Lynda Spiegel en HR, HR Recruiters, HR Executive founder • Rising Star Resumes 8/10/2016 · 2 min de lectura · +700

Why Job Descriptions Need to Tell a Story

Why Job Descriptions Need to Tell a Story

The article below was written by me and published on ReWork, CornerstoneOnDemand's online ezine on November 16, 2015.

Just as branding — both personal and professional — is essential to marketing or sales, it's increasingly crucial for HR.

Job candidates have understood the power of personal branding for quite some time — the key to landing a dream job is to craft a concise, first-person narrative about who you are and the value you represent to potential employers. For recruiters and hiring managers, tired beyond belief of bland, hackneyed descriptions of “results-driven, self-motivated team players," it's a welcome relief to read about actual people, not automatons.

Now, flip the equation.

With relatively low unemployment rates at 5 percent, employers also need to craft a compelling brand in order to attract the most qualified candidates. What more obvious place to craft your employer narrative than through your job descriptions?

How to Tell a Brand Story to Candidates

A job posting should focus on convincing a talented candidate that he or she belongs at your company. Just as a great resume speaks directly to the hiring manager's needs and shares a unique story, a great job posting should speak to the needs of the candidate's ideal employer and offer a narrative for his or her "character."

How do you tell a unique story with a job description? Let's walk through a recent job postingfrom First Round Review, the online magazine of venture capital firm First Round Capital.

1) Lead with a non-stock photo image

The image at the top of the post — a woman on an indoor swing in an art studio — lets interested candidates understand that this is not a buttoned-up, corporate type of job; the company obviously wants to attract creative, daring people.

2) State the company's mission

Candidates immediately get a sense of the employer brand through the image, and a succinct, strong description of the employer confirms the bold brand: "We launched First Round Review to offer a better brand of advice to the startup ecosystem." A link back to the employer's site invites candidates to explore how the Review's mission aligns with the broader vision of First Round Capital and its clients.

3) Invite the candidate to join the adventure

Immediately following the Review's mission, the post states, “That's where you come in." That's right — the posting speaks directly to the candidate, just as candidates should speak directly to the hiring manager thr