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Veterans: To Honor - beBee

Veterans: To Honor

~ 100 buzzes
You will never be forgotten. You never were. You never will be.
Buzzes
  1. Don Kerr

    Don Kerr

    11/11/2016
    @David B. Grinberg My boys today. Gabriel who is 9 attended Remembrance Day services at the Oakville Cenotaph with his classmates and they recited In Flanders Fields. I am proud of the boys' recognition of their Grandfather Kerr (Lieutenant, RCN; Great Grandfather Bridger (RCAF); and Great Grandfather Sanders (US Army). Don Kerr
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    David B. Grinberg
    12/11/2016 #2 David B. Grinberg
    Wow, what a fantastic photo, Don. That's the kind of lesson public schools need to teach which remain open on Veterans Day. Thank you and your family for serving America. True patriots indeed!
    Javier beBee
    11/11/2016 #1 Javier beBee
    I love this picture ! those few small things that make us happy ! Your kids are great !
  2. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    11/11/2016
    Salute to a Special Friend on Veteran's Day
    Salute to a Special Friend on Veteran's Day Today is recognized in the United States as Veteran's Day, observed annually on Nov. 11. It honors military veterans and coincides with other holidays, including Armistice Day and Remembrance Day in other countries, that mark the end of World War I....
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    John Valledor
    11/11/2016 #5 John Valledor
    #3David, in honor of your father's faithful service to a proud and grateful nation, I would like to say, "Climb to Glory!"

    By the way, that is the motto of the 10th Mountain Division. Dates back to service in WWII in the Italian campaign and their train up for war in the Colorado mountain ranges.

    Today, if you were to travel to Fort Drum, NY (home of the 10th Mountain Division) you will often see and hear Soldiers saluting their officers saying, "Climb to Glory Sir!" To which officers quickly return the salute and reply with, "To the Top!"

    John
    10th Mountain Division Combat Veteran

    Last shared insight. The WWII 10th Mountain Division veterans came back from that war and returned to their beloved Colorado ski ranges and established the current ski resorts that dot their picturesque ridge lines e.g., Aspen, Vail and so on. In fact, in honor of their contributions to Colorado's ski industry the state offers vehicle license plates with the 10th Mountain logo and the words, "Ski Troops!"
    Kevin Pashuk
    11/11/2016 #4 Kevin Pashuk
    You write a mighty fine tribute Mr. Keho...
    David B. Grinberg
    11/11/2016 #3 David B. Grinberg
    Thank you, Randy, for an excellent read on Veterans Day. I admire and salute your friend, as well as all U.S. veterans today and every day. My late father served in the Army, 10th Mountain Division as a 1st Lt. in the special explosives unit. The skills and experience he learned in the military were instrumental in shaping his career in the private sector as president and CEO of a textile manufacturing corporation in NYC. He was always so proud of his military experience and serving out great nation. I'll always remember the Taps salute and American flag placed over his coffin at the funeral. That flag is encased today in my home next to a photo of him as a young officer.
    God Bless America and all who served -- not only today, but every day of the year.
    Albert Gibel
    11/11/2016 #2 Albert Gibel
    Happy Veterans Day to all and may God Bless America!
    Pascal Derrien
    11/11/2016 #1 Pascal Derrien
    Its armistice day in France, my great grand father on my grand mother's side died in the Somme, we owe big time to the likes of Gary and wwhile I don't subscribe to any war or system leading to it, it would be unfair and not right not to recognize the heroism of individuals that got swallowed in those turbulent times... say hi to Gary for me :-)
  3. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Military Hot Wheels, Munchausen, and Malingering
    Military Hot Wheels, Munchausen, and Malingering / by Dr Margaret Aranda /  As a doctor on a military base, "Oh! The stories I could tell!" But I first have to mention what a privilege it was to be exposed to both the personnel and the race car hot wheels, now built to withstand roadside bombings...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/08/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 #2 Thank you both. Sometimes my brain injury gets in the way as I shift from jeeps to Invisible Illnesses to Malingering...but as an ER doc, I was always so afraid I would "miss" something. You know, you don't get follow-up so you never really know. I tried to do my best, and I was fresh out of med school with a stack of medical books and just jumped into that ER with only my new medical license! Learned so much...wouldn't trade it for the world. And yes, there is a long, long list of Invisible Illnesses, the 2 most common being heart disease and diabetes. Killers, both. ALL about it in my book ~ 500+pages. I focus on Immunonutrition. Perhaps I'll start posting some of those chapters in brief here.....:-).
    Paul Walters
    08/08/2016 #2 Paul Walters
    another insightful post Doc ...thanks !!!!
    Jeet Sarkar
    08/08/2016 #1 Jeet Sarkar
    Thank you Madam @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD for this informative and intriguing post. I din't know much about that disease, but Cancer, Rheumatoid Arthritis Depression and Mental illness all are invisible illness. In this illness, people externally seems normal but internal problems are massive, specially in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Cancer. The cost of medical treatment in this disease is very expensive, i am not sure but I heard it! However, Great post Madam. Thank you for sharing it!
  4. Lucy Jensen

    Lucy Jensen

    30/07/2016
    Seeking Java Developer for Fort Detrick MD
    Analyzing designs and building component-based applications in a Web/internet
    Lucy Jensen
    Java Developer Fort Detrick MD - Military-Civilian
    www.military-civilian.com Java Developer Fort Detrick MD Planned Systems International Maryland U.S. Citizen Information Technology IT Jobs for Veterans...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/08/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Lucy Jensen: I'm so happy for all you do! I'm Sharing this on beBee Hives: 🔆Veterans: To Serve; 🔆Veterans: To Honor, 🔆Veterans: Homeless, 🔆Veterans: Mental Health; 🔆Veterans: To Believe. Praying it helps one person! Tweeting, too!
  5. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    We Know You Didn't 'Go Gentle'
    We Know You Didn't 'Go Gentle'/ by Dr Margaret Aranda / Dedicated to Dr Allen Brown who knows what I mean all the time.  Our young troops, kids yet shaving their soft beards and whiskers, went into the night with sounds all around. They did not have time to think or blink, to...
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    Jared Wiese
    11/11/2016 #4 Jared Wiese
    @Leckey Harrison and @Dr. Allen Brown did not come up in my earlier comment.

    Note, Dr. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD also created many hives for vets:
    🔆Veterans: To Serve; 🔆Veterans: To Honor, 🔆Veterans: Homeless, 🔆Veterans: Mental Health; 🔆Veterans: To Believe.
    Jared Wiese
    11/11/2016 #3 Jared Wiese
    Per @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD, "Respecting all Veterans who give us inspiration, admiration and to whom we should honor. @Randy Keho, @Brian McKenzie, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @debasish majumder, @Ali Anani "
    Brian McKenzie
    28/07/2016 #2 Brian McKenzie
    War was easier, at least they would always let you in the fight.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Respecting all Veterans who give us inspiration, admiration and to whom we should honor. @Randy Keho, @Leckey Harrison, @Dr. Allen Brown, @Brian McKenzie, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @debasish majumder, @Ali Anani
  6. Lucy Jensen

    Lucy Jensen

    20/07/2016
    Seeking Physical Therapist for Kandahar Afghanistan under contract bid
    Lucy Jensen
    Physical Therapist Kandahar Afghanistan - Military-Civilian
    www.military-civilian.com Physical Therapist Kandahar Afghanistan CHSi under contract bid send resumes to tbennett@chsmedical.com Must have a current state...
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    Lucy Jensen
    22/07/2016 #1 Lucy Jensen
    Physical Therapist – Afghanistan
    Tracking Code: 6097-120
    Job Description for Physical Therapist Kandahar Afghanistan
    SCOPE:
    The Physical Therapist will have the credentials of a Doctor of Physical Therapy with the ability to care U. S. and coalition forces to evaluate, diagnosis, treat and develop plans for the recovery for musculoskeletal injuries and complaints. Location of services will be in Kandahar, Afghanistan. This is a notional position and will be contingent upon contract award.
  7. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    15/07/2016
    U.S. First Division Musuem at Cantigny: Part II
    U.S. First Division Musuem at Cantigny: Part IIMy favorite exhibit at the Museum at Cantigny is Tank Park, which surrounds the museum and features tanks from WWI to the present. I'm drawn to it because my father served in the tank corp. during WWII, following Gen. George Patton through Belgium...
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    Joanna Hofman
    16/07/2016 #2 Joanna Hofman
    Great pictures! A piece of history....
    You mentioned Gen. Patton - a great leader and strategist, I learnt at the National Defence Academy strategy based on his experiences . I love one of his thoughts : "Better to fight for something than live for nothing."
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Rich history that is rich in its own richness.
  8. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    14/07/2016
    U.S. First Division Museum at Cantigny: Part I
    U.S. First Division Museum at Cantigny: Part IThe Museum at Cantigny is a permanent display focused on the U.S First Division, known as "The Big Red One."Located in Wheaton, Illinois, the 500-acre section of land, located 30 miles west of Chicago, was acquired by Joseph Medill for a country...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Amazing!
    Donna-Luisa Eversley
    15/07/2016 #1 Donna-Luisa Eversley
    Wow.... Randy Keho, please share some more!
  9. Lada Prkic

    Lada Prkic

    12/07/2016
    I felt so overwhelmed when I saw this picture. Never saw it before although the picture went viral a couple years ago. This is Kelly Cottle who carries her husband in places that are not suitable for his prosthetic legs. Jesse, who lost both legs in Afghanistan, met his wife during his recovery period and the pair married a year ago. This is a love story that will leave no one indifferent. Lada Prkic
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    mohammed khalaf
    16/07/2016 #8 mohammed khalaf
    Honestly lovely
    Pamela L. Williams
    16/07/2016 #7 Pamela L. Williams
    That is love at its finest.
    Mamen Delgado
    16/07/2016 #6 Mamen Delgado
    💖
    Ken Boddie
    16/07/2016 #5 Ken Boddie
    This picture certainly paints a thousand words, @Lada Prkic 🎨
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    16/07/2016 #4 Mohammed A. Jawad
    An exemplar love story with genuine attachment!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 Amen to that. Not enough credit has been given where it was due, and it is never too late to create another gift for our heroes.
    Lada Prkic
    12/07/2016 #2 Lada Prkic
    #1 Thank you @Ali Anani for your comment. I'm usually not very fond of sharing such contents, but some pictures tell stories better than words. And some of these stories behind the pictures deserve to be shared.
    Ali Anani
    12/07/2016 #1 Ali Anani
    Walking happiness- it is true that certain limitations act as love-boosters. They create need and fulfilling this need beautifies life. Thank you @Lada Prkic for sharing this touching story. It is a story of "portable love"
  10. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    I Can't Wait to Get Back Home
    I Can't Wait to Get Back Homeby Dr Margaret ArandaVideo 1.  "Silkies Ruck."  With 22 Veterans committing suicide per day, event planners of the 4th of July, 2016 "Silkies Ruck" march in military "silkies" boxers marched down the streets of Anchorage, Alaska to gain awareness...
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    Mark Anthony
    27/08/2016 #17 Mark Anthony
    "If we show love and support" indeed , this is what is needed. 70% with substance misuse issues, wow that says something. I fear for helping services, I really do!
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    24/07/2016 #16 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    #15 Margaret, you can go into your hive Health: Alcoholism and reclassify the post to another hive or remove the post. On the right hand side of the post you will see 3 dots. Click on the 3 dots and you will see the options. Your best option is to reclassify the post to where it is intended. Send me a message if you need help. 🌸
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    23/07/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Oopsies. Man. I shared this by accident to my Hive: "Health: Alcoholism" by mistake. Apologies throughout, as that was not my intent. I shall see if it can be changed, but I am assuming this is a rather monumental task.....will endeavor. No disrespect intended. The Title was close to the letter "A" and this is just part of my brain injury. So please be forgiving and accept my apologies. Thank you. @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Juan Imaz, @John White, MBA, @Javier beBee asking for help.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #12 @Franci Eugenia Hoffman: For those of us who keep them alive, they are still with us. Forevermore. Amen.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #11 You and me both (Unless I'm running away from home, but that was in the past).
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    06/07/2016 #12 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Every vet should be treated with respect. I have never understood why they are treated cruelly. I had friends that never came back from the VietNam war and some of those that did had severe problems. Thank you for sharing your information @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD View more
    Every vet should be treated with respect. I have never understood why they are treated cruelly. I had friends that never came back from the VietNam war and some of those that did had severe problems. Thank you for sharing your information @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. Close
    Dale Masters
    06/07/2016 #11 Dale Masters
    #9 I never run. Never.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 🚔 Just perfect! It's a Win! Increasing awareness is the key... 🚔
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #9 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 🌾 🌺 🌻 Hey, we need you for the Cause! Don't run because you're in on it! We'll just look for more Beez and pollinate more trees and blossoms...🌾 🌺 🌻 ...and do what we can do, one person & one problem at a time. Remember our conversation on the song, "What if God was one of us?" We have to treat everyone as if they were the most special person for that instant in time. Let's make the world a better place, hon... we are doing it!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 Well, my mind always goes from the Problems to the Solutions....guess I've just seen too much human suffering, too much pain, too many problems. That can be overwhelming in itself. So what we are doing here is a great thing, as we increase awareness ~ ! And thank you, special @Paul Walters for confirming that we have a good cause here, YES! We all need to know about this.....it will affect everyone in due time. I know it will. So, I'm LIVE On the Air in 1 hr. Gotta Bzzzz! 🌾 🌺 🌻
    Paul Walters
    06/07/2016 #7 Paul Walters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I had no idea this was happening. Thank you for keeping us informed !!
    Dale Masters
    06/07/2016 #6 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I was surrounded by military personnel growing up...so much so that I thought it was mandatory that everyone serve in the military after completing High School. Imagine my surprise...and shock...when I found out the truth! I attempted to get into the military seven times. The first time, I would have gotten in...except for the fact that I needed my blood pressure taken 3 times a day for a week to show that my blood pressure was normal. My grandmother, who had custody of me, refused to sign the paperwork for me to get tested, otherwise I'd now be a Navy Vet. One day in the early '80's, I watched while the car in front of me threw rotten fruit at a man in uniform. I was so shocked, repulsed, and ashamed, that I stopped...and told him I'd take him to his ultimate destination, no matter where it was. He thanked me, but had me stop at a truck stop about two hours away. As Americans, we have a PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY AS CITIZENS to see that our vets get the treatment---and honour---they deserve. The above statistics just add to the disgrace the US has become. I'd considered moving to the UK...but I stay where I'm "stationed"...and THESE COLOURS DON'T RUN.
    Dale Masters
    06/07/2016 #4 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I have seen the way vets are treated. It's (another) national disgrace.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 Hey, I was never in the military, but was the civilian ER doc at Ft. Irwin, the National Training Center (NTC) for the Army. I worked with these youth, seeing upwards of 100 patients on a 24-hour shift. I saw war wounds, and more. That's another Buzz. So I know this world from the perspective of someone who longs to heal, and this will be a home base for me always. Thanks for being here with me. It is good not to be alone. ☮
    Randy Keho
    06/07/2016 #2 Randy Keho
    Thanks for your service @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD It ticks me off to see the not-so-public service spots on television for abused animals and starving kids in foreign countries every day of the week. You don't see non-profit, volunteer veteran's assistance programs air until Memorial Day, Veteran's Day or the Fourth of July.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Special thanks to @Dr. Allen Brown for allowing me to Volunteer to help Our Homeless Veterans and abandoned FosterTeens locked 'out of the system' when they turn 18 years of age and the Foster "Parents" kick them out of 'their home' because they no longer get a government paycheck. Fully 1/3 of all Foster Children end up Homeless, and our hopes and dreams for all those without a voice? To find not only a voice, but to save their lives as well. @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani, @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian, @CityVP Manjit, and more.
  11. ProducerMargaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Remembering the Marines
    Remembering the Marines by Dr Margaret Aranda Marine Cpt. Ryan Anthony Beaupre was affectionately characterized by family friend Patricia Gould as, "...the kind of kid you want your daughter to marry, you want your son to be."  Video 1. Sung by Christian band NF, Breaking...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/07/2016 #2 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 OH, how sweet that this resonates with you! As promised, I shall dedicate at least one Buzz a week to our Veterans. We don't need a holiday to remember them, as we should never forget them in the first place. To HONOR! To SERVE! OO-RAH! @Randy Keho
    Randy Keho
    05/07/2016 #1 Randy Keho
    OO-RAH! @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I am very familiar with Illinois Wesleyan University. My cousin and a friend from the neighborhood attended that school. I occasionally visited them while I was attending Western Illinois University. Cpt.Beaupre received a first-rate education before teaching others about service to their country.
  12. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    04/07/2016
    Veterans in Crisis: Don't Let Them Give Up the Fight
    Veterans in Crisis: Don't Let Them Give Up the FightToday's the Fourth of July, 2016. It's a beautiful day in northern Illinois. It's quiet, except for the birds who sing their morning song. I feel an air of peace embrace me. I pray for this feeling to last, knowing full well it will not.I've just...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    09/07/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #7 It's all real. Tell it. Share the ire and the raw. That's what is real reality.
    Brian McKenzie
    08/07/2016 #7 Brian McKenzie
    #6 @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD i am writing about it in my Kyrzbekistan novella with as much ire, disdain and disgust that I can muster. It matters not, the beating drums still call. I am not so old that I cant still get in the fight, I am past young enough to give a shit about the happy ending.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    08/07/2016 #6 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #5 @Brian McKenzie: That is because no matter where you live, you can't take the 'Warrior' out of you. So write about it! You've already pieced enough together to write a Buzz. Fight with pen!
    Brian McKenzie
    06/07/2016 #5 Brian McKenzie
    #4 I am getting antsy - the itch of war needs to be scratched; and it is driving me crazy to not be in the thick of it. F*cking bastards.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 @Brian McKenzie: and that is why I live to serve. Because they did.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    05/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Pushes and pulls me to shreds that are theirs, too. I just want to put them back together. Extremely compelling, @Randy Keho.
    Brian McKenzie
    05/07/2016 #2 Brian McKenzie
    The fight, I can handle - it's the sitting on the sidelines waiting to be called in that is beyond frustrating.
    mohammed khalaf
    04/07/2016 #1 mohammed khalaf
    we appreciated that sacrifices and honor it ,specialy in iraq thank you to comimmoratiom
  13. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    04/07/2016
    LZ Orange: Honoring the Hidden Casualties of War
    LZ Orange: Honoring the Hidden Casualties of WarLZ Orange is a memorial to the dozen Vietnam veterans from my hometown, and the surrounding communities, who suffered and died from the effects of Agent Orange.Agent Orange was a powerful defoliant sprayed to reduce the thick vegetation that...
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Your hometown seems very well-entrenched in military history. It is so honorable for the history to live on. Agent Orange was a prolific blow to many civilian doctors, who reassured ourselves that it was a good choice to Not join the Reserves at the time. I'm so sorry for all the lives lost, and so grateful they remain honored. You are just amazing.
  14. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    03/07/2016
    Down on the Corner: Veterans - a Star - and Oatmeal
    Down on the Corner: Veterans - a Star - and OatmealA funny thing happened on my way to the store to buy some oatmeal. I came across a pair of Vietnam veterans. God, I love my hometown.The flags immediately drew my attention as I drove by, so I had to investigate. I found out they were members of the...
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    Kevin Pashuk
    04/07/2016 #6 Kevin Pashuk
    A great tribute @Randy Keho. Happy 4th of July to all my U.S.A. friends... and you know who you are.
    Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    03/07/2016 #5 Franci Eugenia Hoffman
    Meaningful buzz @Randy Keho. A great tribute, as well. I like to think this happens a lot in America.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    03/07/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Randy Keho: The reason for the whole thing....those last few lines, "I am part of our American flag that has flown in the U.S.A I can no longer fly since the sun and wind have caused me to become tattered and worn. Please carry me as a reminder of the privilege that is yours to live in the great nation which I was privileged to fly over." ... they remind me once again that we need to keep honoring and serving Those Who Gave for their Countries. It's a bond, a clear and foggy belt that holds two souls together with the team and the comrades, the wind and the sky. Let us never forget. Thank you, Randy. A great tribute. 👍
    Don Kerr
    03/07/2016 #3 Don Kerr
    Meat and Eat. Love it. Charming, meaningful post @Randy Keho Happy 4th!
    Charlene Burke
    03/07/2016 #2 Charlene Burke
    What a grand experience. I don't have a hometown and love reading the experiences of those who do. You know the history of the butcher shop, the Meat and Eat Raffle (what a hoot) and more. While I may not have a hometown, I do know Small Town, USA and I do love my country - the USA - and would be honored to have received a star from a previously flying flag. What a great exchange for a single $1. Oh, and I hope you win the raffle!
    Gerald Hecht
    03/07/2016 #1 Gerald Hecht
    @Randy Keho bingo (and the pun really was unintended)! That is so cool! It's funny how some of the most important moments in life seem to just happen, when you go fill up the tank, or pick stuff up from the store --probably because that's where life is happening...good 'un!
  15. Dean Owen

    Dean Owen

    02/07/2016
    1st July dawn vigil at my school to commemorate 100 years since the start of the Battle of the Somme. Dean Owen
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    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 I love that the buildings "ooze mischief" from you. Is that due to childhood boys running down the halls? Because that's the vision I see, and it causes me to smile, knowing that those in the grave are smiling at this mischief, too!
    Dean Owen
    02/07/2016 #2 Dean Owen
    #1 Beautifully said @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD. To me those old buildings ooze mischief. Fond memories.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #1 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    How honorable and picturesque...perhaps it is just my glasses, but I see tattered windows turned to their sides, some trying to see, and some crying to hide. The straight-backed soldiers with hats on their head reminds us of all those eyes filled with dread. But the glory outshines the story as all stand and wait for the silence to remember the ending, life's fate.
  16. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    29/06/2016
    Dad's Wild Ride: To Hellcat and Back
    Dad's Wild Ride: To Hellcat and BackI built this 1/35-scale diorama about 15 years ago in honor of my father for his service during World War II. His tank destroyer battalion was attached to U. S. Gen. George S. Patton as he raced from Normandy to Germany. Before I required bifocals,...
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    Pamela L. Williams
    27/07/2016 #11 Pamela L. Williams
    I used to love helping my brothers put together models! I could never convince my Mom to get me one, not ladylike. Ugh! I would know how to build what my military father worked with, he was a ground to air missile specialist. Where he was stationed overseas we weren't allowed to go, too remote. The missiles he worked with were still classified top secret so he never talked about them. He did get to support missile programs at Vandenberg and in Montana but most of his time in the 50s and 60s was spent in southeast Asia.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    17/07/2016 #10 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 It's a great pic, & I look forward to more. Oh. Yes. We could rant all day about Ex's, yes...hmm....that would be an awfully dark hive lol.
    Randy Keho
    16/07/2016 #9 Randy Keho
    #7 Unfortunately, photos are all that's left of this diorama, and a few others, due to a accident involving my second ex-wife. Ex-wife being the key word. I will buzz more of my work, that survives, later. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #8 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 @Randy Keho, my father died of Alzheimer's the same year of the car accident with my daughter. With dementia, Reminiscence could very well trigger some well-established paths in your grandfather's brain. I gently recommend you catch the look in his eye at first glance, and even if you don't see a reaction, "he" is still inside there...and his brain will respond. Don't listen to the doctors on this one. Wishing you love, and sending Grandpa a huge smack on the cheek!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    16/07/2016 #7 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 I come back here every so often, just to see this scene and all the details...it belongs in a museum, I think. Yes. A museum behind glass, where no kid can sneeze on it! My favorite image it the navigator with the opened book of maps on his 'tank' desktop. Just precious...and thinking of how many young kids were also sitting in his chair....wow. I'm just filled with respect and admiration, all over again.
    Randy Keho
    01/07/2016 #6 Randy Keho
    #5 Yes. @Lisa GallagherMy father , who's still kicking, but suffers from dementia while living in a nursing home, has seen all of my dioramas. He used to ask me what I was working on every time we got together. He used to build models for me when I was a youngster. I got into the hobby after I was laid off from my job
    in the 1990s. My son and I would work on models together, but the bug never hit him like it did me.
    Lisa Gallagher
    01/07/2016 #5 Lisa Gallagher
    Did you dad ever see the models you built to honor him @Randy Keho? Very impressive, thanks for sharing this!!
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #4 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #2 Absolutely so, @Rod Loader! And it's just the begining, as @Randy Keho is now Official Co-Admin on this Hive with me! We hope to keep putting forward positive, historic and enrapturing stories that do true justice and honor to all Veterans! ........And we're off!!! 🏇 @Ali Anani, @Dr. Allen Brown, @NO one, @Mamen Delgado, @Jim Cody, @Juan Imaz.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #3 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #1 It looks awesome! What a way to honor your father, and it gives me goosebumps to 'relive' his scenario through you. A very honorable piece.
    Rod Loader
    29/06/2016 #2 Rod Loader
    Thanks for sharing Randy Keho, a good story and a very nice diorama.
    Randy Keho
    29/06/2016 #1 Randy Keho
    Oops. It didn't look like this before I published it. I obviously did something wrong. My apologies.
  17. Donald Grandy

    Donald Grandy

    28/06/2016
    This is Leadership..... Donald Grandy
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  18. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    For all Female and Male Warriors: Dedicating one Buzz a week to Hives: (1) "Veterans: To Honor," and/or (2) "Veterans: To Serve." We don't need a separate holiday to Honor, Serve, or Remember those who have Given their All. I'm breaking all the rules. Again. Inviting all international countries to "break the rules" with us. Rant, rave, tell us stories, dedications, or talk about guns. Pray, relieve your mental writings on us. It's all fair and just. @Randy Keho, @Randy Smith, @Sara Jacobovici, @Ali Anani, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @debasish majumder, @Mohammed A. Jawad, @Brian McKenzie, @Lisa Gallagher, @Adriana Bevacqua García, @Dr. Allen Brown, @Ken Boddie, @Paul "Pablo" Croubalian, @Donald Grandy, @Emilia M. Ludovino, @Elizabeth Harris, @Michele Williams, @Pamela L. Williams, @Louise Smith, @Leckey Harrison, @Rod Loader, @Liesbeth Leysen, @Miguel López de la Oliva, and all. All Welcomed. All. 👷 (Photo Courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org and does not constitute an endorsement.) Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
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  19. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    This is a rather long blog about Veterans and PTSD, divided into the realization that two profiles can be made (1) The "Patient" and (2) The "First Responder." Buzz coming.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Perseverance: YOU Be that One in a Million!: To Honor: PTSD in Veterans and First Responders
    drmargaretaranda.blogspot.com.tr
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  20. ProducerRandy Keho

    Randy Keho

    25/06/2016
    LZ Peace Memorial: Gone, But Not Forgotten
    LZ Peace Memorial: Gone, But Not Forgotten In 1969, a pair of soldiers from my hometown of Rockford, Illinois, met on a hilltop in Plekiu, South Vietnam. They vowed to meet for dinner if and when they ever made it back home. They held true to their vow. In 1982, they created the charter...
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    Gerald Hecht
    02/07/2016 #22 Gerald Hecht
    Thank you...Thank you
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #21 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #20 @Randy Keho: You are a good soul, with the essence of "serving others" buried deep within a grave that is never to be forgotten: that of the Veterans. I can feel your soul from here.
    Randy Keho
    02/07/2016 #20 Randy Keho
    #19 You're too kind. @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD I'm always glad to help, especially veterans.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    02/07/2016 #19 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    @Randy Keho: Thank you so much for being Co-Administrator with me on Hive ~ "Veterans: To Honor." Every time you talk, I listen. Just love who you are and how you are helping others, especially our Veterans. You confirm that this position was made for you, and had your name written all over it. I look forward to all that is ahead, and do have great hopes that you are making a great difference! @Dr. Allen Brown, @Gerald Hecht, @Brian McKenzie, @Neal Rauhauser, @Anees Zaidi, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman, @Ali Anani, @Dale Masters.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    29/06/2016 #18 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #17 @Leckey Harrison: Really looking forward to understanding the concepts, especially of mind:body and how the mind can be separated from the bodily responses, that can be diminished in intensity over time. God Bless the Vets you work with day in and day out....and for those you have helped so much! Let's' keep that ball rolling, and get more Vets to know what you have! So many have exhausted all other options and are still hurting. I know that you and I are all about stopping the pain. So much value your time and input. Looking forward to all! This ball is never going to stop rollin'! 🎳 !
    Leckey Harrison
    29/06/2016 #17 Leckey Harrison
    #16 I can do that.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/06/2016 #16 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #6 @Leckey Harrison: Amazing and awesome that you dedicated your life to helping others with PTSD and mental health issues that have carried stigma for too long. Please write us a short story....so we can pass it along as a Buzzzzz on its own! It's too important. It's just too important, and we need to know what you have done, in your own novel way. From your own experience. Please spoon-feed us...
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/06/2016 #15 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #4 Oh, do I ever have goosebumps again! That is worthy of sharing with all! Such love, dedication, tolerance, patience, perseverance....we just don't have enough of that today, do we @Randy Keho, @Randy Smith, @Sara Jacobovici, @Franci Eugenia Hoffman and @Ali Anani.....and that is why I just love this beBee spot so much! Thank you so much for sharing the beautiful memories of a beautiful woman and her Veteran husband. So poignant.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/06/2016 #14 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #3 Gosh! Feel free to write us on him...am certain we want to know. We do want to know, and this is a place for honorable remembrances, too. Because we shall never forget.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/06/2016 #13 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #8 It was an awakening of USA University students protesting, especially beginning with UCBerkeley. I was too young, but I've worked with Vets all my professional life, and listened to many a story. I've also watched their tears as they long for acceptance and validation that to us, they are all heroes.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    28/06/2016 #12 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #9 Gives me goosebumps from afar. Powerful.
    Fran Brizzolis
    28/06/2016 #11 Fran Brizzolis
    Thanks you so much @Randy Keho.
    Lisa Gallagher
    28/06/2016 #10 Lisa Gallagher
    Very powerful story @Randy Keho. Excellent photo's that tell a story too. I can't imagine what it had to be like to be a POW, I just can't imagine! My husband has a VET employed with his company; great employee with a good heart & smart as hell. I've heard stories from him and other VETS that break my heart and melt my heart. So much respect. Thanks for sharing this.
    Randy Keho
    28/06/2016 #9 Randy Keho
    #8 The most eye-opening experience for me was talking with another hometown veteran who was a POW from 1968 until the mass release in 1973. He was a guest speaker at the dedication of the memorial.
    Brian McKenzie
    28/06/2016 #8 Brian McKenzie
    Vietnam was before my time, but the Officers and Flag staff that I briefed had many a story about what a shit war it was. I learned some great life long lessons at a very early age from that generation of Vets.
    Randy Keho
    28/06/2016 #7 Randy Keho
    #6 Thank you, Leckey.
    Leckey Harrison
    28/06/2016 #6 Leckey Harrison
    My dedication is a free TRE® (TRE4Vets) class I give to vets at the local resource center. Open only to vets.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    28/06/2016 #5 Mohammed A. Jawad
    #4 @Pamela L. Williams An inspiring narration with heart-felt parables that say many things. Thanks for recalling this story and sharing here so the world knows how people live their lives in patience out of sheer love.
    Pamela L. Williams
    28/06/2016 #4 Pamela L. Williams
    The most respect I ever had for a friend was a woman who I met while living in Florida. Her husband was alive when we met but was suffering from the effects of agent orange and was terminal. She lost him within months of our meeting. We grew close out of our love for Christmas decorations. I turned a dining room in the Airmen's dining hall into a Santa's village/winter wonderland. It was her idea to hang 2000 cotton balls from the ceiling. (Yep we did!). We were best buddies from that point on. She began to share her husbands story. She saw him crossing the street one day and turned to her twin sister and said: Look at him! I'm going to marry that man (they had never met before this day). Three weeks later they were married. Another few weeks later he left for Vietnam. He was injured by a mine while serving and the next 20+ years of their marriage was platonic due to the injury. They adopted a baby and until the day he died he was her best friend. When she shared this story with me I was in awe. She was a young woman, could have remarried, had the large family she had always dreamed of but in her words; "It never entered my mind that I wouldn't spend the rest of my life with him". It took five years after his death before she could even consider dating but thankfully she met a man who (once I berated her into telling him about the injury) stood by her and courted her like she was a princess. We lost touch due to other circumstances and I learned last year she had passed. I saw her one time after leaving Florida and had the chance to tell her how much our friendship meant to me and how much I admired her as a woman, wife, and mother. Her beau was still with her when she went to join her first love.
    Fran Brizzolis
    28/06/2016 #3 Fran Brizzolis
    Probably an ancestor of mine is there, his name Louis Emidio Brizzoli. Semper Fiedelis.
  21. Leckey Harrison

    Leckey Harrison

    24/06/2016
    PTSD Awareness Month continues. This is why I call it a disorder. This is what PTSD does to the brain: it re-prders, and not beneficially, how the brain functions. This is the result of traumatizing stress, chronic or event based. Leckey Harrison
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    Leckey Harrison
    06/07/2016 #42 Leckey Harrison
    #41 One technique I use is a 5 second inhale, 5 second exhale, no break between, for 5 minutes. About three minutes in I feel the diaphragm shift and the next day my intercostals are complaining.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #41 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #40 You're right. Lots of my chronically ill friends/followers seem to get costochondritis, confirmed by pressing on the rib and reproducing the pain. Bet that has to do with the intercostal muscles between the ribs ~ that are not being properly used. Great insight here! Thank you.
    Leckey Harrison
    06/07/2016 #40 Leckey Harrison
    #39 You're welcome. In chronically stressed people, I can see that they're breathing never gets below the diaphragm. It can actually be a physical workout with aces and pains to earn to breathe deeply after years of not doing so.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #39 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #27 @Leckey Harrison: It may sound perfectly silly, but when we sing (I used to be in choir), we were taught how to expand the diaphragm and use "abdominal breathing" to project the voice. I only just got the epiphany that although I do spend much time bed-ridden, I wake up singing. So I'm just hoping that this should help prevent the lung from atelectasis and resulting pneumonia. The most common causes of death from dysautonomia are pneumonia, sudden cardiopulmonary failure, and respiratory arrest. So I think I'll do more singing, yes... 💙 Thank you for bringing up this point. 💙
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #38 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #35 @Ali Anani: Whatever your hands touch, prospers. So whatever you can know about this disease, dysautonomia...it will come to you in portions, as I live with it. Bed-ridden for 10 years now, I've done all I can to increase awareness....and that's the name of this 'game' of life. 💙 ( The "Invisible Illness," dysautonomia, is represented by the color blue. 💙
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    06/07/2016 #37 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #32 @Leckey Harrison: Absolutely; all the dysautonomias and their classifications continue to confuse physicians and patients alike. A good, short review is here: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/dysautonomia/dysautonomia.htm and there are Resources for adults and youth.
    Leckey Harrison
    27/06/2016 #36 Leckey Harrison
    #35 Ali, awareness is needed. The forefront of any movement is awareness.
    Ali Anani
    27/06/2016 #35 Ali Anani
    #34 This is a crucial issue. I am afraid that my role would be to spread awareness about it. I don't want to contribute much on an issue that I am not qualified to discuss. Thank you @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD View more
    #34 This is a crucial issue. I am afraid that my role would be to spread awareness about it. I don't want to contribute much on an issue that I am not qualified to discuss. Thank you @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD for giving me the opportunity to at least comment and hopefully raise attention even by 0.00001% Close
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/06/2016 #34 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #29 @Leckey Harrison, @Sara Jacobovici, @Dale Masters, @Rebel Brown, @Brian McKenzie, @Randy Keho, @Ali Anani, @Mamen Delgado: We all have reason to help now, and for the future of the family relationships to have love. And the confidence in hope 🏄🏼 .
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/06/2016 #33 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #28 @Dale Masters: We have seen many with invisible illnesses either die, attempt suicide, or commit suicide. I loved our "Gentle Giant" Matt so much...I'll do a Buzz in his memory.
    Leckey Harrison
    27/06/2016 #32 Leckey Harrison
    #31 It can also cause POTS. I have a client that is recovering from it, though it is a slow process.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    27/06/2016 #31 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #27 @Leckey Harrison, @Dale Masters, @Randy Keho, @Ali Anani: The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is dysfunctional with a traumatic brain or neck injuries. Sometimes, the brainstem can also suffer "mini-strokes" or "transient ischemic attack" (TIA), causing "Dysautonomia." Dysautonomia is my primary diagnosis affecting the entire ANS....and when I stand up, I faint. So do millions of others. Here's a short Eyewitness TV-Los Angeles video on 'Dysautonomia: https://youtu.be/-Blshb2RVMk
    Dale Masters
    26/06/2016 #30 Dale Masters
    @Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD Actually, I think all four apply to me, esp. #2.
    Leckey Harrison
    25/06/2016 #29 Leckey Harrison
    #28 I can see that. had a similar fear: that I couldn't change. Happy to say I was incorrect on that assumption.
    Dale Masters
    25/06/2016 #28 Dale Masters
    #23 To be honest, my greatest fear in life is that I'll live 50 more years in pain.
    Leckey Harrison
    24/06/2016 #27 Leckey Harrison
    #26 I just trained someone, and I noticed their incapability to take a deep breathe that extended beyond the diaphragm. It's incredibly important in my eyes because that level of constriction is a sign of chronic traumatic stress. The system is so accustomed to short, shallow breathing, that when physical fitness is added, it still stays in the chest. It's the only autonomic function we have control over.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #26 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #18 Love your thoughts on the breath and width of the stress response, and the integration of the major "organs" or systems that are involved in resolving that stress. I really like your positivity, and your way of getting straight to the matter to actually Solve the problem. I'm all about Solutions, too. We'll see where we are, and I am looking forward to it all1
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #25 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #16 Excellent additional thoughts of spiritualism and creativity. Each deserves investigation. Thank you for your comment. Greatly appreciated.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #24 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #15 There are bound to be situational differences that would change the response of a little, fragile woman vs. a huge-muscled male in hearing/seeing a big bear running toward her/him. Male vs female has to be another factor. Within that, we could say that the menstrual cycle and/or postmenopausal and/or hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) are all going to make a difference in a woman vs. a man. More on that from me, later.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    24/06/2016 #23 Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    #10 Your 'non-response' to "create" conscious fear may be (1) related to a syndrome of repeated threats that you are 'immune' to now; (2) you may have no fear of death; (3) you may have more faith in God than fear of anything else; (4) your autonomic nervous system (ANS) may be 'less' responsive; (5) the realization of the depth of the potential for danger may not be active; (6) your adrenal glands may not secrete epinephrine and all the other stress responses; (7) you may have been on chronic steroid therapy before, affecting cortisol stress hormone response; (8) your sleep:wake circadian rhythm may be stressed due to loss of day and night cycles; ...and the list goes on...so it depends on the individual, and I think @Leckey Harrison would add more insight, too. Great scenario for thoughts and ideas.
  22. Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    Wonderful and nostalgic, through the eyes of both the child and the adult, to his father.
    Margaret Aranda, MD, PhD
    My Father's Day Wish Is Hoping Your Dad Was As Great As Mine.
    www.bebee.com This is my dad…his name is Pete Murray and I am his oldest kid,. My dad was a regular guy in a lot of ways. He grew up during the Great Depression...
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