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Veterans: Mental Health - beBee

Veterans: Mental Health

~ 100 buzzes
We may not know what you did, and what you saw...but in our eyes, you are still a kick-ass honor!
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  1. ProducerLeckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    14/10/2016
    A revolutionary approach to healing PTSD
    A revolutionary approach to healing PTSDThe healing paradigm is shifting. I agree with van der Kolk because I used TRE®, a body based modality, to heal my C-PTSD, and whatever came along for the ride in my time as a firefighter/EMT. Let me ask: If you could heal your trauma, mostly by...
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  2. ProducerChristine Stevens
    Riding for a Reason: One Entrepreneur's Mission to Raise Awareness for Suicide Prevention
    Riding for a Reason: One Entrepreneur's Mission to Raise Awareness for Suicide Prevention About six years ago, I was sitting at my computer doing something unimportant when my daughter walked in in tears and told me one of her dearest friends killed himself. He was only 18 and he jumped from a building in downtown Fairfax, ending his...
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    Comments

    Lisa Gallagher
    12/10/2016 #15 Lisa Gallagher
    What a great story. I'm so happy Josh survived and how admirable that he is riding his bike to raise awareness!! Go JOSH, You've got this, after all you beat suicide so you can now kick butt with your riding!!! Thanks for posting this @Christine Stevens
    Mamen Delgado
    10/10/2016 #14 Mamen Delgado
    Woww @Christine Stevens, thanks for bringing this story to beBee!
    Following Josh on all his networks!
    Jared Wiese
    10/10/2016 #13 Jared Wiese
    Sharing in Veterans: Mental Health
    Jared Wiese
    10/10/2016 #12 Jared Wiese
    Sharing to Suicide Prevention
    James McElearney
    10/10/2016 #11 James McElearney
    Unfortunately for me, I do know the figures worldwide as I have been looking into this for a short film I am writing, and staggering they are! This is a very important issue that needs addressing and in everyway possible. I knew two of my childhood aquantances who took their own lives and I saw frst hand the devistation it causes the families that remain. More needs to be done to raise awareness
    Jared Wiese
    10/10/2016 #10 Jared Wiese
    #8 I would too. I think of all the talented people who are suffering, yet have so much to give. Robin Williams comes to mind. Perhaps because he appeared on the outside to be just the opposite of depressed. A true issue that NEEDS awareness.
    Deb Helfrich
    10/10/2016 #9 Deb Helfrich
    Josh Quigley's journey is one I have been following for about six weeks. It is the very essence of understanding what life is all about. Thank you, @Christine Stevens for so eloquently sharing his mission and the fact that we all need to reach out to the people in our lives who may be having a tough time. It may be more serious than we can imagine and the gift we can give with our time and concern may be priceless.
    Christine Stevens
    10/10/2016 #8 Christine Stevens
    #5 Jared, I get choked up still when I think about that young man who ended his life. It had a profound impact on my daughter's life as well - she now works as a case manager helping people with mental illnesses navigate day-to-day life.
    Jared Wiese
    10/10/2016 #7 Jared Wiese
    Raising Awareness for Suicide Prevention - on October 10, World Mental Health Day
    Ashley Marie Taylor
    10/10/2016 #6 Ashley Marie Taylor
    This is great. Mental illness and depression tend to be stigmatized. It's good to see a push for acceptance of our flaws as human beings and rather than punishing ourselves for them, strive for healing.
    Jared Wiese
    10/10/2016 #5 Jared Wiese
    Absolutely brilliant post, @Christine Stevens. You've turned on a light for hopefully so many!
    You engaged us. Hell, you got me all choked up.
    You've pointed out resources and ways we can all help. There is always hope.

    Sharing on all my networks.
    Christine Stevens
    10/10/2016 #4 Christine Stevens
    #3 Thank you, Frolián!
    Froilán Pérez
    10/10/2016 #3 Froilán Pérez
    Thanks for this, @Christine Stevens!
    following him on social media, will contribute on his web!
    Christine Stevens
    10/10/2016 #2 Christine Stevens
    #1 Thank you, @Don Kerr.
    Don Kerr
    10/10/2016 #1 Don Kerr
    Many thanks for bringing this to my attention @Christine Stevens. I am going to track him. Every bit helps in this type of endeavour. Will also share in Healthcare hive.
  3. ProducerLeckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    19/09/2016
    A revolutionary approach to healing PTSD
    A revolutionary approach to healing PTSDThe healing paradigm is shifting. I agree with van der Kolk because I used TRE® to heal my C-PTSD, and whatever came along for the ride in my time as a firefighter/EMT. Let me ask you: If you could heal your trauma, mostly by yourself, without...
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    20/09/2016 #2 Leckey Harrison
    #1 You're welcome, @Donna-Luisa Eversley. As we see with recent events like bombing and shooting unarmed motorists with their hands in the air, a lot of trauma happens daily, and we need to change the paradigm on how we treat it. That's the work I do.
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    20/09/2016 #1 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    Thanks for sharing this @Leckey Harrison
  4. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    29/08/2016
    Had a great time in Pennsylvania with Dr. Berceli teaching vets how to heal their trauma. It is always an honor to serve those who served us, to work with Dr. Berceli and my colleagues, and to pay for it ourselves so for the vets it was free. Leckey Harrison
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  5. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Never leave your wing man.
    Never leave your wing man.I am sorry this article got mixed in another draft a new article and got lost.I will try to republish it.Sorry for the...
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    Comments

    Reginaldo Afonso Bobato
    19/08/2016 #10 Reginaldo Afonso Bobato
    Existem analogias latinas no idioma invles que lodem facilitar o aprendizado de varias ciencias sobretudo a linguistca
    Phillip Louis D 'Amato
    19/08/2016 #9 Phillip Louis D 'Amato
    I apologize for the article getting deleted.I was in drafts and mistakenly deleted it.
    mohammed khalaf
    19/08/2016 #8 mohammed khalaf
    However, I say keep online you as real as the real you. Be personable and professional
    Never leave your wing man.
    Phillip Louis D 'Amato
    17/08/2016 #7 Phillip Louis D 'Amato
    Thanks for the great insight and nice comments. I appreciate it today.#5
    Brian McKenzie
    17/08/2016 #6 Brian McKenzie
    I follow Tom Cruise & Jerry Bruckheimer on Twiter - they both tweeted about it - but no more details. I sent Tom my best doppleganger pose and let him know that I have direct experience with both Kawasaki crotch rockets and Navy Aircraft .... nothing back from either of them though
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/08/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 #2 #1 #2 Love the update on the movie remake, Brian! How you keep abreast of so many things has always inspired me. Yes, Phillip, awesome pick-up here that applies to aviation, the battlefield, business models, and...the babysitter. Much insight into human morals, integrity, intuition, dependence, and teamwork. Extremely insightful - a battlefield of new-isms ring throughout. Sharing to Veterans: Mental Health, Aviation, HealthCare Administration: Employee Morale. I'd also like to share it across Teens, Youth, Teamwork, etc. Asking @John White, MBA to open this up for wider sharing, please. 🐝A great find, from a great mind! 🐝
    Phillip Louis D 'Amato
    19/05/2016 #2 Phillip Louis D 'Amato
    #1 Wow.I didn't​ know that.
    Brian McKenzie
    18/05/2016 #1 Brian McKenzie
    Rumor is they are doing a remake. The first one is do full of cheese, it is still quotable 30 years later.
  6. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    15/08/2016
    The improved version of a video by Dr. Berceli in view of the training event in Manheim, Pennsylvanis on August 27.
    Warrior Strength Workshop
    Warrior Strength Workshop All veterans and active duty military are welcome to attend this free workshop designed to reduce tension in the body and down-regulate the nervous system....
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  7. ProducerLeckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    12/08/2016
    Free TRE workshop in PA
    Free TRE workshop in PATo all the veterans and emergency responders: dispatchers, paramedics, EMT's, firefighters, and LEOs in the Manheim PA area. Here's a truly beneficial tool for you, and the cost is the best part. I am a retired firefighter/EMT that used TRE to heal...
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  8. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    12/08/2016
    To all the veterans and emergency responders: dispatchers, paramedics, EMT's, firefighters, and LEOs in the Manheim PA area. Here's a truly beneficial tool for you, and the cost is the best part. I am a retired firefighter/EMT that used TRE to heal my PTSD and use it regularly as the foundation of my post traumatic growth. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/warriorstrength-free-veteran-event-tickets-26890949554 This YouTube is a little descriptor of what to expect: https://youtu.be/A4nxFf4qXDM

    If the cost of free scares you, then you can make a donation to me to help defray my costs of attending at Dr. Berceli's invite to this free event. If you aren't a veteran or responder and want to learn TRE, please contact me. If you know any emergency responders, you can share this video (https://youtu.be/NdIMyrMcAWw) with them.
    Leckey Harrison
    WarriorStrength - Free Veteran Event
    lnkd.in (Free) Two hours that may change your life or save someone you know!  WARRIORSTRENGTH A Free Veteran Event that will focus on a successful method that has helped Veterans across the world who struggle with PTSD, Insomnia, Nightmares, Anxiety,...
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  9. Lucy Jensen

    Lucy Jensen

    30/07/2016
    Help Desk Technician II (Computer Operator)
    Help Desk Tech II Level: Seeking candidates willing to work Full-Time Evening Shift providing help desk support from 9pm-5 a.m. Please note that this position is remote work. The chosen candidate will be working from home.
    Lucy Jensen
    Help Desk Tech II Level Remote Work - Military-Civilian
    www.military-civilian.com Help Desk Tech II Level Remote Work Planned Systems International Work from Home Full-Time Evening Shift Home Office Jobs For Veterans...
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    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/08/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Lucy Jensen: You ROCK by putting this out here on beBee! Thank you! I'll ✅Share & Share! ✅
  10. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    23/07/2016
    "If you want to improve the world, start by making people feel safer."
    – Stephen Porges

    I agree. This what I help people experience. Learn how at www.RaiseYourResilience.com
    Leckey Harrison
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    Comments

    mohammed khalaf
    06/08/2016 #1 mohammed khalaf
    that is top of safer when we see cat and dog are sleeping together .
  11. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    21/07/2016
    I used TRE on my PTSD. Here's another story from a colleague in Madison, WI.
    Leckey Harrison
    Rise Above Adversity and Stress by Learning a New Tool
    unleashyourpractice.com
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  12. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    20/07/2016
    A good little primer on the tool I teach by the man who taught me, and created it.
    Leckey Harrison
    Trauma Release Exercises
    whattherapy.com Interview with founder of Trauma Release Exercises, a revolutionary way to let go of tension from known and unknown stresses and...
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  13. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    04/07/2016
    Veterans in Crisis: Don't Let Them Give Up the Fight
    Veterans in Crisis: Don't Let Them Give Up the FightToday's the Fourth of July, 2016. It's a beautiful day in northern Illinois. It's quiet, except for the birds who sing their morning song. I feel an air of peace embrace me. I pray for this feeling to last, knowing full well it will not.I've just...
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    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    09/07/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 It's all real. Tell it. Share the ire and the raw. That's what is real reality.
    Brian McKenzie
    08/07/2016 #7 Brian McKenzie
    #6 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD i am writing about it in my Kyrzbekistan novella with as much ire, disdain and disgust that I can muster. It matters not, the beating drums still call. I am not so old that I cant still get in the fight, I am past young enough to give a shit about the happy ending.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 @Brian McKenzie: That is because no matter where you live, you can't take the 'Warrior' out of you. So write about it! You've already pieced enough together to write a Buzz. Fight with pen!
    Brian McKenzie
    06/07/2016 #5 Brian McKenzie
    #4 I am getting antsy - the itch of war needs to be scratched; and it is driving me crazy to not be in the thick of it. F*cking bastards.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 @Brian McKenzie: and that is why I live to serve. Because they did.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Pushes and pulls me to shreds that are theirs, too. I just want to put them back together. Extremely compelling, @Randy Keho.
    Brian McKenzie
    05/07/2016 #2 Brian McKenzie
    The fight, I can handle - it's the sitting on the sidelines waiting to be called in that is beyond frustrating.
    mohammed khalaf
    04/07/2016 #1 mohammed khalaf
    we appreciated that sacrifices and honor it ,specialy in iraq thank you to comimmoratiom
  14. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    05/07/2016
    I want to share something personal. Yesterday is the 4th of July, the day we in the USA celebrate independence. I shared earlier a Facebook post that we could be freed from the tyranny of trauma.

    I've trained long and hard or 15 years to be prepared for an emergency. I was ALWAYS scanning for trouble: watching faces, watching how clothes hang on bodies, never sitting with my back to a door, and always locating a second exit. That sort of stuff. All the time. Semi-tactical, mostly not. What did happen, despite having PTSD, was it eliminated my startle reflex. If my pager went off, I was up and moving while those around me were still in startle motion. I was headed to the trouble.

    I am happy to report that today, a wish has come true. My startle response has returned. A local blew something BIG up, and I reacted. Smiles of uncomfortable joy here!
    Leckey Harrison
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  15. ProducerLeckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    01/07/2016
    They call it being in the trenches
    They call it being in the trenchesI'm sure the title conjures up an image in your mind. Lets relate that image to stress. We all know what it feels like to be stressed. We might even be able to say what stressed us, but we may not be able to say exactly when our neurobiological...
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    04/07/2016 #12 Leckey Harrison
    @Michele Williams More than happy to train you how to do that.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #11 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 @Dr. Allen Brown: This has great potential in helping teens deal with PTSD and stress in a new way....love that @Leckey Harrison and @Michele Williams are totally with us on that!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 @Michele Williams: Kids are at the heart of my heart, and anything we can do to help them is honorable and worthy. I'm in on this aspect, too ~ all the way!
    Michele Williams
    04/07/2016 #9 Michele Williams
    @Leckey Harrison very helpful article. I need to reduce my use of stress relief and increase my stress release. I can't wait to explore your links. It is so important that kids and teens learn this too.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    03/07/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Definitely a new and novel technique worthy of more exploration. And if it worked for you as a fireman helping firemen who see and smell human flesh differently than the rest of us, I believe it will help here. Thank you, @Leckey Harrison View more
    Definitely a new and novel technique worthy of more exploration. And if it worked for you as a fireman helping firemen who see and smell human flesh differently than the rest of us, I believe it will help here. Thank you, @Leckey Harrison! cc to: @Sara Jacobovici, @Gerald Hecht, @Lisa Gallagher, @Brian McKenzie, @Randy Keho! Close
    Leckey Harrison
    03/07/2016 #6 Leckey Harrison
    #5 Yea, I've used Ditch Witches too. They dig a nice thin ditch as I recall, though they may have different tools now. They also cut through gas lines quite cleanly!
    Brian McKenzie
    02/07/2016 #5 Brian McKenzie
    Of course they have a machine that does that now - known as the Ditch Witch - but I did spend many an hour on the working end of a shovel. If it wasn't shoveling shit, it was digging a ditch to nowhere.
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/07/2016 #4 Lisa Gallagher
    Awesome analogy you used with digging trenches @Leckey Harrison. I can relate to the lemonade even though I've never dug a trench. The website looks as though it has very useful tools. I will go back later when I have more time to take a deeper look. Thank you for sharing this!
    Leckey Harrison
    02/07/2016 #3 Leckey Harrison
    #2 Thank you, and you're very welcome.
    Randy Keho
    02/07/2016 #2 Randy Keho
    Indispensable and insightful information, Leckey. Thank you for sharing and the good work that you do.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    I get the analogy, and the periods of respite that also apply not only to the wounded, but to the weary Caregivers, too. I need to be spoon-fed just like you did here. Each step of the way, one step at a time. This beginning of understanding "Stress Relief" ~ like taking a coffee break that only makes you jittery on an empty stomach, then makes you need to use the restroom when it's a total and complete, archaic imposition....vs...."Stress Release" ~ like taking a vacation away from your 'Vacation' by just staying home and relaxing....did I get it right? We have to go for the "Release." Then we get regenerated, refreshed, and rejuvenated to go back and put out more fires (I know you're a firefighter, a First Responder like MDs). And that 'human factor' of socializing with those around us, whether at work or at home...that is so important because when we're trying and trying but everything around us...it's in black-and-white is a mistake, and ...and we'll never get ahead...and ... rEgrETs LInGEr... we live in a cOMa, neve r ... being QuItE aWAkE...we just beg to escape! Thank you for offering hope as we dig in and keep learning more. Stay with us, can you? @Randy Keho, @Brian McKenzie, @Rebel Brown, @Sara Jacobovici, @Lisa Gallagher, @Gerald Hecht, @Gary Sharpe, @Deb Helfrich, @debasish majumder, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani.
  16. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Both Veterans and Patients with Invisible Illnesses/Disabilities share lots in common. WARNING: This video may cause PTSD, crying, or pure validation that what you are feeling is normal. You are not alone.
    Paralyzed - by NF Military tribute music video
    Paralyzed - by NF Military tribute music video Song: paralyzed by NF. Clips from various military videos. A tribute to all the men and women saving our asses overseas and everywhere, Thank...
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    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 Amen to that!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 Sounds like a Buzz, hon (oh! Was that sexist of me? lol) ! Great info !
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/07/2016 #5 Lisa Gallagher
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD wrote- Both Veterans and Patients with Invisible Illnesses/Disabilities share lots in common. WARNING: This video may cause PTSD, crying, or pure validation that what you are feeling is normal. You are not alone.
    Lisa Gallagher
    02/07/2016 #4 Lisa Gallagher
    I see they used some scenes from American Sniper in this too. Nice tribute to our Vets who deserve so much more than they receive. I despise war but value our Vets.
    Randy Keho
    02/07/2016 #3 Randy Keho
    Worked fine this time. Personally, I would recommend any and all veterans to contact VietNow, a veteran's organization with branches in 40 states. They assist veterans of all conflicts since 1957, not just Vietnam, including their friends and family. They've been there and done that. The organizers are from my hometown, site of the national headquarters, and their great guys. 1-800-837-VNOW or at vietnow,.com.
    Randy Keho
    02/07/2016 #2 Randy Keho
    I had problems loading the video on two laptops @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Will try, again.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Can't help but wonder why 3,000 viewers watched this but did not Comment or Share. The Mental Health Wellness of all Veterans affects the world. It is no longer a stigma or a shame. It is reality, and we are here to open the door to stop the highest suicide rate in American Veterans ever. Please help. Share. Just love. Love conquers all. Thank you. @Sara Jacobovici, @Lisa Gallagher, @Rebel Brown, @Michele Williams, @debasish majumder, @Randy Keho, @Anees Zaidi, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani and more. Please forward.
  17. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    29/06/2016
    Dad's Wild Ride: To Hellcat and Back
    Dad's Wild Ride: To Hellcat and BackI built this 1/35-scale diorama about 15 years ago in honor of my father for his service during World War II. His tank destroyer battalion was attached to U. S. Gen. George S. Patton as he raced from Normandy to Germany. Before I required bifocals,...
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    Comments

    Pamela L. Williams
    27/07/2016 #11 Pamela L. Williams
    I used to love helping my brothers put together models! I could never convince my Mom to get me one, not ladylike. Ugh! I would know how to build what my military father worked with, he was a ground to air missile specialist. Where he was stationed overseas we weren't allowed to go, too remote. The missiles he worked with were still classified top secret so he never talked about them. He did get to support missile programs at Vandenberg and in Montana but most of his time in the 50s and 60s was spent in southeast Asia.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 It's a great pic, & I look forward to more. Oh. Yes. We could rant all day about Ex's, yes...hmm....that would be an awfully dark hive lol.
    Randy Keho
    16/07/2016 #9 Randy Keho
    #7 Unfortunately, photos are all that's left of this diorama, and a few others, due to a accident involving my second ex-wife. Ex-wife being the key word. I will buzz more of my work, that survives, later. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 @Randy Keho, my father died of Alzheimer's the same year of the car accident with my daughter. With dementia, Reminiscence could very well trigger some well-established paths in your grandfather's brain. I gently recommend you catch the look in his eye at first glance, and even if you don't see a reaction, "he" is still inside there...and his brain will respond. Don't listen to the doctors on this one. Wishing you love, and sending Grandpa a huge smack on the cheek!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 I come back here every so often, just to see this scene and all the details...it belongs in a museum, I think. Yes. A museum behind glass, where no kid can sneeze on it! My favorite image it the navigator with the opened book of maps on his 'tank' desktop. Just precious...and thinking of how many young kids were also sitting in his chair....wow. I'm just filled with respect and admiration, all over again.
    Randy Keho
    01/07/2016 #6 Randy Keho
    #5 Yes. @Lisa GallagherMy father , who's still kicking, but suffers from dementia while living in a nursing home, has seen all of my dioramas. He used to ask me what I was working on every time we got together. He used to build models for me when I was a youngster. I got into the hobby after I was laid off from my job
    in the 1990s. My son and I would work on models together, but the bug never hit him like it did me.
    Lisa Gallagher
    01/07/2016 #5 Lisa Gallagher
    Did you dad ever see the models you built to honor him @Randy Keho? Very impressive, thanks for sharing this!!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 Absolutely so, @Rod Loader! And it's just the begining, as @Randy Keho is now Official Co-Admin on this Hive with me! We hope to keep putting forward positive, historic and enrapturing stories that do true justice and honor to all Veterans! ........And we're off!!! 🏇 @Ali Anani, @Dr. Allen Brown, @NO one, @Mamen Delgado, @Jim Cody, @Juan Imaz.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 It looks awesome! What a way to honor your father, and it gives me goosebumps to 'relive' his scenario through you. A very honorable piece.
    Rod Loader
    29/06/2016 #2 Rod Loader
    Thanks for sharing Randy Keho, a good story and a very nice diorama.
    Randy Keho
    29/06/2016 #1 Randy Keho
    Oops. It didn't look like this before I published it. I obviously did something wrong. My apologies.
  18. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    24/06/2016
    PTSD Awareness Month continues. This is why I call it a disorder. This is what PTSD does to the brain: it re-prders, and not beneficially, how the brain functions. This is the result of traumatizing stress, chronic or event based. Leckey Harrison
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    Comments

    Leckey Harrison
    06/07/2016 #42 Leckey Harrison
    #41 One technique I use is a 5 second inhale, 5 second exhale, no break between, for 5 minutes. About three minutes in I feel the diaphragm shift and the next day my intercostals are complaining.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #41 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #40 You're right. Lots of my chronically ill friends/followers seem to get costochondritis, confirmed by pressing on the rib and reproducing the pain. Bet that has to do with the intercostal muscles between the ribs ~ that are not being properly used. Great insight here! Thank you.
    Leckey Harrison
    06/07/2016 #40 Leckey Harrison
    #39 You're welcome. In chronically stressed people, I can see that they're breathing never gets below the diaphragm. It can actually be a physical workout with aces and pains to earn to breathe deeply after years of not doing so.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #39 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #27 @Leckey Harrison: It may sound perfectly silly, but when we sing (I used to be in choir), we were taught how to expand the diaphragm and use "abdominal breathing" to project the voice. I only just got the epiphany that although I do spend much time bed-ridden, I wake up singing. So I'm just hoping that this should help prevent the lung from atelectasis and resulting pneumonia. The most common causes of death from dysautonomia are pneumonia, sudden cardiopulmonary failure, and respiratory arrest. So I think I'll do more singing, yes... 💙 Thank you for bringing up this point. 💙
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #38 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #35 @Ali Anani: Whatever your hands touch, prospers. So whatever you can know about this disease, dysautonomia...it will come to you in portions, as I live with it. Bed-ridden for 10 years now, I've done all I can to increase awareness....and that's the name of this 'game' of life. 💙 ( The "Invisible Illness," dysautonomia, is represented by the color blue. 💙
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #37 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #32 @Leckey Harrison: Absolutely; all the dysautonomias and their classifications continue to confuse physicians and patients alike. A good, short review is here: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/dysautonomia/dysautonomia.htm and there are Resources for adults and youth.
    Leckey Harrison
    27/06/2016 #36 Leckey Harrison
    #35 Ali, awareness is needed. The forefront of any movement is awareness.
    Ali Anani
    27/06/2016 #35 Ali Anani
    #34 This is a crucial issue. I am afraid that my role would be to spread awareness about it. I don't want to contribute much on an issue that I am not qualified to discuss. Thank you @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD View more
    #34 This is a crucial issue. I am afraid that my role would be to spread awareness about it. I don't want to contribute much on an issue that I am not qualified to discuss. Thank you @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD for giving me the opportunity to at least comment and hopefully raise attention even by 0.00001% Close
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/06/2016 #34 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #29 @Leckey Harrison, @Sara Jacobovici, @Dale Masters, @Rebel Brown, @Brian McKenzie, @Randy Keho, @Ali Anani, @Mamen Delgado: We all have reason to help now, and for the future of the family relationships to have love. And the confidence in hope 🏄🏼 .
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/06/2016 #33 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #28 @Dale Masters: We have seen many with invisible illnesses either die, attempt suicide, or commit suicide. I loved our "Gentle Giant" Matt so much...I'll do a Buzz in his memory.
    Leckey Harrison
    27/06/2016 #32 Leckey Harrison
    #31 It can also cause POTS. I have a client that is recovering from it, though it is a slow process.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/06/2016 #31 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #27 @Leckey Harrison, @Dale Masters, @Randy Keho, @Ali Anani: The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is dysfunctional with a traumatic brain or neck injuries. Sometimes, the brainstem can also suffer "mini-strokes" or "transient ischemic attack" (TIA), causing "Dysautonomia." Dysautonomia is my primary diagnosis affecting the entire ANS....and when I stand up, I faint. So do millions of others. Here's a short Eyewitness TV-Los Angeles video on 'Dysautonomia: https://youtu.be/-Blshb2RVMk
    Dale Masters
    26/06/2016 #30 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Actually, I think all four apply to me, esp. #2.
    Leckey Harrison
    25/06/2016 #29 Leckey Harrison
    #28 I can see that. had a similar fear: that I couldn't change. Happy to say I was incorrect on that assumption.
    Dale Masters
    25/06/2016 #28 Dale Masters
    #23 To be honest, my greatest fear in life is that I'll live 50 more years in pain.
    Leckey Harrison
    24/06/2016 #27 Leckey Harrison
    #26 I just trained someone, and I noticed their incapability to take a deep breathe that extended beyond the diaphragm. It's incredibly important in my eyes because that level of constriction is a sign of chronic traumatic stress. The system is so accustomed to short, shallow breathing, that when physical fitness is added, it still stays in the chest. It's the only autonomic function we have control over.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #26 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #18 Love your thoughts on the breath and width of the stress response, and the integration of the major "organs" or systems that are involved in resolving that stress. I really like your positivity, and your way of getting straight to the matter to actually Solve the problem. I'm all about Solutions, too. We'll see where we are, and I am looking forward to it all1
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #25 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #16 Excellent additional thoughts of spiritualism and creativity. Each deserves investigation. Thank you for your comment. Greatly appreciated.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #24 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #15 There are bound to be situational differences that would change the response of a little, fragile woman vs. a huge-muscled male in hearing/seeing a big bear running toward her/him. Male vs female has to be another factor. Within that, we could say that the menstrual cycle and/or postmenopausal and/or hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) are all going to make a difference in a woman vs. a man. More on that from me, later.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #23 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #10 Your 'non-response' to "create" conscious fear may be (1) related to a syndrome of repeated threats that you are 'immune' to now; (2) you may have no fear of death; (3) you may have more faith in God than fear of anything else; (4) your autonomic nervous system (ANS) may be 'less' responsive; (5) the realization of the depth of the potential for danger may not be active; (6) your adrenal glands may not secrete epinephrine and all the other stress responses; (7) you may have been on chronic steroid therapy before, affecting cortisol stress hormone response; (8) your sleep:wake circadian rhythm may be stressed due to loss of day and night cycles; ...and the list goes on...so it depends on the individual, and I think @Leckey Harrison would add more insight, too. Great scenario for thoughts and ideas.
  19. William Rakow

    William Rakow

    20/06/2016
    William Rakow
    media.licdn.com
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    30/06/2016 #9 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 @William Rakow: Yes, indeed!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    30/06/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 We Will Worship His Majesty! Amen!
    William Rakow
    24/06/2016 #7 William Rakow
    #6 I here it now such lovely Melody, he will be Happy
    Dale Masters
    23/06/2016 #6 Dale Masters
    #5 I'll be able to sing again!!!!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/06/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 So funny, yes? I think we will be playing harps, instead!
    Dale Masters
    22/06/2016 #4 Dale Masters
    Oh, that's funny...they're missing heir smartphones! (like they'd miss them in Heaven...where there are literally Infinite things to do!)
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    20/06/2016 #3 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Misty looks for Smartphone mania! :)
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/06/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    The message is silent, and yet it screams out loud.
    Florenc Shehu
    20/06/2016 #1 Florenc Shehu
    Quite meaningful! Wise words and message
  20. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    05/06/2016
    Trauma --- traumatic stress --- PTSD. The list is not extensive. It isn't expicit about adverse childhood experiences. June is PTSD Awareness month. There is a cure. Leckey Harrison
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    Leckey Harrison
    04/07/2016 #18 Leckey Harrison
    #17 I think one thing we've seen over time is that those who were violent and are in prison, had "hurt" at the foundation of their lives. James Gilligan wrote a book about it several years ago. The obvious presence of developmental trauma is clear: hurt people, hurt people. It doesn't mean all hurt people will, but just as clearly, sane healthy people don't. I think also we might see that even in icons, like Dr. Martin Luther King, that there were behaviors one would consider less than optimal. President Bill Clinton comes to mind. What prompts a man to commit adultery (a relative moral label), and then, to lie about it? If he was healthy in his relationships, would he have done that? If he were responsible, would he have owned it instead? Nothing is absolute, including the idea that hurt people, hurt people. When we look closely though, in my experience, it either happens via psychological hurt, and at the very least, self-hurt.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #17 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 I wonder who has studied the kids of abusive/alcoholic parents who haven't carried on the bad behavior. For another time, but aren't we all so glad to know that love can still conquer all? @Lisa Gallagher View more
    #11 I wonder who has studied the kids of abusive/alcoholic parents who haven't carried on the bad behavior. For another time, but aren't we all so glad to know that love can still conquer all? @Lisa Gallagher, @Rebel Brown, @Leckey Harrison, @Gerald Hecht @Dr. Allen Brown. Those who end up being loving, caring parents are definitely to be commended. ☺️ Close
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Not to pound it in, but here's an interesting animal study over 33 years of observation in 5 large families. Regarding infant abuse recurring over the generations: "Conclusions: This study provides the first evidence of genealogical effects on infant abuse in nonhuman primates. Several characteristics of infant abuse in socially living macaques suggest that this phenomenon could represent a good animal model for studying the etiology of child abuse and neglect." Reference: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213497000069
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 I did it again. Reference on comment below, #14 on the right side: http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/3/560.short
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Study results of almost 7,000 Indian men who, in childhood, had witnessed their father abusing their mother: "Conclusions These findings from northern India are congruent with those from other geographical/cultural settings in suggesting that witnessing violence between one's parents while growing up is an important risk factor for the perpetration of partner violence in adulthood." @Lisa Gallagher, @Rebel Brown, @Leckey Harrison, @Gerald Hecht, @Sara Jacobovici...
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Oopsies. Reference on my #11 comment: http://www.jsad.com/doi/abs/10.15288/jsa.2003.64.472
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    04/07/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 Definitely worthy of a Buzz. Here's a 3-generational study of sons of alcoholics: "Results indicate continuity of aggression across three generations and also indicate that the child's pathway into risk for later Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) is not simply mediated by parental alcoholism, but is carried by other comorbid aspects of family functioning, in particular aggression. /☝️ The patient population here may be most important in picking 'the right man." ☝️ i.e., 'don't have kids' with an alcoholic man, esp if his parents were alcoholics. And grandparents, especially. @Lisa Gallagher, @Rebel Brown , @Leckey Harrison, @Gerald Hecht, @Sara Jacobovici...hmm.
    Lisa Gallagher
    30/06/2016 #11 Lisa Gallagher
    #6 @Rebel Brown, I have to agree with you that not all abused people grow up to be abusers. My mother was horribly abused yet she never abused us. She guided us with love. I honestly believe she got through life fantasizing about the life she would have once she got away from her parents. I believe she put her fantasies into action and we were very blessed to have had such a beautiful soul as a mother. I'm not sure what leads an abused person to abuse others but in many cases they don't repeat their own history. I have no stats so I don't discredit that this is a problem with abusers as well. I agree with not putting everyone into one category. This is a great topic and should be discussed. Thank you for tagging me too @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    30/06/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 @Sara Jacobovici: Absolutely agree that awareness is key. I have seen so many patients with this "generational" family abuse pattern...and the devastation inflicted on abandoned children as young as 15 yrs of age (have discussed with @Selim Yeniçeri, @Dr. Allen Brown, @Brian McKenzie, and more). I see the devastation, and have been both a battered wife and the wife of an alcoholic. So I've lived it, too. Please feel free to join my Hive: named "Invisible Illnesses: Child Abuse:" ( https://www.bebee.com/group/invisible-illnesses-child-abuse ). Also extending this Hive invite to @Rebel Brown, @Mamen Delgado, @Deb Helfrich, @NO one, @Ali Anani, @CityVP Manjit, @Leckey Harrison, and opened up to all. @Gerald Hecht, @Lisa Gallagher, @Kirstie-Sweetie Louise Summers, too.
    Rebel Brown
    30/06/2016 #9 Rebel Brown
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Hey sistah. I havent been commenting here much because I have fundamentally different perspectives from most of the comments here, based on both my experience and my coaching clients, many of whom come to me to release the trauma of PTSD and move on with their lives, quickly and effectively.. They aren't abusers, I'm not an abuser and so assuming that the abused are the source of abuse is much too broad a generalization for me to comfortably accept. I know too many people who were never abused that are some of the nastiest abusers ever. Especially i today's world where the masses are being constantly programmed toward fear which then breeds anger and violence. But I wanted to thank you for tagging me.
    Rebel Brown
    30/06/2016 #8 Rebel Brown
    #7 I believe that generalizations are dangerous in their intent and result @Leckey, and that insanity and rage are often undetectable. Its certainly not only abused people that hurt other people. So saying all abused people hurt people is unfair in my world. But thats the beauty of our lives - we all get to have our opinions. Blessings...
    Leckey Harrison
    27/06/2016 #7 Leckey Harrison
    #6 It's not that it's a guarantee, Rebel. It is fairly common though. Hurt people, hurt people doesn't mean that it HAS to happen, but that healthy sane people don't hurt people.
    Rebel Brown
    27/06/2016 #6 Rebel Brown
    Well, as an horribly abused child (my therapists told me to call it what it was, torture), I'd like to point out that I've never abused anyone and have the opposite response to many of the assumptions here. I've worked with a number of abused women and men. None of them were abusers either. In fact, every one of them became exactly the opposite type of person. Loving, caring,going out of the way to be different than their abusers. As with all things, I suggest to clients that they not apply broad brush applications to people about anything. We are ALL unique in our mind programming, and we all deserve to be given the respect of a positive perception until proven otherwise. Negative generalized assumptions be gone.
    Leckey Harrison
    27/06/2016 #5 Leckey Harrison
    #1 Hurt people, hurt people. The cycle continues. An activated sympathetic system becomes the norm, and the emotions associated with it.
    Sara Jacobovici
    27/06/2016 #4 Sara Jacobovici
    #3 Thank you @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD for bringing my attention to this update and its message as well as your comment. I will compact the complexity of the topic at hand into one word that is appropriate to the posting of: awareness. Imperative that we as a community are aware of the fact that traumatic events do take place and will impact on individuals as well as the community. That the impact can vary and to be aware of the signs and means to address those signs. Important that we use information and learning to treat each individual and individual situation with educated awareness and not preconceived ideas of what will happen, just what the potential of what may happen is and to ensure the support necessary for a positive outcome.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/06/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Sara Jacobovici, @Leckey Harrison, @Rebel Brown, @Randy Keho, @Mamen Delgado: In the continuum of the child who underwent child abuse, let us consider: (1) Phase I: The (abused) adult who underwent intervention(s) to mitigate their own precious salvation; (2) Phase 2: The newborn babies of the abused parent, who has no idea what is ahead of her/him after looking into their newborn's eyes with true Love; (3) Phase 3: The parent's potential capacity (and statistical likelihood) of inflicting mental, physical, and emotional harm onto their baby as (s)he grows; (4) Phase 4: Transformation to consider all human actions to be either (A) Love or (B) a call for Love. (5) Phase 5: Forgiveness. Please help me forward to other interested parties I miss here: @Ali Anani, @debasish majumder, @Mohammed A. Jawad, @Mohamed S, @Daniel, ..... thank you.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/06/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Also note and wish that child abuse was specifically mentioned, but would you agree: child abuse leads to the next generation of child abuse, etc....and perhaps it is these abused children that grow up to be abusive husbands and wives, with the mental issues becoming more dominant if not addressed at the time, i.e., in childhood, youth, or teenage years. Increased awareness for Teens & Youth may be a good strategy working towards a solution? Would love your insight.
  21. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    11/06/2016
    June is PTSD Awareness month. The odds of a doctor addressing it? Three percent.
    Leckey Harrison
    When Physicians Counsel About Stress: Results of a National Study
    archinte.jamanetwork.com The prevalence of stress in primary care is high; 60% to 80% of visits may have a stress-related component.1 Over the past 5 years, 44% of Americans have reported an increase in psychological stress.2 Stress is associated with more office visits and...
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    Comments

    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    12/07/2016 #5 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 Absolutely. Increased awareness of the problem, then coping mechanisms for Solutions. I just love the word, "empowerment." That's the best Solution of all, and it can't be sold from a jar. Perhaps that is why our backgrounds make us uniquely suited to speak from personal experience. We just learned to see through it all, cope, be empowered, and conquer one, twice.....
    Leckey Harrison
    30/06/2016 #4 Leckey Harrison
    #3 I have another study that affirms what you said. I start with empowerment at the individual level.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    30/06/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 @Leckey Harrison: Studies show that lots of doctors are uncomfortable asking patients about certain questions, and patients are also reluctant to tell the doctor of the same complaints, too. What is the answer? Teaching patients how to ask.
    Leckey Harrison
    21/06/2016 #2 Leckey Harrison
    #1 My doc is good about asking about mental health. I should offer to train her in TRE....
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    20/06/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Fantastic statistic. Deplorable. Hey, I'm not one of those MDs, just so you know. Of course I'm not, because I'm a Warrior now. I used to just have a family and a career. When I lost both, I was the MD laying in the bed while the other MDs all said nothing was wrong with me. Ahhhh. But I fought to live. Never Give Up, and that's the inspiration and motivation drudged up from the fetal position at the bottom of the well. We both know that people can learn to 'look up.' When I finally looked up, the hand of Christ had been waiting for me the whole time.