Sara Jacobovici en beBee in English Owner • Creative Arts Therapies Services 15/5/2016 · 1 min de lectura · 1,2K

When Turbulence Clearly Makes Sense

When Turbulence Clearly Makes Sense

www.healthyfoodspace.com


In @Ali Anani's buzz, Honey Paradoxes, Dr. Anani writes:

"An appealing and clear honey to the eye isn't a high grade honey. Our senses mislead us to buying an inferior product. We may even pay more for it. Turbid honey has pollen in it which is highly enriched in proteins, but it causes the turbidity of honey. It is the ill-extraction and/or treatment of honey that deprives it of its pollen and other useful ingredients. Processing honey should be minimal if the honey is to keep its valuable ingredients such as antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. - Turbid honey is in fact a sign of quality." The question of turbulence versus clarity then carries over into areas of thoughts, written works and relationships.

The paradox that was raised for me while reading this buzz is: Turbulence is often more clearly understood.

Does clarity allow you to see better or are our senses being deprived of being able to experience the quality of turbulence? Are we a culture that defines “murkiness” or “opacity” as unclear or impure versus engaging in the challenge of extracting those valuable elements within the conflict? 

Our business or corporate culture strives for “the quality of transparency or purity” that is associated with clarity, or the image of "the crystal clarity of water". This is valid as long as we understand that water gets polluted and so its natural state gets contaminated. When I experience an idea with great clarity, I often have to fight off the pollutants that come from others' reactions. When I am in my process of developing quality ideas, it is the turbulence that allows that quality to shape and form the ideas. I have to be cautious as not to not allow that turbulence to be sifted out of the process where only a false clarity remains.

Allow me to throw out another idea to be considered:

"What Dillard describes...in the metaphor of the honey tree is the painstaking, joyful, frustrating, utterly consuming process of writing. The writer must actively catch ideas but then release them if need be. Only by the catch-and-release process can the writer’s ideas really develop and grow into a full honeycomb, relevant and purposeful. I think that this metaphor can be used even in academic writing, where the development of argument and intellectual relevance is paramount."

Finally, different honeys are produced by different flowers; the outcome resulting in the honey having different colors and degrees of turbulence. Ideas are then pollinated from different sources. Diversity contributes to quality.

When Turbulence Clearly Makes Sense


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Sara Jacobovici 16/5/2016 · #19

#18 Thank you for what I refer to (and look forward to) as a "Manjit comment" @CityVP Manjit.

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CityVP 🐝 Manjit 16/5/2016 · #18

One of the great qualities of leadership is to handle increasing states of turbulence and a huge part of our maturation involves moments of growth. If the honey in our life is bereft of those moments, we remain at worst closer to childhood and at best not fulfilling that which we are. Processed honey sells by the millions but it is only sweetness and thus devoid of its character, for then honey is just another name for sugar. I would rather be called honey than sugar, so long as that honey contains the intimate.

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Sara Jacobovici 16/5/2016 · #17

#16 Thank you @William King. Interestingly enough, I was thinking of you when I was writing this Buzz (for the reasons you mention). I am glad that it connected with you.

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William King 15/5/2016 · #16

Sara loved Dillard's description of catch and release. Sometimes I say I'm thinking out loud but catch and release of ideas or thoughts is what it is. Great share and thank you for the link to the story of the honey tree.

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John Ryan 15/5/2016 · #15

I love dark fragrant honey!

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#10 @Sara Jacobovici-just published it. Title is "Suspended Doubts".

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Sara Jacobovici 15/5/2016 · #13

#7 Very interesting perspective @Reena Saxena. The process you describe of the relationship between what happens for someone internally and how it is perceived by an other is insightful and thought provoking.

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I have just uploaded my buzz in response to this great post. My post title is "Suspended Doubts"

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