Leckey Harrison en Healthcare, Traumatologistas Resilience Instructor • Raise Your Resilience, LLC 3/6/2016 · 1 min de lectura · 1,5K

Healing Trauma

"Trauma is the most avoided, ignored, denied, misunderstood, and untreated cause of human suffering." - Peter Levine, Healing Trauma, page 7.

I agree. I think I could add that stress rolls in at the number two
cause. The solution can be simple. Policies and talking help us understand and garner exposure as to how big this issue is. As presented in this book, treatment can be rather simple. The same applies to TRE®. It takes good providers who know trauma, and how it can be healed, and you start with the body.

It has to start with each of us healing our own hurts. Hurt people, hurt people. Not policies, or warm fuzzies talking about how great the world would be. It requires doing the work. It isn't a microwave solution, but the change will begin immediately. Then you won't have to just imagine the world as an invocation, you'll start to feel it. You'll start to live it.



Neville Gaunt 4/7/2016 · #16

#15 @Margaret Aranda - simple advice.... will others use it?

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#11 My biggest attitude of unrelenting Perseverance plowed me through enough to put me in a conversation that almost no MD's can have with millions of patients...and what we are doing here is so positive...I'm 'curious and curious-er' to see where we evolve together in one year. For me, I walk with the Lord most heavily, and I believe in miracles. My famous quote (haha) is: "You see a crack in the cement. If only one dandelion grows out of a crack in the cement, then that dandelion should be You." ~ I just Googled myself the other day and discovered the quote is official. So, keep track of your phrases and Quotes. Gather them as your essence, and you will have allowed your values, your inspiration to live on in one small way. I would like to see that for each one of us.

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#10 Fascinating that the memory of drowning came to you....you should write a Buzz/short story on that, as I almost drowned as a child, also. I'll share my story, too....and wonder.

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#9 Oh...don't I know That One all too well! "It's All in Your Head." Yup. These have to be the worst words a doctor can tell any patient.

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Leckey Harrison 3/7/2016 · #12

#9 Where I think cognitive tools are helpful is in the narrative we all live. It sometimes helps to put t all together, and, a fresh set of perspective and eyes can't hurt. I just don't start there. My body is the bacon, ammo, and motorcycle. As Bessel van der Kolk, titled his book, "The Body Keeps the Score." The body can even it.

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Neville Gaunt 2/7/2016 · #11

Thanks for prompting me @Gary Sharpe and I was most taken by the last para - worth repeating ... "It has to start with each of us healing our own hurts. Hurt people, hurt people. Not policies, or warm fuzzies talking about how great the world would be. It requires doing the work. It isn't a microwave solution, but the change will begin immediately. Then you won't have to just imagine the world as an invocation, you'll start to feel it. You'll start to live it." @Leckey Harrison. Because the first and last step is raising one's awareness and that applies to everyone and everything - not just the extreme nature of trauma. The one and only thing we can control is ourselves, our attitude and behaviour and that's probably what people don't like to believe, but it's true. That's the biggest elephant in the room so we just have to deal with it. Gary refers to Mind Fit and from 20 years of experience it's a process that works in your context, any context. Happy to explore more if it makes sense.

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Gary Sharpe 2/7/2016 · #10

@Leckey Harrison very interesting, because one of the things I wanted to share about my experience with counselling https://www.bebee.com/producer/@gary-sharpe/my-experience-with-counselling-and-parkinson-s-disease is that done right it is not just about talking and listening but it gives you the mind tools to be able to start tackling these things for yourselves. Another source which helped me to even begin to think about what traumatic events may have occured in my life which could have contributed to developing Parkinsonism's is @Neville Gaunt's "MindFit". Interestingly, I was just lying here before turning on the computer thinking back to past events to see if I could uncover anything. And I remembered an incident as a young man where I very nearly drowned.

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Brian McKenzie 2/7/2016 · #9

I never found talking about it did any good; especially since the prevailing wind of sentiment seems to be - get over it, it's all in your head, that was decades ago,.... etc. And the 'clinical' solution always seems to be the next and new pharma - candy that they are getting paid to push. F*ck - just give me bacon, ammo, and a motorcycle and I will deal with the shit on my own.

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