Tony Rossi en Lifestyle, beBee in English, Mindfulness Brand Ambassador • beBee 20/11/2016 · 1 min de lectura · +500

On Lasting Creations: A Fundamental Human Desire

On Lasting Creations: A Fundamental Human Desire




Mankind has always found definition, fulfillment, and meaning in creating things more permanents then ephemeral thoughts or the spoken word. Actually, beyond those items needed for survival (shelter, clothing) oral tradition was likely our first foray into intentionally creating something to stand the test of time.

Then we started building

- largely for societal purposes - monuments. Altars, temples, statues, the Pyramids. Not long after, art, architecture and function - castles, walled cities, The Coliseum, The Great Wall of China. And we've been there for thousands of years, through the birth and rise of industry, cross-cultural civilizations, and the dizzying landscape of modern technology.

Now we're moving

into knowledge economies - which, beyond the smallest fraction of people whom served as philosophers and government figures, is a modern phenomenon. 

This doesn't negate our intrinsic human need to create something with the same amount of permanence.

Hobbies are good, but in work (or communities) influence is better.


Tony Rossi 21/11/2016 · #3

#2 It's definitely a generalization, @Deb Helfrich, so one size doesn't fit all, just most. I think the modern, interconnected world has taken to drive from creating something lasting, to creating something impactful as to what makes people stand out in the world. I would argue that using your unique abilities to affect some positive change, growth, or creation, in the world, even your local community is equally as powerful as having penned a classic novel, or composing a symphony, or erecting the Parthenon. Maybe organization a charity event for a couple of years doesn't seem to shine with permanence, but the ripples of what you started, do.
Thanks for reading, Deb! ;-)

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Deb Helfrich 20/11/2016 · #2

Hmmm, @Tony Rossi. I am going to have to ponder this. My gut doesn't really care too much about permanence, intrinsically speaking. I can certainly appreciate it, even revere a few exemplary examples of Art and Architecture and Music that have transcended the lives of their creators. I have been listening to Marvin Gaye's "What's Going On" each day for over a week and cannot get enough of it.

But do I need to be part of something I know will last? My current definition of meaning in my life doesn't include permanence, as I define it as learning to use my own thinking equipment.

Would I find a different level of fulfillment in working toward a lasting creation? A quite relevant question I will continue to let marinate!

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Franci Eugenia Hoffman 20/11/2016 · #1

Concise and interesting buzz @Tony Rossi. Our creating of tangibles and intangibles are constantly influenced by our knowledge, which is forever changing. "Remember that you must at all costs remain self-similar." - Milos Djukic via Fractals forever

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