John Whitehead en Leadership Development, HR Manager, Human Resources Professionals Associate Executive Coach • Marshall Goldsmith Stakeholder Centered Coaching 7/1/2017 · 1 min de lectura · 1,4K

What’s That Knocking at the Door?

 

When I started writing this blog in 2014, my initial intent was to write about my journey as I started my own business as an Executive Coach. I had decided on the school I would attend for training, and had already completed some certifications in processes that would be useful. It was a time of personal discovery and I wanted to use the blogging platform as a way to share and maybe even explain what I was doing, and why.What’s That Knocking at the Door?

Over time, the blog morphed into a series of posts on Leadership and Soft Skills development as those became the focus of my coaching practice. I was able to use personal experiences and learning to illustrate my points and ideas. As I look back over the 120 posts I can see how my experiences have shaped my writing and how my writing has helped me to determine my next steps.

One of the biggest lessons I've learned is to expect the unexpected: be open to opportunities as they arise and don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone.

Are you familiar with the concept of the imposter syndrome (sometimes referred to as the fraud syndrome)? It is the feeling one gets in certain situations when that little voice inside your head starts going on about how you don’t belong, that you are not qualified, that someone will find out that you are here and, boy, will you be in trouble. It happens most often in situations outside of your comfort zone, when you are trying something new. It happened to me this week as I stood in front of a classroom of university students about to give my first presentation in Leadership. Well, actually, it started a few hours before that as I was leaving home to drive to the university! But then I stopped myself and remembered what I have said to many of my clients: there is a reason you are here; someone thought you are the right person for this role. So do your best and be who you are. You know your stuff — be confident in that. Yes, it did go well and no one tapped me on the shoulder and asked what I was doing there.

So, be ready to step up and be uncomfortable at times because those are the opportunities for real growth. Be ready to open that door when it knocks. There is reason for you to be doing what you are doing and it will become clear as you go along. I can say this with confidence, because as I look back over the past two and half years, I’ve experienced it myself.

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John Whitehead, coaches’ individuals and organizations in becoming more effective by helping them improve their interpersonal communications, emotional intelligence and resiliency.

*******Are you wondering if having a Leadership/Personal Development Coach is right for you? Contact John for a complimentary, exploratory coaching session at john@johnkwhitehead.ca********

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Jared J. Wiese 9/1/2017 · #8

Great points. As you say, "step up".
I've heard it added: Show up. Be authentic. That ties nicely with @Sara Jacobovici's comment. Prepare, then focus on the work, and the rest takes care of itself.

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Adam Weedy 9/1/2017 · #7

Very encouraging!

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Sara Jacobovici 9/1/2017 · #6

As always @Ali Anani "reads" me perfectly. Thanks Dr. ali for bringin my attention to this great buzz. @John Whitehead, you present an experience most of us can relate to and certainly identify with in a narrative that makes it easy to hear. As Dr. Ali pointed out, I appreciate when you write, ""One of the biggest lessons I've learned is to expect the unexpected: be open to opportunities as they arise and don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone". This can lead to what has worked for me to gratefully not have to experience the imposter syndrome anymore. First, I always find a way of asking as many questions beforehand regarding expectations; from the organizers or other team members. Then, in expecting the unexpected, my focus is on trying to imagine, where I will be, with who I will be and why I will be there; whether presenting, training, joining a new team , and so on. After all that, I go into the experience not focusing on me or others but on the work itself. With my focus on the work, I have shifted any attention from me or others to the content of the gathering. And since I wouldn't be doing what I was doing if I didn't have an interest or care enough about the work, immersing myself in the work beats any other place, comfort zone or not. Thanks for sharing your experiences and success story John.

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Laura Mikolaitis 9/1/2017 · #5

"So, be ready to step up and be uncomfortable at times because those are the opportunities for real growth. Be ready to open that door when it knocks." A great read by @John Whitehead.

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Laura Mikolaitis 9/1/2017 · #4

@John Whitehead, I love what you say here: "there is a reason you are here; someone thought you are the right person for this role. So do your best and be who you are. You know your stuff — be confident in that." Amen to that. It's something that we tend to forget and we do a disservice to ourselves when we do. Maybe it is due to outside forces or our own internal conflicts that can lead us down that road. But you are right. There is a reason. And likely, a steadfast one. So grab it by the reigns and go because you just never know. And if whatever it is doesn't work out, then perhaps it is leading you to the next thing that will. Growth doesn't come without challenges. We just have to be willing to accept them and learn from them - even if we don't understand the lesson at first. Thank you for sharing this. I really enjoyed reading it.

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@John Whitehead- I enjoyed immensely reading your buzz and experiencing the imposter syndrome. I know the feeling and your buzz triggered some memories. I like some doubts for short times because they make me try to do better. However; if should the syndrome stay for prolonged times it could be very harmful.
I am sure @Sara Jacobovici shall enjoy reading this buzz as you wrote "One of the biggest lessons I've learned is to expect the unexpected: be open to opportunities as they arise and don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone". Only last week she wrote on the relationship of imagination and expecting the unexpected. Sharing

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Harvey Lloyd 9/1/2017 · #2

This was a good discussion about the "imposter syndrome", i have never heard it labeled. This is a concept that when traveling in uncharted areas of growth can become a battlefield of the mind.

I am not sure we can avoid it. There seems to be a competitive communications style that feels it must challenge people in their growth. This would establish a narrative of constant seeking understanding in the area of your growth. Early in my small business journey i was lucky and had a few mentors who recognized my blind exploration and provided complimentary guidance.

Great thoughts here and certainly is a worthy topic.

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David B. Grinberg 7/1/2017 · #1

Nice post, John. I would emphasize the many employees need to improve their "soft skills" in today's mobile, digital and virtual Information Age. This is especially true for Millennials and Gen Z, the biggest age demographics who also represents the next generation of leadership. It's good to know you are training people on "soft skills" -- as mastering these skills enhance interpersonal communication and customer service, among other things. Keep buzing in 2017, John!

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