Josh LeBlanc-Shulman en Prayer for the World, Emotional Intelligence, Psychology Founder • Logos Academy PDX 27/9/2016 · 1 min de lectura · 1,1K

1 Reason Why We Don't Agree on Anything

1 Reason Why We Don't Agree on Anything

1. We think that the opposite of rational thought is irrational thought.


It isn't. There is no such thing as irrational thought. Unless your brain is significantly damaged and sick, and that happens.

Otherwise, the human psyche is divided into two parts:

A. Rational Thought

B. Emotional Thought (also known as feelings)

Rational and emotional thought are two opposites on the spectrum of how we think, but they are both open to compromise. Both know that the other side is valid. Otherwise we would be schizophrenic.

Think about how you resolve arguments within your own mind. Do you tell one half of yourself that it's irrational, and then tell the other half that it's also irrational? Or do you acknowledge your emotions, acknowledge the facts, and find a solution that addresses both?

Now look back at your fiercest, most heated arguments with other people (hint: it's probably your spouse, mother, father, sister, or brother). Do any of the following scenarios sound familiar?

Scenario A: They are talking about numbers and facts and money and results. You are talking about fairness and justice and value and process. Your argument goes in circles.

Scenario B: They are talking about fairness and justice and value and process. You are talking about numbers and facts and money and results. Your argument goes in circles.

News flash: You are making the same points, using two different sides of your brain. Both your thoughts are valid. Both your ways of thinking are valid. Both of you are valid.

Keep in mind that emotional thought, or feelings, tend not to be communicated in full verbally. The other night, I woke up from my sleep after hearing my wife's call of distress. She hadn't been saying a word, but she was indeed having some bad dream. Feelings are transmitted through the energy that they generate in our bodies.

Both of you are human. Acknowledge your humanity. Acknowledge their humanity. Acknowledge the emotions involved. Acknowledge the facts involved. Find a solution.



Deb Helfrich 27/9/2016 · #2

Hey @Josh LeBlanc-Shulman looking forward to continuing our conversations here - Welcome to beBee. This is an incredibly useful buzz. Sometimes we do need to work towards agreement and I think you've nailed the right strategy:

"Acknowledge your humanity. Acknowledge their humanity. Acknowledge the emotions involved. Acknowledge the facts involved. Find a solution."

+3 +3
Harvey Lloyd 27/9/2016 · #1

@Josh Leblanc-Shulman you are on point. Steven Covey describes this process as "Seeking first to understand, then be understood" Everyone has their emotional triggers. To assume yours are the only ones that matters usually makes for some cold coffee conversations. Great post.

+4 +4