Christine Stevens en IT - Information Technology, Human Resources Professionals, Business Senior Business/Strategic Communications Analyst • Peridot Solutions, LLC 20/9/2016 · 4 min de lectura · +700

Turn About is Fair Play - Rules for Recruiters from Job Seekers

Turn About is Fair Play - Rules for Recruiters from Job Seekers

Looking for a new job is never truly fun. New opportunities are exciting, but those are the result of the less thrilling job hunt. The internet and sites like LinkedIn, Dice.com, Ladders.com, and many others make it much easier it is for you to search for jobs and for recruiters to find you. Compared to when I had to print résumés, pay postage, and send snail mail all over the country, I LOVE online job hunting. I owe my last two career changes (both unsolicited) in large part to LinkedIn. Thank you, Reid Hoffman and Jeff Weiner.

There’s a caveat to that ebullient expression of love for online job hunting. It’s the whole recruiter finding you part. Many of the recruiters I’ve worked with are good. One is great. Then there are the rest of them. They are… Well… Not so good.

I don’t know about other industries, but the IT-related fields get calls all of the time. In my office, we average about four unsolicited calls per week and dozens of unsolicited, often auto-generated, emails based on our LinkedIn profiles alone. It’s higher if we ever used Dice.com, which most of us have. We’re also all contract-based consultants, which means we don’t normally take our résumés down. (If you don’t get lots of these emails and want them, consider following LinkedIn Influencer and serial entrepreneur James Caan’s advice.)

Everyone who has ever applied for a job online or posted their