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  1. ProducerTony Rossi

    Tony Rossi

    11/07/2016
    Why Veterans Don't Use All Our Benefits
    Why Veterans Don't Use All Our BenefitsThere was once a time to be the Lone Sailor, or that Stoic Soldier, standing watch over your post and our country; for Veterans, that wtime has passed. It's OK to grab hold of those hands reaching out to you.It's been 6 years since I was medically...
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    Comments

    Mark Tillman Davis
    14/07/2016 #10 Mark Tillman Davis
    #6 Here's the problem with those broad generalizations. 1) Homeless veteran rates are impossible to calculate because they rely upon unconfirmed self identification. If I had a dollar for every non-homeless person who has told me they were a veteran and then determined they had never been in the military, well I could take a few days off. 2) Veteran suicides and attempts are overwhelmingly unrelated to military service. Moreover, the vast majority of in service suicides, attempts and ideations are by servicemembers who have never deployed. And who exactly is stuck in the middle? With 30 years of service until I retired last year, stuck in the middle usually meant, "I want someone to do this for me". Veterans deserve compassion and support. However, the expectation is that 4, 8 or 30 years of service entitles us to a modicum of respect, not return trips to the trough. Particularly when it starts to wear on the 98% of the population who are paying the bills and have challenges of their own. Today, veterans are set up for success like at no point in our history. We don't have a veteran support problem; we have a cultural problem.
    Tony Rossi
    14/07/2016 #8 Tony Rossi
    #7 Thanks, John. I'm very proud of my service, and struggle with the fact I couldn't end it on my own terms. The years I spent in limbo dealing with medical issues exposed me to an oft hidden group of transitioning service members and Vets that didn't feel they had a voice. We know we're responsible for setting our own path, but I do feel Veterans should be entitled to a bit more support than the average Joe. No hand-outs, but we should extend a hand to help our brothers and sisters that are struggling.
    John Valledor
    14/07/2016 #7 John Valledor
    After 35 years of service and multiple combat tours going back to Desert Storm I passed my entire 9/11 GI Bill to my children. Thank you for your service to a proud and grateful nation. Many gripe and bitch about things in America, but few display the kind of responsible citizenship you did--thank you! You represent less than 1 percent of the US population. A fact that is both amazing and sad at the same time.
    Tony Rossi
    14/07/2016 #6 Tony Rossi
    #5 Mark- Those were broad generalizations explaining what has happened over the last 2 decades. Changes in the late 2000's have been phenomenal. I too utilized the Post 9/11 GI Bill successfully. The problem is the momentum we've got now still isn't enough to overcome the 15-20 yrs surrounding 9/11. Veteran homeless rates are the highest ever, and we're still losing 20 vets a day to suicide. Talking about all the new programs and efforts is great, but it's those that are stuck in the middle that should be our focus.
    Mark Tillman Davis
    14/07/2016 #5 Mark Tillman Davis
    The Post 9/11 GI Bill is incredible and far and beyond any educational benefit funded by the taxpayer for previous generations of veterans. Vending issues/complaints usually revolve around the veteran not taking the appropriate steps to process their benefits. Throughout earning a B.A. and an MBA on two different GI Bill programs (thank you, taxpayers), I never had a single problem because I did my part. Additionally, the VA is not "plagued with problems". There are some VA hospitals with issues that should be addressed. It is more media hype than substance. The real problem is the entitlement mentality that is becoming pervasive within the services. You can serve 3-4 years and get a four year degree free of charge if you choose wisely. How is that a problem? Before I "lay down my pride", I'm going to show a little gratitude.
    Brian McKenzie
    14/07/2016 #3 Brian McKenzie
    For those of you dealing with the VA for medical / health / certification claims - drop me a note. I will help you through the hoops. No charge - just giving back to the crew that supported me when I was in.
    Tony Rossi
    12/07/2016 #2 Tony Rossi
    #1 @Randy Keho - I think it's mostly because my generation of Vets is facing an entirely new set of challenges (insufficient GI Bill vending, VA plagued with problems, enemies without nations, not easily recognizable) so the support groups and systems haven't caught up. Thereby, advocacy lags woefully behind. All that said, thank you for your support, Randy!
    Randy Keho
    12/07/2016 #1 Randy Keho
    Thank you for furthering awareness of the issue. My vet friends are from the Vietnam-era, and I make it a point to honor those who have died and befriend the rest. I know many. I must admit, though, that it is difficult to recognize contemporary veterans, although Vietnam-era organizations welcome and provide services for all vets. I don't know why this is, other than they probably just want to blend back into society and carry on with their lives. All vets do.
  2. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    04/07/2016
    Veterans in Crisis: Don't Let Them Give Up the Fight
    Veterans in Crisis: Don't Let Them Give Up the FightToday's the Fourth of July, 2016. It's a beautiful day in northern Illinois. It's quiet, except for the birds who sing their morning song. I feel an air of peace embrace me. I pray for this feeling to last, knowing full well it will not.I've just...
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    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    09/07/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 It's all real. Tell it. Share the ire and the raw. That's what is real reality.
    Brian McKenzie
    08/07/2016 #7 Brian McKenzie
    #6 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD i am writing about it in my Kyrzbekistan novella with as much ire, disdain and disgust that I can muster. It matters not, the beating drums still call. I am not so old that I cant still get in the fight, I am past young enough to give a shit about the happy ending.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 @Brian McKenzie: That is because no matter where you live, you can't take the 'Warrior' out of you. So write about it! You've already pieced enough together to write a Buzz. Fight with pen!
    Brian McKenzie
    06/07/2016 #5 Brian McKenzie
    #4 I am getting antsy - the itch of war needs to be scratched; and it is driving me crazy to not be in the thick of it. F*cking bastards.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 @Brian McKenzie: and that is why I live to serve. Because they did.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Pushes and pulls me to shreds that are theirs, too. I just want to put them back together. Extremely compelling, @Randy Keho.
    Brian McKenzie
    05/07/2016 #2 Brian McKenzie
    The fight, I can handle - it's the sitting on the sidelines waiting to be called in that is beyond frustrating.
    mohammed khalaf
    04/07/2016 #1 mohammed khalaf
    we appreciated that sacrifices and honor it ,specialy in iraq thank you to comimmoratiom
  3. Jim Cody

    Jim Cody

    04/03/2016
    Jim Cody
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