What the Future Holds for Video Analytics


What the Future Holds for Video Analytics

Businesses are no strangers to video surveillance. After all, it’s been around in some form for decades now, and many organizations use them to monitor their worksites and ensure the safety and security of their property. But like all technology, as the years have gone on, video surveillance has advanced and gotten better. Quite a bit better, in fact. Now, many companies combine their video surveillance with video analytics, a new method for gaining much more out of the footage surveillance systems record. As video cameras are now being put up practically anywhere, it’s time to think ahead to what the future holds for video analytics. The possibilities are intriguing, and the use of the technology may actually solve some of the problems organizations encounter when adopting surveillance systems.


One of the most promising elements that can be incorporated with video analytics is the technology known as deep learning. Deep learning has already been put to some use with other big data analytics applications, but only recently has it been combined with video analytics. In a practical manner, deep learning helps overcome several challenges that often crop up with video analytics. For one, the flood of new cameras and their high resolution means businesses are collecting a lot more data. Analyzing all that streaming data is an immense task, but it’s made possible thanks to deep learning. Since deep learning mimics how the human brain functions, it can process huge amounts of data, and over time, that process becomes more effective and more efficient. A continually improving technology is one that will get a lot of attention from organizations.


Video analytics already provides plenty of useful functions. Things like alarm triggers and video object tracking have become a common feature, providing businesses with the ability to detect specific situations and immediately send out the appropriate notifications and alarms. Most of those situations involve security threats, but video analytics has become more versatile in its applications. The one downside, however, is that video analytics can send out false positives from time to time. It’s an inconsistent performance issue, one that worries organizational leaders since false positives