Geoff Hudson-Searle in Communications and journalism, beBee in English, LinkedIn CEO • International Business and Executive Management Limited Sep 5, 2019 · 1 min read · 1.1K

Why Purposeful Discussions are a Human Imperative

Why Purposeful Discussions are a Human Imperative


I recently had a meeting in the City of London with a group of executives – the interesting fact was when I left the boardroom, there was this picture on the wall with the words:

‘Do more things that make you forget to check your phone’

The facts, do we actually have time for our most precious relationships, do we give the time to build lasting relationships around trust and values or do we constantly feel we can always do better with the latest api or technology app?

Let’s face it: Technology is everywhere, but the more we depend on it, and the more we use it when we don’t really need it, the harder it becomes to create meaningful relationships — and sometimes, it actually makes things more difficult.

A recent video interview with Martin Lucas, CEO of Mastermindset, challenges discussion and debate with Geoff Hudson-Searle across the meaning of human interaction, why we need a purpose driven life and Geoff's new book 'Purposeful Discussions'

Why Purposeful Discussions are a Human Imperative

The facts, do we actually have time for our most precious relationships, do we give the time to build lasting relationships around trust and values or do we constantly feel we can always do better with the latest api or technology app?

Let’s face it: Technology is everywhere, but the more we depend on it, and the more we use it when we don’t really need it, the harder it becomes to create meaningful relationships — and sometimes, it actually makes things more difficult.

Final thought….. If you use your phone less, you’ll end up with more free time. Much of this will be in small chunks, such as when you are in the elevator, waiting in line of on the train. These can be great opportunities to take a deep breath and just do nothing (which can be a surprisingly relaxing and restorative experience).

You’re also likely to find yourself with longer periods of time to fill. In order to keep yourself from reverting to your phone to entertain you, it’s essential that you decide on several activities you would like to use this time for and then set up your environment to make it more likely that you will stick to these intentions.

For example, if you say you want to read more, put a book on your coffee table, so when you flop down on the couch at the end of a long day, your book will be within eyesight and reach. If you want to practice playing music, take your instrument out of its case and prop it up in the hall, where it will be easy to grab when you have a few spare moments. If you want to spend more time in mindfulness take the time to schedule time for meditation and practice it daily. If you want to spend more time with your family or a particular friend, make plans to do so and put your phone in your pocket or bag for the duration of your time together. Smartphones are habit-forming, so think about the habits you want to form.

As American author Regina Brett once said:

“Sometimes you have to disconnect to stay connected. Remember the old days when you had eye contact during a conversation? When everyone wasn’t looking down at a device in their hands? We’ve become so focused on that tiny screen that we forget the big picture, the people right in front of us.”



Lauren Irwin-Szostak Sep 9, 2019 · #11

Thanks for sharing!

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Geoff Hudson-Searle Sep 7, 2019 · #10

#4 Great to have your inputs John, love your view on the use of electronics and how you spend your time on media.

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Geoff Hudson-Searle Sep 7, 2019 · #9

#5 Hi Jerry, absolutely focus, I called into minutes at a board meeting that the executive board must keep their devices on silent and not used whilst in meeting, definitely the correct decision.

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Geoff Hudson-Searle Sep 7, 2019 · #8

#6 Hi Franci, your time and place and idiom, really resonates with why we should have more balance in our lives, real meaningful conversations require real people and quality time. 

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Geoff Hudson-Searle Sep 7, 2019 · #7

#3 Absolutely, generally, loneliness is a negative condition resulting from a state of aloneness.  People who desire more interpersonal relationships than they actually have can develop feelings of loneliness.  How much social connectedness a person needs influences how much aloneness they can tolerate.  However, it is not the number of social relationships that determines whether people feel lonely.  Rather, it is the emotional and cognitive reactions the individual experiences in relation to these connections that plays a role in experiencing loneliness.  For example, social interactions where an individual feels the following are associated with loneliness 

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I agree @Geoff Hudson-Searle. I remember the old idiom "there's a time and place for everything". I feel smart phones have their place but many have let them take over quality time that can be spent with real people relationships, etc.

+2 +2
Jerry Fletcher Sep 6, 2019 · #5

Geoff, All the successful consultants I work with have the ability to focus at an incredible level. To a person they shut off their smart phones in meetings. And so it goes.

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John Rylance Sep 5, 2019 · #4

I'm in full agreement. I don't have a mobile, IPhone or waste time Twittering as if it was everlasting Spring. Therefore when out I'm constantly aware of the bigger picture, and can avoid those glued into their own small world, of for the most part  is trivia. 

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