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  1. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    17/01/2017
    What's the difference between a drug pusher and a food pusher? There is none.
    What's the difference between a drug pusher and a food pusher? There is none.In my blog, Just Say "No" To Food Pushers, I wrote about the scourge of those who cannot take "No" for answer.  It's time to do so again. It seems some people relish (no pun intended) that role, and often it's because they're miserable in their...
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  2. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    10/01/2017
    Mind Your Own Business in 2017
    Mind Your Own Business in 2017Another year has come to a close.In our personal lives, this is the time when we reflect on the year that has just ended: The things we did, the places we went, the people we met; the good things we’ll always remember, the bad things we hope to...
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    Comments

    Dorothy Cooper
    10/01/2017 #1 Dorothy Cooper
    I just read your blog. I enjoyed the post! I blogged about Motivation, weight loss, and my disability. You might want to check it out. Perhaps we could collaborate?
    I live in Pa near King of Prussia. I see you're a Jersey Girl
    Dorrie @sittingpretty61 Twitter and Instagram.
  3. ProducerHana Diaz

    Hana Diaz

    08/01/2017
    Lean Belly Breakthrough
    Lean Belly BreakthroughLean Belly Breakthrough: “is safe, fast, a very important and life changing program that will teach you about the dangers of belly fat and give you good and useful strategies for losing it effectively”.See full review...
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  4. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    03/01/2017
    New Year, New You? or . . . Different Year, Same Sh*t?
    New Year, New You? or . . . Different Year, Same Sh*t?Over the years, in keeping in touch with many clients who have achieved and were maintaining their goal weights, I've come to realize a pattern: Much more had taken place in their lives than just waking up one morning a year or two or longer ago and...
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    Comments

    Cheryl Magnuson
    03/01/2017 #3 Cheryl Magnuson
    Really, must we have that language?
    Gloria 🐝 🐾 💫 ☕ Ochoa
    03/01/2017 #2 Anonymous
    LOL Totally me...except the outfits have changed!
    John White, MBA
    03/01/2017 #1 John White, MBA
    Love the headline, @Lori Boxer!
  5. Lori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    02/01/2017
    Happy Slim Year! Time to start working on your summer belt. Lori Boxer
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  6. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    27/12/2016
    Dangerous Dieting
    Dangerous DietingDiets that encourage eating only one type of food or promise rapid weight loss can be dangerous to your health. The short list of the possible risks posed by fad diets includes:Nutritional deficiencies caused by a lack of a balanced diet.Lack of...
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    Comments

    Lori Boxer
    04/01/2017 #2 Lori Boxer
    #1 Thanks so much, Ginger; very nice of you to stay. Glad you enjoyed it.
    Ginger A Christmas
    03/01/2017 #1 Ginger A Christmas
    @Lori Boxer. I like your style. Your graphics are so memorable, I see them and your buzz rises in me word for word. That's strong!
  7. ProducerHana Diaz

    Hana Diaz

    27/12/2016
    Tips To Lose Weight
    Tips To Lose WeightTips To Lose Weight3 Tips To Lose Weight (Best Way, Safe, and...
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  8. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    20/12/2016
    The Eat What You Want As Much As You Want Whenever You Want Weight Loss Program
    The Eat What You Want As Much As You Want Whenever You Want Weight Loss ProgramLet me ask you this: Have you ever really wanted something so badly and then went on to achieve (and maintain) that goal without any self-imposed restrictions? Did you cut back (even just a little) on all-night partying and drinking in college when...
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  9. Lori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    20/12/2016
    Diets that encourage eating only one type of food or promise rapid #weightloss can be dangerous to your health. (Dangerous Dieting http://ow.ly/AwGf307eKhk) Lori Boxer
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  10. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    13/12/2016
    Sea Salt vs.Table Salt: What's the Difference?
    Sea Salt vs.Table Salt: What's the Difference?So many people are addicted to salt: By rote response, when a meal is placed in front of them, they will reach for the salt shaker before they even taste their food.  When I speak with new clients about the necessity of lowering their sodium, and to...
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  11. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    06/12/2016
    The Scale Doesn't Tell The Whole Story
    The Scale Doesn't Tell The Whole StoryI’ve met so many people over the years who have fallen into a pattern of dieting failure: One diet after another, several in a year, multiple times, and each time focused solely on their weight, almost never on their health. Obsessively focused on a...
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    Comments

    Loribeth Pierson
    06/12/2016 #3 Loribeth Pierson
    Some very good advice @Lori Boxer thank you. You are right, Success is more than a number! I just starting making ginger tea. It has taken the acid reflux away and the hot flashes! I buy organic ginger and boil it for an hour and add a bit of honey! Yummy in my tummy!
    Lori Boxer
    06/12/2016 #2 Lori Boxer
    #1 Many thanks for taking the time to read and comment. I'm glad you found it informative, and thanks for sharing.
    Kate Hickery
    06/12/2016 #1 Kate Hickery
    Thanks @Lori Boxer. Great post. Read and shared
  12. Lori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    29/11/2016
    In this episode of my weekly #FatChat℠ #podcast, I talk about why obese people get gout.
    Lori Boxer
    Episode 74 - The Disease Of Kings (and Commoners)
    bit.ly Got...
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  13. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    29/11/2016
    "It's Under Control" . . . Is It?
    "It's Under Control" . . . Is It?Not surprisingly, I meet many people who have all the various medical issues associated with being overweight and obese: diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, acid reflux, insulin resistance . . . just to name a few. Unfortunately, I find...
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    Comments

    Lori Boxer
    29/11/2016 #2 Lori Boxer
    #1 Agree, Mohammed. Let's face it: Despite our very best efforts to eat well, exercise and maintain good health, sometimes we can't prevent getting sick or experience a medical issue. But, we should do all we can to ward that off and NEVER get complacent enough where we 'settle' for a doctor's prescription.

    Thanks for reading my post and taking the time to comment. I appreciate it.
    Mohammed A. Jawad
    29/11/2016 #1 Mohammed A. Jawad
    Ah...how we on routine basis lace our stomachs with powdery medicines! If there's good food and good exercise, then diseases remain aloof.
  14. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    22/11/2016
    Fat Moms, Fat Babies
    Fat Moms, Fat BabiesI see a lot of very overweight and obese young women and since childhood obesity is such a passion of mine, I talk to these women about all the pitfalls of being obese and how it will affect their fertility, for one thing, but also how their...
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  15. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    15/11/2016
    Obesity and Osteoporosis
    Obesity and OsteoporosisOsteoarthritis develops when the cushioning material between the joints, known as cartilage, wears away, eventually allowing the bones to painfully rub or grind together.  Obesity is an important risk factor for osteoarthritis sufferers.  This is...
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  16. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    08/11/2016
    Bariatric + Pediatric = Bad Combination
    Bariatric + Pediatric = Bad CombinationMost of the overweight young people I see in the office have overweight or obese parents. Oftentimes, despite a child’s size and health issues or risks, many of these parents are in denial of the consequences of a do-nothing attitude, and they are...
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  17. Carlos Peterson

    Carlos Peterson

    02/11/2016
    Carlos Peterson
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  18. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    01/11/2016
    The Big Fat Blame Game
    The Big Fat Blame GameThink about this: According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, obesity most often develops from ages 5 to 6 or during the teen years, and a child who is obese between the ages of 10 and 13 has an 80%...
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    Comments

    Lori Boxer
    02/11/2016 #21 Lori Boxer
    #20 Thank you, Gillian; appreciate it. First of all, kids (and adults too of course) can and often do become overweight and obese WITH "healthier" foods; it's not always junk food. Portion control is key. If you eat too much, regardless of whether it's 'good' or 'bad', you will gain weight. If you eat too little, regardless of whether it's 'good' or 'bad,' your metabolism will slow and you can gain weight with less food. Parents have to be able to say to a kid who wants seconds and thirds, "No, you've had enough. Drink some water" or "No, wait a while and if you're still hungry you can have an apple."

    And, unlike many others who also seem to think that parents need to be educated, believe me . . . barring a mental or psychological problem where they can't tie their own shoelaces, parents ARE absolutely aware of exactly what they are doing to get their kids fat. The bigger problem is that parents choose not recognize that their kids are getting fat and/or they don't want to make the changes in their own lives that is necessary to make changes in the households. They make every excuse in the book and, in part, when they are fat, and when all the kids in the cul-de-sac are fat, and all the kids in the classroom are fat, your eyeballs register fat as a 'new norm.'

    I am passionate about this subject in particular because, as I always say, if adults want to be fat, if they think that's sexy, if they think obesity is cool and healthy, hey . . . have at it; knock yourselves out. But, your kid DO NOT have that option to choose for themselves. Parents GIVE THEIR KIDS OBESITY . . . and that is what pisses me off.
    Gillian Pearl
    02/11/2016 #20 Gillian Pearl
    Hi Lori - this is the first post of yours that I am reading and I have to say that I admire and appreciate your honest and no B-S writing style. Sometimes the truth hurts to hear but it doesn't make it any less important to be said. As a parent to a 6 year old and someone that has struggled to maintain a healthy weight for all of my adult life, your words ring very true. I was an overweight child, with overweight parents. I ate healthy a lot. But unhealthier even more. There are many of my own posts I can write on this as it is a BIG topic (pardon the pun). My daughter is a selective eater, but the options presented to her are all healthy ones with less healthy options added in when appropriate. That being said, while this might just be semantics to some, I think when we assign 'blame' to someone, it usually leaves the person with their back up against the wall - more focused on dealing with the discomfort of potentially being wrong - then on the issue at hand. No matter how we got here - change needs to begin now... Parents need to be informed/educated of the true impact being overweight has on their child (especially if they do not have a weight issue). Because if not addressed early on - it can become a life sentence (again - I speak from experience). And children need to be educated as well so that they can make the right choices for themselves, when their parents are not around. Thank you for writing about this.
    Lori Boxer
    02/11/2016 #19 Lori Boxer
    #18 To each his own. My daughter, too, is fit and slim, was on crew at school, and an equestrian since 7 years old. She knew there'd be consequences of not eating the right meals and snacks at school. She understood the need for proper nutrition ESPECIALLY because of long school days and sports immediately thereafter. The choice was hers to throw her lunch out or make bad choices. The choice was mine to tell her she wouldn't be riding. I'll leave it at that. No two parents are the same.
    Christine Stevens
    02/11/2016 #18 Christine Stevens
    #12 I erred on the side of I'd rather my child eat than force her to take foods I knew she would throw out and substitute with whatever she could get out of the vending machine. If I packed anything other than what she wanted, that is where the food ended up. I insisted and won on the sides like apples and carrots (no chips or candy), but quit fighting the PB&J when I found out the fresh chicken or tuna ended up in the garbage can. I was a single mom on a very tight budget and couldn't afford to throw out entire meals. She ate. She excelled at school and in extracurriculars, is quite thin, and turned out just fine. Far better than if she'd gone without lunch or had a lunch of chips from the vending machine.

    I don't disagree with blaming the parents for a child's obesity (or their horrendous behavior), but you are being kinda judgmental. Too much of anything is bad for you, yes. Hell, you can die from water toxicity. But in moderation, even if it is daily, most things won't hurt you. Even with my extreme diet, I still regularly have a small bite of chocolate or a small spoonful of almond butter (allergic to peanuts, or I'd eat that). Oh, I did the "I'm not a short order cook" thing for dinners too - eat what I fix or go hungry.
    Lori Boxer
    02/11/2016 #17 Lori Boxer
    #16 I don't sit in judgment of any parent, believe me. This is just an issue close to my heart, for the obvious reason. I deal every single day with overweight teens who were overweight kids. I sit and watch them cry, and that includes boys. I have no fucking patience from the parents of these kids who whine to me about 'how hard it is' to make the changes necessary. Listen, I'm old school, hard core, Brooklyn street-smart born and raised. In my house, me and Steve are the bosses, not our daughter. That's the rule: My house, my rules. There was one menu at home each night for dinner. Column A was what was being served. Column B was 'you starve.' That was Sabrina's choice. She got the hang of it real quick. My job as a parent is to make sure I do everything in my power to give my daughter the habits (physical, mental, emotional, spiritual) that give her the best chance for good health and a happy life. If, now that she's a college sophomore, she decides she doesn't like being slim and healthy and wants to party and drink and stuff her face with bullshit food every day so she can put on 10, 15, 20 pounds or more . . . hey, she can knock herself out. I did my job, and turned her out to the world. The rest is up to her.
    John White, MBA
    02/11/2016 #16 John White, MBA
    #12 Thanks, Lori. We do try to balance the PB&J w/ fruit and carrot sticks. She also likes just plain ham or turkey roll ups. (no bread) But I have to admit our go to is a PB&J. I appreciate the advice in your columns.
    Lori Boxer
    02/11/2016 #13 Lori Boxer
    #8 Sorry you feel that way. I wasn't being nasty. I was just curious as to what Christmas greetings had to do with my post. Now obviously you can't answer that question so you choose to call me nasty instead. That's OK. I can take it.
    Lori Boxer
    02/11/2016 #12 Lori Boxer
    #1 As I mentioned in another comment in this thread, PBJ is not the worst thing in the world, but it is not something that should be a regular habit; and there are parents who give that to their kids every school day. Quick and easy is a turkey sandwich, a tuna salad or egg salad sandwich; 2 hard boiled eggs (many kids love hard boiled eggs) with some crackers on the side; or any of those items on a mini-bagel . . . and 1 cup of raw veggies (cucumbers, carrots, string beans, etc) should always be in a kids lunch box, as well as a piece of fruit for either at lunch or afternoon snack, either in school or to have on their way home from school.
    Lori Boxer
    02/11/2016 #11 Lori Boxer
    #3 Yes, and still am. More active there.
    Lori Boxer
    02/11/2016 #10 Lori Boxer
    #6 There are plenty of food items that are quick to make, inexpensive and healthy. When kids are young enough that they are still going to school with lunch packed from home (vs. older kids who usually just buy stuff in the cafeteria) a healthy half- or whole sandwich and cup of cucumbers or carrots and a piece of fruit with a bottle of water does not cost a lot of money to make, and the entire lunch box can be packed the night before. It is very important to set the standard when kids are in the lower grades because, and I can tell you from personal experience, watching my daughter's school mates for 15 straight years at the same school . . . those who were fat in the lower grades were, by the time they got to the Middle and Upper Schools and now choosing their own meals in the cafeteria, WERE OBESE . . . almost every single one of them. Who's to blame? Their parents.
    Lori Boxer
    02/11/2016 #9 Lori Boxer
    #2 You're right in that PBJ is not the worst thing a kid could eat, but it IS fattening and it is NOT good to send a kid to school every day with that for lunch . . . no matter how healthy (whole grain, for example) the bread might be. Putting aside children who have emotional or food-textural issues, when parents tell me that they give their kids PBJ every day because that's all they'll eat, my response is that's all they'll eat BECAUSE they allowed that to happen by giving their kids that habit. Plain and simple. Kids need a wide variety of stuff in their diet and WE, as parents, set those habits. A good breakfast is very important but a school-age kid needs a very good lunch as well so that they are alert and functioning to full mental and physical capacity for both scholastic learning and sports activities. All meals in a kids life should be balanced. There's plenty room for snacks of a, shall we say, less healthy variety every now and then, but during the school week, focus should be put on (a) what will give my kid the best start to the day, and (b) what meals and snacks will stay longer in his/her belly, take longer to digest, stabilize sugar levels, and result in longer energy.
    Lori Boxer
    02/11/2016 #7 Lori Boxer
    #5 . . . and what does your comment have to do with my post?
    Franci🐝Eugenia Hoffman
    01/11/2016 #6 Franci🐝Eugenia Hoffman
    Kids pick up their parents eating habits plus some parents do what's easy and inexpensive. In the case of PB&J, if in moderation using a healthier type of bread and just a smidgen of the J - it's better than a lot of things kids may eat.
    Christine Stevens
    01/11/2016 #2 Christine Stevens
    #1 I'm not sure a PB&J is so bad in and of itself if other meals balance out the day. My daughter wouldn't eat anything but PB&J for lunch for years, but always had a healthy breakfast and dinner. She always was and still is a healthy weight.
    John White, MBA
    01/11/2016 #1 John White, MBA
    Thanks for writing this, Lori. What do you recommend as an alternative to PB&J at lunch? We always balance
  19. Carlos Peterson

    Carlos Peterson

    01/11/2016
    Any goal can be accomplished if you dont give up. Congrats!!!
    http://carlosp329.skinnybodycare.com/
    Carlos Peterson
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  20. ProducerPat Bagano

    Pat Bagano

    31/10/2016
    Discover Why FasterEFT is Very Effective in Weight Loss
    Discover Why FasterEFT is Very Effective in Weight LossWhy Are You Still Fat?FasterEFT is a system that understands the root cause of all our problems, weight and nutrition included. It is not just another weight loss modality being marketed online. In fact, FasterEFT is a community and family of...
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  21. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    29/10/2016
    Can't?! If You're Potty Trained, You CAN!
    Can't?! If You're Potty Trained, You CAN!I recently wrote about how “I don’t know” is tied with “I don’t have time” for the #1 spot on the hit parade of excuses heard regularly from weight loss clients. The #2 spot? Well, that’s definitely “I can’t.” OMG . . . I hate that freakin’ word...
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  22. Lori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    27/10/2016
    God . . . I can't tell you how many times I say this on a daily basis. #weightloss #motivation Lori Boxer
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  23. Lori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    27/10/2016
    There are so many potentially harmful changes to a fetus of an overweight or obese mother as well as potential serious medical issues for the mother. Women who are contemplating pregnancy should plan ahead for that event and lose weight. This will give them the best chance to create the optimal environment in which to conceive and carry to term a healthy baby.
    Lori Boxer
    Obesity can lead to high risk pregnancies
    www.thehealthsite.com Obesity among pregnant women is leading to a rise in high-risk pregnancies that may affect both mother and child, a study has...
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  24. ProducerLori Boxer

    Lori Boxer

    25/10/2016
    Cholesterol: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
    Cholesterol: The Good, The Bad and The UglyCholesterol is not exactly a barn-burner of a topic, but it is one of the reasons why so many people make that first phone call to my offices AFTER their physician tells them their levels are high.  And that’s a result almost always because an...
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  25. Pat Bagano

    Pat Bagano

    25/10/2016
    If you are like me who is in constant struggle to lose weight but have TERRIBLE eating habits. This will be a read that is worth it.
    Pat Bagano
    FasterEFT Ultimate Weight Loss Course is Focused to Make Immediate Changes
    fastereft.com Losing weight was never easy for a lot of people until they get acquainted to FasterEFT. The reason behind the immediate changes that...
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