Gerald Hecht en beBee in English, College, Scientists and Research Associate Professor (Tenured and rank promotion 2007) of Psychology • Southern University Baton Rouge 19/11/2016 · 1 min de lectura · 3,6K

But Why Quibble?

But Why Quibble?

Insane:

There is only one kind of person, Phaedrus said, who freely chooses to accept or reject the mythos in which he lives. And the definition of that person, when he has rejected the mythos, Phaedrus said, is “insane”. To go outside the mythos is to become insane…

-Robert PirsigBut Why Quibble?

Insane:

adjective in·sane \(ˌ)in-ˈsān\

1: mentally disordered : exhibiting insanity

2: used by, typical of, or intended for insane persons <an insane asylum>

3: absurd <an insane scheme for making money>

4: extreme

-Merriam-Webster Dictionary and Thesaurus of American English.But Why Quibble?

Insane:

adj. 1) mental illness of such a severe nature that a person cannot distinguish fantasy from reality, cannot conduct her/his affairs due to psychosis, or is subject to uncontrollable impulsive behavior. Insanity is distinguished from low intelligence or mental deficiency due to age or injury. If a complaint is made to law enforcement, to the district attorney, or to medical personnel that a person is evidencing psychotic behavior, he/she may be confined to a medical facility long enough (typically 72 hours) to be examined by psychiatrists who submit written reports to the local superior/county/district court. A hearing is then held before a judge, with the person in question entitled to legal representation, to determine if she/he should be placed in an institution or special facility. The person may request a trial to determine sanity. The original hearings are often routine with the psychiatric findings accepted by the judge. In criminal cases, a plea of "not guilty by reason of insanity," will require a trial on the issue of the defendant's insanity (or sanity) at the time the crime was committed. In these cases the defendant usually claims "temporary insanity" (crazy then, but okay now). The traditional test of insanity in criminal cases is whether the accused knew "the difference between right and wrong," following the "M'Naughten Rule" from 19th Century England. Most states require more sophisticated tests based on psychiatric and/or psychological testimony evaluated by a jury of laypersons or a judge without psychiatric training. 4) a claim by a criminal defendant of his insanity at the time of trial requires a separate hearing to determine if a defendant is sufficiently sane to understand the nature of a trial and participate in his/her own defense. If found to be insane, the defendant will be ordered to a mental facility, and the trial held only if sanity returns. 5) sex offenders may be found to be sane for all purposes except the compulsive dangerous and/or anti-social behavior. They are usually sentenced to special facilities for sex offenders, supposedly with counseling available. However, there are often maximum terms related to the type of crime, so that parole and release may occur with no proof of cure of the compulsive desire to commit sex crimes

-Collins Dictionary of Law:

Insane. (n.d.) Collins Dictionary of Law. (2006).


Gerald Hecht Hace 3 d · #59

#58 @Brian McKenzie We thank you for your continuing support; as the man said: "yeah, yeah, yeah..."

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Brian McKenzie Hace 3 d · #58

#51 I fully support, endorse and am actively working on collective extinction. The Trust None Over 35 Generation should know that their socialist ideology and bastions are on the chopping block. Let them eat Cake.

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Praveen Raj Gullepalli Hace 3 d · #56

#55 :) lemme dig that!;) Thanks Gerry!

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Gerald Hecht Hace 4 d · #55

#54 @Praveen Raj Gullepalli oh sorry...yeah, so his rejoinder was: "bank tellers are fatalistic --I'm a farmer. Who ever heard of a fatalistic farmer?"

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Praveen Raj Gullepalli Hace 4 d · #54

#53 Wish I knew what that rejoinder was! Was it in that interview link you shared a while back? In life, it's either Hope or Nope ;) A fatalist could never ever hope to write such volumes about life and times...that are always chaaaanging!

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Gerald Hecht Hace 4 d · #53

#52 @Praveen Raj Gullepalli I remember once...a reporter asked Bob if he was fatalistic. His rejoinder left room for a glimmer of optimism...maybe even a small opening for hope;

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Praveen Raj Gullepalli Hace 4 d · #52

#50 No man in his right senses can deny the fact that we are failing as a species, collectively, by always, consistently, invariably, unrelentingly biting the hand that feeds us, by cutting away the hands that rock our cradles, by slowly draining away the life blood from our very planet, love from our hearts, and hope from the minds of our children allowing them to be led by the illusions of the digital age. Exceptions never made the rule. Of course there is more to it. I apologise everyday. Every time I see a beggar with his hand stretched out. Every time I see a tree being cut to make way for a playground or a bypass road. Every time my rupee buys me less than what it bought me yesterday. Every time I see the cloud of smog enveloping the streets in the mornings. And there's lots more here too. But I fear we are eternal optimists (didn't someone say that the only real pessimist is a dead one? :) If not our civilisation, maybe the next? This age is called Kaliyuga in our ethos. The End of Ages. The decline of civilisation has been so well described that it is frightening. And it is happening as written. Nothing is sacred anymore. In the final equation, good will be outnumbered. Crucified million times over. It is just us. Just you, Just me. And we should treasure, nurture what good there is left around in the people around us. Regardless of who they are and where they might be. Now it is time for a Dylan song dear Sir! Don't think twice it's alright :)

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