Adam Read en Lifestyle, Communications and journalism, beBee in English 3/11/2016 · 1 min de lectura · 1,3K

When Lying Brings Encouragement

When Lying Brings Encouragement


What dilemmas do we face, then, when we come across hard evidence that lying to people might actually evoke a significantly stronger sense of encouragement than telling the truth? How do leaders manage to this, when people pay substantial sums of money to empower half truths and then turn around and make claims of intentional deceit?

We appear to be standing on the very branches we are cutting off.

If this dynamic is true, reliable, and reproducible, it seems reasonable to assume that it might have affected every effort we have made to establish the parameters of government, justice, education, psychology, religion, and the fundamental search for truth.

This may even be how we arrived at the political dynamics we now all despise. Decades...centuries...maybe even millennia of buying into half truths thinking that positive and encouraging messages should be our mainstay. While it may have worked for us in the past (and the past goes back quite a ways), this may be the very dynamic that has us frozen, frightened, and afraid of what is to come next.

It is inappropriate for us to elect leaders that tell us what we want to hear and then turn around and blame them for lying to us. Perhaps we are the collective problem more than they are, as they did not arrive where they are today without us empowering them in direct or indirect ways.

If we want leaders to be honest, then we must gain an appetite for truth and elect people that tell us what we need to hear rather than what we want to hear.

Enough with assuming they are here to fix our problems. The onus is on us to come out of our daze, shoulder our proportional responsibility of making the world a better place, and give our descendants a heritage to be proud of.

No more excuses and no more whining.

Let's get out there and get to work.


image credit:  A stunning image by "Unsplash" at Pixabay.com.


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Dean Owen 3/11/2016 · #8

#2 #5 That's not very nice. In a bad mood? Cheer up. It's almost the weekend.

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Mohammed Sultan 3/11/2016 · #7

@ Adam Read.People may want to be entertained while in the contrary they are in a bad need to avoid pain. Universally,most of the education and health systems have become like a Swiss Cheese,full of holes because leaders are either telling half truths or telling lies.Telling people half truths is more dangerous than telling lies,because it implies being of a double-face and, so too, a double- talk.Telling lies may create an imminent satisfaction,but later on change will become a right.Also,half truths gives the people the feeling that they have been led to fall in a gap between a perfect knowledge and the need to act in state of false knowledge. Aristole quoted - the least deviation from the truth is multiplied later a thousand fold.

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Adam Read 3/11/2016 · #6

Easy folks. Let's keep this professional.

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Mohammed A. Jawad 3/11/2016 · #4

#2 @Karen Anne Kramer ~ CNN Women Leaders 2015 Thanks so much for your counsel! I have realized, in a hurry, where I was wrong!

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Mohammed A. Jawad 3/11/2016 · #3

Leadership, without the sense of truthfulness and well-being of others, is meaningless. Indeed, as a leader, your foremost duty should be to focus on your people, and then think of how well you can guide them to achieve results.

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