Dean Da Costa in Staffing and Recruiting, Recruiting & Sourcing Professionals, Human Resources Professionals President • Search Authority Oct 14, 2016 · 1 min read · +200



How to write a great job description

It’s All In The Name – Your first challenge is to get a top candidate to click on your job posting from a large, mind numbing, and repetitive list of startling similar jobs. Research shows that job seekers click on jobs based on the name and reputation of the posting company and the job title. You can’t do much about your company name…but you sure can spice up your job title. Add action to your title that speaks directly to the opportunity the job offers.

Focus on Achievement – Studies indicate that the opportunity for advancement and interesting work are significantly higher drivers for job candidates than compensation. Make your positions attractive by describing what individuals can hope to accomplish in their new job.

Search for Success – Instead of turning your advertisement into a laundry list of desired skills, define your position in terms of the successes that qualified candidates will need to demonstrate.

Convey Excitement – The best job postings are those that are fun to read. You know which ones they are – descriptions that have the reader saying, “That sounds like an interesting job.” Take the time to understand the position, get excited about your company’s culture and the promise of the opportunity. If you wouldn’t want to apply, no one else will either.

Spell out true requirements – If there are must-have technical or knowledge based requirements of the job, spell these out clearly and early in the post. People will be less inclined to read on and become interested in a position that they know from the outset they are unqualified for.

Set job seeker expectations appropriately – By doing a good job of defining the daily responsibilities of the job, you will also be discouraging people who don’t wish to do those things.

Require Homework – Consider asking for a cover letter with each application. This simple request will often weed out people that are taking a flyer on a job they really don’t know much about. Have your candidate solve a tough problem, submit a piece of code. Watch out, while this could be fun, it may also deter candidates who you may have been interested in.

Writing a JD

  • Minimum Qualifications; minimum requirements should be universal across the company with regards to pipe.
  • Basic Qualification: next set of qualifications ie;..Job specific
  • Preferred Qualifications; nice to haves, group specific.
  • Tags/Buzz Words- a list of words, titles, and phrases that candidates might search under that are relevant to your JD