Mike Dixon en Lottery, game, Luxury Lifestyle 10/11/2017 · 1 min de lectura · ~10

Powerball: The World's Most Luxurious Lottery

There are a number of lotteries out there that post pretty sizeable jackpots, but none come near the gargantuan figures that Powerball posts, as week after week the money routinely goes up, reaching ridiculous levels of cash. And if jackpot alone doesn’t make Powerball the world’s foremost lottery of luxury, its myriad methods of gameplay certainly do. This article will train a close eye to how Powerball works – its rules and jackpot structure – the big winners who’ve cashed in playing it, and what an average Powerball jackpot can buy.


Powerball: The World's Most Luxurious Lottery


Powerball isn’t altogether too complicated, but it takes some explanation, especially in regard to the ways in which you can boost your ticket to multiply your winnings. First off, Powerball starts with you picking five main numbers between 1 and 69, and a Powerball number from 1 to 26. If your Powerball number is chosen, you’re guaranteed to win; if two or more of your main numbers hit, you’re also going to win, and the amount depends on how many numbers you match and whether they come with accompanying matched Powerball. “Power Play” is a feature you can choose for your card where, if you win money, that money is multiplied by anywhere from 2 to 10 times. If it all sounds a little befuddling, it’s really not, and if you check out the FAQs about Powerball, everything should be cleared up.

Past winners have walked away from their Powerball wins with hundreds of millions of dollars. The largest jackpot in the history of the universe (as far as we know; aliens could be playing the lottery in some distant galaxy!) was with Powerball: a colossal 1.5-billion-dollar jackpot was won in January 2016, split between three tickets. And even more recently than that, the second-highest jackpot in history was won through Powerball, when a single ticket, belonging to Massachusetts resident Mavis Wanczyk, won 758 million dollars.



That’s a ton of money by anyone’s standards, but it’s a little difficult to picture physically, so perhaps it would be helpful to put that in physical, real-world terms. Let’s take Wanczyk’s win, and see what it could buy. Say you wanted a Bugatti Chiron, believed by many to be the best car in the world – well, you could buy 250 of them and still have a few million in pocket c