Leckey Harrison, @Gerald Hecht, @Sara Jacobovici...hmm.
    Lisa Gallagher
    30/06/2016 #11 Lisa Gallagher
    #6 @Rebel Brown, I have to agree with you that not all abused people grow up to be abusers. My mother was horribly abused yet she never abused us. She guided us with love. I honestly believe she got through life fantasizing about the life she would have once she got away from her parents. I believe she put her fantasies into action and we were very blessed to have had such a beautiful soul as a mother. I'm not sure what leads an abused person to abuse others but in many cases they don't repeat their own history. I have no stats so I don't discredit that this is a problem with abusers as well. I agree with not putting everyone into one category. This is a great topic and should be discussed. Thank you for tagging me too @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    30/06/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 @Sara Jacobovici: Absolutely agree that awareness is key. I have seen so many patients with this "generational" family abuse pattern...and the devastation inflicted on abandoned children as young as 15 yrs of age (have discussed with @Selim Yeniçeri, @Dr. Allen Brown, @Brian McKenzie, and more). I see the devastation, and have been both a battered wife and the wife of an alcoholic. So I've lived it, too. Please feel free to join my Hive: named "Invisible Illnesses: Child Abuse:" ( https://www.bebee.com/group/invisible-illnesses-child-abuse ). Also extending this Hive invite to @Rebel Brown, @Mamen Delgado, @Deb Helfrich, @Cat Gal U., @Ali Anani, @CityVP Manjit, @Leckey Harrison, and opened up to all. @Gerald Hecht, @Lisa Gallagher, @Kirstie-Sweetie Louise, too.
    Rebel Brown
    30/06/2016 #9 Rebel Brown
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Hey sistah. I havent been commenting here much because I have fundamentally different perspectives from most of the comments here, based on both my experience and my coaching clients, many of whom come to me to release the trauma of PTSD and move on with their lives, quickly and effectively.. They aren't abusers, I'm not an abuser and so assuming that the abused are the source of abuse is much too broad a generalization for me to comfortably accept. I know too many people who were never abused that are some of the nastiest abusers ever. Especially i today's world where the masses are being constantly programmed toward fear which then breeds anger and violence. But I wanted to thank you for tagging me.
    Rebel Brown
    30/06/2016 #8 Rebel Brown
    #7 I believe that generalizations are dangerous in their intent and result @Leckey, and that insanity and rage are often undetectable. Its certainly not only abused people that hurt other people. So saying all abused people hurt people is unfair in my world. But thats the beauty of our lives - we all get to have our opinions. Blessings...
    Leckey Harrison
    27/06/2016 #7 Leckey Harrison
    #6 It's not that it's a guarantee, Rebel. It is fairly common though. Hurt people, hurt people doesn't mean that it HAS to happen, but that healthy sane people don't hurt people.
    Rebel Brown
    27/06/2016 #6 Rebel Brown
    Well, as an horribly abused child (my therapists told me to call it what it was, torture), I'd like to point out that I've never abused anyone and have the opposite response to many of the assumptions here. I've worked with a number of abused women and men. None of them were abusers either. In fact, every one of them became exactly the opposite type of person. Loving, caring,going out of the way to be different than their abusers. As with all things, I suggest to clients that they not apply broad brush applications to people about anything. We are ALL unique in our mind programming, and we all deserve to be given the respect of a positive perception until proven otherwise. Negative generalized assumptions be gone.
    Leckey Harrison
    27/06/2016 #5 Leckey Harrison
    #1 Hurt people, hurt people. The cycle continues. An activated sympathetic system becomes the norm, and the emotions associated with it.
    Sara Jacobovici
    27/06/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    #3 Thank you @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD for bringing my attention to this update and its message as well as your comment. I will compact the complexity of the topic at hand into one word that is appropriate to the posting of: awareness. Imperative that we as a community are aware of the fact that traumatic events do take place and will impact on individuals as well as the community. That the impact can vary and to be aware of the signs and means to address those signs. Important that we use information and learning to treat each individual and individual situation with educated awareness and not preconceived ideas of what will happen, just what the potential of what may happen is and to ensure the support necessary for a positive outcome.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/06/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Sara Jacobovici, @Leckey Harrison, @Rebel Brown, @Randy Keho, @Mamen Delgado: In the continuum of the child who underwent child abuse, let us consider: (1) Phase I: The (abused) adult who underwent intervention(s) to mitigate their own precious salvation; (2) Phase 2: The newborn babies of the abused parent, who has no idea what is ahead of her/him after looking into their newborn's eyes with true Love; (3) Phase 3: The parent's potential capacity (and statistical likelihood) of inflicting mental, physical, and emotional harm onto their baby as (s)he grows; (4) Phase 4: Transformation to consider all human actions to be either (A) Love or (B) a call for Love. (5) Phase 5: Forgiveness. Please help me forward to other interested parties I miss here: @Ali Anani, @debasish majumder, @Mohammed A. Jawad, @Mohamed S, @Daniel, ..... thank you.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/06/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Also note and wish that child abuse was specifically mentioned, but would you agree: child abuse leads to the next generation of child abuse, etc....and perhaps it is these abused children that grow up to be abusive husbands and wives, with the mental issues becoming more dominant if not addressed at the time, i.e., in childhood, youth, or teenage years. Increased awareness for Teens & Youth may be a good strategy working towards a solution? Would love your insight.
  3. ProducerLeckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    03/06/2016
    Healing Trauma
    Healing Trauma"Trauma is the most avoided, ignored, denied, misunderstood, and untreated cause of human suffering." - Peter Levine, Healing Trauma, page 7.I agree. I think I could add that stress rolls in at the number twocause. The solution can be simple....
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    Comments

    Neville Gaunt
    04/07/2016 #16 Neville Gaunt
    #15 @Margaret Aranda - simple advice.... will others use it?
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 My biggest attitude of unrelenting Perseverance plowed me through enough to put me in a conversation that almost no MD's can have with millions of patients...and what we are doing here is so positive...I'm 'curious and curious-er' to see where we evolve together in one year. For me, I walk with the Lord most heavily, and I believe in miracles. My famous quote (haha) is: "You see a crack in the cement. If only one dandelion grows out of a crack in the cement, then that dandelion should be You." ~ I just Googled myself the other day and discovered the quote is official. So, keep track of your phrases and Quotes. Gather them as your essence, and you will have allowed your values, your inspiration to live on in one small way. I would like to see that for each one of us.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #10 Fascinating that the memory of drowning came to you....you should write a Buzz/short story on that, as I almost drowned as a child, also. I'll share my story, too....and wonder.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 Oh...don't I know That One all too well! "It's All in Your Head." Yup. These have to be the worst words a doctor can tell any patient.
    Leckey Harrison
    03/07/2016 #12 Leckey Harrison
    #9 Where I think cognitive tools are helpful is in the narrative we all live. It sometimes helps to put t all together, and, a fresh set of perspective and eyes can't hurt. I just don't start there. My body is the bacon, ammo, and motorcycle. As Bessel van der Kolk, titled his book, "The Body Keeps the Score." The body can even it.
    Neville Gaunt
    02/07/2016 #11 Neville Gaunt
    Thanks for prompting me @Gary Sharpe and I was most taken by the last para - worth repeating ... "It has to start with each of us healing our own hurts. Hurt people, hurt people. Not policies, or warm fuzzies talking about how great the world would be. It requires doing the work. It isn't a microwave solution, but the change will begin immediately. Then you won't have to just imagine the world as an invocation, you'll start to feel it. You'll start to live it." @Leckey Harrison. Because the first and last step is raising one's awareness and that applies to everyone and everything - not just the extreme nature of trauma. The one and only thing we can control is ourselves, our attitude and behaviour and that's probably what people don't like to believe, but it's true. That's the biggest elephant in the room so we just have to deal with it. Gary refers to Mind Fit and from 20 years of experience it's a process that works in your context, any context. Happy to explore more if it makes sense.
    Gary Sharpe
    02/07/2016 #10 Gary Sharpe
    @Leckey Harrison very interesting, because one of the things I wanted to share about my experience with counselling https://www.bebee.com/producer/@gary-sharpe/my-experience-with-counselling-and-parkinson-s-disease is that done right it is not just about talking and listening but it gives you the mind tools to be able to start tackling these things for yourselves. Another source which helped me to even begin to think about what traumatic events may have occured in my life which could have contributed to developing Parkinsonism's is @Neville Gaunt's "MindFit". Interestingly, I was just lying here before turning on the computer thinking back to past events to see if I could uncover anything. And I remembered an incident as a young man where I very nearly drowned.
    Brian McKenzie
    02/07/2016 #9 Brian McKenzie
    I never found talking about it did any good; especially since the prevailing wind of sentiment seems to be - get over it, it's all in your head, that was decades ago,.... etc. And the 'clinical' solution always seems to be the next and new pharma - candy that they are getting paid to push. F*ck - just give me bacon, ammo, and a motorcycle and I will deal with the shit on my own.
    Leckey Harrison
    02/07/2016 #8 Leckey Harrison
    #7 Thanks!
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    02/07/2016 #7 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Welcome to beBee Leckey Harrison.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 I'm happy to have you here, too, @Leckey Harrison...our Invisible Illness population is so neGlEcTEd.....the rEsTLesSnESs iS jUsT aN eChO. @Anees Zaidi, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani, @Deb Helfrich, @debasish majumder, @Gary Sharpe, @Brian McKenzie, @Dr. Allen Brown.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/06/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Well, you know I just couldn't stop reading your Buzzes and was waiting for one just a mite 'Buzzier'...and low and behold! You ROCK! This is waiting for you: https://www.bebee.com/group/invisible-illnesses-traumatology
    Leckey Harrison
    03/06/2016 #4 Leckey Harrison
    #1 Thank you, @Javier beBee!
    Leckey Harrison
    03/06/2016 #3 Leckey Harrison
    #2 Thanks, Jessica. You will. I might be the spear point for a while, but that's okay. Trauma is the number 1 planetary health crisis. I wouldn't be surprised if you could contribute!
    Jessica Robinson
    03/06/2016 #2 Jessica Robinson
    Interesting, I think that bringing awareness about this issue is great. Thank you for this wonderful initiative, hope to read more about this in beBee!
    Javier beBee
    03/06/2016 #1 Javier beBee
    Thanks for sharing it ! Welcome.to beBee !